Knowledge Management Initiatives: Generally and at Jones, Day ...

collardsdebonairManagement

Nov 6, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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Share Your Toys:

Collaboration is a Team Sport


Terry Crum



Chief Knowledge Officer and


Director, Global Information Services

Jones Day




LAWNET 2003

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Football is a Team Sport

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PASS PLAY

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Is Lawyering a Team Sport?


Observations


Law is parochial, limiting the need for collaboration
across jurisdictions and geographies.


Large law firms are likely collections of smaller
practices and solos who have banded together for
strategic advantage (e.g., income hedging, full
-
service strategies, etc.).


Prevailing reward systems (e.g., eat
-
what
-
you
-
kill)
encourage lawyers to corral work for themselves
--
especially when work is scarce.

Is Lawyering a Team Sport?


Conclusion


Lawyering is a more akin to Track & Field than to
Football. (Each athlete competes individually but
scores are summed to a team. At times, athletes
work together to win a given event (e.g., relays).

To What Extent Do Lawyers
Need to Collaborate?


Finding a specialist


Finding information, answers


Building on prior work product


Distributing excess work


Training newer lawyers

Finding a Specialist


How it’s done today


Telephone call to colleague.


Request
-
for
-
information broadcast e
-
mail.


Opportunities to improve


Conduct a social network analysis.


Collect specialist expertise in a central system.


Barriers to change


Difficulty collecting current and accurate expertise profiles
(i.e., grade inflation).


Some decision makers have “not broken” mentality.

Finding Information, Answers


How it’s done today


Telephone call to colleague.


Request
-
for
-
information broadcast e
-
mail.


Search for prior work product.


Primary, secondary source searches.


Opportunities to improve


Global, syndicated search engine; returning both content
and author information.


Specialist libraries (e.g., Labor & Employment Database)


Barriers to change


Technical challenges, especially in geographically
dispersed Firms.


Lawyer distrust in quality of content.


Moderate to high development costs.

Building on Prior Work
Product


How it’s done today


Hardcopy precedent files.


Document management systems.


Informal e
-
mail collections.


Opportunities to improve


Clause libraries.


Specialized content, model collections.


Processes to identify quality precedent.


Barriers to change


Technical challenges.


Content development costs.


Keeping content current and reliable.


Distributing Excess Work


How it’s done today


Reliance on a known network of lowest
-
cost but proven
performers.


Opportunities to improve


Gauge work appropriately to the right resources (John’s
example of low cost lawyer taking three hours v. him @
$300).


Associate availability systems.


Barriers to change


Desire to collect as much work as possible in slow times.



Training Newer Lawyers


How it’s done today


Elaborating on issues as they are encountered in actual
matters.


Opportunities to improve


Development of diligence lists, checklists.


Transactional systems that capture content and
information about actual deals.


Barriers to change


Training issues.


Change management.


Questions & Answers