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Nov 6, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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BD EA Turkmenistan

68













UNDP PROJECT DOCUMENT


Government of Turkmenistan

Executing Agency:
Ministry of Nature Protec
tion of Turk
menistan (
MNP)


United Nations Development Programme

-

UNDP

Global Environment Facility
-

GEF



UNDP GEF
PIMS no.
4929


National Biodiversity Planning to Support the implementation of the CBD 2011
-
2020 Strategic Plan in
Turkmenistan



UNDAF Ou
tcome(s)/Indicator(s):

(Link to UNDAF outcome., If no UNDAF, leave
blank)

UNDAF Outcome 3
: By the end of 2015 a comprehensive
approach to environmentally sustainable principles and
practices is integrated into policies at all levels and into
community deve
lopment to improve social well
-
being

Expected Outcome(s)/Indicator (s):

(CP outcomes linked to the SRF/MYFF goal and
service line)

Country Programme (CP) outcome 1
: Environmental
policies and their implementation are aligned with
international principle
s and standards

Expected Output(s)/Indicator(s):

(CP outputs)

CP Output 3.1.1

Government formulates and implements
people centered national strategies and sector specific
policies to promote inclusive growth

CP Output 3.2.1

National authorities better pla
n, manage

and monitor the environment sector


Executing
Agency
:



Ministry of
Nature Protection of Turkmenistan

GEF
Implementing partner
:


United Nations Development Programme in Turkmenistan
(UNDP)


Brief description

This project is part of the second

generation of Biodiversity Enabling Activities
(BD EA)
under the GEF
.
Turkmenistan

has been
Party to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) since

18 June
1996
. The project addresses

the
country’s
need to continue

to fulfill

its obligations under the

CBD,
with

particular
focus on the Convention’s

Article 6

and
the
CBD COP Decision X/2
. Above
all, the project is

a significant

con
tribution to
Turkmenistan’s

efforts towards implementing the CBD Strategic Plan 2011
-
2020 at
the national level.
The project
builds on

the current
status and
achievements
of
Turkmenistan

with respect to
biodiversity
planning and reporting. I
t
aims to integ
rate
Turkmenistan

obligations under the CBD into its national development and sectoral
planning frameworks through a renewed and participative ‘biodiversity planning’ and strategizing process
. This process is
expected to produce

measurable
targets for
biod
iversity c
onservation and sustainable use. It will equally ensure that
the value
of ecosystems’ goods and services, as well as the challenges and opportunities for ecosystem
-
based adaptation and resilience

are
taken into consideration in the process
.
The p
roject will achieve its objective
through the implementation of three components,
whose activities are thoroughly described in the GEF approved proposal for BD EA
. They are
: (
1) A participative stocktaking
exercise on biodiversity planning takes place and
national biodiversity targets are developed in response to the global Aichi
Targets; (2) The NBSAP is revised/updated and it fully integrates new aspects of the CBD strategic plan, such as mainstreamin
g
and anchoring the implementation of the plan into nat
ional development frameworks, valuing ecosystem services and
promoting ecosystem
-
based adaptation and resilience; and (3) National frameworks for resource mobilization, Convention
reporting and exchange mechanisms are strengthened.


BD EA Turkmenistan

68




Programme Period:

20
10
-
2015


Key Result Area (Strategic Plan):

Environment and
sustainable development: Mainstreaming environment
and energy


Atlas Award ID:

00068388


Project ID:

00083624



PIMS #

4929


Start date:

September

2012


End Date:

August

2015


PAC Meeting Da
te:

26 July 2012





Total resources required (incl. co
-
financing):




US$ 4
40
,000


Total allocated resources (UNDP managed funds):






Regular (UNDP)


US$ 40,000

Government


US$120,000




GEF


US$ 2
20
,000




In
-
kind contributions:



Government:


US$
60
,000















Agreed by Ministry of Nature Protection of Turkmenistan:

Date/Month/Year








Agreed by UNDP Turkmenistan:

Date/Month/Year

BD EA Turkmenistan

68



Table of Contents


Overview of Approved Proposal
................................
................................
................................
.......................

4

SECTION I: Elaboration of the

Narrative

................................
................................
................................
........

6

PART I: Situation Analysis
................................
................................
................................
..............................

6

Point of Departure

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........................

6

S
takeholder
Analysis and Engagement

................................
................................
................................
.................

6

PART II: Strategy

................................
................................
................................
................................
...............

8

Project Goal, Objective, Outcomes and Outputs/activities

................................
................................
...........

8

Project Risks

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
....

8

PART III: Management Arrangements

................................
................................
................................
....

10

PART IV: Monitoring

and Evaluation Plan and Budget
................................
................................
.....

13

Monitoring and reporting

................................
................................
................................
................................
........

13

PART V: Legal Context

................................
................................
................................
................................
..

14

SECTION II: STRATEGIC RESULTS FRAMEWORK (SRF) AND GEF INCREMENT

.............................

16

PART I: Strategic Results Framework, SRF (formerly GEF Logical Framework) Analysis

..

16

Indicator framework as part of the SRF

................................
................................
................................
............

16

SECTION III: Total Budget and Workplan

................................
................................
................................
..

20

SECTION IV: ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

................................
................................
................................
.

23

PART I: Other agreements

................................
................................
................................
..........................

23

Co
-
financing Letters

................................
................................
................................
................................
...................

23

PART II: Terms of References for key project staff

................................
................................
............

23

National Project Coordinator

................................
................................
....

Error! Bookmark not defined.

Project Ass
istant

................................
................................
................................
................................
..........................

26

Project Consultants

................................
................................
................................
................................
....................

28

Project Annexes

................................
................................
................................
................................
...................

29

Annex 1. App
roved GEF proposal for BD EA (Headings Overview on page 3)

.........................

29

Annex 2. GEF CEO Approval Letter

................................
................................
................................
...........

29

Annex 3. Minutes of the Local
Project Appraisal Committee (LPAC) Meeting

.........................

68

Signature Page
................................
................................
...............................

Error! Bookmark not defined.



BD EA Turkmenistan

68




Overview of Approved Proposal

Sdt EA Proposal: Headings Overview


PART I: PROJECT IDE
NTIFIERS

A.

EA

F
RAMEWORK

B.

C
O
-
F
INANCING
F
OR
T
HE
E
A
B
Y
S
OURCE
A
ND
B
Y
N
AME

C.

G
RANT
R
ESOURCES
R
EQUESTED BY
A
GENCY
,

F
OCAL
A
REA AND
C
OUNTRY

D.

EA

M
ANAGEMENT
C
OST


PART II: ENABLING A
CTIVITY JUSTIFICATIO
N

A.

E
NABLING
A
CTIVITY
B
ACKGROU
ND AND
C
ONTEXT

B.

E
NABLING
A
CTIVITY
G
OALS AND
O
BJECTIVES

C.

D
ESCRIBE THE
EA

AND
I
NSTITUTIONAL
F
RAMEWORK FOR
P
ROJECT
I
MPLEMENTATION

D.

D
ESCRIBE
,

IF POSSIBLE
,

THE EXPECTED COST
-
EFFECTIVENESS OF THE

PROJECT

E.

D
ESCRIBE THE BUDGETED

M&E

P
LAN

F.

E
XPLAIN THE
D
EV
IATIONS FROM TYPICAL

C
OST
R
ANGES
(
WHERE APPLICABLE
):


PART III: APPROVAL/
ENDORSEMENT BY GEF O
PERATIONAL FOCAL POI
NT(S) AND GEF
AGENCY(IES)

A.

R
ECORD OF
E
NDORSEMENT OF
GEF

O
PERATIONAL
F
OCAL
P
OINT
(
S
)

ON
B
EHALF OF THE
G
OVERNMENT
(
S
):


B.

C
ONVENTION
P
ARTICIPAT
ION

C
.

GEF

A
GENCY
(
IES
)

C
ERTIFICATION



Annex

A:

CONSULTANTS TO BE HI
RED FOR THE
E
NABLING
A
CTIVITY

Annex B:
O
PERATIONAL
G
UIDANCE TO
F
OCAL
A
REA
E
NABLING
A
CTIVITIES


--

Refer to
Annex
1

for the approved proposal
--





BD EA Turkmenistan

68



Acronyms


APR/PIR

Annual Project Review / Project Implementation Report

BD EA

Biodiversity Enabling Activities

CBD

Convention on Biological Diversity

CDR

Combined Delivery Report

CHM

Clearing House Mechanism

CO

Country Office (UNDP)

COP

Conferen
ce of the Parties

GEF

Global Environment Facility

NBSAP

National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan

PoWPA

CBD’s Programme of Work on Protected Areas

QOR

Quarterly Operational Reports

TBW

Total Budget and Workplan

TEEB

The Economics of Ecosystems
and Biodiversity

UNDP

United Nations Development Programme


















BD EA Turkmenistan

68




SECTION I: Elaboration of the Narrative

PART I:
Situation Analysis

P
OINT OF
D
EPARTURE


1.

This Project Document
(PRODOC)
serves to operationalise at the level of UNDP and
government,
the

proposal for Biodiversity Enabling Activities approved by the GEF on
13 June 2012
. This proposal is
appended to
the PRODOC

in
Annex
1

and the GEF
CEO L
etter of
A
pproval
is
in

2.

part
I: PROJECT IDENTIFI
ERS

EA Title:

National Biodi
versity Planning to Support the implementation of the CBD 2011
-
2020 Strategic Plan in Turkmenistan

Country(ies):

Turkmenistan

GEF Project ID:

t.b.d.

GEF Agency(ies):

UNDP

GEF Agency Project
ID:

4929

Other Executing
Partner(s):

Ministry of Nature Protect
ion of
Turkmenistan (MNPT)

Submission Date:

May 2012

GEF Focal Area
(s):

Biodiversity

Project Duration
(Months)

36

Check if
applicable:

NCSA

NAPA

Agency Fee ($):

22,000

A.

EA

FRAMEWORK


EA

O
BJECTIVE
:

T
O INTEGRATE
T
URKMENISTAN

S OBLIGATIONS UNDER
THE
C
ONVENTION ON
B
IOLOGICAL
D
IVERSITY
(CBD)

INTO ITS NATIONAL DE
VELOPMENT AND SECTOR
AL PLANNING FRAMEWOR
KS THROUGH A RENEWED

AND PARTICIPATIVE

BIODIVERSITY PLANNIN
G


AND STRATEGIZING PRO
CESS
,

IN A MANNER THAT IS
IN LINE WI
TH THE GLOBAL GUIDAN
CE CONTAINED
IN THE
CBD’
S
S
TRATEGIC
P
LAN FOR
2011
-
2020.


EA

C
OMPONEN
T

T
YP
E

E
XPECTED
O
UTCOMES

E
XPECTED
O
UTPUTS

G
RANT
A
MOUNT
($)

C
ONFIRMED
C
O
-
FINANCING
($)

1.
Stocktaki
ng and
national
target
setting

TA

-

By early 2013,
a multi
-
sectoral/mu
lti
-
stakeholder
working group
is established
and it
completes the
stock
-
taking
exercise.

-

By mid
-
2013,
national
targets in
response to the
global Aichi
Targets are
developed.

1.1 Review and stocktaking of products and
results from previous biodiversity plan
ning
processes at the national level are carried out in
participative manner.

1.2 In response to the global Aichi Targets,
national biodiversity targets are developed in a
manner that is attuned to Turkmenistan’s reality.

ㄮ㌠1桥⁡ 桩敶em敮e映 a瑩潮慬⁴a
牧整sⰠ
摥d敬e灥搠in楮攠 i瑨⁴桥⁧汯扡氠lichi⁔慲a整eⰠis
摵汹dm潮i瑯牥搠摵物ng⁴h攠e牯r散琠摵d慴a潮o慮a
b敹潮搬⁡d搠瑨ts⁩s⁲数潲e敤⁵灯e⁴漠瑨攠䍂䐠
瑨牯tg栠h慴i潮慬⁲数潲瑳 慮a瑨敲 m敡es.

ㄮ㐠䥮1慮ai瑥牡tiv攠m慮a敲Ⱐ,畲um敮es瑡t⁴慰s
in瑯⁵t敦e氠in景f
m慴i潮o潮Ⱐ慮搠灡牴楣i灡p敳⁩湴漬
g汯扡氠l整睯牫s⁡ 搠ini瑩a瑩v敳 ⁢i潤ove牳i瑹
摡瑡⁡d搠in摩c慴潲o
suc栠慳⁴桥⁂i潤iv敲ei瑹
㈷ⰶ〰

㈰ⰰ〰

BD EA Turkmenistan

68



EA

C
OMPONEN
T

T
YP
E

E
XPECTED
O
UTCOMES

E
XPECTED
O
UTPUTS

G
RANT
A
MOUNT
($)

C
ONFIRMED
C
O
-
FINANCING
($)

Indicators Partnership
,
Global Biodiversity
Information Facility

and the World Conservation
Monitoring Centre
, the Global Env
ironment
Outlook portal
, among other relevant ones).

2. NBSAP
update

TA

-

By 2014,
Turkmenistan’
s NBSAP is
fully updated,
it is in line with
the guidance in
the CBD
Strategic Plan
(2011
-
2020)
and has been
submitted to
the CBD COP

2.1 A Nation
al Biodiversity Strategy and Action
Plan (NBSAP) for Turkmenistan, anchored into
national development frameworks, is updated in
a manner that is participative, widely
disseminated and fully integrates new aspects of
the CBD strategic plan, such as: (i)
mai
nstreaming; (ii) the valuing of ecosystem
goods and services; and (iii) the incorporation of
challenges and opportunities linked to
ecosystem
-
based adaptation and resilience.

2.2 The updated and fully endorsed NBSAPs for
Turkmenistan is submitted to the CB
D, upon
proper national and sub
-
national consultations,
preferably within the deadline set by the COP.

101,800

90,000

3.
National
framewor
ks for
NBSAP
implemen
tation,
CDB
reporting
and
exchange
mechanis
ms

TA

-

By 2013,
complete the
updating and
improvement
of national
clearinghouse
mechanisms

-

By 2014,
complete a
plan for
implementing
the NBSAP,
including
capacity,
technology and
finance needs
assessment

3.1 National frameworks for NBSAP
implementation is in place and includes: (i)
institutional leadership fo
r implementation is
established and strategic partnerships are forged
(nationally and internationally); (ii) a costed and
prioritized Action Plan is appended to the NBS;
(iii) needs assessments on capacity, technology
and finance are carried out; and (iv)
a strategy for
resource mobilization for the implementation of
the NBSAP is produced and includes a baseline
assessment of existing biodiversity finance.

3.2 An effective, user
-
friendly and easily
updatable country
-
driven CHM site is developed;
it is linke
d up to the CBD’s global CHM networks
and to other information and knowledge
exchange network on biodiversity.

3.3. Immediate CBD reporting obligations are met
by Turkmenistan in a timely manner, in particular
the Fifth National Report to the CBD by 31 Mar
ch
2014.

73,600

51,000

Subtotal

203,000

161,000

EA Management Cost

17,000

59,000

Total EA Cost

220,000

220,000


a

Listed in $ by EA components.

B.

C
O
-
FINANCING

FOR THE

EA

BY SOURCE AND BY NAM
E

BD EA Turkmenistan

68



Sources of Co
-
financing

Name of Co
-
financier

Type of Co
-
financing

Amount
($)

National Government

Ministry of Nature Protection of Turkmenistan
(MNPT)

In
-
kind

60,000

Grant

120,000

GEF Agency

UNDP

Grant

40,000

Total Co
-
fina
ncing

220,000

C.

G
RANT
R
ESOURCES
R
EQUESTED BY
A
GENCY
,

F
OCAL
A
REA AND
C
OUNTRY

GEF
Agency

Type of
Trust Fund

Focal Area

Country
Name/Global

EA Amount
(a)

Agency Fee
(b)

Total
(c)=(a)+(b)

UNDP

GEF TF

Biodiversity
Focal
Area Set
-
Aside

Global

220,000

22,000

242
,000

Total Grant Resources

220,000

22,000

242,000

D.

EA

M
ANAGEMENT
C
OST

C
OST
I
TEMS

[GEF

ONLY
]

T
OTAL
E
STIMATED
P
ERSON
W
EEKS
**

G
RANT
A
MOUNT

($)

C
O
-
FINANCING


($)

EA

T
OTAL


($)

L
OCAL CONSULTANTS
*

40

17,000

40,000

57,000

I
NTERNATIONAL CONSULT
ANTS
*

0

0

0

0

O
F
FICE FACILITIES
,

EQUIPMENT
,

VEHICLES AND
COMMUNICATIONS
***


0

19,000

19,000

T
RAVEL
*


0

0

0

O
THERS
**


0

0

0

Total


17,000

59,000

76,000

*Details provided in Annex A. ** Other items to be clearly specified. *** See Additional Information for Table D.

A
D
DITIONAL INFORMATION

FOR
T
ABLE
D,

IF APPLICABLE
:

All expenses for the office facilities, equipment, vehicles and communications will be borne by the Ministry for
Nature Protection. Only one quarter of total expenses under this category will be requested fr
om GEF financing,
mainly for communication. One computer will be obtained for the Nat. Enabling Activity Manager. Office facility
costs covered by GEF will also include phone, fax and the internet expenses in the amount of not exceeding
$300 per month. UND
P will co
-
finance the costs if the EA Manager, while government will avail own staff,
including the National Project Director to be engaged in management activities in this project.

PART II: ENABLING A
CTIVITY JUSTIFICATIO
N

A.

E
NABLING
A
CTIVITY
B
ACKGROUND

AND
C
ONTEXT



National biodiversity context


Turkmenistan is located in the western part of Central Asia, bordered between Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, the
Republic of Iran and Afghanistan and the Caspian Sea. The natural conditions of Turkmenistan are diver
se.
Topographically, the country can be divided into two unequal areas: the larger is occupied by the desert plain
and the smaller by foothills and mountains.


Biodiversity is critical to the economy of Turkmenistan. The fisheries, tourism, forestry and ag
ricultural
industries depend directly on the sustainable use of ecological resources, while others are connected with them
BD EA Turkmenistan

68



indirectly. Wild relatives of cultivated plants and numerous medicinal and economically important species are
currently used or will
be used in the future for the benefit of society and the country.


Up to 80% of Turkmenistan is desert. A major part of the biodiversity in deserts is in areas such as the Barkhan
dune fields (which cover 350,000 km2). Deserts are home to amphibians such
as the Eurasian green toad (
Bufo
viridis
) as well as more than 40 species of reptiles including agamas, race
-
runners or fringe
-
toed geckos
(Eremias spp.), agamid lizards (
Phrynocephalus

spp.), rock geckos (
Cyrtopodion

spp.), snakes, desert monitor
lizard (
Varanus griseus
) and steppe tortoise (
Agrionemys horsfieldi
). Two hundred and twenty species of birds
live in the Karakum desert, 60 of which are breeding species. These include species such as long
-
legged buzzard
(
Buteo rufinus
), little owl (
Athene noctua
), eagle owl (
Bubo bubo
), saxaul sparrow (
Passer ammodendri
), and
Pander’s ground jay (
Podoces panderi
). More than 40 species of mammal are recorded from the deserts of
Turkmenistan. These include long
-
eared desert hedgehog (
Hemiechi
-
nus auritus
), Tolai ha
re (
Lepus tolai
), kulan
(
Equus hemionus kulan
), goitred or sand gazelle (
Gazella subgutturosa
) and others. Rodents are the most
representative mammalian group in deserts. Predators include the red fox (
Vulpes vulpes
), Corsac fox (
V.
corsac
), golden jackal
(
Canis aureus
), wolf (
Canis lupus
), European weasel (
Mustela nivalis
), marbled polecat
(
Vormela peregusna
), caracal (
Lynx caracal
), sand cat (
Felis margarita
) and wild cat (
Felis lybica
). The
characteristic species of the sand desert is the piebald or sand

shrew (
Diplomesodon pulchellum
). More than
1,500 species of insects are recorded including many species of locust, ants, termites and beetles (especially
family
Tenebrionidae
). The national symbols of the desert are the kulan and sand gazelle. Key mammal
species
in other ecosystems include: Turkmen wild goats, North Persian leopard, Turkmen urial, steppe cat, Blanford’s
fox, Caspian seals, wolf, jackal and hyena. Key bird species include white
-
winged grosbeaks, Eastern rock
-
nuthatch, bearded vulture and Ca
spian snow cock.


The importance of the mountain ecosystems cannot be overstated in terms of the conservation of arid
ecosystems as a whole. The conservation of mountain rivers and springs helps prevent soil erosion.
Turkmenistan has 92 endemic and near
-
en
demic vertebrate taxa, most of which are montane. A total of 122
rare habitats have been identified as in need of protection, including the relict wild walnut forests, pistachio
forests, wild pomegranate forests, wild pear and apple forests, and important
fisheries areas. Wild crop
relatives in Turkmenistan are extremely important as gene banks to ensure global food security in the event of
disease; these include barley, oats, rye, onions, almonds, and apples, walnut, mulberry, grapes and more than 3
dozen
others. The area is also particularly important for wild relatives of domestic animals, including kulan
(wild
Equus
) and wild goat. A wide range of medicinal plants are also particularly important in the mountains.



Threats:


The main threats to biodivers
ity in Turkmenistan include:



Invasive alien species
: One of the most detrimental introductions into the Caspian Sea has been that of
the three
-
spined stickleback (
Gasterosteus aculeatus
) which was first recorded in 1981. It has no value
as a fishery specie
s but it competes with young fish of other native species and can adversely affect the
spawning efficiency of commercially important species. However,
Mnemiopsis leidyi
, a jellyfish that has
appeared in recent years, has turned out to be the most dangerous

exotic species in the Caspian.



Over consumption
: Overgrazing, tree felling and poaching are among the most significant threats
related to over
-
consumption.



Land conversion
: The expansion of cultivation is always accompanied by the loss of natural landsc
apes.



Water pressures
: In montane areas wild and domestic animals compete for pastures and water. In
conditions of continuous drought the lack of tough regulation of livestock numbers causes degradation
of some specific pastures and results in a number of
unfavorable consequences (land erosion,
salinization, decrease of water availability, etc.).



Pollution
: The main sources of pollution are the extraction and processing of hydrocarbons, the
chemical industry, agriculture, electricity generation and househol
d waste.



Climate change
: Climate change, fluctuations of sea level, and natural disasters are other factors that
present some threat to biodiversity. The problem of climate change is closely associated with
BD EA Turkmenistan

68



desertification, the most serious threat to biod
iversity. The existing models of climate change forecast
that a 100% increase in CO2 in the atmosphere will cause a warming of 4
-

8°C with a simultaneous
decrease in rainfall over practically the whole of Turkmenistan, especially in spring.



Development
al context and challenges


Agriculture plays an important role in the development of the country’s economy. More than half of the
population lives in rural areas and about 48% of the manpower is involved in agriculture. Fisheries are of great
importance to

the national economy of Turkmenistan. Fish are traditionally caught both in inland basins and in
the Caspian Sea. Over 4,800 industrial enterprises, producing 80% of the national income, are operating today
in Turkmenistan. The country is an exporter of e
nergy resources such as natural gas, oil products and
electricity. The development of resources in the Caspian Sea shelf is the primary focus of the

oil production industry. There are plans for the construction of fertilizer plants in the cities of Mary,
T
urkmenabat and Tedjen, an aluminum complex in Mary, a pulp and paper plant in the city of Shatlyk, a soda
ash producing plant in the city of Guwurdak, and three iodine plants. The ecotourism industry is in the early
stages of development. Turkmenistan is a
ttractive for its man
-
made and natural features such as the Caspian
Sea, Kugitang massif with a famous plateau containing dinosaurs’ footprints, Kyrk gyz cave, Daraydere gorge,
and the great Central Asian Amudarya River. There have been recent efforts to d
evelop a nature
-
based
ecotourism program based on Turkmenistan’s protected areas. Literacy rates are very high in Turkmenistan


99.3% of the population between 9 and 49 is literate.


Challenges to development in Turkmenistan include balancing the need for

economic development, particularly
the growth of the oil and energy sector, with the fragility of the desert and mountain ecosystems. In addition,
pressures on water resources for development continue to be exacerbated by competing interests, and by
incre
ased likelihood from drought due to climate change.



Institutions responsible for managing biodiversity


The Government of Turkmenistan is responsible for managing biodiversity in the country with the Ministry of
Nature Protection being specifically assi
gned to overlook biodiversity. Included under this framework is the
Service “Kaspekokontrol;” the Velayat Department of Nature Protection; the National Institute of Deserts, Flora
and Fauna; State Nature Reserves and Sanctuaries; and the Service for Forest
-
Seed Farming and Natural Parks
Protection. Very minimal power and management duties are given to other agencies and ministries. Lastly,
national and international NGOs, including Flora and Fauna International, Royal Society for the Protection of
Birds, M
ichael Succow Foundation, make some contributions to managing biodiversity.



Brief description of the protected area system


Turkmenistan has a long history of protected areas. The total area of protected areas of all categories is
1,978,300 ha or 4.02% o
f the whole territory of the country. Zapovedniks constitute 39.7% (784,600 ha) or
1.6% of the whole area of Turkmenistan; zakazniks 58.4% (1,155,900 ha) or 2.35% of the country’s area;
protected zones 1.8% (35,400 ha) or 0.07% of Turkmenistan’s area; natu
ral monuments 0.1% (2,300 ha). The
protected areas of Turkmenistan include 8 state zapovedniks, 13 state zakazniks, and 17 state natural
monuments. Areas of particular importance include:



Repetek zapovednik

(established in 1928), Turkmenistan’s only biosph
ere reserve, is located at the
junction of the Central and Southeastern Karakum sand deserts, covering 34,600 hectares.



Hazar zapovednik

(until 1994 called Krasnovodskiy) was established in 1932 on the southeastern
coast of the Caspian Sea at the juncture

of typically dry Transcaspian desert and the saltwater area of
the Caspian and Astrabad subtropical province of Iran. The total area is 262,037 ha, including 192,047
ha of the Caspian Sea itself

BD EA Turkmenistan

68





Badkhyz zapovednik

(established in 1941, covering 87,680 ha)

is located between the Kushkinsko and
Tedjensky rivers in the foothills of the Eastern Kopetdag (mountain range Gezgyadyk) and Paropamiz
(the saline Eroylanduz lake basin) in the southeast of Turkmenistan.



Kopetdag zapovednik

(established in 1976, 49,793
ha) is located in the Central Kopetdag. Mountain
forest (mainly of Turkmen juniper) covers 21,814 ha (1982 data).



Kalininskiy

(established in 1976 covering 15,000 ha) and Meana
-
Chaachinskiy zakazniks (created in
1976 covering 60,000 ha) were established
to protect common cranes (Grus grus) and to restore the
population of kulan.



Syunt
-
Hasardag zapovednik

(established in 1978 covering 26,461 ha) fully represents the main
landscape and ecological types of the middle elevations of the Southwestern Kopetdag d
ry subtropics.
Relict plants such as Turkmen mandrake, wild pomegranate and wild grapes occur. In 1990 Syunt
-
Hasardagskiy zakaznik (38,000 ha) was established.



Amudarya zapovednik

(established in 1982 covering 49,514 ha) consists of three areas in the midd
le
course of the Amudarya River in which the valley flood plain tugais, ridge
-
hillocks and barkhan sands,
and salt pans of the Turan lowland are well represented.



Kugitang zapovednik

(established in 1986, 27,139 ha) is located on the territory of the weste
rn
(Turkmen) scarp slope of the Kugitang ridge of the Pamiro
-
Altai mountain range. Karlyuksky zakaznik
(1986, 40,000 ha), Hodjaburdjibelendsky zakaznik (1986, covering 17,532 ha) and Hodjapilsky
zakaznik (1986 covering 31,635 ha) were created to protect un
ique caves and archa forest and species
of rare plants.



Barriers to effective implementation of the CBD Strategic Plan


The 4
th

National Report and the capacity needs self
-
assessment report identified some barriers to effective
implementation of the CBD
. Those barriers most relevant to the CBD Strategic Plan include:



Inadequate research capacity on climate change issues, including capacity to assess climate
vulnerability and to develop adaptation measures to climate change and their integration into
inte
rnational programs and projects.



Insufficient biodiversity incentives.



Insufficient mechanisms of management and planning, especially in regards to the system of national
environmental planning, especially the integration of specific CBD objectives into n
ational policies and
strategies of the NBSAP, and the development and approval of clear targets, work plans, national
programs for the early adoption of conservation measures.



An underdeveloped legal and regulatory framework and institutional framework of
monitoring
components of biodiversity, and the absence of comprehensive national programs for biodiversity
monitoring.



Inadequate public participation in environmentally significant decisions.



Other biodiversity planning efforts



UNDP
-
GEF (3013): Early
Action Grant to Turkmenistan to develop a tourism program based on
protected areas. The project aimed at supporting the integration of sustainable economic options into
the PA system of Turkmenistan, primarily through ecotourism, by addressing key policy a
nd on
-
the
-
ground barriers.



UNDP
-
GEF (2638): Conservation and Sustainable Use of Globally Significant Biological Diversity in
Khazar Nature Reserve on the Caspian Sea Coast: this project aimed to strengthen one of the key
protected areas in the Turkmenistan
’s national system of Pas (the Khazar reserve) by demonstrating
effective biodiversity conservation in Turkmenistan’s Khazar Nature Reserve (Khazar) on the Caspian
Sea coast, including through the engagement of local communities;



UNDP
-
GEF (3239): Capacity
Building and on
-
the
-
ground Investments for Integrated and Sustainable
Land Management


this project aimed to improve the capacity of land users for sustainable
management of their land resources. As such the project focuses on land degradation issues, but

does
BD EA Turkmenistan

68



incorporate the ecosystem approach into land
-
use planning.



UNDP
-
GEF (3698): Strengthening the Turkmenistan Protected Areas System. This project has recently
started; its objective is to create an enabling environment for the establishment of a functi
onal, effective
and ecologically coherent system of protected areas. The project will aim to set up the first national park
(IUCN II category) in the country.



In addition to the above UNDP and GEF initiatives, a number of projects are ongoing in the area o
f PA
strengthening, focusing on increasing the patrolling and research capacities of key PAs in the country, as
well as on awareness raising. These are financed by international NGOs, such as Royal Society for the
Protection of Birds (RSPB, UK), and Michae
l Succow Foundation (Germany).


1)

National Reporting to CBD

Reports

Date of
Submission
to CBD
Secretariat

Current
Status*

Comments

National Biodiversity
Strategy and Action Plan

2003
-
01
-
16

Submitted

Although submitted, it is currently outdated

Revision of

NBSAP

Not
submitted

Not yet
started.

Funding being applied for under this project.

1
st

National Report

2003
-
01
-
16

Submitted

This is now outdated

2
nd

National Report

Not
submitted

Not
completed

No funding was requested from GEF for this.

3
rd

National Re
port

2007
-
03
-
19

Submitted

This is now outdated

4
th

National Report

2009
-
08
-
20

Submitted


Contains a lot of fairly up
-
to
-
date information
and alaysis on biodiversity management in
Turkmenistan, but it is not “Aichi
-
ready”.


2)

Capacity Needs Assessments c
arried out YES

NO


Start Date: Feb 2003

End Date: Dec 2006


Please list all of the CBD Program of Work and cross
-
cutting themes that were
addressed in


the Biodiversity

Enabling Activities Capacity Needs Assessments:

Dates



Cross
-
cutting capacity needs assessments for the implementation of the Rio
Conventions

See e.g.
http://ncsa.undp.org/report_detail.c
fm?Projectid=314

2007



Under the Third National Report to the CBD:



Agricultural Biodiversity



Forest Biodiversity



Access to Genetic Resources and Benefit
-
sharing



Biodiversity for Development



Invasive Alien Species



Protected Areas



Sustainable Use of Biodive
rsity

2007

3) Clearing House Mechanism (CHM) established?

YES

NO


CHM link(s):

Does not apply

Is the CHM website maintained up to date? Does not apply

YES

NO

How

many people currently operate and maintain the national CHM? Does not apply

The CHM is
outdated

How many people visited the national CHM website in the past 12 months? Does not
apply

Not assessed

BD EA Turkmenistan

68



Note: The lack of a functional central clearinghouse fo
r information, and the challenges in inventorying and
monitoring without robust data systems, was recognized as a major challenge to implementation of the CBD
in the previous NBSAP.




Project consistency with national strategies and plans or reports an
d assessments relevant for the CBD,
as well as other cross
-
cutting assessments and priority setting exercises


At a national level, Turkmenistan’s obligations under CBD are addressed through the following policy and
regulatory instruments:


-

Cabinet of Mini
sters decree (2003) adopting the National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan and
assigning roles and responsibilities for various agencies for its implementation.

-

the Turkmenistan National Environmental Action Plan (1998), which aims at improving enviro
nmental
conditions for human health; promoting the efficient and sustainable use of natural resources; protecting
the most vulnerable and valuable ecosystems and species and defining a general strategy for
Turkmenistan’s transition to sustainable developme
nt by identifying major environmental problems,
setting priorities for action and building adequate policy and institutional frameworks.

-

the “National Action Plan of the President of Turkmenistan on Environment Protection” (2002), which
states that the co
untry has to adopt international standards and economic tools for biodiversity protection

-

Protocol on Biodiversity to Frame Convention on Protection of Marine Environment of the Caspian Sea
(2008), which puts special emphasis on the protection of marine bi
odiversity.


Guidance for CBD also comes from the National Capacity Self
-
Assessment funded by GEF and conducted under a
UNDP project in 2007, as stipulates the objective of capacity building for the Clearing House Mechanism and
identify the biodiversity
-
cl
imate nexus, relevant for national Turkmenistan context.


Thus, this project is a follow
-
on to the existing NBSAP, and it is consistent with it. It will also be guided by
priorities in Turkmenistan’s above
-
mentioned strategies, policies and plans. The proj
ect builds on previous
biodiversity planning and CBD reporting processes. It also builds on the conclusions from previous capacity
assessments, taking these one step further.



B.

E
NABLING
A
CTIVITY
G
OALS AND
O
BJECTIVES
(The proposal should briefly justif
y the need for the project.)


The Baseline Project: The Current NBSAP and the new CBD Strategic Plan


The new CBD Strategic Plan, adopted at CoP
-
10 in 2010 in Nagoya, clearly addresses the need for updating
NBSAPs, stating in Target 17 that “By 2015, each

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plan.” The strategic plan also covers a range of issues that will need to be incorporated

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-
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’s Aichi Targets:



A plan for integrating the value of biodiversity into national and local development and poverty
reduction strategies and planning processes and are being incorporated into national accounting, as
BD EA Turkmenistan

68



appropriate, and reporting systems (Targe
t 2). This is mentioned in the 1998 NBSAP as a serious gap.



A plan for creating incentives and removing harmful subsidies (Target 3)



A plan for developing landscapes that have sustainable production and consumption and ensure the use
of natural resources f
alls well within safe ecological limits. (Target 4). Although the plan does mention
the need for sustainable grasslands management, the strategies and actions to address this were weak.



A plan for fully implementing the Programme of Work on Protected Areas
, including increased
protection and landscape/seascape connectivity (Target 11). The existing NBSAP does identify some
specific steps of the PoWPA (e.g., creating new protected areas and enhancing community involvement)
but does not cover most of the acti
ons required to fully implement the PoWPA. The lack of protected
area implementation is a serious weakness in Turkmenistan, and this NBSAP will outline clear steps to
move forward.



A plan for restoring and safeguarding ecosystems that provide essential ser
vices, including services
related to water, and contribute to health, livelihoods and well
-
being (Target 14). By the third National
Report, this had become a critical issue in Turkmenistan.



A plan for strengthening ecosystem resilience and the contribution

of biodiversity to carbon stocks,
including the restoration of at least 15 per cent of degraded ecosystems (Target 16).



A plan for the mobilization of financial resources for effectively implementing the Strategic Plan for
Biodiversity 2011
-
2020 from all

sources (Target 20). Existing plans in the NBSAP are limited to external
funding, whereas a long
-
term, sustainable finance basis for implementing the Strategic Plan must be
sought.



Proposed Response and Rationale: The new generation of BD EA.


This pro
ject seeks to fully incorporate the above issues into the NBSAP. This ‘new generation’ of NBSAP will
help set a regional standard of excellence by creating a national road map for achieving the Aichi Targets.
Special emphasis will be placed on mainstreamin
g biodiversity into development plans, incorporating
protected area networks and sustainable production systems into ecosystem
-
based climate adaptation and
resilience plans, and creating sustainable finance for biodiversity conservation through the full va
luation of key
ecosystem services.



Alignment with Focal Area Outcome(s):


BD5 Objective
: Integrate CBD Obligations into National Planning Processes through Enabling Activities (herein
serving as the ‘Project Development Goal’):

Focal Area Outcome 5.1
: D
evelopment and sectoral planning frameworks at country level integrate
measurable biodiversity conservation and sustainable use targets.



Objective and outcomes


The Project
Objective

is t
o integrate Turkmenistan’s obligations under the Convention on Bio
logical Diversity
(CBD) into its national development and sectoral planning frameworks through a renewed and participative
‘biodiversity planning’ and strategizing process, in a manner that is in line with the global guidance contained in
the CBD’s Strateg
ic Plan for 2011
-
2020.


This will be achieved through the following
Outcomes

(corresponding to components described in detail
below):



Outcome 1


A participative stocktaking exercise on biodiversity planning takes place and national
biodiversity targets ar
e developed in response to the global Aichi Targets



Outcome 2


The NBSAP is revised/updated and it fully integrates new aspects of the CBD strategic plan,
such as mainstreaming and anchoring the implementation of the plan into national development
BD EA Turkmenistan

68



framewo
rks, valuing ecosystem services and promoting ecosystem
-
based adaptation and resilience



Outcome 3


National frameworks for resource mobilization, Convention reporting and exchange
mechanisms are established and strengthened


Refer to Part I, Table A and t
o the next section for more details.



How the project plans to build national capacity


Enabling Activities are considered foundation activities within the framework of the GEF. The ultimate goal of
Biodiversity Enabling Activities is to build national c
apacity across the board for biodiversity management. The
effective achievement of global biodiversity benefits depend on the development of national capacity for
managing biodiversity. The more robust this capacity is in a given country, the more effectiv
e the national
implementation of the CBD will be.


The approach to building of national capacity in this proposal follows the guidance from the
GEF Strategic
Approach to Enhance Capacity Building

(2003)

under the GEF’s cross
-
agency Capacity Development
Initiative.
Three levels of capacity were identified: individual, organizational and systemic. Quoting from a recent GEF
publication on the theme of capacity (GEF 2010)
:


“At the
individual

level, capacity development refers to the process of changing a
ttitudes and behaviors,
most frequently through imparting knowledge and developing skills through training. However it also
involves learning by doing, participation, ownership, and processes associated with increasing
performance through changes in manag
ement, motivation, morale, and improving accountability and
responsibility.


Capacity development at the
organizational

level focuses on overall performance and functioning
capabilities, such as developing mandates, tools, guidelines and management informa
tion systems to
facilitate and catalyze organizational change. At the organizational level, capacity development aims to
develop a set of constituent individuals and groups, as well as to strengthen links with its environment.


At the
systemic

level, cap
acity development is concerned with the “enabling environment”, i.e., the overall
policy, economic, regulatory, and accountability frameworks within which organizations and individuals
operate. Relationships and processes between organizations, both forma
l and informal, as well as their
mandates, are important.”


In this light, this project will build national capacity in Turkmenistan in the following manner:


Individual

Much of the work under this project will be carried out through working groups. This

is an
ideal forum for imparting knowledge among different individuals involved in biodiversity
planning and in environmental matters in Turkmenistan in general. For many of the civil
servants and NGO staff in Turkmenistan, the opportunity for working with
in a project like
this is a form of training. Furthermore, consultation, participation and ownership are
guiding principles of biodiversity planning processes. These are part and parcel of this
proposal.

Organizational

UNDP’s approach to Biodiversity Ena
bling activities in GEF5 goes beyond the mere
production of national reports and strategies to the CBD and the development of a website
for the CHM. Rather, it is concerned about the developing a permanent framework for
reporting to the CBD and for maintai
ning the CHM interesting and up to date. This implies
institutionalizing the capacity for eventually achieving this with as little external assistance
as possible. Given the ambitious targets of the CBD Strategic Plan (2011
-
2020), it is
recognized that act
ions to engage external assistance and retain national are in the
meanwhile needed. This will be availed through the project. In particular, the following
BD EA Turkmenistan

68



activities are specially targeted at building organizational capacity:



Taking stock of the NBSAP and
identifying barriers to its implementation



Setting targets and priorities



Developing implementation plans for the revised NBSAP



Assessing and strengthening capacity needs



Developing clearinghouse mechanisms



Developing a permanent framework for reporting to

the CBD

Systemic

The approach that UNDP has developed for Biodiversity Enabling Activities in GEF5 is
transformational with respect to systemic capacity elements (i.e. policy, economic,
regulatory, and accountability frameworks within which organizations

and individuals
operate). The aim is to ensure that the objectives, targets and guidance from the CBD
Strategic Plan (2011
-
2020) become fully anchored into national development frameworks.
This will be achieved by the development of the following
new aspe
cts of the CBD strategic
plan: (i) the valuing of ecosystem goods and services; (ii) mainstreaming; and (iii) the
incorporation of challenges and opportunities linked to ecosystem
-
based adaptation and
resilience. The knowledge developed through these activ
ities will become part of
Turkmenistan’s new NBSAP and will have a greater chance of influencing and even
becoming policy.
In particular, the following activities are specially targeted at building
systemic capacity:



Assessing and integrating ecosystem ser
vices through economic valuation



Mainstreaming biodiversity into development policies, plans and practices and into
sectoral plans and strategies



Incorporating climate change issues into NBSAPs



Integrating the NBSAP implementation plan with the CBD Program
me of Work on
Protected Areas implementation plan



Securing sustainable finance for NBSAP implementation



Monitoring and reporting on the status of biodiversity under climate change
scenarios




C.

D
ESCRIBE THE
E
NABLING
A
CTIVITY AND
I
NSTITUTIONAL
F
RAMEWOR
K FOR
P
ROJECT
I
MPLEMENTATION
(
discuss
the
work intended to be undertaken and the output expected from each activity as outlined in Table A ).



Detailed Description of Activities per Project Component / Outcome


The description that follows has been orga
nized in five modules (I
-
V), following the GEF’s guidance, but which
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景f汯ling⁡牥 m潤o汥s:


Component

Outline of modules for NBSAP Revision and Related
Activities

Indicative percentage
of total GEF funding in
the proposal

1

I. Preparation

6%

II. Setting national targets, principles, & main priorities of the
strategy

6%

2

III. Strategy and action plan development

52%

3

IV. Development of Implementa
tion plans and related activities

20%

V. Institutional, monitoring, reporting and exchange

16%



Component 1. Stocktaking and national target setting

BD EA Turkmenistan

68




Key
Outputs

expected under this component includes the following:

1.1

Review and stocktaking of produc
ts and results from previous biodiversity planning processes at the
national level are carried out in a participative manner.

1.2

In response to the global Aichi Targets, national biodiversity targets are developed in a manner that is
attuned to Turkmenist
an’s reality.

1.3

The achievement of national targets, developed in line with the global Aichi Targets, is duly monitored
during the project duration and beyond, and this is reported upon to the CBD through the 5
th

national
report, and through other means.


1.4

In an iterative manner, Turkmenistan

taps into useful information on, and participates into, global
networks and initiatives on biodiversity data and indicators (such as the Biodiversity Indicators
Partnership , Global Biodiversity Information Facili
ty and the World Conservation Monitoring Centre, the
Global Environment Outlook portal , among other relevant ones).


Key
Outcomes
:

-

By early 2013, a multi
-
sectoral/multi
-
stakeholder working group is established and it completes the stock
-
taking exercise.

-

By mid
-
2013, national targets in response to the global Aichi Targets are developed.


Key
Products

or publications resulting from activities:



Brief Review of the Biodiversity Planning Process in Turkmenistan



Biodiversity Targets for Turkmenistan: As part o
f national efforts to implement the CBD’s Strategic Plan for
2011
-
2020


Key
Activities

(I
-
II):


I.

Preparing for the NBSAP revision




Taking stock of the NBSAP and identifying barriers to its implementation
: This activity will focus on rapidly
but accurately t
aking stock of existing plans, policies and practices, and of the root causes of biodiversity
loss. Within country
-
specific contexts, the aim is not only to identify key threats, but to understand the
drivers behind these threats, as well as the key aspect
s of the policy environment that are barriers and
challenges to effective conservation/sustainable use. Based on existing studies and analyses, the emphasis
of this activity will be on identifying key gaps in the existing NBSAP, understanding the primary d
rivers and
root causes, and identifying the means of overcoming existing barriers and challenges.




Stakeholder consultation and participation:

This activity will focus on ensuring a robust consultative
process that engages representatives from key sectors,

administrative leaders, and traditionally under
-
represented groups. The aim is to develop and sustain a participatory process in order to increase the
likelihood of successful implementation of the NBSAP. This is especially important relative to the goals

of
mainstreaming biodiversity into national development plans, and promoting resilient landscapes that
include production sectors. (refer to section B5).


II.

Setting targets




Setting targets and priorities
:

This activity focuses on setting specific, measurab
le, achievable and time
-
bound targets for the NBSAPs based on the global Aichi Targets, including targets on restoration of
ecosystems, protected area coverage, overall biodiversity loss, and other aspects of the Strategic Plan. This
activity, which is lin
ked to priority setting among different aspects within the NBSAP, will be completed by
CoP
-
11.



Component 2. NBSAP Update

BD EA Turkmenistan

68




Key
Outputs

expected under this component includes the following:

2.1

A National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan (NBSAP) for
Turkmenistan, anchored into national
development frameworks, is updated, in a manner that is participative, widely disseminated and fully
integrates new aspects of the CBD strategic plan, such as: (i) mainstreaming; (ii) the valuing of ecosystem
goods and
services; and (iii) the incorporation of challenges and opportunities linked to ecosystem
-
based
adaptation and resilience.

2.2

The updated and fully endorsed NBSAPs for Turkmenistan

is submitted to the CBD, following national and
sub
-
national consultations
, preferably within the deadline set by the COP.



Key
Outcome
:

-

By 2014, Turkmenistan’s NBSAP is fully updated, it is in line with the guidance in the CBD Strategic Plan
(2011
-
2020) and has been submitted to the CBD COP



Key
Products

or Publications resu
lting from activities



Second National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan for Turkmenistan



Sub
-
product 1: Study on Ecosystem Valuation in Turkmenistan



Sub
-
product 2: Study on Advances in Sectoral Mainstreaming of Biodiversity in Turkmenistan



Sub
-
product
3: Study on the Incorporation of Challenges and Opportunities linked to Ecosystem
-
Based
Adaptation and Resilience in Turkmenistan


Key
Activity

(III)


III.

Developing the NBSAP


This step will seek to achieve the following: (i) Developing the strategy and actio
ns to implement the agreed
targets though national consultations; (ii) Application of the NBSAP to sub
-
national entities through sub
-
national and local consultations; and (iii) Sectoral integration including mainstreaming into development,
poverty reductio
n and climate change plans through sectoral consultations. While the project will focus on
updating all aspects of NBSAPs, it will place particular emphasis on those aspects that are both highlighted in
the 2011
-
2020 CBD Strategic Plan, and that are typica
lly absent from its existing NBSAP. These include the
following:



Assessing and integrating ecosystem services through economic valuation
: The study on the Economics of
Ecosystems and Biodiversity (TEEB) has drawn attention to the global economic benefits o
f biodiversity
and ecosystem services and to the growing costs of biodiversity loss and degradation. However,
Turkmenistan has not yet linked the value of biodiversity and ecosystem services to our own national
development goals, including poverty eradicat
ion and sustainable livelihoods. Through this activity,
Turkmenistan will be able to demonstrate the benefits and values of ecosystems and biodiversity at a
national level, and better link ecosystems and priority sectors in national development plans, in o
rder to
guide allocation of resources. The aim is to strengthen the point that biodiversity not only underpins human
well
-
being, but that biodiversity and associated ecosystem services can make a significant contribution to
poverty reduction and economic d
evelopment. By engaging national specialists and providing support from
global specialists, hard economic data will be collected and processed at the country level to demonstrate
the costs and benefits of investing in biodiversity management. Capacity to c
arry out the assessments and
make important links to priority economic sectors will be simultaneously built within the country. The
availability of essential data and the analysis will allow Turkmenistan to “make the case” for biodiversity
and will facilit
ate the process of mainstreaming biodiversity into sectoral planning through concrete
biodiversity valuation examples. Specific steps in this process include:

a)

Identify and assess the full range of values of key ecosystem services within the country, based

on
existing local, national, regional and global studies on the value of ecosystems and biodiversity,
including: the national TEEB valuation results, the valuation of protected areas, any other national
ecosystem services studies that have been conducted
(e.g., water, carbon), and existing global and
BD EA Turkmenistan

68



regional maps and overlays of key ecosystem services.

b)

Identify the implications of these services for different stakeholder groups within the country, including
those who benefit from, and pay for, the mainten
ance of these ecosystem services, and those that
degrade ecosystems through unsustainable use.

c)

Estimate and demonstrate the value of key ecosystem services (using methods appropriate to each
service), including the value of the ecosystem service in contrib
uting to climate resilience, adaptation
and mitigation; reducing poverty, and sustaining livelihoods.

d)

Where appropriate, this activity will also identify potential means of capturing the value of targeted
ecosystem services including through policies such
as payments for ecosystem services and other
positive incentives.



Mainstreaming biodiversity into development policies, plans and practices and into sectoral plans and
strategies
: Mainstreaming has been defined as the internalization of biodiversity conse
rvation goals into
economic and development sectors, policies and programs, such that they become an integral part of their
functioning of these sectors.
. As part of this process, the project will focus on the following
sectors
:
agriculture, forestry, hun
ting , livestock, energy, mining, oil and gas, and water management. The Project
will also focus on the following
development areas / topics
: land
-
use management, including spatial and
infrastructural development planning, development finance, poverty alle
viation, rural development and
livelihoods, food security, local development and decentralization, gender, climate change resilience and
adaptation. Specific steps in this process will include:

a)

forming partnerships between relevant stakeholders interested

in biodiversity conservation issues and
in development issues;

b)

explicitly identifying key stakeholders’ interests, and desired outcomes;

c)

identifying potential conflicts and trade
-
offs, and work towards mutually acceptable solutions, including
strategies
that serve mutually beneficial interests and achieve mutually beneficial outcomes;

d)

embedding and institutionalizing these strategies in the institutions, policies, agreements, programs and
mechanisms of each sector.



Incorporating climate change issues int
o NBSAPs
: The previous NBSAP did not adequately address aspects
of climate change. This activity will involve incorporating aspects of climate change into NBSAPs, including,
for example:

a)

identifying, protecting and appropriately managing areas important fo
r carbon sequestration;

b)

updating the country’s ecological gap assessment to include predicted future distribution of biodiversity
under climate change scenarios;

c)

assessing the impact of climate change on the functioning of ecosystem services, such as wat
er;

d)

identifying areas important for improving nature’s ability to adapt to climate change, such as altitudinal
gradients and conservation corridors

e)

identifying areas of particular importance for restoration in order to improve climate resilience,
adaptati
on and mitigation.



Sharing NBSAP draft at the sub
-
national level
: Once the aspects of mainstreaming and climate change
impact have been incorporated in the updated NBSAP, the draft NBSAP will be shared with communities
through 3 sub
-
national workshops in
different parts of the country. The workshops will be largely co
-
financed by Government and will aim to present, discuss and agree on the key aspects of the updated
NBSAP.



Component 3. National frameworks for NBSAP implementation, CDB reporting and excha
nge
mechanisms


Key
outputs

expected under this component includes the following:

3.1 National frameworks for NBSAP implementation is in place and includes: (i) institutional leadership for
implementation is established and strategic partnerships are forge
d (nationally and internationally); (ii) a
costed and prioritized Action Plan is appended to the NBS; (iii) needs assessments on capacity, technology
BD EA Turkmenistan

68



and finance are carried out; and (iv) a strategy for resource mobilization for the implementation of the
N
BSAP is produced and includes a baseline assessment of existing biodiversity finance.

3.2 An effective, user
-
friendly and easily updatable country
-
driven CHM site is developed; it is linked up to the
CBD’s global CHM networks and to other information and k
nowledge exchange network on biodiversity.

3.3. Immediate CBD reporting obligations are met by Turkmenistan

in a timely manner, in particular the Fifth
National Report to the CBD by 31 March 2014.


Key
Outcomes
:

-

By late 2013, complete the updating and impr
ovement of national clearinghouse mechanisms

-


By 2014, complete a plan for implementing the NBSAP, including capacity, technology and finance needs
assessment


Key
Products

or publications (maybe combined into one):



Set of ‘straight
-
forward’ and feasible

NBSAP implementation plans, which ensure the effective
implementation of the Action Plan contained in the NBSAP



Fully functional CHM for Turkmenistan based on best international practices in developing CHMs.


Key Activities (IV


V)

IV.

Developing implementat
ion plans

This activity will focus on developing an overall plan for implementing the NBSAP. This implementation plan
will include the following elements:



Developing an overall implementation plan:
The primary output of this activity is an overall implemen
tation
plan that delineates major steps, responsible parties, costs for main activities, expected outcomes and a
timeline



Integrating the NBSAP implementation plan with the CBD Programme of Work on Protected Areas
implementation plan:
Turkmenistan is in th
e process of finalizing its PoWPA implementation plan
, and this
step will ensure that the country’s work on protected areas, including goals, objectives and next steps, are
fully integrated into the NBSAP. We will place particular emphasis on those aspect
s of Target 11 from the
CBD Strategic Plan, including our plans for expanding protected areas, improving management
effectiveness, sustainably financing protected areas, improving connectivity, and integrating protected
areas into the wider landscape and s
eascape.



Securing sustainable finance for NBSAP implementation
: Article 20 of the Convention mentions the need for
Parties “to provide, in accordance with its capabilities, financial support and incentives in respect of those
national activities which are
intended to achieve the objectives of this Convention.” In the past few years,
there has been a wide proliferation of innovative biodiversity finance mechanisms, such as payments for
ecosystem services, conservation trust funds, biodiversity offsets and bi
o
-
carbon funding, among many
others. Turkmenistan is still in the early stages of exploring these mechanisms. This activity will therefore
focus on the following:


a)

Identifying the existing financial gap for implementing the NBSAP

b)

Identifying potential sour
ces of revenue for filling these gaps

c)

Assessing the feasibility for these revenue sources

d)

Developing a detailed plan for operationalizing these revenue sources



Assessing and strengthening capacity needs
: One of the primary areas of enabling activities is t
he
assessment of capacity needs. The decisions at CoP
-
10 place new and ambitious demands on countries,
including requirements to protect and sustainably manage their lands and water, to develop comprehensive
plans that integrate climate change into their l
and use, development and sectoral plans and strategies, and
to develop appropriate biodiversity and climate policies, laws and incentives. This activity will ensure that
Turkmenistan develops a road map for strengthening these specific capacities. Building

on existing capacity
needs assessment, and using existing guidance, Turkmenistan will focus on addressing the following
capacity priorities:

BD EA Turkmenistan

68



a)

Addressing inadequate research capacity on climate change issues, including capacity to assess climate
vulnerabili
ty and to develop adaptation measures to climate change and their integration into
international programs and projects. Specific capacity recommendations include a) strengthening the
network of observations of the climate system, support for climate studie
s; b) improving the database
on the state of the climate system and the environment; c) developing and implementing climate
-
related
research programs;

b)

Addressing insufficient biodiversity incentives. Specific recommendations include: a) developing
bilater
al ties and regional for the conservation and sustainable use of natural resources (especially in a
transboundary context); b) promoting adherence to existing international agreements; c) developing
mechanisms and adopting legal instruments on sponsorship
, preferential and differential taxable
activities that promote the sustainable management of the components of biodiversity (especially in
ecologically threatened regions); and d) the development of national markets for ecosystem services.

c)

Addressing insu
fficient mechanisms of management and planning, especially in regards to the system of
national environmental planning. Recommended actions include improving the system of national
planning for biodiversity and conservation, developing national and regiona
l action plans on
biodiversity, and strengthening political will for following through on commitments to the CBD. In
particular, this requires the inclusion of specific CBD objectives into national policies and strategies of
the NBSAP, and the development
and approval of clear targets, work plans, national programs for the
early adoption of conservation measures.

d)

Strengthening underdeveloped legal and regulatory framework and institutional framework of
monitoring components of biodiversity, and the absence
of comprehensive national programs for
biodiversity monitoring, preventing us from effectively reporting on biodiversity to the CBD. To solve
this problem, we will prioritize the development of inventory and monitoring systems.

e)

Improving public participati
on in environmentally significant decisions. To improve public participation
in environmental decision, we will establish clear mechanisms of public hearings, develop mechanisms
for public environmental review and monitoring; involve the public, indigenous

and local communities
and relevant stakeholders in the implementation of all program elements of the NBSAP.


V.

Institutionalizing, monitoring and reporting



Monitoring and reporting on the status of biodiversity under climate change scenarios
: Monitoring and

reporting on the status of biodiversity is a key aspect of several Programmes of Work within the CBD. To
date, efforts to monitor and report on the status of biodiversity have been sporadic and have typically not
taken into full account the status and tre
nds of biodiversity, the status of effective conservation, the
contribution of ecosystem services (such as water and carbon), and the likely impacts of climate change on
biodiversity and ecosystem services. Through this project, Turkmenistan will ensure th
at future monitoring
and reporting on the status of biodiversity and ecosystem services is comprehensive, and fully incorporates
climate change issues.



Developing clearinghouse mechanisms (CHM)
: Of the 90 countries that accessed funding under the Fourth
Na
tional Report joint global project (UNDP
-
UNEP/GEF), only 44 had national CHM sites, and of those, 25
were kept up
-
to
-
date (data from 2010). At the same time that CHMs are largely out of date, reliance on
digital information has increased exponentially. Tur
kmenistan is no exception. While Turkmenistan has a
website on environmental issues (http://uznature.uz/eng/), it is insufficient to provide adequate
information related to biodiversity, and will need to be radically upgraded. This aspect of the project wi
ll
help us develop an effective, user
-
friendly and easily
-
updatable CHM that will enable us to effectively share
information nationally, regionally and globally. The project will also work in collaboration with the CHM of
the Secretariat of the CBD, to ens
ure that lessons and information are disseminated globally.



Developing a permanent framework for reporting to the CBD
: Parties to the CBD committed to submitting a
fifth national report by 2014. In this project, Turkmenistan will submit a 5
th

National Repo
rt that fully
covers the NBSAPs, key changes in the status and trends in biodiversity status, threats and conservation,
and will develop a long
-
term reporting framework that will enable us to better track changes over time.



BD EA Turkmenistan

68



Collaboration and synergies w
ith related initiatives


UNDP has active biodiversity and ecosystems portfolio in Turkmenistan, financed primarily by the GEF. Some of
these projects have direct relevance for the activities under this EA project. Four of these projects have been
mentioned

and briefly described above under the subsection
Biodiversity Planning Efforts.
They are:



Early Action Grant to Turkmenistan to develop a tourism program based on protected areas



Conservation and Sustainable Use of Globally Significant Biological Diversit
y in Khazar Nature Reserve on
the Caspian Sea Coast



Capacity Building and on
-
the
-
ground Investments for Integrated and Sustainable Land Management



Strengthening the Turkmenistan Protected Areas System


The Enabling Activity Coordinator, the host institutio
n and the UNDP Country Office will ensure that this
Enabling Activity project can benefit from technical synergies with the above mentioned initiatives, as well as
with other ones, e.g. those financed by international NGOs, such as Royal Society for the Pr
otection of Birds
(RSPB, UK), and Michael Succow Foundation (Germany).


Representatives and experts from the on
-
going relevant biodiversity projects will be invited to NBSAP
workshops and to participate, where relevant, in specific working groups. The aim

is to ensure that the
knowledge on biodiversity that these projects have collected and are producing can be incorporated into the
NBSAP.



Project implementation arrangement


The project will be implemented over a period of 3 years. The
Ministry of Natur
e Protection of
Turkmenistan (MNPT)
i
s the government institution responsible for the implementation of the project and
will act as the
Executing Agency
.


UNDP is the
GEF Agency

for the project and accountable to the GEF for the use of funds. The project
is nationally
executed (NEX), in line with the Standard Basic Assistance Agreement (SBAA) between the UNDP and the
Government of Turkmenistan, and the United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF) for
Turkmenistan.


The overall responsibility for

the project implementation by SCNP implies the timely and verifiable attainment
of project objectives and outcomes. MNPT will provide support to, and inputs for, the implementation of all
project activities.


MNPT will nominate a high level official who
will serve as the National Project Director (NPD) for the project
implementation.
The NPD will chair the Project Steering Committee (PSC), and other relevant stakeholder,
sectoral and working groups under the project, and will be responsible for providing
government oversight and
guidance to the project implementation.

The NPD will not be paid from the project funds, but will represent a
contribution to the project from the government of Turkmenistan. The NPD will be technically supported by a
project techn
ical team, as well as UNDP’s technical backstopping provided by the UNDP/GEF Regional
Technical Advisor responsible for the project and the UNDP Environment Focal Point at the Country Office in
Turkmenistan.


Working closely with MNPT, the UNDP Country Of
fice (UNDP
-
CO) will be responsible for: (i) providing project
assurance services to government (ii) recruitment of project staff, if so requested by government, and the
contracting of consultants and service providers, especially international,; (iii) over
seeing financial
expenditures against project budgets approved by PSC; (iv) appointment of independent financial auditors; and
(iv) ensuring that all activities including procurement and financial services are carried out in strict compliance
with UNDP/GEF

procedures. A UNDP staff member will be assigned with the responsibility for the day
-
to
-
day
management and control over project finance.

BD EA Turkmenistan

68




A
National Project Steering Committee

(PSC)

will be convened by MNPT, and will serve as the project’s
coordination an
d decision
-
making body (Project Board). The PSC will include representation of key project
stakeholders. The PSC meetings will be chaired by the NPD. It will meet as needed, but not less than once in 6
months, to review project progress, approve project wo
rk plans and approve major project deliverables. The
PSC is responsible for ensuring that the project remains on course to deliver products of the required quality to
meet the outcomes defined in the project document.


The day
-
to
-
day
management

of the pro
ject will be carried out by the

Climate Resilience Component Manager
with administrative and technical assistance from Enabling Activity Chief Technical Adviser (CTA)
.
The
financial, logistical administration of the project will be carried out by Environme
nt Programme Project
Implementation Unit.
Enabling Activity
CTA

will manage the implementation of all project activities.


CTA

will liaise and work closely with all partner institutions to link the project with complementary national
programs and initiati
ves.
The
CTA

is accountable to
MNPT,
and the PSC for the quality, timeliness and
effectiveness of the activities carried out, as well as for the use of funds.
The
CTA

will also be technically
supported by contracted national and international consultants a
nd service providers.



Comparative advantage of UNDP in Turkmenistan with respect to this project:


UNDP has historically been the largest GEF implementing agency in terms of assisting countries in undertaking
biodiversity enabling activities, having ass
isted more than 100 countries with it through several projects. The
GEF2 global project ‘Biodiversity Support Programme’ was jointly implemented with UNEP and has set the
stage at the global level in the field of biodiversity planning among GEF eligible co
untries. Furthermore, UNDP
assisted Turkmenistan in the preparation of its existing NBSAP and the 1
st
, 3
rd

and 4
th

National Reports to the
CBD.


The Government of Turkmenistan has requested UNDP assistance in designing and implementing this project,
due
to UNDP’s track record in Central Asia, and its long association with UNDP on various GEF projects. UNDP
has an established national office in

Ashgabat

with well