NODAL ANALYSIS

clankjewishElectronics - Devices

Oct 10, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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CIRCUIT THEOREMS


So far we have solved circuit problems by applying Ohm's Law and Kirchhoff's Laws.
This approach can be applied to many circuits but sometimes a structured way of
applying these laws is necessary as the circuit itself may be very complica
ted and it may
be difficult to know where to start. It is not always easy to apply Kirchhoff’s Laws
without help.


The following vocabulary will already be known to you apart from the last term, mesh.
These terms will be used throughout the notes.


NAME

DE
FINITION

node

a point where two or more circuit elements
join

path

a trace of adjoining elements with no
elements included more than once

branch

a path that connects two nodes

loop

a path whose last node is the same as its
starting node

mesh

a loop th
at does not enclose any other loops



NODAL ANALYSIS

Nodal analysis involves looking at a circuit and determining all the node voltages in the
circuit. The voltage at any given node of a circuit is the voltage drop between that node
and a reference node (
usually ground). Once the node voltages are known any of the
currents flowing in the circuit can be determined. The node method offers an organised
way of achieving this.


Approach:

Firstly all the nodes in the circuited are counted and identified. Secondl
y nodes at which
the voltage is already known are listed. A set of equations based on the node voltages are
formed and these equations are solved for unknown quantities.
Remember you need as
many equations as you have unknown node voltages.
The set of equ
ations are formed
using KCL at each node. The set of simultaneous equations that is produced is then
solved. Branch currents can then be found once the node voltages are known. This can be
reduced to a series of steps:


Step 1: Identify the nodes

Step 2:
Choose a reference node

Step 3: Identify which node voltages are known if any

Step 4: Identify the BRANCH currents

Step 5: Use KCL to write an equation for each unknown node voltage

Step 6: Solve the equations

This is best illustrated with an example. Fin
d all currents and voltages in the following
circuit using the node method. (In this particular case it can be solved in other ways as
well)


Step 1:

There are four nodes in the circuit., A, B, C and D

Step 2:

Ground, node D is t
he reference node.

Step 3:

Node voltage B and C are unknown. Voltage at A is V and at D is 0

Step 4:

The currents are as shown. There are 3 different currents





Step 5:

I need to create two equations so I apply KCL at node B an
d node C

The statement of KCL for node B is as follows:



The statement of KCL for node C is as follows:



Step 6:

We now have two equations to solve for the two unknowns V
B

and V
C
. Solving the above
two equati
ons we get:






Further Calculations

The node voltages are know all known. From these we can get the branch currents by a
simple application of Ohm's Law:


I
1

= (V
-

V
B
) / R
1

I
2

= (V
B

-

V
C
) / R
2

I
3

= (V
C
) /
R
3

I
4

= (V
B
) / R
4


MESH ANALYSIS

This is an alternative structured approach to solving the circuit and is based on
calculating mesh currents. A similar approach to the node situation is used. A set of
equations (based on KVL for each mesh) is formed and
the equations are solved for
unknown values. As many equations are needed as unknown mesh currents exist.


Step 1: Identify the mesh currents

Step 2: Determine which mesh currents are known

Step 2: Write equation for each mesh using KVL and that includ
es the mesh currents

Step 3: Solve the equations


Step 1:

The mesh currents are as shown in the diagram on the next page

Step 2:

Neither of the mesh currents is known



Step 3:

KVL can be applied to the left hand side loop. This

states the voltages around the loop
sum to zero. When writing down the voltages across each resistor Ohm’s law is used. The
currents used in the equations are the mesh currents.


I
1
R
1

+ (I
1

-

I
2
) R
4

-

V = 0


KVL can be applied to the right hand side loop.

This states the voltages around the loop
sum to zero. When writing down the voltages across each resistor Ohm’s law is used. The
currents used in the equations are the mesh currents.


I
2
R
2

+ I
2
R
3

+ (I
2

-

I
1
) R
4

= 0

Step 4:

Solving the equations we get




The individual branch currents can be obtained from the these mesh currents and the node
voltages can also be calculated using this information. For example:



NOTE: OF COURSE THE CIRCU
IT IN THE ABOVE EXAMPLES CAN BE
SOLVED WITHOUT USING THESE THEOREMS. HOWEVER SOME
CIRCUITS YOU COME ACROSS CAN ONLY BE SOLVED WITH THESE