Space News Update

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Nov 8, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Space News Update

-

February 17, 2012
-

In the News


Story 1:



John Glenn, 1st American in Orbit, Pushes for Manned Mars Missions


Story 2:

Microbial Oasis Discovered Beneath the Atacama Desert


Story 3:



Light Echoes: The Re
-
Run Of The Eta Carinae “Great Eruption”




Departments


The Night Sky

ISS Sighting Opportunities

Space Calendar

NASA
-
TV Highlights

Food for Thought

Space Image of the Week


John Glenn, 1st American in Orbit, Pushes for
Manned Mars Missions

Microbial Oasis Discovered Beneath
the Atacama Desert

Light Echoes: The Re
-
Run Of The
Eta Carinae “Great Eruption”

The Night Sky

Friday, February 17

∙ This is the time of year when, after dinnertime, the W pattern of Cassiopeia stands vertically
on end high in the northwest.


Saturday, February 18

∙ After dinnertime at this time of year, four carnivore constellations stand in a row from the
northeast to south. They're all seen in profile with their noses pointed up and their feet (if any) to
the right: Ursa Major in the northeast (with the Big Dipper as its brightest part), Leo in the east,
Hydra the Sea Serpent in the southeast, and Canis Major in the south.



Sunday, February 19

∙ We're in the dark of the Moon, which means it's deep
-
sky observing time. Check out a dozen
winter planetary nebulae using your star atlas and Ted Forte's guided tour with pictures in
the

February

Sky & Telescope
, page 60.


Monday, February 20

∙ Brilliant Sirius shines highest due south around roughly 8:30 or 9 p.m., depending on how far
east or west you live in your time zone.

∙ Have you ever seen Canopus, the second
-
brightest star after Sirius? In one of the many
interesting coincidences that devoted skywatchers know about, Canopus lies

almost due
south

of Sirius: by 36
°
. That's far enough south that it never appears above your horizon unless
you live below latitude 37
°

N (southern Virginia, southern Missouri, central California). And even
there you'll need a flat south horizon. Canopus transits the sky's north
-
south meridian just 21
minutes before Sirius does.

When to look? Canopus transits right when Beta Canis Majoris (Mirzim) does. That's the fairly
bright star about three finger
-
widths to Sirius's right. When Mirzim is due south, look straight
down from there.


ISS Sighting Opportunities

SATELLITE

LOCAL

DURATION

MAX
ELEV

APPROACH

DEPARTURE

DATE/TIME

(MIN)

(DEG)

(DEG
-
DIR)

(DEG
-
DIR)

Sighting information for other cities can be found at NASA’s
Satellite Sighting Information

For Denver:

For Denver:

No ISS Sighting Opportunities

For Denver:

No ISS Sighting Opportunities

ISS

Wed Feb 15/06:28 PM

4

44

32 above W

11 above NE

ISS

Thu Feb 16/07:07 PM

2

16

13 above NW

15 above N

ISS

Fri Feb 17/06:11 PM

4

25

21 above WNW

10 above NNE

ISS

Sat Feb 18/06:50 PM

3

12

10 above NW

10 above N

ISS

Mon Feb 20/06:34 PM

1

10

10 above NNW

10 above N

NASA
-
TV Highlights

(all times Eastern Daylight Time)

Watch NASA TV on the Net by going to
NASA website

February 18, Saturday

6:30 p.m.
-

50th Anniversary of Americans in Orbit “On the Shoulders of Giants”


KSC (Public, Media and Education Channels)



February 20, Monday

1:30 p.m.
-

NASA Future Forum at The Ohio State University Opening; includes
ISS Expedition 30 In
-
Flight Event with NASA Expedition 30 Commander Dan
Burbank and NASA Flight Engineer Don Pettit at 1:35 p.m. ET
-

WOSU/HQ
(Public, Media and Education Channels)

2 p.m.
-

3:15 p.m.
-

NASA Future Forum
--

Learning from the Past to Innovate for
the Future
-

WOSU/HQ(Public, Media and Education Channels)

3:30
-

4:45 p.m.
-

NASA Future Forum
--

Inspiration and Education Panel
-

Building the Innovators for Tomorrow
-

WOSU/HQ (Public, Media and Education
Channels)

Space Calendar

Feb 17
-

Comet C/2011 L2 (McNaught)

Closest Approach To Earth

(1.899 AU)

Feb 17
-

Asteroid 433 Eros Occults TYC 6067
-
01100
-
1

(10.0 Magnitude Star)

Feb 17
-

Asteroid 1993 DA

Near
-
Earth Flyby

(0.041 AU)

Feb 17
-

Asteroid 1221 Amor

Closest Approach To Earth

(0.736 AU)q

Feb 17
-

Asteroid 136 Austria

Closest Approach To Earth
(1.503 AU)

Feb 18
-

Asteroid 2012 BJ11

Near
-
Earth Flyby

(0.097 AU)

Feb 18
-

Asteroid 13212 Jayleno

Closest Approach To Earth
(1.565 AU)

Feb 18
-

Asteroid 65675 Mohr
-
Gruber

Closest Approach To Earth
(1.819 AU)

Feb 18
-

Asteroid 11945 Amsterdam

Closest Approach To Earth
(2.436 AU)

Feb 19
-

[Feb 16]

Cassini,

Titan Flyby

Feb 19
-

Comet P/2010 UH55 (Spacewatch)

Closest Approach To Earth

(2.557 AU)

Feb 19
-

Asteroid 162421 (2000 ET70)

Near
-
Earth Flyby

(0.045 AU)

Feb 19
-

Asteroid 38086 Beowolf

Closest Approach To Earth

(1.183 AU)

Feb 19
-

Asteroid 10217 Richardcook

Closest Approach To Earth
(2.187 AU)

Feb 19
-

Asteroid 498 Tokio

Closest Approach To Earth
(2.263 AU)

Feb 20
-

[Feb 17]

50th Anniversary (1962),

Friendship 7

Launch
(John Glenn)

Feb 20
-

Cassini, Distant Flyby of Polydeuces

Feb 20
-

Asteroid 3131 Mason
-
Dixon

Closest Approach To Earth
(1.847 AU)

Feb 20
-

Asteroid 5471 Tunguska

Closest Approach To Earth
(2.168 AU)

Feb 20
-

15th Anniverary (1997),

Galileo, Europa 6 Flyby

Feb 20
-
24
-

2012
Ocean Sciences Meeting, Salt Lake City, Utah

Feb 21
-

Cassini, Distant Flyby of Telesto, Enceladus, Pallene, Dione & Rhea

Feb 21
-

Asteroid 189202 Calar Alto

Closest Approach To Earth
(2.411 AU)

Feb 21
-

Kuiper Belt Object 90482 Orcus

At Opposition

(47.023 AU)

Johann Gottfried Galle

Wilhelm Beer

Food for Thought

NASA Shuts Down Its Last Mainframe Computer

Space Image of the Week

Rhea Before Titan

Image credit: NASA/JPL
-
Caltech/Space Science Institute