2002-2004 - Las Positas College

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Oct 7, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Las Positas College

3033 Collier Canyon Road

Livermore, CA 94551
-
7650

(925) 373
-
5800

(925) 443
-
0742 (Fax)



Course Outline for Physics 8C

GENERAL PHYSICS III


I.

CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

PHYS 8C


GENERAL PHYSICS III


5 units


Electricity and magnetism, circui
ts, Maxwell’s Equations. Electromagnetic Waves.
Prerequisite: Physics 4B and Mathematics 3 (both completed with grade of C or higher).
4

hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory.


II.

NUMBER OF TIMES COURSE MAY BE TAKEN FOR CREDIT:

One



III.

PREREQUISITE AND/OR ADV
ISORY SKILLS:

Before entering this course, the student should be able to:


A.

analyze and solve a variety of problems often using calculus in topics such as:

1.

electrostatics;

2.

electric potential and potential energy;

3.

electric currents and DC circuits;

4.

magnetism

5.

electromagnetic induction

6.

AC circuits

7.

Polarization

8.

Maxell’s equations

9.

operate standard laboratory equipment;

10.

analyze laboratory data;

11.

write comprehensive laboratory reports;

12.

transform points and equations among rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical
coor
dinates and sketch their graphs as well as quadric surfaces;

13.

parameterize curves using vector functions of one variable and analyze them
(e.g. find unit tangent, unit normal, curvature);

14.

sketch the graphs of functions of two variables using level curves,

traces in
coordinate planes, symmetry, etc;

15.

extend the concepts of limits, continuity, differentiability and differential of
single variable functions to functions of two variables;

16.

compute limits, partial derivatives, total differential, gradient, direct
ional
derivatives and interpret them geometrically and in terms of rate of change;

17.

apply partial derivatives and/or gradients to problems involving tangent planes
and linear approximation, and optimization, especially using Lagrange
multipliers;

18.

compute do
uble and triple integrals directly or using change of variables and
explain the geometric interpretation of Jacobians;

19.

apply differential operators gradient, divergence, curl and Laplacian to scalar
and vector field and interpret the results;

20.

compute line

integrals using parameterizations for curves;

21.

parameterize surfaces using vector functions of two variables, and compute
their areas;

22.

compute surface integrals of scalar functions and vector functions using
parameterization for surfaces;


Course Outline for Physics 8C


Page
2

GENERAL PHYSICS III

23.

interpret the the
orems of Green, Stokes and Gauss physically as well as
mathematically (as the generalizations of the Fundamental Theorem of
Calculus), and use them to compute line and surface integrals;

24.

find scalar potentials for conservative vector fields.


IV.

EXPECTED OUTC
OMES FOR STUDENTS:

Upon completion of the course, the student should be able to:


A.

analyze and solve a variety of problems often using calculus in topics such as:

1.

Electric forces and fields for varying charge distributions

2.

Gauss’s law

3.

electric potential and

electric potential energy;

4.

Capacitance

5.

Single and multi loop DC circuits;

6.

magnetic forces and fields

7.

Sources of magnetic fields

8.

electromagnetic induction

9.

Inductance

10.

AC circuits

11.

Maxell’s equations

12.

Electromagnetic Waves and Polarization

B.

operate standard lab
oratory equipment;

C.

analyze laboratory data;

D.

write comprehensive laboratory reports.


V.

CONTENT:

A.

Electric Charge and Electric Force

B.

Electric fields

C.

Gauss' Law

D.

The electrostatic potential

E.

Electric energy

F.

Capacitors and dielectrics

G.

Currents and Ohm's Law

H.

DC ci
rcuits

I.

The magnetic force and field

J.

Sources of Magnetic fields, Biot Savart Law

K.

Ampere's Law, Electromagnetic induction

L.

Alternating current circuits

M.

The displacement current and Maxwell's equations

N.

Electromagnetic waves


VI.

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION:

A.

Lecture and

discussion.

B.

Problem solving.

C.

Demonstrations.

D.

Laboratory experimentation.

E.

Internet and other computer based simulations and instructional multi
-
media


VII.

TYPICAL ASSIGNMENTS:

A.

Homework assignments from textbook

1.

Assigned Problems:
(not to be turned in):

a.

Proble
ms Ch 31: 6,12, 24,25,29,33,38,62,78, 90

2.

Homework Assignment
(to be turned in)

a.

Chapter 31
--
28, 51, 53, 86

b.

Laboratory reports (individual and group), including computer
-
based
data acquisition and analysis

Course Outline for Physics 8C


Page
3

GENERAL PHYSICS III

3.

Lab 7 from 4A laboratory manual: The Earth’s Magneti
c Field

a.

Special exercise worksheets, problem review, and computer
simulations and

b.

Tutorials; both individual and group activities.

i.

Web assignment: Motion of a Charged particle in a Magnetic
Field. Complete Sections (a) through (c) and turn in with
lab
oratory report for lab The Earth’s Magnetic Field

ii.

Complete Web Independent Study Assignment #1 assignment
listed in on
-
line Syllabus. Work together in groups of two or three
and turn in with lab report on RLC circuit.

c.

Collaborative projects

i.

Research a to
pic in applied Electricity and Magnetism. As a
group, present the results of your research in a paper, and a
presentation to the class. Groups are strongly encouraged to
post your paper on the WWW. In lieu of a formal paper, however,
groups can also condu
ct an experiment, write a computer
simulation, or build a device. As with a paper, you will still be
required to present your special project to the class.


VIII.

EVALUATION:

A.

Methods

4.

Examinations

5.

Quizzes

6.

Homework

7.

Collaborative project(s)

8.

Computer Assignments

B.

Fr
equency of evaluation

1.

Recommend tri
-
weekly quizzes and final exam (or) two midterm (unit) exams
and final exam.

2.

Weekly or bi
-
weekly homework assignments (as described above)

3.

Weekly or bi
-
weekly laboratory reports (as described above)

4.

Two or more collabor
ative laboratory assignments per semester (as described
above)

5.

One or more computer assignments (as described above)

6.

One collaborative project (as described above)

C.

Typical Problems:

1.

Quiz, homework and exam problems:

a.

Example 1: Homework Problem

A technici
an wearing a brass bracelet enclosing an area of 0.00500m
2

places her hand in a solenoid whose magnetic field is 5.00 T directed
perpendicular to the plane of the bracelet. The electrical resistance
around the circumference of the bracelet is 0.200 Ohms.
An
unexpected power failure causes the field to drop to 1.50 T in a time of
20.0 ms. Find (a) the current induced in the bracelet and (b) the power
delivered to the resistance of the bracelet. (What does this problem
imply about the risks of wearing metall
ic objects when working in
regions of strong magnetic fields?).

i.

If the plates are separated by a distance d = 0.015 mm,
determine the potential difference between the plates.

ii.

If a dielectric with dielectric constant k = 5.0 is placed between
the two pla
tes, determine the new potential difference. Assume
the dielectric completely fills the space between them

iii.

Would it require energy to remove the dielectric? Explain.

b.

Example 2: Quiz Problem:

An RC series circuit has a time constant of

Course Outline for Physics 8C


Page
4

GENERAL PHYSICS III

i.

Sketch a graph showing the voltage as a function of time for the
charging cycle of this circuit, assuming that a one volt DC voltage
source has been connected at t = 0.

ii.

how long will it take for the capacitor to reach 99% of its
maximum ch
arge?

iii.

If R = 100 ohms, determine an expression for the current as a
function of time in this circuit while the inductor is discharging.
Sketch your result

c.

Example 3: Exam Problem:

i.

A solid non
-
conducting sphere of radius R has a nonuniform
charge dist
ribution of volume charge density


=

s
r/R, where

s

is a constant and r is the distance from the center of the sphere.

(a)

Show that the total charge on the sphere is Q =

s
R
3

(b)

Show, using Gauss's law and your result from part (a),
that the electric field inside the sphere has a magnitude
given by:




IX.

TYPICAL TEXTS:

A.

Serway and Beichner.
Physics for Scientists and Engineers,

Volume II. New York:
Harcourt College Publisher, 2000.


X.

OTHER MATERIALS REQUIRED OF STUDENTS:

A.

A programmable scientific calculator capable of
graphing

B.

A computer use certificate


Creation Date:

1/94

Revision Date:

11/01


PHYS 8C