Knowledge management in the forest products industry: the role of centres of expertise

cheeseturnManagement

Nov 6, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

49 views

Knowledgemanagement in the
forest products industry: the role
of centres of expertise
Constance Van Horne MBA
Jean Marc Frayret PhD
Diane Poulin PhD
IUFRO: Information interoperability and organisation for national and
global forest information systems
Day three: The human factor
September 19, 2003 Quebec City, Canada
Outline
•Introduction
•Knowledge management and the knowledge
value chain in the forest products industry
•R&D choices
•Centres of expertise
•The case of FOR@C
•Conclusion
•Questions
Introduction
•Forests: source of tacit experience and
knowledge
•Four trends in the forest products
industry :
1.restructuring, consolidation and search for profitability
2.cost reduction through production optimisation and
technological innovation
3.a customer orientation, differentiation and value adding
4.confronting environmental challenges
Introduction
1.Consolidation
•stemmed overproduction, price wars and the
incapacity of the industry to manage its own
trends
2.Optimisation and innovation
•Increased flexibility and productivity
Introduction
3.Customer oriented value added products
•Whole systems perspective that begins with
land use planning and ends with the final
deliver to the end customer
4.Environment
•Environmental management, (ISO 14 000 sets
environmental management standards)
forestry certification and environmental
labelling
Knowledge management and the
knowledge value chain
"Knowledge is of two kinds. We know a subject ourselves, or we know where we can find
information upon it."
--Samuel Johnson, writer •Knowledgemanagement:
getting the right information to the right people at the right time,
so that they can use that information and turn it into knowledge.
knowledge is then used and shared to add value and new
competences to the organization
•Goal:
Innovation, sustainable development and increased profit
Knowledge management and the
knowledge value chain
•Knowledgevalue chain
:
a flow of knowledge through a sequence of
processes in which its value is increased at
each stage (Albert Simard Canadian Forest Service)
•Knowledgesupply network:
an integrated multi-company set of
competencies, which exploits the knowledge
needed to design, manufacture, market and
distribute a product (K-T Mak University of Illinois at Chicago)
Knowledge value chain
Application
Information
Innovation
Data
Knowledge
Dissemination
Knowledge management and the
knowledge value chain
•Data
The facts of knowledge
•Information
Data that has been organised and had value added
•Knowledge
information that has been read, understood, interpreted and
applied to a specific work function
–Tacit knowledge
hunches, insights, know-how and cognitive knowledge and is
based on our beliefs, ideals, values, schemata and mental
models
–Explicit knowledge
expressed in words and numbers
Knowledge management and the
knowledge value chain
•Knowledge transformation
Socialisation: transfer of tacit knowledge to tacit knowledge
Externalisation: transfer of tacit knowledge to explicit
knowledge
Combination: transfer of explicit knowledge to explicit
knowledge
Internalisation:transfer of explicit knowledge to tacit
knowledge
•Dissemination
Teaching/learning/sharing
Knowledge management and the
knowledge value chain
•Application
Keys to success:
–strong leadership
–culture that supports and encourages information and
knowledge sharing
•Innovation
Products and processes
Lifeblood of organisations
The role of centres of expertise
Three main sources for R&D
1.In-house
Core competencies
2.Outsource
Non-core competencies
Paperloop
3.Collaboration
Unknown research benefits
Skogforsk, Forintek and IUFRO
The role of centres of expertise:
The case of
The FOR@C Research Consortium in e-
Business in the forest products industry is based
at the Université Laval in Quebec City, Canada
Research activities in the fields of supply chain
management and e-Business for the forest
products industry in Canada
15 public and private partners
The role of centres of expertise:
The case of
•Data
Collected by Grad students and Research Professionals
From partners, other centres of expertise and the literature from
surveys and studies
i.e. Survey on e-Business practises in Quebec
•Information
Managed with Internet and Information Technologies
i.e. Website and Extranet
•Knowledge
Articles, presentations, hands on projects
i.e. Conferences
The role of centres of expertise:
The case of
•Knowledge transformation
Socialisation: tacit to tacit
i.e. On-site work
Externalisation: tacit to explicit
i.e. E-learning courses
Combination: explicit to explicit
i.e. Articles
Internalisation:explicit to tacit
i.e. The wood supply game
•Dissemination
responsible for developing the tools and methods used for
dissemination
The role of centres of expertise:
The case of
•Application
In the hands of member organisations
i.e. implement a new planning schedule for drying operations
•Innovation
Products and processes
New business models to include e-Business strategies
The role of FOR@C in a forestry knowledge value
chain
Partners: Industrial & Government
Teaching,
learning and
sharing
Literature
Data,
information,
knowledge
know-how
Innovation
Publication,
sharing
FOR@C:
centre of expertise
C
o
n
t
i
n
u
o
u
s
k
n
o
w
l
e
d
g
e

d
e
v
e
l
o
p
m
e
n
t
C
o
n
t
i
n
u
o
u
s
s
c
i
e
n
t
i
f
i
c

p
r
o
g
r
e
s
s
.
Other centres of expertise and the Acedemic Community
Disemmination through:
Papers and Conference
Presentations
Disemmination through:
Skilled Grad Students
Student Interns
e-Learning
Continuing Education
Seminars & Workshops
Application to processes
and operations
Creation, transformation
and combination of new
tacit and explicit knowledge
Creation, transformation
and combination of new
tacit and explicit knowledge
Conclusion
•Companies need to use the tools of knowledge
management and the model of the knowledge
value chain to turn the challenges of the future
into business opportunities
•Centres of expertise, working in collaboration
with companies in the industry and other centres
of expertise should work to develop tools to turn
research into innovation
Thank you!
Merci!
Any Questions?
It's what you learn after you know it all that counts:John Wooden