Chemical Methods of Control Lab - nhsprocaccinobiology - home

chatteryellvilleBiotechnology

Feb 20, 2013 (4 years and 5 months ago)

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Week

Unit

Ch

Topic

Labs & Activities

Homework

Test/Quiz

Days


Marking
Period 1








9/2
-
9/4

Introduction

1

Themes in
Biology





Course introduction


Syllabus & expectations


Chapter 1
Notes

Chemical Methods of Control Lab


Due:

Summer
Assignment (9/3)


Signed syllabus
&
Safety Contract

Obtain required
supplies

Review Ch 1



3


9/8
-
9/10

Unit 1

Chemistry


2

Chemistry of
Life

Chapter
2

Notes


HONC lab
-
bonding lab


Bonding Concept map


Lewis dot review


Review Ch 2


3

9/11
-
9/14

Unit 1

3

Water

Chapter
3
Notes


Properties of Water Lab


Review Ch 3


Complete
Q’s C
h’s
2
-
3


2

9/15
-
9/16

Unit
7

Animals


51

Animal
Behavior

Chapter
51
Notes


Lab 11 A
nimal Behavior



Review Ch 51


Pre
-
Lab 11 A


*Collect 10 pill
bugs in an
appropriate
container!!

-
Drop off early
before class


Post
-
Lab 11 A

Q’s




2

9/17

Unit
8

Ecology

52

Ecology &
Biosphere

Chapter
52
Notes

Methanol as Fuel Reading

Review Chapter 52


1

9/18

Unit
8

Ecology

53

Populations

Chapter
53
Notes


Review
Chapter 53


1

9/21

Unit 8

Ecology

54

Community
Ecology

Chapter

54

Notes


Review Chapter 5
5


1

9/22
-
9/23

Unit 8

Ecology

55

Ecosystems

Chapter

55

Notes


Food Chains & Energy in
Ecosystems
Activity


Study guides due day of exam

Complete
Test
Study
Guide


Study for Test

Test
-
Summer
assignment
Chapters


9/23



2

9/24
-
9/25

Unit 1

Chemistry

4

Carbon
Chemistry

Chapter
4

Notes


Complete study
Q’s

Ch 4


2

9/29
-
10/1

Unit 1

Chemistry

5

Macromolecules


Carbohydrates


Lipids

Proteins

Nucleic Acids

Chapter

5

Notes


Building macromolecules
Activity


How to write Free Response
Questions (FRQs)

AP Essay question (1991): “Describe the
various characteristics of the carbon atom
that make possible the building of a variety of
biological

molecules.”


DNA Extraction
http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/
AEC/CC/DNA_extractions.php


Practice Essay

“The unique properties
of water that make life
on earth possible…”


3

10/02
-
10/0
7

Unit 2

Cells

6

Tour of Cell

Chapter

6

Notes


Blank diagrams of plant and animal cell for
labeling of parts.


Inner Life of a cell video
http://multimedia.mcb.harvard.edu/a
nim_innerlife_hi.html



http://multimedia.mcb.harvard.edu/


In class Practice Essay


Construct an organelle chart for
Chapter 6


Web sites:
www.cellsalive.com


Complete study
Q’s

Ch
6


Construct an
organelle chart for
Chapter 6



4

10/0
8
-
10/1
8

Unit 2

Cells

7

Cell Membrane

Chapter

7

Notes


Lab 1 Diffusion/Osmosis

(2 days)


Online tutorial
http://www.phschool.com/science/bi
ology_place/biocoach/


Discuss kidney functioning
http://www.sumanasinc.com/webcont
ent/anisamples/majorsbiology/kidney
.ht
ml


Building a membrane


Osmosis Challenge


Test Review


Study guide due

Pre
-
Lab 1
Diffusion/Osmosis


Complete study
Q
’s

Ch 7


Post lab 1 questions
& graph


Test Study guide




Essay


Test (ch’s
4,5,6,7)

6




10/19
-
10/2
3

Unit 2

Cells

8

Metabolism

Chapter

8

Notes

Toothpickase Activity


Lab 2 A
-

Enzyme Catalase
demonstration


Lab 2B & 2C & 2D Enzymes
Catalysis


Analyze Enzyme Data


Enzymes at work
Activity

Pre
-
Lab 2 Enzymes
Catalysis


Lab Report (Lab 2 )

due in 1 week


Complete study
Q
’s

Ch
8




5

10/2
6
-
10/
30

Unit 2

Cells

9

Cellular
Respiration

Chapter

9

Notes


Lab 5 Cell Respiration


Online demo of lab 5

http://www.phschool.com/science/bi
ology_place/labbench/


Cell Res
p
iration Pathways Chart
Assignment

http://www.peevyhouse.com/respirati
on.htm


ATP Synthase Animation

http://multimedia.mcb.harvard.edu/a
nim_ATPase3_flv.html

Pre
-
Lab 5 Cell
Respiration



Review online demo
o
f lab


Post Lab 5 Analysis

Lab Quiz
(Labs 1, 2,
5,
11
)

5

11/02
-
11
/06

End of
MP 1

Unit 2

Cells

10

Photosynthesis

Chapter

10

Notes


Use of Spectrophotometer


Photosynthesis Pathways Flowchart


C
3
,C
4
,CAM comparison chart

http://www.peevyhouse.com/c4path
ways.jpg



Concept Mapping Activity


Lab 4 Plant Pigments








Study Q’s

Chapter
10



Pre lab 4


Post Lab 4 Analysis
Q’s

Essay

4








Marking
Period 2









1/0
9

Unit 2

Cells

11

Cell
Communication

Chapter 11 Notes


Study Q’s
ch 11


1

11/10
-
11/13


Unit 2

Cells

12

Cell Cycle

Chapter

12

Notes


Online onion mitosis
http://www.biology.arizona.edu/cell_
bio/activities/cell_cycle/cell_cycle.ht
ml


Lab 3 Mitosis


Nobel


e
-
Museum
-
Cell Cycle Game

http://nobelprize.org/educational_ga
mes/medicine/2001/index.html


DNA Replication activity



DNA replication video

http://www.cells.de/cellseng/1medien
archiv/Zellstruktur/Zellkern/DNA_co
ndensation/index.jsp


Study guides due


Test Review

Study Q’s
Ch 12


Pre lab 3 Mitosis


Post lab 3 Analysis







Unit 2 Test &
Essay

3

1/16
-
11/1
7

Unit 3

Genetics

13

Meiosis

Chapter

13

Notes



DNA Extraction


Meiosis & Independent Assortment
Animations

http://www.sumanasinc.com/webcont
ent/animations/content/meiosis.html


http://www.sumanasinc.com/webcont
ent/animations/content/independentas
sortmentnm.html


http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/baby/
divi_flash.html



Study Q’s
Ch 13


DNA Analysis q’s


2

11/18
-
11/20

Unit 3

Genetics

14

Mendel

Chapter

14

Notes


Genetics Research Paper
due in 1
week


Genetics problems


Work on Genetics
Paper

Essay Q

3

Graphic organizer


Virtual Fly Activity
http://www.iusd.k12.ca.us/uhs/apbiol
ogy/Unit%20Resources/unitresources
.htm


http://bioweb.wku.edu/courses/Biol1
14/Vfly1.asp



11/23

Unit 3

Genetics

15

Chromosomes

Chapter

15

Notes


Sex Determination of Athletes
Activity

http://www.hhmi.org/biointeractive/g
ender/click.html



Lamba DNA fingerprinting
http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/
AEC/AEF/1996/conley_dna.php


Study Q’s


3


Unit 3

Genetics

16

Molecular
Inheritance

Chapter

16

Notes


Lab 7 Genetics of Organisms


Test Review


Study guides due

on day of Test




Pre lab 7 Genetics



Post Lab Analysis


Chi Square
Problems


Test Study Guide



Test & Essay

(Ch 13, 14, 15,
16)


4


Unit 3

Genetics

17

Protein
Synthesis

Chapter

17

Notes


Protein synthesis activity


Protein Synthesis Animations

http://highered.mcgraw
-
hill.com/sites/0072437316/student_vi
ew0/chapter15/animations.html



Concept Mapping


DNA replication and


&


Protein
Synthesis Flow chart assignment


Nucleotide Animations

http://highered.mcgraw
-
hill.com/sites/0072437
316/student_vi
ew0/chapter14/animations.html#



Study Q’s

Ch 17



3


Unit 3

Genetics

18

Gene
Expression

Chapter 18 Notes


Lac operon animations

http://highered.mcgraw
-
hill.com/sites/0072437316/student_vi
ew0/chapter18/animations.html#


Study Q’s Ch 18


Essay




2


Unit 3

Genetics

19

Viruses

Chapter

19

Notes

AIDS Therapy Reading



Study Questions Ch
19

Essay

1


Unit 3

Genetics

20

Biotechnology

Chapter

20

Notes



Human Genome Project Activity

http://www.ornl.gov/sci/techresource
s/Human_Genome/project/about.sht
ml


Lab 6A Bacterial Transformation


Lab 6C Gel
Electrophoresis


Gel Electrophoresis simulation

http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/
labs/gel/



Pre lab 6


Lab 6
Report



4


Unit 3

Genetics

21

Genomes &
Evolution

Chapter

21

Notes


Lab 8 Population Genetics


Study guide due


Assign Chapter

Presentation
s
(ch’s
25
-
31)


Pre
-
lab 8


Post Lab 8 Report


Unit Test Study
guide



Work on chapter
presentations

Unit 3 Test

3


Unit 4

Evolution

22

Descent with
Modification

Chapter

22

Notes


Key Terms activity


Group completion of time line
including important contributors to
current evolutionary biology.



Work on chapter
presentations


2


Unit 4

Evolution

23

Evolution of
Populations

Chapter

23

Notes


Natural Selection in Butterflies
Activity

Activity: Sickle Cell Disease

Activity: A
Step in Speciation


Salamanders


Activity: Human Evolution


Activity: Human Cranial Volume

Article: “What Wiped Out the

Dinosaurs

Climate Change”

Study Q’s
Ch 23


Work on chapter
presentations


Lab 8 Report


3

Lab 8 Population Genetics


Unit 4

Evolution

24

Origin of
Species

Chapter

24

Notes


Work on chapter
presentations

Essay

2

-
1/22

End of
MP 2

Unit 4

Evolution

25

History of Life

Chapter Presentations Begin





Study Q’s Chapters
25
-
31


5

Marking
Period 3









Unit 5
History of

Evolution

26

Phylogeny

Pairs Across the Phyla


Classification/Taxonomy

Systematic
Review



1


Unit 5
History of

Evolution

27
*

Bacteria &
Archae

Video: Howard Hughes Medical
Institute Holiday Lecture Series.
Bacteria and Viruses


View prepared microscope slides

of
bacteria.



Essay

1


Unit 5
History of

Evolution

28
*

Protists

Pond life Microscopy

http://www.microscopy
-
uk.org.uk/mag/indexmag.html?http://
www.microscopy
-
uk.org.uk/mag/wimsmall/smal3.html

Virtual pond dip

http://www.microscopy
-
uk.org.uk/mag/indexmag.html?http://
www.microscopy
-
uk.org.uk/mag/wimsmall/smal3.html


Protist images

http://protist.i.hosei.ac.jp/PDB/Image
s/menuE.html


“Who Am I
Classification”

Activity



1


Unit 5
History of

Evolution

29

Plant Diversity
I

Plant kingdom classification lab


Essay


1


Unit 5
History of

Evolution

30

Plant Diversity
II





1


Unit 5
History of

Evolution

31
*

Fungi

Kingdom Fungi Survey Lab


Test Study guide due




Test

Ch’s 25
-
31

& Essay

2


Midterm
Exams


Review




2


Unit 5
History of

Evolution

32

Animal
Diversity

Key Terms activity


Animal Phyla Chart Activity

Study Q’s Ch 32
-
33


1


Unit 5
History of

33

Invertebrates




1

Evolution


Unit 5
History of

Evolution

34

Vertebrates



Test

1


Unit 7

Animals

40

Basic Principles

Animal Behavior Research

Practice Essay

Key Terms activity

Blood Typing Lab

Microscopy
-
human tissue



2


Unit 7

Animals

41

Nutrition

Lactose intolerance article

Study Q’s

Essay

2


Unit 7

Animals

42

Circulation

Heart Dissection



Lab 10A, 10B, 10C Physiology of
the Circulatory System




Video: HHMI
-

Holiday Lecture
Series: Hearts and Hypertention #1
-
4


Essay


Lab Report


3


Unit 7

Animals

43

Immune system

Lab
-
Food Forensics: A Case of
Mistaken Identity
http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/
AEC/AEF/1995/grupe_identity.php

Howard Hughes Medical Ins
titute
Video (optional): The immune
system


Study Q’s


2


Unit 7

Animals

44

Osmoregulation

Nephron Coloring Activity

http://www.peevyhouse.com/Nephro
nColoringSheet.htm


(optional)
Video: HHMI Holiday Lecture Series,
The Kidney’s Tale

Study Q’s


2


Unit 7

Animals

45

Hormones &
Endocrinology




3


Unit 7

Animals

46

Reproduction

Study guides due

Viagra Reading


Test

3


Unit 7

Animals

47

Development

Key Terms activity



3


Unit 7

Animals

48

Neurons &
Signaling


Study Q’s

Essay

3


Unit 7

Animals

49

Nervous System


Study Q’s


3

-
4/9

End of
MP

3


Unit 7

Animals

50

Sensory
Mechanisms

Eye Dissection Lab

Human Vision Lab
http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/
AEC/CC/vision_activities.php




Unit 7 Test

2

Marking
Period 4









Unit 6

Plants

35

Structure &
Growth

Plant Structures Lab

Root Stem Leaf Lab



Essay

5

*= Skip/Skim

Skip= 27,28,31,56

Skim=37,38,39

S= Summer= 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 1, 2, 3

Skipped labs: 11

HW: Pre reading Q’s

Time Frame

-
Intro 2 days

-
Unit 1
-
2
-
3 wks

-
Unit 8
-
2
-
3 wks

-
Unit 2
-
5 wks

-
Unit 3
-
2
-
3 wks

-
Unit 4
-
2
-
3
wks

-
Unit 5
-
2
-
3 wks

-
Unit 6
-
5 wks


On
-
line tutorial

www.biologyplace.com




Key Terms


Unit 6

Plants

36

Transport

Lab 9 Transpiration in Plants

Lab 9 Pre
-
lab

Lab 9 Report


3


Unit 6

Plants

37
*

Plant
Nutrition




2


Unit 6

Plants

38
*

Angiosperm
reproduction

Coloring activity



2


Unit 6

Plants

39
*

Plant Responses

Lab 12 Dissolved Oxygen Lab


Study guides due

Lab 12 Pre
-
lab

Lab 12 Report

Unit 6 Test

2


Review



Sample Tests &
Essays





Exam
5/10










Projects








-
Unit 7
-
5 wks

























To Do



AP list serv
-
email Scott



Order refills
-
except lab lab 6
-
bio rad order form (1 wk prior)



Log in: Seiple1

o

Password
-
science 1

We
bsites:

http://www.phschool.com/science/biology_place/labbench/

http://www.biology project.com

Lab Data
http://www.iusd.k12.ca.us/uhs/apb
iology/

Teachers

Animations

http://www.stolaf.edu/people/giannini/biological%20anamations.html


Lessons
-
http://www.iusd.k12.ca.us/uhs/apbiology/

Lessons &
Graphics
-

http://www.accessexcellence.org/RC/VL/GG/index.php

http://www.peevyhouse.
com/calapbio.htm

http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/members/exam/exam_questions/1996.html


http://www.phschool.com/science/biology_place/labbench/

http://www.ucopenaccess.org/

http://www6.district125.k12.il.us/science/APBIO/calendar
.html

http://www.rapiniscience.com/id37.html









Ideas:


-
Top ten lists


-
Latin terms



Order:



Blood



Agrose



Staphylococcus epidermis (Gram
-
positive)



Escherichia coli (Gram
-
negative)



DNA

Wiki space

Academic Biology Labs




Living or Not living
http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/ATG/data/released/0067
-
HopkinsKathryn/index.php



Hand washing lab
http://www.accessexcellence.org/AE/AEC/CC/hand_activity.php







Tips For Writing AP Biology Exam Essays


DO


1. The first thing that you should do is carefully read the question.


The second thing you should
do is read the question, and the third thing you should do is read the question.


Be sure that you
answer the question that is asked and only that question,
and that you answer all parts of it.


If
you are given a choice of parts to answer, choose carefully.


Don’t answer all parts in that case.

2. Briefly outline the answer to avoid confusion and disorganization.


Pay close attention to the
verbs used in the

directions (such as “describe”, “explain”, “compare”, “give evidence for”,
“graph”, “calculate”, etc.) and be sure to follow those directions.


Thinking ahead helps to avoid
scratchouts, astices, skipping around, and rambling.

3. Write an essay.


Outline
s and diagrams, no matter how elaborate and accurate, are not essays
and will not get you much, if any, credit by themselves. Exceptions: If your are asked as a part of
an essay on a lab to calculate a number, this doesn’t not require that you write an ess
ay, but be
sure to show how you got your answer (show the formulas you are using and the values you have
inserted into those formulas);or, if you are asked to draw a diagram in the question, do so, but be
sure to annotate it carefully.

4. Define and/or ex
plain the terms you use.


Say something about each of the important terms
that you use.


Rarely would the exam ask for a list of buzzwords.

5. Answer the question parts in the order called for and label them “a”, “b”, etc., as they are
labeled in the ques
tion.


It is best not to skip around within the question.


The four essay
questions do not have to be answered in any particular order.

6. Write clearly and neatly.


It is foolhardy to antagonize or confuse the reader with lousy
penmanship.

7. Go into de
tail that is on the subject and to the point.


Be sure to include the obvious (for
example, “light is necessary for photosynthesis).


Answer the question thoroughly.

8. If you cannot remember a word exactly, take a shot at it
-
get as close as you can.


Eve
n if you
don’t remember the name for a concept, describe the concept.

9. Use a ball point pen with dark black ink.

10. Remember that no detail is too small to be included as long as it is to the point.


Be sure to
include the obvious
--
most points are giv
en for the basics anyway.

11. Carefully label your diagrams (they get no points otherwise) and place them in the text at the
appropriate place
-
not detached at the end.


Be sure to refer to the diagram in your essay.

12. Widen your margins a little.


This

will make the essay easier for mist folks to read.

13. Bring a watch to the exam so that you can pace yourself.


You have four essays with about 22
minutes for each answer.

14. Understand that the exam is written to be hard.


The national average for th
e essay section
will be about 50% correct, that is 5 points out of a possible 10 on each essay.


It is very likely
that you will not know something about each essay, so relax and do the best you can.


Write
thorough answers.




Do include these things if
you are asked to design or describe an experiment:


1. hypothesis and/or predictions

2. identify independent variable(s)
--

what treatments will you apply

3. identify dependent variable(s)
--

what will you measure

4. identify several variables to be con
trolled (VERY IMPORTANT)

5. describe the organism/materials/apparatus to be used

6. describe what you will actually to (how will you apply the treatment)

7. describe how you will actually take and record data

8. describe how the data will be graphed an
d analyzed

9. state how you will draw a conclusion (compare results to hypothesis & predictions)

10. your experimental design needs to be at least theoretically possible and it is very important
that your conclusions/predictions be consistent with the pr
inciples involved and with the way
you set p the experiment.

Include these things in a graph:


1. set up the graph with the independent variable along the x
-
axis and dependent variable along
the y
-
axis.

2. mark off axes in equal (proportional) increments

and label tick marks with proper numbers.

3. plot points and attempt to sketch in the curve (line).

4. if more than one curve is plotted, write a label on each curve (this is better than a legend)

5. label each axis with the variable name and include t
he units in which it is measured (°C, min,
mg, etc.)

6. give your graph an appropriate title (what exactly is it showing?


Try: “Y” as a function of
“X”).

DON’T


1. Don’t waste time on background information or a long introduction unless the question cal
ls
for historical development or historical significance.


Answer the question.

2. Don’t ramble
--

get to the point, and don’t shoot the bull
--

say what you know and go on to
the next question.


You can always come back if you remember something.

3. Don
’t use a pencil, and don’t use a pen with an ink color other than black.


Don’t use a felt
-
tip
pen because the ink seeps through the page and makes both sides of the paper hard to read.


Don’t scratch out excessively.


One or two lines through the unwanted

word(s) should be
sufficient, and don’t write more than a very few words in the margin.


Finally, don’t write
sloppily.


It is easy for a grader to miss an important word when he/she cannot read your
handwriting.

4. Don’t panic or get angry because you a
re unfamiliar with the question.


You probably have
read or heard something about the subject
--

be calm and think.

5. Don’t worry about spelling every word perfectly or using exact grammar.


These are not a part
of the standards the graders use.


It is i
mportant for you to know, however, that very poor
spelling and grammar will hurt your chances.

6. There is no need to say the same thing twice.


While introductory paragraphs may be
important in English class, saying, “Process A is controlled by x, y, and

z.”, and then writing a
paragraph each on A, y, and z is a valuable waste of time.


This also goes for restating the
question.


Don’t restate it, just answer it.

7. If given a choice of two or three topics to write about, understand that only the first o
ne(s) you
write about will count.


You must make a choice and stick with it.


If you decide that your first
choice was a bad one, then cross out that part of the answer so the reader knows clearly which
part you wish to be considered for credit.

8. Don’t
leave questions blank.


Remember that each point you earn on an essay question is the
equivalent of two correct multiple choice questions, and there is no penalty for a wrong guess,
bad spelling, or bad grammar.


Make an effort on every question!


Don’t Qu
it!




Instructor

Mrs. Brianna Rapini (
Brianna.Rapini@springbranchisd.com
)


Text


Campbell, Neil A. and Jane B. Reece.
Biology 6th edition
, San Francisco: Benjamin Cummings, 2002
.


Materials

Composition Book (required for labs)

Bound Notecards (required for daily vocab.)

Spiral (or other component for notes)

AP Biology Review Book (Optional but HIGHLY suggested)


Course Overview

AP Biology II is a rigorous, advanced course designed to be equi
valent to a two semester college introductory
biology course. This course also prepares students to take the AP Biology II Test in May 2008. Depending on
a student’s score on this exam (and depending on the particular university’s standards), a student ca
n earn
up to
eight

hours of college biology credit. This is a laboratory course in which students are expected to use
the data collected to solve biological problems.


The AP Biology course offered conforms to the standards instituted by the College Board

for all AP courses
including the
topics
listed below:


• Molecules and Cells

• Heredity and Evolution

• Organisms and Populations


Each of the topics are integrated throughout the course using the
eight major themes
from the AP Biology
Curriculum Requirem
ents. Examples of these themes appear below and are also integrated throughout the
entire year in the curriculum.


Theme 1



Science as Process


Students engage in AP lab 7 (fruit flies) and AP lab 11 (animal behavior) in lab
projects that are ongoing a
nd require scientific reasoning to come to scientific conclusions.

Theme 2



Evolution


Students compare ecological time with evolutionary time and examine how they
correspond by assembling a phylogenic tree based on electrophoresis.

Theme 3



Energy t
ransfer


Students are asked to describe the movement, conversion, and storage of
energy within an ecosystem, usually originating with the sun, then stored and converted to chemical energy
by autotrophs, then passed on to heterotrophs and/or dissipated as
heat. Students must model their own
ecological pyramids to demonstrate energy transfer.

Theme 4



Continuity and change


Students are asked to consider how specific changes to an ecosystem
(geological, climatic, introduction of new organisms, etc.) can a
ffect the organisms that live within it.

Theme 5



Relationship of Structure to Function


Students consider how organisms are physically adapted to
survive and reproduce in their environment.

Theme 6



Regulation


Students are to understand how an orga
nism’s regulatory mechanisms (such as those
that control body temperature) serve to aid or hinder its survival in particular environments.

Theme 7



Interdependence in Nature


Students study various types symbiotic relationships and the
interdependence o
rganisms have on each other.

Theme 8



Science, Technology and Society


Discussion is integrated in the curriculum (example:
biotechnology implications and ethical issues or discussion on human impact on the ecosystems) which
encourages students to think critically about the impact of scien
ce and technology on our society today.




Course Objectives

The objectives of this course is that each student will:


• demonstrate skills in using various types of biological instrumentation and scientific methodologies,


• practice finding and using
patterns in collected data to solve scientific problems



• exhibit mastery of the major principles of biology, and


• apply biological knowledge and critical thinking to environmental and social concerns.


Calendar
:

Students receive a six weeks calendar

that displays the dates of all daily grades, lab, quizzes, and tests.
Students should refer to this to know when all assignments are due as they are not written on the board. If a
student loses his/her calendar, it can be obtained on the website as well
.


Website:

This course actively uses a course website:
www.rapiniscience.com

as it will contain copies of handouts,
chapter objectives, selected PowerPoints/Flipcharts, and additional information. There is a
lso a page for
parents that displays monthly updates.


Grading:

Daily Work

= 15%
Labs/Quizzes

= 25%
Tests

=60%


Tests:


Tests consist of multiple choice questions and essay questions that mimic the AP exam. On the majority
of exams, the
multiple choice accounts for 60% of the test grade and the essays account for 40% of the test grade. Essay questions
will be written in the AP format and level.


Labs/Quizzes:

The twelve official AP Biology labs are performed in this course
and completed in a student’s laboratory
notebook unless it is considered an “informal” lab in which case the student will be informed. Quizzes are all
previously announced on the calendar.


Daily Work

Students have a large amount of reading assigned in thi
s course. In order to assess comprehension, students
have warm
-
ups and follow
-
ups. Warm
-
ups are short, take
-
home assignments designed to guide students in
grasping the overview of chapter readings. They are typically assigned with each chapter reading.

Follow
-
ups
occur at the end of lecture and typically consist of multiple choice AP
-
style questions. Follow
-
ups may be on
paper or utilize the ActiVotes. Students may use their
hand
-
written
notes from their assigned reading on the
follow
-
ups.
Students w
ho are absent who do not come by to pick up their assignment before the next
class period (as we are on block schedule) can expect a different warm
-
up and follow
-
up.

Students should
view the objectives on the website in order to know what to focus their r
eading notes on. Other daily grades
include some supplemental activities as dictated on the calendar.


Tutorials

Official tutorials are Friday mornings before (7:10am
-
7:40 am) school and Monday

afternoons after (3:00pm
-
3:45

pm) school. However, additi
onal tutorial times can be arranged by appointment. Students are highly
encouraged to also email if they run in to any difficult material.


Late Work:


Assignments are due in class on the due date
. Assignments that are not turned in class on the due dat
e can be
turned in by 3:00 pm
the same day

with a 10% grade reduction.
Work turned in after the due date,
however, is NOT accepted
.



Absences

By student handbook policy, students have one day to make up work for every day that they are absent. If a
student is absent the day an assignment is due, the student must have it the next time they are in class. Students
are also expected to make up a lab in their own time after school. A student has 2 weeks to make up missed
tests, but students are encourag
ed to make them up as soon as possible as this course moves at a fast pace.



Semester I


I. Molecules and Cells

Unit 1: Basic Chemistry and Biochemistry



Water



Carbon and its structure that aids it in being the building block of life (
structure and
func
tion
)



Macromolecules



Functional Groups and their properties



Enzymes and their properties

1.

Read Chapters 1
-
6

2.

AP Lab 1: Diffusion and Osmosis*

Lab Objectives:

-
measure the water potential of a solution in a controlled experiment

-
determine the osmotic conce
ntration of living tissue

-
describe the effects of water gain or loss in animal and plant cells

3.

AP Lab 2: Enzyme Catalysis*

Lab Objectives:

-
measure the effects of changes in temperature, pH, ion concentration and
enzyme concentration on the reaction
rates of an enzyme catalyze reaction in a
controlled experiment (
energy transfer
)


Unit 2: Cells



Surface area to volume ratio in regards to the limitation on cell size (
structure and
function
)



Prokaryotic vs. Eukaryotic cells



Why Organelles? How do they
regulate

cellular activity?



Cell Transport and membrane structure to accommodate transport (
structure and
function
)

1.

Read Chapters 7 & 8

2.

Cell Analogy Project

3.

Viewing Cells under the microscope



Unit 3: Energy Transformations
(
energy transfer
) (3 weeks
)



Cellular Respiration



Fermentation



Organization of a leaf



Light Dependent and Light Independent Reactions



C4 and CAM Plants

1.

Read Chapters 9 & 10

2.

AP Lab 5: Respiration*

Lab Objectives:

-
relate oxygen consumption to respiration
rate

-
test the effect of temperature on the rate of cell respiration rate in
ungerminated versus germinated seed in a controlled experiment


3.
AP Lab 4: Chromatography and Photosynthesis*

Lab Objectives:

-
separate pigments and calculate their R
f

values

-
measure percent of light transmitted to determine rate of photosynthesis

-
explain why the rate of photosynthesis varies under different environmental
conditions


II. Heredity and Evolution




Unit 4: Cell Reproduction



Cell Cycle



Stages of Mitosis



Bin
ary Fission vs. Mitosis



Control of the cell cycle



How does cancer form? Treatment options? (
science, technology, and society)



Types of Asexual Reproduction

1.

Read Chapters 12


13

2.

AP Lab 3: Mitosis & Meiosis*

Lab Objectives:

-
Recognize the stages of
mitosis in a plant or animal cell

-
Calculate the relative duration of the cell cycle stages

-
Use chromosome models to demonstrate the activity of chromosomes during meiosis
I and meiosis II

-
Describe how independent assortment and crossing over can generat
e genetic
variation among the products of meiosis

-
Compare and contrast the results of meiosis and mitosis

-
Calculate the map distance of a particular gene from a chromosome's center or
between two genes using a model organism

-

Compare and contrast the r
esults of meiosis and mitosis in plant cells

-

Compare and contrast the results of meiosis and mitosis in animal cells


Unit 5 Molecular Genetics



DNA Structure and Replication



Protein Synthesis and relationship of RNA types with function
(structure and
function)



Gene Mutations: Insertion, deletion, silent and frameshift



Chromosomal Mutations: Addition, deletion, inversion, translocation



Biotechnology techniques: cloning, PCR, electrophoresis, transformation



Operons: Lac and Trp

1.

Read Chapters 16
-
20

2.

Biotechnology Ethical Discussion (
science, technology, and society)

3.

AP Lab 6: Bacteria Transformation and Electrophoresis *

Lab Objectives:

-

use plasmids as vectors to transform bacteria with a gene for antibiotic
resistance in a controlled experiment

-
Demonstrate how restriction enzymes are used in genetic engineering




-
Use electrophoresis to separate DNA fragments


-
Describe the biological process of transformation in bacteria


-
Calculate transformation efficien
cy


-

Design a procedure to select positively for antibiotic resistant transformed cells


-
Determine unknown DNA fragment sizes when given DNA fragments


Semester II


Unit 6: Genetics




Mendel’s experiments (
science as a process
)



M
endel’s Concepts of allele pairs, independent assortment, and segregation



What Mendel Didn’t Know: incomplete and codominance, sex
-
linked
inheritance, pleiotropy, epistasis, and polygeny



Dihybrid crosses and probability; rule of multiplication



Test cross a
nd pedigrees



Karyotypes: non
-
disjunction and aneuploidy



Linked genes: map units and linkage maps



Chi square

1.

Read Chapters 14
-
15

2.

AP Lab 7: Genetics of
Drosophila
*

Lab Objectives:


-
Investigate the independent assortment of two genes and determine whether the tw0 genes are
autosomal or sex
-
linked using a multigeneration experiment.


-
Analyze the data from their genetic crosses using chi
-
square analysis techniques


Unit 7 Mecha
nisms of Evolution



Darwin’s Voyage and Theory: Natural Selection and Differential Reproduction



Evidence of Evolution



Mechanisms of Evolution: Gene pools and Microevolution



Population Genetics: Hardy Weinberg equation (
Interdependence in Nature
)



Speciation
: Geographic and Reproductive Isolation



Patterns and Temp of Evolution: Gradualism/Punctuated Equilibrium/Co
-
evolution



Extinction and the Fossil record

1.

Read Chapters 22
-
25

2.

AP Lab 8: Population Genetics and Evolution*

Lab Objectives:

-
calculate the frequen
cies of alleles and genotypes in the gene pool of a
population using the Hardy
-
Weinberg formula

-
discuss natural selection and other causes of microevolution and deviations
from the conditions required to maintain Hardy
-
Weinberg equilibrium.


III.
Organisms and Populations

Unit 8 Taxonomy, Bacteria, Protists , Fungi



Origins of Life: Prokaryote and Eukaryote Diversity



Three Domains



Linnean Classification



Microbiology

1.

Read Chapters 26
-
28, 31


Unit 9 Plant Diversity, Anatomy and Physiology



Evolution of Plant Diversity (
continuity and change)



Plant Tissues and Systems



Plant Transport



Plant Reproduction and adaptations enabling plant reproductive success
(structure and function)



Role of plants in nature (
interdependence in nature)

1.

Read Chapter
s 29
-
30, 35
-
39

2.

AP Lab 9: Transpiration*

Lab Objectives:

-
Test the effects of environmental variables on rates of transpiration using a
controlled experiment.


-
Make thin sections of stem, identify xylem and phloem cells, and relate the
function of
these vascular tissues to the structures of their cells.


Unit 10 Animal Evolution and Diversity



Branch Points in Animal Evolution

1.

Read Chapters 32
-
34

2.

Exploring the relationship of organisms in a phylogenic tree (
continuity and
change)

3.

Lab: Animal Phyla
Observation

Lab Objectives:

-
observe basic differences in animal phyla

-
classify animals into their proper phyla


Unit 11 Animal Form and Function



Basic principles of anatomy with emphasis on mammalian systems



Overview of systems working to create homeos
tasis (
regulation)



Heart and Circulatory system



Digestive system



Excretory system



Endocrine system



Nervous system



Muscular system



Immune system

1.

Read Chapters 40
-
49

2.

AP Lab 10: Physiology of Circulatory System*

Lab Objectives:

-
describe the effect of
changing body position on heart rate and blood pressure

-
explain how exercise changes hear rate

-
discuss and explain the relationship between heart rate and temperature

Unit 12 Ecology



Overview of Ecology covered in Biology I emphasizing symbiotic relatio
nships,
feeding patterns, and nutrient cycles

1.

Selected readings from Ch 50
-
54

2.

Discussion: Human Impact on Ecosystem (
continuity and change)

3.

AP Lab 11: Animal Behavior* (lab done as project on individual’s own time to
explore
science as a process
)

Lab Obje
ctives:

-

Describe some aspects of animal behavior, such as orientation, behavior,
agonistic behavior, dominance display, or mating behavior. (
Interdependence in
Nature
)


-

Understand the adaptiveness of the behaviors studied.

4.

AP Lab 12 Dissolved Oxy
gen and Aquatic Primary Productivity

Lab Objectives:

-
Measure primary productivity based on changes in dissolved oxygen in a
controlled experiment.


-
Investigate the effects of changing light intensity and/or inorganic nutrient
concentrations on primary productivity in a controlled experiment (
continuity and change)


Unit 13 Exam Review

1.

Mock AP Exam

2.

Out of Class (after school) Review
Sessions