WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

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Oct 23, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

REQUIRED CHECKLIST FOR ALL CURRICULAR PROPOSALS


Course or Program
___
BA Minor Professional Studies:
Sustainability
Option


This checklist enables A2C2 representatives to endorse that their departments have accurately followed the Process for Accomp
lishing
Curricular Change. For each course or program proposal submitted to A2C2, this checklist must be completed, signed by the
submitting department's A2C2 representative, and included with the proposal when forwarded for approval. Peer review of prop
osals
is also strongly advised, e.g., departments should discuss and vote on the proposals
as submitted to A2C2
, rather than on jus
t the ideas
proposed or drafts of proposals.


If a proposal fails to follow or complete any aspect of the process, the Course and Program Proposal Subcommittee will postpo
ne
consideration of the proposal and return it to the department's A2C2
representative for completion and resubmission. Resubmitted
proposals have the same status as newly submitted proposals.

Note: This form need not be completed for notifications.


1.

The appropriate forms and the “Approval Form" have been completed in ful
l for this proposal. All necessary or relevant
descriptions, rationales, and notifications have been provided.


___
X
_____ Completed


2a.

The “Financial and Staffing Data Sheet" has been completed and is enclosed in this proposal, if applicable.


____
X
____

Completed

________ NA


2b.

For departments that have claimed that “existing staff" would be teaching the course proposed, an explanation has been
enclosed in this proposal as to how existing staff will do this, e.g., what enrollment limits can be
accommodated by
existing staff. If no such explanation is enclosed, the department's representative is prepared to address A2C2's questions
on this matter.


_____
X
___ Completed


________ NA


3.

Arrangements have been made so that a department representati
ve knowledgeable of this proposal will be attending both
the Course and Program Proposal Subcommittee meeting and the full A2C2 meeting at which this proposal is considered.


___
X
_____ Completed


Name and office phone number of proposal's representative:

_
Jeanne Franz X
5297
_______________


4.

Reasonable attempts have been made to notify and reach agreements with all university units affected by this proposal.
Units still opposing a proposal must submit their objections in writing before or during the C
ourse and Program Proposal
Subcommittee meeting at which this proposal is considered.


________ Completed

___
X
_____ NA


5.

The course name and number is listed for each prerequisite involved in this proposal.


___

X

_____ Completed

________NA


6.

In this
proposal for a new or revised program (major, minor, concentration, etc.), the list of prerequisites provided includes
all the prerequisites of any proposed prerequisites. All such prerequisites of prerequisites are included in the total credi
t
hour calcu
lations. ____
X
____ Completed

________ NA


7.

In this proposal for a new or revised program, the following information for each required or elective course is provided:


a.
The course name and number.


b.
A brief course description.


c.
A brief
statement explaining why the program should include the course.


___
X
_____ Completed


________ NA


8.

This course or program revision proposal:


a
.
Clearly identifies each proposed change.


b.
Displays the current requirements next to the proposed new
requirements, for clear, easy comparison.


________ Completed


____
X
____ NA


9.

This course proposal provides publication dates for all works listed as course textbooks or references using a standard form
of citation. Accessibility of the cited publicatio
ns for use in this proposed course has been confirmed.


________ Completed


____
X
____ NA



_____
Candace L. Kairies Beatty (Geoscience Department)
_____


___
2/
23
/2011
___________
________



Department's A2C2 Representative or Alternate



Date

[
Revised 9
-
05]

WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

PROPOSAL FOR REVISED PROGRAMS AND NEW PROGRAMS


Use this form to submit proposals for revised majors, minors, concentrations, options, etc.


Note: A department, with its dean’s approval, may change up to two courses per year within an existing major, minor, concent
ration,
option, etc., per year without seeking review of A2C2 and/or graduate Council, provided that (1) the total credits do not i
ncrease or
decrease for the major, minor, concentration, option, etc., and (2) the change does not affect other departments or the Unive
rsity
Studies Program. A2C2 and/or Graduate Council do, however, wish to be informed of these changes. Use form
Notifi
cations
.


If a department wishes to make more extensive revisions to an existing major, minor, concentration, option, etc., complete an
d submit
this form with the appropriate number of copies. Refer to Regulation 3
-
4,
Policy for Changing the Curriculum
,
for complete
information on submitting proposals for curricular changes.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Department:

__
Professional Studies
_________________________________________
____


Title of Program: _________

BA Minor Professional Studies: Sustainability Option



Revised:

______ Major

______ Minor

______ Concentration

______ Option

______ Other



List all Major/Minor Codes that Apply: __________________
_______________________________



New:


______ Major

_
XX
___ Minor

______ Concentration

______ Option

______ Other



List all Major/Minor Codes that Apply: _
________________________________________________


Total credit hours: ___
2
4

-

2
5
_______

Classroom Hours ____
2
2
-
2
5
______

Lab Hours ___
0
-
2
_______


Proposed Implementation Date:

_____
Fall 2011
____________________



Please attach to this proposal a narrative with the following information:


A.

Statement of major focus and objectives

of the revised program.


B.

New Catalog Content



1.

Provide a list of program content as it would appear in the catalog including required courses, electives, etc., by number
and name. Include the number and name for each prerequisite, and all
prerequisites of proposed prerequisites. All such
prerequisites, and prerequisites of prerequisites, should be included in the total credit hour calculations for the revised
program.


2.

New catalog narrative, if any.


C.

Description of Revisions, to incl
ude


1.

A display of current program requirements next to proposed new requirements for clear, easy comparison.


2.

A clear identification of each proposed change.


3.

The following information for each required or elective course:


a.

Course number and name,


b.

A brief course description, and


c.

A brief statement explaining why the program should include the course.


Attach a
Financial and Staffing Data Sheet
.


Attach an
Approval Form
.


Also fill out the MNSCU New Program Application

or the Program Redesign Application, whichever applies and submit directly to
the VPAA.


Department Contact Person for this Proposal:


Jennifer Lamberson/ Diane Dingfelder


_
x2963/ x5138


JLamberson@winona.edu/

DDingf elder@winona.edu


Name (please print)




Phone



e
-
mail address








[Revised
7
-
05
-
07
]
WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

FINANCIAL AND
STAFFING DATA SHEET



Course or Program____

BA Minor Professional Studies: Sustainability Option


Include a Financial and Staffing Data Sheet with any proposal for a new course, new program, or revised program.


Please answer the following questions comple
tely. Provide supporting data.


1.

Would this course or program be taught with existing staff or with new or additional staff? If this course would be taught b
y
adjunct faculty, include a rationale.


The new
interdisciplinary
minor

will be taught by a cohort of qualified full time faculty. The minor
does not increase the total
number of courses offered or increase the frequency of offerings within
the

individual
department
s
.

In the event of sabbatical
replacements c
ourses may be ta
ught by
fixed terms or
adjuncts as required by their home departments.

The CHEM 301 class,
Energy and Sustainable Living, will be taught primarily with adjunct faculty, at least initially.
















2.

What impact would approval of this
course/program have on current course offerings? Please discuss number of sections of
current offerings, dropping of courses, etc.


The new minor

will not have any negative impact
on current curriculum

within the individual departments.















3.

What effect would approval of this course/program have on the department supplies? Include data to support expenditures for
staffing, equipment, supplies, instructional resources, etc.



N
o additional funds will be necessary to begin this
minor
.

All departments contributing to the new minor have the necessary
equipment for the field/ lab component of their respective classes. Existing staff will cover the courses required for the m
inor
as part of the regular rotation in each department

with the

exception of CHEM 301. CHEM 301 will be taught, at least
initially, with adjunct faculty.


The new minor will not affect individual department supply needs.














[Revised 9
-
05]





A.
Statement of major focus and objectives of the revised
program.

The proposed
interdisciplinary
minor is a set of courses designed to
:

1.

enhance students’ understanding of the complex issues surrounding present and foreseeable challenges
to building and
maintaining a more sustainable society;

2.

provide students
with opportunities to synthesize disparate interdisciplinary perspectives;

3.

give students the experience and education they need to contribute to our region’s and our planet’s current and future effort
s for
sustainability
.



B. New Catalog Content


1.
Program content as it would appear in the catalog:



BA Minor Professional Studies: Sustainability Option

This
minor

has
t
wo

parts
:



Part I:
Sustainability Core Courses
-

provides students with an overview of the fundamentals of sustainability



Part II:
Sustainability Focus Areas

-

provides students

with

an opportunity to gain in
-
depth knowledge in specific areas of
study


PART
I: SUSTAINABILITY CORE

REQUIRED COURSE
S (
18

-

1
9

S.H.)

Biology



BIOL

104 Environment, Society & Conservation (3)



OR BIOL 312 General Ecology (3) OR

BIOL

315 Environmental Biology (3) OR

BIOL 351 Agroecology (3)


OR

BIOL 405 Fishery Biology (3)

OR

BIOL 423 Ecosystem Ecology OR BIOL 424 Biogeography (3)

Chemistry



CHEM 3
01 Energy and S
ustainable Living (3)


English


ENG 111 College Reading and Writing



sustainability focus

(4)

OR ENG 210 Advanced Exposition (3)

Geoscience


GEOS 325 Environmental Geoscience (3)

Recreation, Tourism and Therapeutic Recreation


RTTR 244

Stewardship of Self and the Environment
:
Building a Principled Way of Life

(3)



AND 3 credits from the following:

Philosophy


PHIL 232 Environmental Ethics (3)

Political Science
and Public Administration


POLS 340 Environmental Policy (3)



PART II:
SUSTAINABILITY FOCUS AREAS

ELECTIVE
COURSES (
6

S.H.)


Choose
6

additional credits from one of the following
categories
. All credits must be from the same category

and may not duplicate
Core Required Courses

or courses used to fulfill major requirements
.


SCIENCE

CATEGORY

Biology


BIOL 118

General Biology (4)


BIOL 312

General Ecology (3)


BIOL 314

Current Issues in Plant Biology (4)


BIOL 315

Environmental Biology (3)


BIOL 351

Agroecology (3)

Chemistry


CHEM 100

Chemistry Appreciation (3)


CHEM 106

Chemistry in Our World (3)


CHEM 107

Chemistry in Our World with Lab

(4)


CHEM 320

Environmental Chemistry (3)


CHEM 425

Analytical Chemistry I (4)


CHEM

436

Topics in Environmental Chemistry (3)



Composite Materials Engineering


CME 182

Engineering Graphics and Design (2)




CME 410

Polymer Processing (3)

Computer Science


CS

110

Com
puters in a Global Society (3
)


CS

116

Web Technology I (3
)



CS 344

Introduction to Web Programming (3)


CS 444 Human Computer Interaction (3)

Geoscience


GEOS 335
Global Climate Change (3)


GEOS 405 Current Topics in Geoscience (1
-
3)

Health, Exercise and Rehabilitative
Science


HERS 205 Nutrition For Lifetime Wellness (3)

Mathematics and Statistics


MATH 120

Pre
-
calculus (4)



HUMANITIES
,
SOCIAL SCIENCES

AND EDUCATION CATEGORY

Arts Administration


AAD 303 Independent Study (3)

English


ENG 120

Introduction to Literature (3)


ENG 210

Advanced Exposition (3)


ENG 211

Writing in Communities (3)


ENG 220

Multicultural American Literatures (3)

Global Studies


GS

200

Introduction to Global Studies (3)


GS

232

Introduction to

Latin America (3)


GS

335

Global Poverty and Sustainable Development (3)


GS

350 Cross
-
cultural Field Experience (1
-
3)


GS 400

Seminar in Global Studies

(3)


G
S

435

Indigenous Social Movements in Latin America (3)

History


HIST 398

Topics in History with Oral Communication Emphasis (3)

Marketing


MKTG 105

Marketing in a Global Society (3)

Music


MUS 491

Independent Studies in Music (1
-
3)

Nursing


NURS 444

Leadership in Contemporary Health Settings (2)

Philosophy


PHIL 232 Environmental Ethics (3)

Political Science
and Public Administration


POLS 340 Environmental Policy (3)

Recreation, Tourism and Therap
e
utic Recreation


RTTR 265

Leisure in Different Cultures (3)


RTTR 302

Adventure Travel and Tourism Development (3)


RTTR 339

Wilderness Ethics, Safety, and Survival (3)


RTTR 421

Outdoor Education and Interpretive Services (3)


RTTR 426

Recreation Facilities and Area Design (3)

Social Work


SOCW 415

Soci
al Work Practice III


Organizations and Communities (3)

Sociology


SOC 340 Social
-

Cultural Anthropology (3)

Theatre and Dance


THAD 111 Theatre Appreciation (
Sannerud only;
3)


THAD 137 Dance Repertory (1


2)


THAD 295 Making Interdisciplinary Connections (3)


THAD 395 Topics in Theater (1


3)


THAD 399 Internship (1


3)


THAD 499 Independent Study in THAD (1
-
3)

Women’s and Gender Studies


WAGS 235

Gender and Social Justice Issues in Latin America (3)


WAGS 348

Topics in Women’s and Gender Studies (3)


WAGS 420 Field Experience

(3)



Part I: Sustainability Core (16


17 S.H.)




Required:

Prerequisites

Prerequisites of Prerequisites

Prerequisites of Prerequisites

BIOL 104


None




OR BIOL 312

BIOL 241, BIOL 242 or
instructor’s permission




OR BIOL 315

BIOL 308



BIOL 310


BIOL 312


or instructor’s
permission

BIOL 241, BIOL 242 and
CHEM 340 or CHEM 350


BIOL 241,
BIOL 242


BIOL 241, BIOL 242 or
instructor’s permission


CHEM 340 and CHEM 350
require CHEM 212, CHEM 213


OR BIOL 351

BIOL 310, BIOL 312,
and CHEM 212

BIOL 241 and BIOL 242



OR BIOL 405

BIOL 308, BIOL 310,
and BIOL 312

BIOL 241, BIOL 242,

and
either CHEM 340 or CHEM
350

CHEM 212 and CHEM 213


OR BIOL 423

BIOL 308, BIOL 310,
BIOL 312, MATH 150,
and MATH 155

BIOL 241, BIOL 242, MATH
115, and either CHEM 340 or
CHEM 350

CHEM 212 and CHEM 213


OR BIOL 424

BIOL 308, BIOL 310,
an
d BIOL 312

BIOL 241, BIOL 242, and
either CHEM 340 or CHEM
350

CHEM 212 and CHEM 213

CHEM 301

Student must have taken
at least one of their
University Studies
Natural Science course



ENG 111

Qualifying ACT English
sub
-
score, minimum
score on English
placement exam, or
successful completion of
ENG 099




OR ENG 210

ENG 111



GEOS 325

Any University Studies
Natural Science
laboratory course or
instructor’s permission







RTTR 244

None



AND 3 credits from:




PHIL 232

None



POLS 340

None



Part II: Sustainability Focus
Areas (6 S.H.)




Select from the following (all
elective credits must be taken
within one category):

Prerequisites

Prerequisites of Prerequisites

Prerequisites of Prerequisites

Science Category




BIOL 118

None



BIOL 312

BIOL 241 and BIOL
242, or instructor’s
permission



BIOL 314

BIOL 241 and BIOL
242



BIOL 315

BIOL 308, BIOL 310,
and BIOL 312, or
instructor’s permission

BIOL 241, BIOL 242, and
either CHEM 340 or CHEM
350

CHEM 212 and CHEM 213

BIOL 351

BIOL
310, BIOL 312,
and CHEM 212

BIOL 241 and BIOL 242


CHEM 100

None



CHEM 106

None



CHEM 107

None



CHEM 320

One year of general
chemistry or instructor’s
permission



CHEM 425

One year of chemistry



CHEM 436

CHEM 320 or
instructor’s permission

One
year of general chemistry
or instructor’s permission


CME 182

None



CME 410

CME 350

MATH 270

MATH 165

CS 110

None



CS 116

None



CS 344

CS 250 or instructor’s
permission

CS 234

Qualifying score on the math
placement test or MATH 120 or
MATH 150

CS
444

CS 341, CS 344, and
PSY 210

CS 250 and CS 275

CS 234 and MATH 140 or
MATH 155 or MATH 160 or
instructor’s permission

GEOS 335

GEOS 325 or
instructor’s permission

Any University Studies Natural
Science laboratory course or
instructor’s permission


GEOS 405

None



HERS 205

None



MATH 120

Qualifying score on the
mathematics placement
exam or MATH 115



Humanities, Social Sciences, and
Education Category




AAD 303

AAD 301 and AAD 302



ENG 120

None



ENG 210

ENG 111



ENG 211

ENG 111



ENG
220

None



GS 200

None



GS 232

None



GS 335

None



GS 350

Permission of the
instructor and the GSP
Director



GS 400

GS 200



GS 435

GS 200 and GS 232



HIST 398

None



MKTG 105

None



MUS 491

Department’s
permission



NURS 444

NURS 344, NURS
353,
NURS 354, or
instructor’s permission

NURS 341, NURS 343, NURS
344, NURS 353, NURS 354,
NURS 358, NURS 360, NURS
366, and/or either STAT 305,
STAT 110, or PSY 231

NURS 343, NURS 341, NURS
344, NURS 360, NURS 366,
HERS 340, PSY 210,
Math/Statistics Basi
c Skills
Requirement, and either BIOL
211, BIOL 212, or instructor’s
permission, as well as either
MATH 120, MATH 150, or
instructor’s permission

PHIL 232

None



POLS 340

None



RTTR 265

None



RTTR 302

None



RTTR 339

None



RTTR 421

None



RTTR
426

Sophomore or
preferably even higher
standing, RTTR 229,


and RTTR 245

SOCW 415

Admission to the social
work major, SOCW
385, and SOCW 400

Admission to the social work
major, SOCW 365, completion
of all coursework for graduation
except the Practicum a
nd
Seminar (SOCW 475)

Admission to the social work
major

SOC 340

SOC 150



THAD 111

None



THAD 137

Concurrent Registration
in THAD 090 unless
excused by the
department



THAD 295

None



THAD 395

Junior standing,
declared major or minor
or instructor’s
permission, THAD 090



THAD 399

Declared theater and
dance majors and
minors only



THAD 499

Instructor’s permission



WAGS 235

SOC 150
(recommended)



WAGS 348

none



WAGS 420

WAGS minor
status






B. 2 New Catalogue Narrative:


The following description will be placed at the
beginning of the BA
-
minor option requirements:


BA Minor Professional Studies: Sustainability Option

This minor allows students to undertake an interdisciplinary program of study that focuses on sustainability. Sustainability

has been
defined by the United Nations as a way for humankind to
“meet present needs without compromising the ability of future ge
nerations
to meet their needs.” Fulfilling the requirements of this minor will
help

students gain an understanding

of the complex issues
surrounding present and foreseeable challenges to building and maintain
ing a more sustainable society.
Because of the

interdisciplinary nature of sustainability issues, this minor will compliment all
major programs of study
.



C. 1. A display of current program requirements next to proposed new requirements for clear, easy comparison.

Does not apply to a new program.
Course requirements presented in B1.


C. 2. A clear identification of each proposed change.

Does not apply to a new program.


C. 3. The following information for each required or elective course:


a.

Course number and name,


b.

A brief course
description, and


c.

A brief statement explaining why the pr
ogram should include the course


Proposed Program

Justification

Part I: Sustainability Core (1
8


19

S.H.)


BIOL 104 Environment, Society & Conservation (3)













OR BIOL 312 General Ecology (3) OR BIOL 315
BIO 104 is a foundation course of the proposed curricu
lum,
which aims at enhancing students’ appreciation and
understanding of sustainability from a broadI environmental
perspective. All the remaining biology courses amplify
discussions and reflections on current
environmentalLecological issuesI in an attemp
t to guide
learners toward embracing stewardship in managing our
natural resource base

Environmental Biology (3) OR BIOL 351
Agroecology (3) OR BIOL 405 Fishery Biology (3)
OR BIOL 423 Ecosystem Ecology OR BIOL 424
Biogeography (3)

CHEM 301

This course looks at things an individual can do to live more
sustainably and help their community be more sustainable.
Students will learn about energy conservation, renewable
energy, sustainable building, ways to reduce waste, how to
eat sustainably and

sustainable transportation options.

ENG 111

This course provides students with opportunities to develop
college
-
level academic reading and writing skills within the
context of issues central to sustainability. In this way, the
course not only readies
students for the more advanced
academic reading and writing they will encounter in their
majors but, because of its thematic content, it also allows
students to study thoroughly topics that are relevant to
creating or maintaining more sustainable practices
.

OR ENG 210

This course provides students with opportunities to enhance
the reading and writing skills developed in previous
coursework. Using issues central to sustainability as the
thematic content of the course, English 210 undertakes a
thorough study

of topics that are relevant to creating or
maintaining more sustainable practices.


GEOS 325

GEOS 325
focuses on a variety of issues central to building a
sustainable society, including water, resource use and
extraction, soils and food systems, and ener
gy. An emphasis
is placed on understanding the science
and relevant policy
behind these key issues.

RTTR 244

In this course students utilize various techniques to
investigate,
explore
and determine
their role in contributing to
a sustainable society
.

AND 3 credits from the following:



PHIL 232

PHIL 232 investigates the rights and ethical responsibilities
humans have with respect to nature. The course addresses
sustainability of our consumption, population growth, and
pollution given their effects
on the environment and future
generations.

POLS 340

POLS

340 is a course designed to introduce students to the
public and non
-
profit management efforts to protect natural
resour
c
es. Students are exposed to the political,
administrative, economic, and
scientific challenges involved
in formulating, implementing, and evaluating environmental
policy in ways that informed by contemporary disputes over
sustainability and quality of life expectations. The course
serves as a valuable introduction to any stude
nt seeking
advanced study or an entry level career water, air, hazardous
waste, or public lands management.

Part II: Sustainability Focus Areas (6 S.H.)


Select from the following

(all elective credits must be
taken within one category)
:


Science
Category

The elective courses offered in the Science Category should
be included as options in the Sustainability Minor because
they contain significant discipline
-
specific content about
sustainability and the science behind sustainable issues in
their cou
rse material.

Many of these courses underwent a
major revision in order to include more discipline specific
curriculum around sustainability issues.

BIOL 118


BIOL 312


BIOL 314


BIOL 315


BIOL 351


CHEM 100


CHEM 106


CHEM 107


CHEM 320


CHEM
425


CHEM 436


CME 182


CME 410


CS 110


CS 116


CS 344


CS 444


GEOS 335


GEOS 405


HERS

205


MATH 120


Humanities, Social Sciences, and Education
Category

The elective courses
offered in the Humanities, Social
Sciences and Education category
should be included as
options in the Sustainability Minor because they contain
significant discipline
-
specific content about sustainability in
their course material
. Many of these courses underwent a
major revision in order to include more discipline spec
ific
curriculum around sustainability issues.

AAD 303


ENG 120


ENG 210


ENG 211


ENG 220


GS 200


GS 232


GS 335


GS 350


GS 400


GS 435


HIST 398


MKTG 105


MUS 491


NURS 444


PHIL 232


POLS 340


RTTR 265


RTTR 302


RTTR 339


RTTR
421


RTTR 426


SOCW 415


SOC 340


THAD 111


THAD 137


THAD 295


THAD 395


THAD 399


THAD 499


WAGS 235


WAGS 348


WAGS 420



Course Descriptions


AAD

303
-

Independent Study (3 S.H.)

During this experiential learning course, students will be

assigned to work with a local arts organization or on a project in support of
one of WSU’s visual or performing arts departments. Applying knowledge gained from their coursework, students will receive ha
nds
-
on experience in such areas as marketing/publici
ty, budgeting, fundraising, audience development and others areas critical to leaders
of arts organizations. Prerequisite: Successful completion of AAD 301 and AAD 302
.


BIOL

104
-

Environment, Society, and Conservation (3 S.H.)

Problems in the wise use of

renewable resources with emphasis on human impacts and sustainable living. Lecture only. Offered each
semester.


118
-

General Biology (4 S.H.)

A course that promotes critical thinking about the process of studying living organisms. Students are exposed t
o a sampling of major
living groups while utilizing the scientific method. Lecture and laboratory. Letter grade only. Offered each semester.


312
-

General Ecology (3 S.H.)

Relationships between organisms and their environment with an emphasis on
fundamental principles. Lecture only. Prerequisites:
BIOL 241 and BIOL 242 or instructor’s permission. Offered each semester.


314


Current Issues in Plant Biology (4 S.H.)

This course reviews a broad range of current topics/issues in plant biology by way

of discussion and laboratory. Some of the topics are
controversial and will intersect with social, ethical, and political aspects of biology (i.e., biotechnology, ethnobotany). O
ther topics
will introduce students to current methodologies (i.e., forensic
botany, genetic engineering, phytoremediation) and unorthodox ways
of thinking about plants (i.e., consider whether plants have intelligence, plant sex and sex change, tales from the undergrou
nd, etc.).
Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 241 and B
IOL 242. Offered alternate years.


315
-

Environmental Biology (3 S.H.)

A study of human impacts on the natural environment. Modern conservation measures, pollution prevention, and habitat manageme
nt
procedures are treated in depth. Lecture, laboratory, a
nd field trips. Prerequisite: BIOL 308, BIOL 310, and BIOL

312 or instructor’s permission. Offered alternate years.


351
-

Agroecology (3 S.H.)

An introduction to the theory of agroecology and the current practices of sustainable agriculture. The
components of farm
management will be studied within the context of a complex ecosystem. Lecture, field studies, and laboratory will integrate c
oncepts
of agroecology with actual practices in sustainable agriculture. Prerequisites: BIOL 310, BIOL 312, and
CHEM 212. Offered alternate
years.


405
-

Fishery Biology (3 S.H.)

Examination of the concepts, methodologies, and problems of modern
-
day fishery management. Lecture and fieldwork. Prerequisites:
BIOL 308, BIOL 310, and BIOL 312. Offered alternate years.


423
-

Ecosystem Ecology (3 S.H.)

The structure and function of ecosystems including biochemical cycling, food webs, and introduction to modeling. Lecture only
.
Prerequisites: BIOL 308, BIOL 310, BIOL 312, MATH 150, and MATH 155. Offered alternate years.


4
24
-

Biogeography (3 S.H.)

A study of the dynamics of ranges and distribution changes of plants and animals on earth, with emphasis on the evolutionary,

ecological, geological, and climatic influences on dispersal, extinction, and diversification. Lecture
only. Prerequisites: BIOL 308,
BIOL 310, and BIOL 312. Offered alternate years.


CHEM

100
-

Chemistry Appreciation (3 S.H.)

Chemical concepts presented as lecture
-
demonstrations for students who wish to gain an appreciation of the chemical world. Meets
University Studies requirements; not intended as preparation for other chemistry courses. Does not preclude taking any other
chemistry courses for credit. No laboratory. Not open to students with credit in higher numbered chemistry courses. Offered e
ach
se
mester.


106 (3 S.H.), 107 (4 S.H.)
-

Chemistry in Our World

Intended to introduce students to chemistry and give them an appreciation and understanding of the role chemistry plays in th
eir
everyday lives. Topics covered include atomic structure, bonding,
water, acid rain, and energy. This course is intended both for
University Studies students and as a first course for students who have not had high school chemistry and wish to prepare to
take other
chemistry classes. Students may elect to take the course
with lab (CHEM 107, 4 S.H.) or without lab (CHEM 106, 3 S.H.). Note:
Students may enroll in either CHEM 106 or CHEM 107, but they cannot earn credit for both courses. Offered each semester.


3
01

Energy and Sustainable Living (3 S.H.)

Participants in this class will have a broad exposure to issues in sustainability. They will learn the basic ways to conserv
e energy and
will learn about small scale renewable energy including information about current and state of the art technology, sit
e suitability,
system sizing, and financial incentives that are available. The student will also learn about alternative building options,
ways to green
up the home or business, and alternative transportation options. Finally, this class will present inf
ormation about emerging “green”
jobs. This class will be taught on
-
line as well as having a contextual field component.
This course does not count toward any of the
degree requirements for the Chemistry major or minor. The course may not substitute for
any other Chemistry courses.


320
-

Environmental Chemistry (4 S.H.)

An introductory study of current environmental issues, emphasizing the chemistry and chemical interactions underlying these t
opics.
The topics may include, but are not limited to, global
warming, depletion of stratospheric ozone, ground level air chemistry and air
pollution, organic chemicals in the environment, toxic heavy metals, chemistry of natural waters, and energy production and i
ts
environmental consequences. Lecture and laboratory
. Prerequisite: One year of general chemistry or instructor’s permission. Offered
yearly.


425, 426
-

Analytical Chemistry I & II (4 S.H. Each)

A sequence of courses stressing modern analytical chemistry. A study of the theory and practice of the quantita
tive examination of
chemical systems. CHEM 425 covers volumetric and fundamental visible spectrophotometric methods. CHEM 426 covers the
instrumental methods of UV
-
vis, emission, and AA spectroscopy, electrical methods, and gas and liquid chromatography.
Prerequisite
for CHEM 425: one year of chemistry; prerequisites for CHEM 426: CHEM 425 and CHEM 412. Offered yearly.


436
-

Topics in Environmental Chemistry (3 S.H.)

This course covers advanced topics in environmental chemistry. Topics studied will depend

upon the interest of the class and may
include topics such as acid rain, endocrine disruption, risk assessment, global warming, and bioaccumulation. Prerequisite: C
HEM
320 or instructor’s permission. Offered every other year.


CME

182
-

Engineering Graphi
cs and Design (2 S.H. )

A lecture
-
laboratory course. Engineering design process. Visualization and design communication. Engineering drawing standards
and conventions. Computer
-
aided drafting and design (CADD) software are used throughout the course. Secti
onal views, auxiliary
views, dimensioning, tolerancing, and reading of drawings. Grade only.


410
-

Polymer Processing (3 S.H.)

Chemical and physical properties of polymers, additives, mixing and compounding, rheology of polymer melts, continuity, energ
y,
and momentum equations, qualitative description and quantitative modeling of extrusion, blow molding, thermoforming, injectio
n
molding, compression molding, and rotational molding processes. Environmental aspects of polymers. Prerequisite: CME 350. Gra
de
o
nly. Offered a minimum of once every two years.


CS

110
-

Computers in a Global Society (3 S.H.)

This course exposes students to some of the basic scientific foundations of computer technology to help them understand the s
ocietal
implications of computer
technology. This course addresses such questions as: What happens when you hit a “submit” button on a
Web form? What is going on when you “download” a file? How does a Web
-
search happen? Based on this technical perspective, the
course looks at the role tec
hnology plays in the United States, as well as its effect on nations and cultures all over the world. The
impact and significance of the information age is explored in several different contexts including economic, political, cultu
ral, legal,
environmental
, historical, ergonomic, and psychological.


116
-

Web Technology I (3 S.H.)

An introductory, hands
-
on course on Internet website development. The emphasis is for students to develop competence using web
authoring tools and tools for incorporating multimed
ia into a web page in order to build a complex website focused on some area of
academic interest. Students will learn how to plan and publish websites and develop electronic portfolios that are exciting,
efficient,
accessible, and well
-
designed. Students w
ill gain insight into the technology behind the World Wide Web by working with CSS
(cascading style sheets) and HTML (hypertext) markup language. No prior programming experience is necessary for this course.


344
-

Introduction to Web Programming (3 S.H.)

Focus is on the fundamentals of the Web as a computer system, and the components used in developing client
-
side web
-
based
applications. Topics include markup languages (HTML and its variants), scripting languages (e.g., JavaScript, Perl, PHP), and

applets
including security and digital signatures, multimedia content, animation, and usability issues. In addition, the course will
provide an
overview of web history, web architecture, search engines, and web security. Students will develop a number of web pages

and
programs throughout the course and work with a team to develop an integrated, interactive website. Prerequisite: CS 250 or
instructor’s permission.


444
-

Human Computer Interaction (3 S.H.)

This course examines fundamental principles of human factors

issues related to the development of software and the design of
interactive systems. Topics include user
-
centered design, usability tests, tradeoffs between interaction devices, alternative input
-
output
methods, design of interfaces for special audiences,

and construction of appropriate error messages. Projects will involve
implementation and evaluation of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) and web pages. Prerequisites: CS 341, CS 344, and PSY 210.


ENG

111
-

College Reading and Writing (4 S.H.)

This course
aims to strengthen students’ reading and writing abilities in preparation for college
-
level writing. A means of learning and
inquiry, the writing in this course is based on interpreting, analyzing, and critiquing texts as well as on conducting resear
ch,
sy
nthesizing sources, and using citation/documentation formats. Prerequisite: Qualifying ACT English sub
-
score, minimum score on
the English placement exam, or successful completion of ENG 099. Grade only.


120
-

Introduction to Literature (3 S.H.)

Intensive

reading in selected major forms and themes of literature. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s
content. Grade only.


210
-

Advanced Expository Writing (3 S.H.)

An advanced course in writing expository essays for academic audiences,

this course emphasizes the development of a mature prose
style and a sophisticated approach to textual interpretation. Students refine their rhetorical and grammatical/mechanical com
petence
and strengthen their skills in academic research, source integrat
ion, critical analysis, and evaluative judgment. Prerequisite: ENG 111.
Grade only.


211
-

Writing in Communities (3 S.H.)

This course concerns the study and practice of writing as a means of participation in a diverse, democratic, and literate soc
iety.
Stu
dents may work with community partners to define and complete writing projects. Prerequisite: ENG 111. Grade only.


220
-

Multicultural American Literatures (3 S.H.)

Recognizing the rich array of cultures that have contributed to American history, life, an
d art, this course focuses on one such culture
or on a cross
-
cultural topic and offers students a study of vital literary voices and their social contexts. Variable content: Semester
schedules announce each section’s subject. Grade only.


GEOS

325
-

Environmental Geoscience (3 S.H.)

Study of the environmental implications of human interactions with natural geological systems. An emphasis is placed on
understanding environmental science concepts and how scientific findings ultimately shape public polic
y and political decisions.
Topics typically include climate change, water resources, alternative energy resources, soils and weathering, and coastal pro
cesses.
Course is taught from an Earth systems perspective. Discussion oriented lecture format. Lecture
only. Prerequisite: Any University
Studies Natural Science laboratory course or instructor’s permission. Offered alternate years, usually spring semester.


335
-

Global Climate Change (3 S.H.)

Exploration of the Earth’s most recent glacial/interglacial cyc
les: geological and faunal evidence, the sequence of historical events,
potential causative factors, environmental responses and rates of change, and pertinence to contemporary global change. An e
mphasis
will be placed on understanding the mechanisms of c
limate change in relation to geological processes. Prerequisite: A 100
-

or 200
-
level Geoscience Course or the instructor’s permission. Offered in alternate years.


405
-

Current Topics in Geoscience (1
-
3 S.H.)

Analysis of current topics and issues
relevant to Geosciences. Subject matter and prerequisites will be announced in advance by the
department. May be repeated as topics change. Offered with sufficient demand.


G
S

200
-

Introduction to Global Studies (3 S.H.)

This course introduces students to

a framework for viewing the world as a unit and explores a variety of contemporary global issues
such as economic development, environmental problems, status of women, world population.



232


Introduction to Latin America (3 S.H.)

The Latin America
-
Car
ibbean region is one of the world’s most misunderstood regions. Geograpically, this region is very complex
and culturally diverse; historically, it has been the scene of constant abuse and violent changes. In this introductory cours
e, a global
explanation
of the processes that link the three major cultural groups (indigenous peoples, Afro
-
American, and Iberian or Portuguese
settlers) will be explored. The interactions will be examined within social, historical,

and ethnographic

contexts. Grade only. Offered

every other year.


335
-

Global Poverty and Sustainable Development (3 S.H.)

This course provides an interdisciplinary analysis of global material poverty and sustainable development, and related key
socioeconomic issues and objectives. Students have the
opportunity to study particular global and local approaches to poverty
reduction and sustainable development, including the work of global and local development organizations. Once students have
completed the campus
-
based course, they will have the option
of completing an additional three credits by participating in a service
learning project based in a developing country. Offered every other year.


350
-

Cross
-
Cultural Field Experience (1
-
3 S.H.)

The cross
-
cultural field experience is typically part of a W
SU
-
approved Study Abroad Program. The field experience gives students
an opportunity to explore cultural issues through experiences outside the classroom situation and to integrate direct cultura
l
experiences with theoretical understanding of cultural issu
es. May be repeated for up to 9 semester hours. This course

cannot be used to fulfill University Studies credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and the GSP Director.


400
-

Global Studies Seminar (3 S.H.)

This course allows students to engage
in an in
-
depth examination of global issues, using a cross
-
disciplinary approach. Prerequisite:
GS 200. Offered yearly.


435
-

Indigenous Social Movements in Latin America (3 S.H)

This course allows student to engage in an in
-
depth analysis and research of
indigenous social movements in Latin America. In
addition to exploring diverse ethnic traditions, the course will analyze and compare how indigenous groups are transforming c
ultural,
economic, and political life in the region. Prerequisites: GS 200 and GS
232.


HERS

205

Introduction to basic nutritional concepts and their application to lifetime wellness. Topics of study will include normal n
utritional
standards, nutrients, weight management, eating disorders, life cycle nutrition and disease prevention.
A personal dietary analysis is
also included. Offered each semester.


HIST

398
-

Topics in History with Oral Communication Emphasis (3 S.H.)

In
-
depth study of topics of current concern to historians including newer areas of research, emerging themes, and
recent interpretive
debates. The assignments will include an emphasis on discussion and oral presentations.


MKTG

105
-

Marketing in a Global Society (3 S.H.)

An introduction to key marketing concepts within the context of current and emerging global
issues. This course is designed to expose
students to the impact of cultural, economic, and political environments on the global marketplace and to explore the ethical

and social
responsibilities of marketing managers in this dynamic era of globalization.
Topics include the importance of cross
-
cultural
understanding, global linkages, emerging markets, and fair trade practices.


MUS

491
-

Independent Studies in Music (1
-
6 S.H.)

Course designed to offer advanced students the opportunity to work in a music are
a of special interest to them. May be taken for or
repeated up to six credits. Prerequisite: Department’s permission. Offered each semester.


MATH

120
-

Precalculus (4 S.H.)

A study of topics designed to give students the skills necessary for successful c
ompletion of calculus. Equation solving, graphing,
functions, and trigonometry are some of the main topics covered. Prerequisite: Qualifying score on the mathematics placement
exam
or MATH 115.


NURS

444
-

Leadership in Contemporary Health Care Settings (2

S.H.)

Explores leadership and management in nursing practice focusing on health care policy and systems. Prerequisites: NURS 344, N
URS
353, NURS 354, or instructor’s permission.


PHIL

232
-

Environmental Ethics (3 S.H.)


A critical investigation into our

rights and ethical responsibilities with respect to nature. Topics include, the moral status of nature, its
value, and the sustainability of our consumption, population growth, and pollution given their effects on the environment and

future
generations.
Offered each year.


POLS

340
-

Environmental Policy (3 S.H.)

A seminar in environmental policy analysis. Students examine and assess a variety of global, national, local, and inter
-
governmental
environmental problems and governmental efforts in response to

these problems. Special emphasis is placed on air and water
pollution, erosion, toxic wastes, species loss, and population growth.


RTTR

244
-

Stewardship of Self and the Environment: Building a Principled Way of Life (3 S.H.)

Students will explore and
critically analyze information from popular culture and research sources to assist in the development of their
affective, psychomotor, and cognitive domains as described by Bloom. Students will also investigate their social selves by co
mparing
themselves t
o selected role models. Students will have the opportunity to critically analyze themselves while developing a slogan,
motto, mission, goals, and objectives to assist with their sustainable journey through the university environment. Students w
ill chart
th
emselves to determine the extent to which they become contributing sustainable members of the campus and the surrounding
community. Grade only.


265
-

Leisure in Different Cultures (3 S.H.)

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to different c
ultures through travel study. Applies only to travel education programs
offered through RTTR and the ADVT minor. Repeatable for credit when students enroll in different travel/study programs. Grade

only.


302
-

Adventure Travel and Tourism Development (3 S
.H.)

An overview of the rapidly growing adventure tourism industry, and its relation to the field of recreation and leisure studie
s. Course
emphasis will be placed on adventure tourism and national and international “eco
-
tourism,” which promotes cultural a
nd
environmental sensitivity. Field trip is an additional fee. Grade only.


339
-

Wilderness Ethics, Safety, and Survival (3 S.H.)

Students will examine the elements of ethical wilderness trip planning, low impact activities, and select appropriate gear an
d
equipment for trip safety. Survival and rescue skills will also be examined in this course. Grade only.


421
-

Outdoor Education and Interpretive Services (3 S.H.)

Exploration of the out
-
of
-
doors as a medium to enhance cognitive, affective, and psychomot
or learning for persons of all ages.
Outdoor recreation as a component of outdoor education is also addressed. Grade only.


426
-

Recreation Facilities and Area Design (3 S.H.)

Principles and procedures related to the design, operation, and care of leisure

resources, areas and facilities. Prerequisites: Sophomore
or preferably higher standing, RTTR 229, and RTTR 245. Grade only.


RESC

201
-

Residential College Seminar: Whose Planet (1 S.H.) This course is designed to explore the connections between various
d
isciplines through activities outside of class and discussion. This section will include assignments based on the topic of th
e topic of
Whose Planet is it Anyway. This class partially satisfies the 120 semester hour requirement for graduation.


SOCW

415
-

Social Work Practice III
-

Organizations and Communities (3 S.H.)

This is the final of the practice courses designed to prepare students as generalist practitioners able to provide services t
o client
systems at all levels. The focus of this course is on th
e evaluation and termination processes of planned change, crisis intervention,
and macro skills of intervention. Prerequisites: Admission to the social work major and successful completion of SOCW 385. Th
is
course is taken concurrently with SOCW 400. Limit
ed to 25 students. Grade only. Grade only. Offered each semester on the Winona
campus; offered in the fall semester only on the Rochester campus.


SOC

340
-

Social
-
Cultural Anthropology (3 S.H.)

The cross
-
cultural and comparative examination of different
cultures with emphasis on the varieties and ranges of human behavior.
Prerequisite: SOC 150. Grade only. Offered yearly.



THAD

111
-

Theatre Appreciation (3 S.H.)

Designed for the general student who wishes to become familiar with theatre. Students will
explore theatre through class lectures and
discussion, individual and group projects, production attendance, and play readings. Students will be expected to attend thea
tre
productions outside scheduled class time. Offered each semester.


137
-

Dance Repert
ory I (1
-
2 S.H.)

May be taken by students preparing for public performance of new or previously created dance, which is choreographed by facul
ty or
guest artists; or by student choreographers preparing dance for public performance under direct faculty supe
rvision. Prerequisite:
Instructor’s permission. May be repeated once. Concurrent registration in THAD 090 required of dance minors unless excused by

the
department. Grade only. Offered each semester.


295
-

Making Interdisciplinary Connections (3 S.H.)

Int
erdisciplinary experience involving one or more artistic media incorporating content from diverse disciplines across campus.
Topics vary. This course satisfies the requirements for University Studies Fine

and Performing Arts. Prerequisite: None. Grade only
.
Offered yearly.


395
-

Topics in Theatre (1
-
3 S.H.)

Study of a specific topic in dramatic theory/literature/history, performance, or theatrical design/stagecraft. Topics and cou
rse credits
vary. May be repeated as topics change. Course may contain produc
tion crew requirement. Concurrent registration in THAD 090
required unless excused by the department. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Open to declared majors and minors or instructor’s
permission. Offered yearly.


399
-

Internship (1
-
16 S.H.)

Supervised wor
k experience designed by student, advisor, and employer. Prerequisites: Faculty advisor’s permission and a minimum
overall GPA of 2.5. Open to declared theatre and dance majors and minors only. P/NC only. Offered by arrangement.


499
-

Independent Studies
in THAD (1
-
8 S.H.)

Offers the advanced student an opportunity to study independently in an area of special interest. May be repeated to a total
of eight
S.H. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered by arrangement.


WAGS

235
-

Gender and
Social Justice Issues in Latin America (3 S.H.)

This course demonstrates how ordinary women have had transformational roles in the social and political spheres of their coun
tries. It
will explore how women have chosen to participate in collective action in

Chile, Guatemala, El Salvador, and Mexico to address
human rights issues and how family values can become a part of public life. Recommended prerequisite: SOC 150. Grade only.
Offered every other year.


348
-

Topics in Women’s and Gender Studies (3 S.H.)

This course presents an in
-
depth study of topics of current interest in the field of Women’s and Gender Studies. Offered as needed.


420
-

Field Experience (3
-
6 S.H.)

The Field Experience gives students an oppor
tunity to explore gender related
issues and t
he gender dimension of so
cial issues through
experiences
outside the classroom; integrate practical ex
perience with feminist analyses
developed in Women’s and Gender Studies
courses; and develop the skills
and knowledge necessary to act effectively as citi
zens of their communities.

Prerequis
ites: Enrollment
in Women’s and
Gender Studies minor.


WINONA STATE UNIVERSITY

NEW AND REVISED COURSE AND PROGRAM
APPROVAL FORM


Routing form for new and revised courses and programs.
Course or Program
__

BA

Minor
Professional Studies: Sustainability Option

Department Recommendation



_________________________________

________________

____________________________________________

Department Chair



Date



e
-
mail address


Dean’s
Recommendation

_____
Yes


_____
No*


_________________________________

________________

Dean of College



Date


*
The dean shall forward their recommendation to the chair of the department, the chair of A2C2, and the Vice Pres
id
ent for
Academic Affairs.

A2C2 Recommendation

_____ Approved


_____ Disapproved



_________________________________

________________

Chair of A2C2



Date


Graduate Council Recommendation

_____ Approved


_____ Disapproved

(if applicable)



_________________________________

________________

Chair of Graduate Council



Date


_________________________________

________________

Director of Graduate Studies


Date


Faculty Senate Recommendation


_____ Approved


_____ Disapproved



_________________________________

________________

President of Faculty Senate



Date


Academic Vice President Recommendation

_____ Approved


_____ Disapproved



________________________________

________________

Academic Vice President



Date


Decision of President

_____ Approved


_____ Disapproved



_________________________________

________________

President




Date


Please forward to Registrar.

Registrar

_________________

Please notify department chair

via e
-
mail that curricular change has been recorded.


Date entered














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-
1
-
10
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