Graduate Program Summary - College of Sciences - Old Dominion ...

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Oct 2, 2013 (4 years and 12 days ago)

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Old Dominion University

Chemistry & Biochemistry Dept

Graduate program

Home to the Chemistry & Biochemistry Department, the four
-
story

Alfriend Chemistry building, constructed in 1967, houses classrooms

and laboratories for both teaching and research.

Our PhD in Chemistry program, in its fifth year, is moving the department towards its goal of
national recognition as a premier graduate facility. Areas of specialization within the
graduate program include analytical chemistry, biochemistry, environmental chemistry,
marine chemistry, materials chemistry, organic chemistry, and physical chemistry.

Dr. Craig Bayse is our

Graduate Program Director.

mailto:cbayse@odu.edu

Val De Costa is our

Graduate Program Assistant.

mailto:vdecosta@odu.edu

Department of Chemistry
And Biochemistry

Click on the link below to view
our Graduate Program
offerings.

The research laboratories in the Alfriend Chemistry building were substantially renovated in
1996 to accommodate our rapidly expanding research programs. Students of all degree
levels will use these facilities for research as they learn from highly talented, nationally
known researchers on the Chemistry & Biochemistry Department faculty.

Dr. Patrick Hatcher, a renowned geochemist and leader of the Virginia Coastal Energy
Research Consortium, established in 2006 by the Virginia General Assembly,

leads an initiative to create biodiesel fuel from algae. He and his colleagues have
developed an algae
-
growing farm as a demonstration facility in Spring Grove, Virginia.

Dr. Hatcher and his research group have pioneered new analytical

approaches to studying the transformation of plants

to natural organic matter in terrestrial and aquatic systems.

Dr. Hatcher’s research laboratories are housed in the adjacent

Physical Sciences building, opened in 2009, along with the

College of Sciences Major Instrumentation Cluster (
COSMIC
) which he directs.

Susan Hatcher is the COSMIC manager and oversees

the operation of a $1.3 million 12
-
Tesla fourier transform

ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer and two ultra
-
shielded

400MHz nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers (NMR).


Susan Hatcher and Pat Hatcher

Junyan Zhang (back left) & Mahasilu Amunugama (back right)

The big move of the FTICR Mass Spectrometer magnet

(about 9,000 pounds) to the new Physical Sciences building.

Dr. X. Nancy Xu is an internationally recognized leading researcher in nanoscience

and nanotechnology, and ultrasensitive analysis. She and her research group have been
developing cutting
-
edge nanobiotechnology and ultrasensitive detection technologies to explore
living systems at the single
-
cell and single
-
molecule level. Her research team aims to invent
novel technologies for better understanding of fundamental biomedical sciences, disease
development, as well as early diagnosis and detection of cancers.


Images of single

gold and silver nanoparticles.

Dr. Xu’s research group

has state
-
of
-
the
-
art single
-
molecule,

single
-
cell and single nanoparticle imaging tools,

which are housed both in the Alfriend

Chemistry building and also in the

New Physical Sciences building.

Dr. Richard Gregory directs the advanced polymer electronics, photonics,

and soft materials characterization lab.

This lab houses state of the art thermal characterization equipment, spin coaters

for this electronic film preparation, rheometers, modulated

and differential scanning calorimeters, dynamic mechanical analyzers,

thermal gravimetric analysis instrumentation and electrochemical analyzers.


Dr. Mopper’s current research areas include the impact of photo
-
chemical processes

on oceanic and global carbon cycling, the study of free radicals (e.g., OH radicals)

and stable species (e.g., H
2
O
2
) and their reactions in natural waters, the characterization

of humic substances in natural waters, the production of surface active polysaccharides

by organisms and their role in surface microlayer and particle formation in natural waters,
and the development/adaptation of analytical techniques for trace organics, total

and dissolved organic carbon, and photo
-
chemically formed species in natural waters.


Dr. John R. Donat's research interests include the water quality of the Chesapeake Bay,

the speciation and concentrations of trace metals in estuarine, coastal, and oceanic waters
and the factors affecting them; trace metal
-
phytoplankton interactions; and development
& application of analytical methods for trace metal analysis in aquatic chemistry.

Dr. Lesley Greene’s research group studies the determinants of protein structure, function,
folding and stability using cutting
-
edge techniques in molecular biology, protein chemistry,
biophysics and bioinformatics. Their studies also include the investigation of amyloid fibril
formation and the relationship to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and
Parkinson’s. Her research group is also pioneering the modeling of protein structures as
network systems. Their work involves a multidisciplinary approach in collaboration with
engineers, physicists, mathematicians, computer scientists and biologists.

Dr. Bala Ramjee’s research group is broadly interested in the interfacial area

of nanomaterials and organic synthesis. They are currently probing ligand

effects in the synthesis and dynamics of nanoparticles towards fundamental

studies and applications in catalysis and sensing.

Dr. Jennifer Poutsma’s research group uses computational chemistry to study organic
reactions and biological molecules. Current projects include identifying

the mechanism of the Schmidt reaction and various analogues, determining

the source of binding cooperativity in R67 dihydrofolate reductase,

and understanding how modifications affect the binding of PNA to DNA or RNA.

Dr. Mao’s research group is interested in development and applications of advanced

solid
-
state NMR techniques for research in biogeochemistry and environmental chemistry.

Currently,
his group is

investigating non
-
covalent interactions of organic


contaminants with soil and sediment organic matter.




Old Dominion University's
Applied Research Center
(ARC)
consists of an interdisciplinary team of researchers working
on scientific and technological problems in the areas

of thin films, laser and plasma applications, materials
technology, and the emerging fields of nanotechnology,
biomedical engineering, sensor science and technology,
and MEMS.


Projects at the Center are sponsored

by federal agencies, the Commonwealth of Virginia,

and various industries and national labs.

Interactive collaborative research is a strong focus of the

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry with such departments as Ocean, Earth &
Atmospheric Sciences, Biological Sciences, Physics, and Engineering.

State of the art instrumentation is available to Old Dominion University
researchers and graduate students



some of which can be seen in the next three slides.

SEM

JEOL JSM
-
6060LV


Accelerating
Voltage:

5


30 kV



Imaging Mode:
High vacuum for regular samples


Low vacuum for biological samples



Resolution:

3.5
nm
(HV mode)



4.0 nm (LV mode)



Magnification
:

3
0x


3
00,000x




EDS Unit:
Thermo Electron NORAN System SIX


Modes:
Point
analysis



Line
analysis



Elemental
mapping

TEM

JEOL JEM
-
2100F


Accelerating Voltage:
200
kV



Electron Gun:

ZrO/W(100
) field emission



Resolution:

0.23
nm (point
-
to
-
point)



0.10
nm (lattice)



0.20
nm (STEM)



Spot Size:

2
-
5
nm (TEM mode)



0.5
-
2.4
nm (analytical mode)



Magnification:

MAG mode: 2,000x


1,500,000x



Low
MAG
mode: 50x


6,000x



Image Mode:

High
resolution



Bright
field


Dark
field



CCD Camera:

Gatan SC1000 ORIUS CCD camera (11 megapixel)




EDS Unit:
Oxford INCAx
-
sight EDS detector


Modes:
Point
analysis



Line
analysis



Elemental
mapping

AFM

Veeco Dimension 3100

Collaborative regional research opportunities are also available



NASA


Home
,


U.S. Navy,

Chesapeake Bay Foundation
,

Eastern Virginia Medical School,

Virginia Institute of Marine Science
,

and with a number of local industries



Morphix Technologies
,
U.S. Amines
,
BASF
.

The
Thomas Jefferson Lab National Accelerator Facility
, a center for
both basic research and applied research, is just a short distance
away in Newport News. As a user facility for scientists
worldwide, it’s primary mission is to conduct basic research

of the atom's nucleus at the quark level.



We encourage prospective students to meet our faculty and staff

by arranging a visit to tour our facilities and to discuss the great opportunities

that careers in the chemical sciences can provide.




Don’t miss out on the many area attractions while visiting Old Dominion University.

Norfolk offers a host of cultural events including Harborfest which is one

of numerous events hosted by Norfolk’s Waterside Festival Marketplace.

Contact the Department Manager,

Alicia Herr,
aherr@odu.edu


to arrange a visit to our campus.


Request more Information

for our graduate program



Old Dominion University




The main campus is just a short drive from the popular Virginia Beach oceanfront

and the historic triangle comprising Colonial Williamsburg, Jamestown and Yorktown.

Virginia Is For Lovers
-

Vacation in Virginia
-

Beaches, Mountains, History and More

Join the many graduates from our program who have gone on to a diversity

of professions in the chemistry and biochemistry fields


industrial,

government, forensic and clinical laboratories; education; technical writing.

A number of our graduates have moved on to medical school,

dental school, and pharmacy school.

The June 2008 issue of Chemical and Engineering News
reports that “In 2007 the average starting salary

for all new bachelor’s graduates was $37,500,

and those for Masters and Doctoral graduates

were $50,000 and $70,000 respectively.”

Graduate Admissions | Old Dominion University | Norfolk, VA