U.S. Nuclear Regulatory

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Nov 6, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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U.S. Nuclear Regulatory
Commission



Mapping Tacit Knowledge as a
Foundation for Knowledge Management




7
th

Annual Meeting of NERS

September 24, 2004


Vienna, Austria

James E. Morris


Office of Human Resources


2

Agenda


Brief background


Action plan


Strategic workforce plan development


Knowledge mapping


Pilot program


Results


Using the knowledge map information



3

Brief background


October 2000


Chairman Meserve
requested the Nuclear Regulatory
Commission (NRC) staff to prepare a
plan of action to address maintaining
the core scientific, engineering, and
technical competencies (tacit
knowledge) needed to perform NRC’s
technically
-
based functions.

4

Action plan


The NRC developed an integrated
approach called Strategic Workforce
Planning (SWP) to address maintaining
its core competencies.


5

Strategic Workforce Planning
Development

Phase 1
-


Understand Nature of
Organizational Mission &
Business Requirements

Phase 2
-


Define Workforce Capacity
Profile to Support
Organizational Mission &
Business Requirements

Phase 3
-


Identify Availability of
Human Resources to
Support Business
Requirements

Phase 4
-


Compare ‘Supply’ to
‘Demand’ & Develop
Strategies to Address
Gaps & Surpluses

Sourcing

Strategies

Future Needs

“Resource Demand”

Current Capacity

Gap Analysis

People


Positions

Workforce

Capacity

Knowledge, Skills,

Abilities,

Proficiencies & Other

Attributes of Interest

Workforce

Trends

Workforce

Capacity

Internal Data

External Data

Labor Market

Trends

“Resource Supply”

Key

Outcomes

&

Outputs

Strategic Arenas

Nuclear

Waste

Safety

International

Nuclear

Safety

Support

Nuclear

Reactor

Safety

Nuclear


Materials

Safety

Corporate

Management

Competencies

KSAs

Proficiencies,

Attributes

6

SWP development


A fundamental step was developing a
knowledge map


Defining the knowledge that needs to
be managed


identify tacit knowledge critical to the
agency’s mission


locate where in the agency the
knowledge resides (people)

7

Pilot program


Identified three organizational units to
participate in the Skills Assessment


Fuel Cycle Licensing Branch


Office of
Nuclear Materials Safety & Safeguards
(NMSS)


Plant Systems Branch


Office of Nuclear
Reactor Regulation (NRR)


Safety Margins & Systems Analysis
Branch


Office of Nuclear Regulatory
Research (RES)

8

Knowledge competencies


Communications plan


Interviewed selected branch chiefs and
supervisors in the selected branches


Program offices identified critical
workforce knowledge, skills, and other
attributes



9

Competencies (continued)


An essential piece of knowledge
management initiative


Required the right level of detail


If the knowledge items identified were too
broad then the information would not be
useful


If the items were too detailed then the
information would be too cumbersome


“Narrow down” not “pinpoint” knowledge

10

Self
-
assessment survey


Second component was the self
-
assessment survey


Divided into 4 sections

I.
Personal background information

II.
Language proficiencies

III.
Knowledge, skills, and abilities

IV.
Leadership competencies

11

Self
-
assessment approach


Employees access the on
-
line database
and rate their level of expertise for each
of 1000 different knowledge
competencies


Supervisors receive an electronic
message whenever employees update
the database


Supervisors review the employee
ratings to ensure consistency

12

Levels of expertise


Expert: I am looked to as an expert in this
knowledge or skill


Extensive: I have extensive knowledge of/training in
this knowledge or skill and am comfortable serving
as a technical advisor in this area


Applied: I have participated in multiple assignments
requiring the application of this knowledge or skill


General: I have a general understanding via training
or some work experience


Limited: I have a limited understanding


None: I have no knowledge or skill in this area


13

Results


The Strategic Workforce Planning (SWP) we
developed is an intranet
-
based system


Collects personal background
information, approximately 1000 skills in
15 categories, leadership competencies,
and language proficiencies


Voluntary participation


Has a high participation rate (84%)

14

Using the information


Managers and supervisors are able to search
the database to locate critical competencies


Used for human capital management


forecasting “gaps”


Identifies individuals possessing unique
knowledge that may be lost


Candidates for knowledge transfer
strategies


Timely identification (through forecasting)
provides increased options


15

Planned uses in the near
-
future


Identifying communities of practice


Two groups establishing online
communities


Use the knowledge map to identify
additional communities


Publishing an electronic directory of experts


Intended as a tool for the staff


Consensual publication


Supervisors “look ahead” for knowledge
transfer options




16

Summary


Linked to the strategic mission


Dynamic


changes in the agency’s mission


changes in individual competencies


Obtaining participation is an artifact of each
agency’s culture


Self
-
evaluation results need validation


Very powerful tool


but still only a tool


17

Example


14 competencies under the Electrical Power/Power
Distribution category


Control Panels



Electrical Support Systems


Equipment Protection Studies

Equipment Sizing Studies


Fuel Cycle Facility Systems

Load Flow/Voltage






Regulation and Protection


Motors and Generators


Onsite Power Supplies


Power Bus Duct



Power Distribution






Equipment


Raceway Penetrations


Reading Electrical Drawings


Short Circuit Studies


Transformers

18

Experiences of other agencies
informed process development


Centered around highly technical
knowledge, skills, and competencies


Inventory of employee skills to attain
strategic goals


Determine net capacity gaps and
surpluses


Well
-
defined process enabled by
technology