Sedimentation, Weathering, and

choppedspleenMechanics

Feb 21, 2014 (2 years and 9 months ago)

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Sedimentation, Weathering, and
Erosion

What is weathering?


It is the natural process by which rocks are
broken into fragments by the elements (wind,
rain, ice, heat, etc.) or living organisms.


It leads to (or can lead to)erosion, the process
of transporting loose fragments from one
place to another.


The rate of weathering depends on an area’s
climate; the method of weathering depends
on an area’s elevation

Erosion leads to ….


Deposition, the process in which newly formed
sediments are dropped into a new location,
usually a low
-
lying area or a body of water. Here
they accumulate


With these sediments, chemicals and minerals
are also carried and released.


How can the combination of sediments,
chemicals, and minerals influence the rock cycle
and create the process of sedimentation?

Why is this information important to
us, especially in Florida?


Consider the following:


Florida itself is mostly made of recent
sediment (especially limestone)


Sinkholes and mudslides

Types of Weathering


Mechanical
vs

Chemical


Mechanical Weathering is the breakdown of
rock by a physical means


Ice


Abrasion


Plants

connect to the grass card in the game


Animals/People


How do we use mechanical weathering?

Chemical Weathering


The breakdown of rocks due to the presence
of chemicals

like acids


What is the connection between the water
cycle, pollution, and chemical weathering?


Hint: Acid precipitation


How can this create or influence mudslides
and/or sinkholes?

Other forms of chemical weathering


Living things

the growth of lichens on rock
surfaces

they produce acids as they grow


Air


Rust on metal

this results from a
process called oxidation, where oxygen reacts
with iron and other metals to become an
oxide.

Closing questions to consider


Over thousands or even millions of years,
what role did the following play in the
formation of Florida?


Deposition


Mechanical Weathering