5th CONFERENCE FOR tEAChERS 2013

chantingrompMobile - Wireless

Dec 10, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

94 views

5th CONFERENCE FOR tEAChERS 2013
uNivERSity OF biRmiNghAm 14 JuNE 2013
Achim Jung
University of Birmingham
As we are planning for
another instalment of the
CAS Conference for
Teachers of Computing, I
marvel at the amazing
successes that the
Computing At School
consortium has already had and at the
enthusiasm and energy that radiate from this
community. Working for a university, I am
happy to see that now the time has come for
close collaboration between schools and HE
institutions, and I am thrilled by the many
initiatives that are being taken by colleagues
around the country. Collaboration and the
sharing of ideas and experiences are more
important than ever and this is exactly what
the Teachers Conference is trying to
facilitate. So welcome to Birmingham, and I
look forward to being your host during
another stimulating and productive meeting.
Simon Peyton Jones
Computing At School
Much has happened since
the last CAS Teachers
Conference. A year ago we
were making the case that
computer science should
be a clearly articulated part
of our school curriculum, alongside the use
and application of information technology; a
year on, computer science is in the core
aims of the proposed new National
Curriculum Programme of Study. This time
last year we were writing to Mr Gove to invite
him to make computer science GCSEs
count towards the EBacc; in January he
agreed to do so. This time last year CAS had
1,100 members; now it has over 4,000.
Job done then? Far from it: as Adrian Mee
says “it’s no good joyfully writing a
curriculum if no one can teach it”. Equipping,
encouraging, supporting and inspiring our
excellent existing ICT teachers is what the
CAS Network of Excellence is all about; and
the CAS Teachers Conference is its most
visible embodiment. We need to put flesh on
the dry bones of the programme of study,
and make it come to life. We need to
articulate the distinction between
computational thinking and mere
programming, so that we don’t slide from
Death by PowerPoint into Death by Scratch.
We need to convey to every head teacher,
every governor, every parent and every child
our vision of computer science as a vibrant,
creative, empowering discipline, not an
academic niche for geeks.
Many others are involved in this partnership,
including Naace, Raspberry Pi, Young
Rewired State, MirandaNet, Code Club,
ITTE, Behind the Screen, Make Things Do
Stuff, Technocamps, NextGen, cs4fn, Apps
for Good. Together we can make it happen.
Enjoy the conference!
The DfE have supported the application made by CAS/BCS to continue
and expand the Network of Teaching Excellence in Computer Science
(NoE) that was launched in September 2012.
The heart of the programme is to build a high-quality, sustainable CPD
infrastructure at low cost. This will be achieved by nurturing long-term,
bottom-up collaboration between employers, universities, professional
bodies, schools and teachers.
In the first six months of the scheme:
• 622 schools
• 70 universities
• 120 schools self-designated as lead schools
• 28 CAS Master Teachers recruited to run local CPD events
During this phase over 700 hours of CPD contact time was delivered by the Master
Teachers. The DfE have been impressed and their approval has now been matched by
this further grant. The funding we have received is for two years but we are working
on a five year programme to:
• Recruit and train 600 CAS Master Teachers (primary and secondary);
• Harness university expertise to lead on training and development of the CAS Master
Teachers;
• Maintain comprehensive set of classroom resources for all key stages;
• Enhance professional status for all Heads of Computing in schools.
Are you interested in using your expertise and experience to:
• Support colleagues as a Master Teacher;
• Shape the training and qualifications needed;
• Build our online infrastructure?
Special thanks to Achim Jung and the
University of Birmingham for their kind
support and providing this excellent venue
and to Debbie Smith and Claire Davenport
for their help with the conference programme.
NEtWORK OF EXCELLENCE
There is no doubting the scope of the task but our experience in phase 1 has
shown us what is possible. We are confident that together, with your help, we
will be able to support teachers embrace the new challenges.
Will you join our team?
For further information contact
noe@computingatschool.org.uk
WELCOmE
2/3
PROgRAmmE SChEduLE
(STC)
timE ROOm titLE SPEAKER(S)
8:00 Registration Atrium
9:00 Welcome MECH-G31 Welcome Simon Humphreys
9:20 Plenary 1 MECH-G31 Creativity and Motivation through Programming Michael Kölling
10:00 Plenary 2 MECH-G31 The opportunity of Microsoft, creating inspiring curriculum Lee Stott
10:45 Break Atrium
11:20 A. Workshops and Seminars (40 mins) LC-LG15 How to engage students and double uptake in computer science classes Kevin Miller
LC-LG13 Introduction to Programming with LOGO Jurac Hromkovic
LC-UG06 GCSE Computing: a forum for sharing best practice Darren Travi, Ilia Avroutine
and achieving the best for your pupils
LC-UG05 #include Laura Dixon
LC-UG07 From paper to Scratch to Python Dave Ames
LC-UG09 A “compendium” of ideas and tips for teaching Coding, Computing and John Palmer
Computational Thinking
LC-LG14 Running your own CPD Programme Sue Sentance
MECH-G36 Computer Science Unplugged Tim Bell
MECH-G28 Fun and effective learning with CodeAvengers.com Mike Walmsley
MECH-G42 Using the Raspberry Pi to teach computational thinking and computer science Ajit Jaokar
12:10 B. Workshops and Seminars (40 mins) LC-LG15 How to engage students and double uptake in computer science classes (cont.) Kevin Miller
LC-LG13 Introduction to Programming with LOGO (continued) Jurac Hromkovic
LC-UG06 A-Level Forum Ian Crosby
LC-UG05 The difficulty with the Difficult Mark Jell
LC-UG07 You’ve learned a bit of Python. Where do you go next? Adam McNicol
LC-UG09 Introducing Computational Thinking Without Computers Paul Curzon
LC-LG14 A Computing Science Workshop in Mobile App Development using App Inventor Trevor Bragg
MECH-G36 Techniques to radically accelerate the adoption of computer science in schools Ajit Jaokar
MECH-G28 Code Club Laura Kirsop
LC-UG04 Networking with the RPi Doug Clark
12:50 Lunch and Networking Atrium
13:50 C. Workshops and Seminars (40 mins) LC-LG15 I Love My Smartphone Jeremy Scott
LC-LG13 Introduction to BlueJ Neil Brown
LC-UG06 Primary Forum: Evolving ICT into Computing Phil Bagge, Jane Waite
LC-UG05 Using Programmable Robots (Autism) Karen Guldberg, Ian Lowe
LC-UG07 Microsoft TouchDevelop David Renton
LC-UG09 Creative Cross-curricular Computing Zoe Ross
LC-LG14 Modelling Activities at KS3 Roger Davies
MECH-G36 Computational Thinking is Informational Thinking Greg Michaelson
MECH-G28 Excite, Inspire and Engage Your Computing Classes Alan O’Donohoe
MECH-G42 PiFace Andrew Robinson
14:40 D. Workshops and Seminars (40 mins) LC-LG15 I Love My Smartphone (continued) Jeremy Scott
LC-LG13 Introduction to BlueJ (continued) Neil Brown
LC-UG06 How to build an outstanding computing curriculum Mark Dorling, Matthew Walker
LC-UG05 Open Badges Genevieve Smith-Nunes
LC-UG07 Kinaesthetic activities Peter Marshman
LC-UG09 Logical thinking as a precursor to computer programming Mark Clarkson
LC-LG14 Becoming a CAS Master Teacher Simon Humphreys
MECH-G36 A broad view of computational thinking Aaron Sloman
MECH-G28 CoderDojo Eugene O’Donough
MECH-G42 Excite, Inspire and Engage Your Computing Classes Alan O’Donohoe
15:20 Break Atrium
15:55 Plenary 3 MECH-G31 Agile pedagogy Miles Berry
16:20 Keynote MECH-G31 Rapid introduction of a new curriculum – the NZ experience Tim Bell
17:00 MECH-G31 Closing Remarks Simon Peyton Jones
17:15 MECH-G31 Close
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 PROGRAMME 4/5
One of the aims in the recent efforts to
reform computing in UK schools is to
increase motivation and foster creativity
for a broad range of pupils in the context
of computer science. Yet, doing so is not
easy. Some people, on reading the new
computing curriculum, wonder where the
creativity might be found in it. Others fear
that the infamous Death by PowerPoint
might be replaced with Death by Scratch,
or that an over emphasis on programming
might turn out just as tedious as an over
emphasis on word processing.
In reality, the new curriculum presents
countless opportunities for creative
engagement with the subject. In this talk, I
will discuss and demonstrate some ideas
for increasing motivation and encourage
creativity through programming. I will
endeavour not to waffle in the abstract, but
to be concrete and specific, so that the
teachers in the audience can take some
ideas directly into their classrooms.
michael Kölling
Computing Education Researcher, University of Kent
Michael Kölling is a
computing education
researcher at the
University of Kent.
He works on the
Greenfoot and BlueJ
software projects:
Java programming environments tailored
specifically for education. Michael authored
a textbook for each environment, and
recently received the SIGCSE Outstanding
Contribution to Computer Science
Education Award. Michael also created
(and now runs) the new CAS membership
site, CAS Online, with Neil Brown.
This workshop introduces Computer
Science Unplugged (www.csunplugged.
org), a widely used set of kinaesthetic, fun
activities that can be used to introduce many
core areas of computer science without
using computers at all. We will explore how
to use them in a school context, including
using them as an introduction to a topic, to
encourage computational thinking, to have a
break from computers, and, well, to just have
some fun.i
RAPid iNtROduCtiON OF A NEW
CuRRiCuLum: thE NZ EXPERiENCE
Room mECh-g31 at 16:20
6/7
CREAtivity ANd mOtivAtiON thROugh PROgRAmmiNg
Room mECh-g31 at 09:20
KEyNOtE SPEAKER WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
PLENARy 1
COmPutER SCiENCE uNPLuggEd
Room mECh-g36 at 11:20
New standards for computer science and
programming were phased in to New
Zealand high schools starting in January
2011, and the first cohort of students who
have had access to these standards will
arrive at universities in 2014. This talk will look
at how the new standards were introduced,
the support that was available for teachers to
adopt them and the reaction from the various
stakeholders, including students, teachers,
schools, universities and employers.
tim bell
Professor, Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering,
University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
Professor Tim Bell is in the Department of Computer Science and
Software Engineering at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch,
New Zealand. His Computer Science Unplugged project is widely used
internationally, and its books and videos have been translated into about
18 languages. He has been actively involved in the recent introduction
of new computer science standards into New Zealand high schools. He
is a guest professor of Huazhong University of Science and Technology
in Wuhan, China, where he lectures regularly. He is also a qualified
musician, and performs regularly on instruments that have black-and-
white keyboards.
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 KEY NOTE SPEAKER
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 PLENARY
thE OPPORtuNity OF miCROSOFt: CREAtiNg AN iNSPiRiNg CuRRiCuLum
Room mECh-g31 at 10:00
Lee Stott
Technical Evangelist, Microsoft UK
Lee Stott is a technical
evangelist within the
Developer and Platform
Evangelism Group at
Microsoft UK.
Lee is responsible for
engaging and helping UK academia
understand how Microsoft can help
complement existing strategies within
teaching, learning and research. He has
over 10 years of experience within the UK
HE educational sector and is a Chartered
IT Professional member of BCS, The
Chartered Institute for IT.
He is currently responsible for Microsoft
Curriculum Resources http://www.
microsoft.com/faculty and Microsoft
DreamSpark http://www.dreamspark.com
david Renton
Lecturer, Reid Kerr College
David wrote his first
program on the ZX81 age
nine and his first game on
the ZX Spectrum. After
graduating from
Strathclyde University in
1993 he worked as a
database programmer
doing work for the likes of
Land Rover and Glasgow City Council. For
the past 13 years he has lectured in games
development at Reid Kerr College. In the
past few years he has become increasingly
interested in the role that educational
computer games can play in the classroom
and has developed a number of award-
winning educational games making use of
gaming technology such as wireless
controllers and Kinect.
Lee will provide an introduction to the Microsoft Academic landscape, resources and tools that
are available, followed by David who will present a live demonstration of Microsoft
TouchDevelop, a brand new application development platform from Microsoft, which allows
anyone to create a mobile app on pretty much any device. The entire programming
environment takes place inside an HTML5 browser and it has been designed to be used purely
by touch or with a keyboard and mouse. Apps can be tested instantly on any device that runs
an HTML5 browser and everything created inside it is saved to the cloud, so no messing
around with pen drives. Within minutes students can create simple apps and see them running
on their PC, Windows Phone, Windows Tablet, iPhone, iPad, Android Phone or Tablet.
TouchDevelop can create apps that can be published to the Windows Phone or Windows 8
Store and it can also create Facebook apps as well as web apps.
David has created a games development curriculum using TouchDevelop for Microsoft and a
free electronic copy of this and other Microsoft resources will be available at the session.
AgiLE PEdAgOgy
Room mECh-g31 at 15:55
This session explores some of the parallels
between the worlds of software development
and education. Miles looks at how modern
approaches to software development
can be adapted to the craft of learner-
centred, responsive teaching, particularly
for computing and ICT. He explores how
values of the agile software development
manifesto, which stress the importance
of individual interactions, collaboration
and responsiveness to change, have
direct applications in the classroom. He
also considers how principles of software
craftsmanship, such as productive
partnerships and professional communities,
can help raise the bar for teachers’
professionalism. Other ideas from agile
development methodologies, such as pair
programming, pattern languages, sprints and
scrums provide additional inspiration for both
lessons and broader aspects of school life.
miles berry
Senior Lecturer and Subject Leader for Computing
Education, University of Roehampton
Miles is a senior lecturer
and the subject leader for
computing education at
the University of
Roehampton. He teaches
initial teacher education
courses as part of the
undergraduate and
postgraduate programmes,
as well as tutoring masters students. His
principal research focus is the role of
online communities in the professional
formation and development of teachers.
He is engaged in a range of consultancy
activities, particularly in the field of
curriculum development. Miles has
recently stepped down as chair of Naace.
He is a Chartered Fellow of BCS, The
Chartered Institute for IT, and serves on
the management board of Computing At
School. He’s also a fellow of the RSA and
HEA. Other interests include classical
music, creative cookery and photography.
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 PLENARY 8/9
PLENARy 2 PLENARy 3
The goal of the workshop is to train teachers to teach an introductory course in programming
consisting of approximately 20 lessons for pupils up to age ten (up to eight for the first two thirds).
The focus is on:
a) experimenting with the problem and searching for a general method to solve it;
b) learning to communicate the discovered method solving the problem;
c) expressing the discovered solution method as a program in a programming language
understandable to the computer;
d) developing a language for communication with the computer in the order to make it more
powerful and therefore easier for describing the solution methods;
e) testing the correctness of the programs developed and improving them if necessary;
f) learning the modular approach as the basic concept of all engineering disciplines;
g) learning more about geometry as a side effect.
The didactic contribution consists in the facts that all the goals above can be reached
without understanding the abstract concept of the variable. The syntax is so simple that one
can start to write programs after five minutes, and the search for an error is simplified by the
possibility of executing the program line by line.
Working sheets for pupils are available in five languages including English online for free.
The corresponding textbook is available only in German, but covers materials for about 60
lessons, including advanced topics such as recursion.
iNtROduCtiON tO PROgRAmmiNg With LOgO
Room LC-Lg13 at 11:20 – 12:50
Juraj hromkovic,
Professor of Informatics, Education and Information Technology,
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology
Born in former Czechoslovakia in 1958, Dr. Rer. Nat. DrSc. Juraj
Hromkovic is professor with Comenius University, University of
Paderborn, CAU University Kiel, Technological University RWTH Aachen
and since 2004 Professor for Informatics, Education and Information
Technology on ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology).
He is a member of the Academia Europaea and the Slovak Academic
Society. He has published about 180 scientific papers and 15
monographs and textbooks.
In 2005 he founded the center for computer science education at ETH (www.abz.inf.ethz.
ch) that developed a concept for teaching informatics in schools, and a training system
for computer science teachers. He has taught and teaches in about 40 experimental
schools and has published four textbooks for teaching computer science in high schools
and one textbook for teaching programming in primary schools.
In this session Kevin will introduce and
demonstrate LiveCode, showing examples
of the apps and games that students have
made in schools in Europe and the USA. He
will provide a view from the classroom with
feedback from teachers describing how and
why they are able to engage their students,
double the uptake of computer science
classes within a year and make programming
equally appealing to both boys and girls.
Kevin will talk about the projected growth
in the global app market, the importance of
programming as a vital life skill for students to
underpin their future employment prospects
and to contribute to the economy.
He will provide details of the free LiveCode
resources for teachers, which include
LiveCode Community Edition, curriculum-
aligned class plans (for students age 13 and
above), learning materials that have been
developed by teachers for teachers, online
share site where students from around the
world upload and share their apps and
games, LiveCode Fora where teachers can
collaborate, communicate and share best
practice. In addition Kevin will provide details
of learning resources that are available for
teachers to ensure their own continuous
professional development with LiveCode.
Kevin will also provide details of the LiveCode
coding club resources for teachers and
parents to provide after school, weekend and
summer school coding clubs and how to get
started with LiveCode today.
Kevin miller
CEO, RunRev Ltd.
Kevin Miller is the founder
and CEO of RunRev. He
manages a global team
that develops, maintains
and supports LiveCode,
the award-winning cross
platform software
development platform.
Kevin started coding as a
hobby when he was 12 years old. He
quickly realised how traditional
programming languages made developing
software complicated and inaccessible to
many. His hobby turned into a passion to
make computer programming fun, easier
and accessible to all, and at 17 years old
he established RunRev. Today LiveCode is
used in 40 countries around the world to
teach students how to code and it is widely
used in industry to solve real-world
business needs.
hOW tO ENgAgE StudENtS ANd dOubLE uPtAKE
iN COmPutER SCiENCE CLASSES
Room LC-Lg15 at 11:20 – 12:50
WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS 10/11
#iNCLudE
Room LC-ug05 at 11:20
FROm PAPER tO SCRAtCh tO PythON
Room LC-ug07 at 11:20
#include is a working group that forms
part of CAS, with the remit to improve
diversity amongst the students studying
computing at school. We recognise that
issues surrounding diversity begin at school,
where many students are put off studying
computing because of perceptions about
gender, race, disability or socio-economic
status. For example, of the 3809 students
who studied A-level computing in 2012,
only eight per cent were female. After a
successful launch party and with our first
major event for students coming up the day
after this conference, we would like input
from CAS members as to how we can best
take the initiative forwards. Come along and
discuss the issues surrounding diversity in
computing, suggest strategies that have
worked for you and find out what other
people have tried to encourage a wider
range of students into their classes.
Laura dixon
Head of Computing and ICT, Rugby School,
Warwickshire
Laura is Head of Computing
and ICT at Rugby School in
Warwickshire. She has a
degree in computer science
from the University of Bath
and prior to training as a
teacher used to work as a
web developer. Laura is
interested in investigating
new ways of learning about computer
science and improving the delivery and
perception of education in this field. She
also works on the CAS #include project
which aims to challenge stereotypes and
improve the diversity of students studying
computing in the UK. She writes a blog and
tweets as @codeboom.
Our first half term of computing in year 9
consists of some paper-based activities,
which ultimately results in a design activity,
where we design a simple number guessing
game. This then leads us to implementing the
game in Scratch and relating the programming
ideas/constructs back to our original design.
Finally we introduce the students to Python
(version 3) and reimplement the game in that,
relating the constructs back to Scratch and
also back to the original paper-based design.
After 15 to 20 hours we are ready to move on
further with our exploration of programming
and the Python language. Join me for this
session so that we can recreate this process
in just 50 minutes.
dave Ames
Computing Coordinator,
Holy Family RC & CE College, Heywood
Following a long and
distinguished teaching
career as a Maths teacher
Dave went back to university
and did a degree (in the
evenings) in computer
science graduating with
first-class honours in 2009.
Dave is now the computing
coordinator at Holy Family RC & CE College
in Heywood. He is the CAS hub leader for
East Lancashire, Rochdale and Bury and a
CAS Master Teacher.
This session will focus on some teaching ideas for aspects of the theory and delivering
strategies for achieving the best results from the live assessment activities. There will also
be an opportunity to discuss with colleagues and other teachers any key issues involved in
delivering GCSE Computing.
gCSE COmPutiNg: A FORum FOR ShARiNg bESt PRACtiCE ANd
AChiEviNg thE bESt FOR yOuR PuPiLS
Room LC-ug06 at 11:20
darren travi
Head of Computing, Royal Grammar School,
High Wycombe
Darren Travi is Head of
Computing at the Royal
Grammar School and has
been involved with
Computing At School
since the start. RGS was
one of the schools to pilot
the GCSE Computing
course and has moderated
work for OCR.
ilia Avroutine
Economics Teacher, Royal Grammar School,
High Wycombe
Ilia Avroutine has been
teaching computing since
1998, first in Canada, then
at the Royal Grammar
School in High Wycombe,
Bucks. He specialises in
Visual Basic and
multimedia creation
(animation and music
technology). His background in graduate
level econometrics and music brings him a
different perspective to teaching the
subject – trying to keep it relevant and
applied, inclusive for everyone. Not every
pupil taking computing continues into
computer science, we need computer-
confident engineers, accountants,
scientists and DJs, too!
WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
12/13
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS
FuN ANd EFFECtivE LEARNiNg
With COdEAvENgERS.COm
Room mECh-g28 at 11:20
uSiNg thE RASPbERRy Pi tO
tEACh COmPutAtiONAL thiNKiNg
ANd COmPutER SCiENCE
Room mECh-g42 at 11:20
This session introduces CodeAvengers.
com, a site that offers interactive online
courses that teach the basics of web
development and computer programming
in a way that is both effective and fun. The
courses are perfect for beginners with
carefully sequenced lessons and gradual
progression of difficulty. CodeAvengers’
gameified learning environment uses code
challenges, points, badges and games to
maximise engagement. This session gives an
overview of the CodeAvengers platform and
its courses, and offers helpful suggestions for
classroom implementation.
For school teachers, CodeAvengers also
provides live updates of class progress,
which make it easy to identify students that
need support. This session concludes by
demonstrating the teacher tools for setting
up and monitoring class progress.
mike Walmsley
Software Engineer, New Zealand
Michael Walmsley is a
software engineer from
New Zealand with a
passion for education.
While undertaking a PhD
in computer-assisted
language learning and
tutoring undergrad
computer science
courses, he began creating
CodeAvengers.com: online courses for
fun and effective teaching of computer
programming and web development.
Michael also runs CPD workshops for high
school computing teachers throughout
New Zealand, as well as summer camps
for 10-16 year olds.
This session explores how the Raspberry Pi
can be used to teach computational thinking
and computer science. We first identify the
elements of computational thinking and then
the elements comprising the new computer
science syllabus. We then demonstrate how
they can be implemented in the Pi, i.e. we
use the Pi to illustrate the various elements of
computer science and computational thinking.
The session covers the entire stack including
hardware, software (Python and assembly
language code on the Pi) and algorithms.
Ajit Jaokar
Founder; feynlabs
Ajit Jaokar combines a
background of industry,
academia and research.
Through his ed-tech
start-up feynlabs he
brings that knowledge to
computer science
education, where he is
focused on accelerating
the early stage learning for computer
science among young people.
Outside of education, Ajit’s work is widely
respected in the industry. In 2009, Ajit was
nominated to the World Economic
Forum’s ‘Future of the Internet’ council. In
2011, he was nominated to the World
Smart Capital program (Amsterdam). Ajit
moderates/chairs Oxford University’s Next
Generation Mobile Applications Panel and
conducts courses at Oxford in the next
generation telecoms trends.
A “COmPENdium” OF idEAS ANd tiPS FOR tEAChiNg COdiNg,
COmPutiNg ANd COmPutAtiONAL thiNKiNg
Room LC-ug09 at 11:20
John teaches at a large comprehensive
school in Malvern that is now teaching
computing to many more and also much
younger students with a wider variety of
needs. This has required him to reflect on his
approaches to teaching computing and
computational thinking!
Here are practical ideas that have worked for
him in his teaching. Some ideas are his own
and some are “borrowed” (with apologies!)
from such luminaries as Paul Curzon (Queen
Marys), Quintin Cutts (Glasgow) and Colin
Price (Worcester University).
He will cover ideas for teaching algorithms,
algorithm tracing, coding, finite state machines
and programming concepts that are
interesting (hopefully!!!), visual and practical.
John Palmer
Curriculum Leader: ICT, Computing & Business
Faculty, The Chase School, Malvern
After a degree in computer
science / maths at Cardiff,
John taught maths and IT in
a number of schools before
leaving for a role as IT
manager for a large law firm.
He has taught computing at
The Chase, Malvern since
2001 and is now faculty
head for IT, computing and business. Hub
leader for CAS “Three Counties”
(Herefordshire, Worcestershire and
Gloucestershire), John is also a consultant in
the computing subject for Worcestershire
LEA and a CAs Master Teacher.
RuNNiNg yOuR OWN CPd PROgRAmmE
Room LC-Lg14 at 11:20
This session will be of interest to you if you
are thinking of running a CPD course for
ICT/computing teachers at your school/
university. The format of the seminar will be
part presentation and part group discussion.
We will look at some of the practicalities of
getting a CPD programme off the ground
and also at some existing materials that
can be used and adapted. We will also
look at different formats of CPD and some
recent research into effective CPD and what
teachers find useful.
Sue Sentance
Subject Leader, Anglia Ruskin University
Dr Sue Sentance is the subject leader for
the Secondary PGCE Computer Science
with ICT at Anglia Ruskin
University. She has
delivered a number of CPD
courses for secondary
school teachers in the last
two years, and developed
a programme of courses at
different levels alongside
the Python School
website. She also runs
CPD courses for AQA on .NET Gadgeteer.
WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS 14/15
A unique opportunity for teachers of A-level
computing to get together and share ideas,
experiences and complaints. This year we
might focus on:
• The forthcoming A-level revision:
- What would we like to see included/
excluded in the new specifications?
- How would we like to see practical
skills/programming assessed?
- How will the new AS level fit in?
• How we can start to compile a CAS
submission to the exam boards,
expressing our views and preferences.
• The impact of the introduction of GCSE Computer Science on A-level: how can we adapt
our teaching to cater for students with increasingly varied prior experience?
A-LEvEL FORum
Room LC-ug06 at 12:10
thE diFFiCuLty With thE diFFiCuLt
Room LC-ug05 at 12:10
ian Crosby
Head of Computing, Hills Road Sixth Form College
Ian has been Head of
Computing at Hills Road
Sixth Form College,
Cambridge for 11 years.
Previously he taught at an
11-18 comprehensive in
Northamptonshire. Ian has
been teaching various
incarnations of A-level
computing for 20 years.
Teaching in a BESD school can be very
challenging especially when a majority of the
pupils are boys. A majority of the pupils
come from some very diverse backgrounds
and some are in permanent care. With this in
mind school in some cases is the most
stable part of their lives. So the question is
how to engage with pupils that have had
very little formal primary education and a
mixed secondary education. Some of these
pupils who have ASD, have a proclivity for
computing and programming. As a teacher
of ICT and computing I have had to find
ways to engage with these pupils. The
presentation is sharing with my colleagues
how I have managed and still manage to
catch these students, stimulate their intellect
and hopefully direct them into a hopeful and
bright future.
mark Jell
Head of Department, Stephenson Academy
After completing a degree in
information systems design
Mark joined Tate and Lyle
Sugars based in London as
a systems support analyst.
He moved on to work with
Baltimore Technologies
specialising in data
encryption and security. He
was involved in the support of BACS and
CHAPS, the bank clearing system. Mark has
worked with clients such as UKPA, MOD and
Customs Excise. He has also worked with
many banking organisations such as the
Bank of America, Lloyds TSB, ECB and
Citigroup. Mark became a teacher nine years
ago and is now Head of Department of a
BESD school in Milton Keynes.
yOu’vE LEARNEd A bit OF PythON: yOu ARE hAPPy With vARiAbLES,
SELECtiON, itERAtiON, LiStS ANd FuNCtiONS. WhERE dO yOu gO NEXt?
Room LC-ug07 at 12:10
iNtROduCiNg COmPutAtiONAL thiNKiNg WithOut COmPutERS
Room LC-ug09 at 12:10
This workshop will investigate the use of
Python to deliver theory content in a
practical way. It will also highlight how
Python can be used to support student
projects. We will investigate the teaching of
event-driven and object-oriented
programming, databases, networking, data
structures inc.graphs.
By the end of the session you will have a
range of links, resources and notes for
further reading that will enable you to make
more of Python in your classroom.
Adam mcNicol
Course Team Leader, Long Road Sixth Form College,
Cambridge
Adam is Course Team
Leader for computing at
Long Road Sixth Form
College, Cambridge and
has taught A-level
computing seven years. He
has been working with
Anglia Ruskin University to
upskill existing ICT
teachers so that they can confidently teach
GCSE and A-level computing and
maintains and creates resources for the
Python school website which provides a
range of materials for learning and
teaching Python at school.
Computational thinking skills are widely
argued as being an important set of
fundamental skills that students learn as a
result of studying computing. We will look at
how they can explicitly be introduced to
students using cs4fn ‘unplugged’ activities,
getting students out of their seats and away
from their computers. We will demonstrate
activities, games and magic tricks and
discuss how they can be used to illustrate
the ideas of computational thinking.
Paul Curzon Professor, Computer Science, Queen
Mary, University of London
Paul Curzon is a professor
of computer science at
Queen Mary, University of
London. He was made a
National Teaching Fellow in
2010 in recognition of his
excellence in teaching and
outreach, was a finalist in
the 2009 Times Higher
Education Innovative Teacher of the Year
Award and has twice won student-
nominated Queen Mary awards for
teaching excellence. He runs the Computer
Science for Fun project www.cs4fn.org
WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
16/17
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS
A COmPutER SCiENCE WORKShOP iN mObiLE APP dEvELOPmENt uSiNg
APP iNvENtOR
Room LC-Lg14 at 12:10
tEChNiquES tO RAdiCALLy
ACCELERAtE thE AdOPtiON OF
COmPutER SCiENCE iN SChOOLS
Room mECh-g36 at 12:10
This workshop is suitable for beginners and those who have tried App Inventor and would
like to learn more. This free programming software was developed by Google, but is currently
maintained by Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), the developers of Scratch, and is
providing a popular programming environment for key stage 3 and 4 students. Attendees will
experience creating apps and collecting resources for teaching programming in a modern
visual environment, accessible to a wider range of students than a traditional programming
language. Samples of GCSE Controlled Assessment apps will be available.
trevor bragg
ICT Teacher, Southfields Academy
Trevor organised an “Introduction to App Inventor” CPD course in March
2013 and a computer science INSET in November 2012. The latter
course included presentations on teaching Java, Logo and App Inventor
plus a forum on KS3-5 computing. He is currently using App Inventor
with 44 OCR GCSE computing students completing their programming
controlled assessment. Trevor teaches OCR GCE AS Computing. In July
2012 he taught groups of Year 6 Primary pupils adding commentary to
short Olympic video clips and producing a cartoon-style leaflet. These
students quickly became very engaged in the sessions and their head wrote to thank
Trevor’s school for the excellent experience. Trevor led three twilight active learning sets
over the last three years for non-ICT teachers to improve their use of technology, which
helped staff be better organised, produce improved resources and use the managed
learning environment to collect and mark coursework more effectively. Trevor has an
MSc in computer programming from Dundee University; a PGCE in Secondary ICT,
Kings; 20 years software development experience and eight years teaching ICT/
computing years 7 to 13 experience.
Based on research we are conducting in
schools in the UK and Europe, this session
explores specific techniques to radically
accelerate the adoption of computer
science. Our work is focused on the
concept of understanding and accelerating
the learning of computer science at an
early stage (what we describe as going
from 0 to 60 rapidly). The techniques
cover acceleration of learning for systems
thinking, programming, problem solving,
algorithms and computational thinking.
Ajit Jaokar
Founder; feynlabs
Ajit Jaokar combines a
background of industry,
academia and research.
Through his ed-tech
start-up feynlabs he
brings that knowledge to
computer science
education where he is
focused on accelerating
the early stage learning for computer
science among young people. Outside of
education, Ajit’s work is widely respected
in the industry. In 2009, Ajit was
nominated to the World Economic
Forum’s ‘Future of the Internet’ council. In
2011, he was nominated to the World
Smart Capital programme (Amsterdam).
Ajit moderates/chairs Oxford University’s
Next Generation Mobile Applications
Panel and conducts courses at Oxford in
the next generation telecoms trends.
COdE CLub
Room mECh-g28 at 12:10
So far Code Club volunteers have taught
over 10,000 children in UK schools to code.
In this talk Laura will describe the journey that
Code Club has been on since it was founded
in April 2012. She will draw on her personal
experiences as a teacher hosting a club and
describe the amazing impact this had on the
children and her professional development.
She will explain how to set up a club and the
benefits this provides for all members of a
school community.
Laura Kirsop
Growth Captain for Code Club
Code Club is a nationwide
network of volunteer-led
after-school coding clubs
for children aged 8-11.
Laura’s aim is to get more
volunteers into schools to
create more Code Clubs.
Previously Laura worked as an ICT
coordinator in an inner London primary
school. She is passionate about teaching
children skills to equip them for life in the
21st century.
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS
WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
18/19
NEtWORKiNg With thE RPi
Room LC-ug04 at 12:10
We will build a network of Raspberry Pis
and use it to illustrate some of the aspects
of TCP-IP including IP addresses, MAC
addresses and DNS. We will use debug tools
such as Nmap, Tlog, Traceroute and Ping to
test the network. We will send files across the
network using the netcat command. We will
move on to encryption using steganography.
If there is time we will look at sockets
programming to bring the client server model
to life. Delegates will program their own client
and server using Linux commands.
The purpose of the session is to give the
delegates resources and ideas for using
Raspberry Pis in a classroom to enhance the
teaching of networks and programming. All
of the resources have been developed for
use by and tested on GCSE classes.
doug Clark
Assistant Head Teacher, Park High School, Colne
Doug is an assistant head
teacher at Park High
School in Colne, East
Lancs, with responsibility
for the curriculum and
timetable, raising the
profile of STEM subjects
and teaching GCSE
computing. Prior to this he was curriculum
leader for ICT and computing at an 11-18
school in Wiltshire, and an ICT teacher in
Bristol. Doug has a degree in computing
and 12 years experience of working in the
electronics and computing industries. He
is committed to teaching computing as a
rigorous discipline in its own right and as
an essential vehicle for developing
thinking and problem-solving skills.
i LOvE my SmARtPhONE
Room LC-Lg15 at 13:50 – 15:20
This hands-on workshop will provide an
overview of the RSE/BCS computer science
exemplification project and focus on how
teachers might use the materials to deliver
engaging and exciting computer science in
the classroom. The resources support the
delivery of computer science in a way that’s
relevant to students’ own digital lives and
are a cornerstone of Scotland’s Curriculum
for Excellence. Introductions teach the
history, hardware and software of computing
science. Screencast tutorials teach app
creation. Discussion based questions and
algorithm design reinforce computational
thinking. Finally, a project sets students free
to develop their own ideas and encourages
meaningful interdisciplinary learning.
Jeremy Scott
Principal Teacher of Computing,
George Heriot’s School, Edinburgh
Jeremy Scott is Principal
Teacher of Computing at
George Heriot’s School in
Edinburgh. Since August
2001 he has been on
secondment to The Royal
Society of Edinburgh and
BCS, The Chartered
Institute for IT, to lead a project to
exemplify the teaching of computer
science within Scotland’s new Curriculum
for Excellence. His secondment also
presented a timely opportunity to get
Computing Science and computational
thinking firmly established within the
curriculum and reverse the recent decline
in uptake.
iNtROduCtiON tO bLuEJ
Room LC-Lg13 at 13:50 – 15:20
PRimARy FORum: EvOLviNg iCt iNtO COmPutiNg
Room LC-ug06 at 13:50
This session provides a hands-on
introduction to the BlueJ programming
environment. BlueJ is an educational
Java programming environment designed
to support teaching. It shares the same
editor as the Greenfoot environment, but
allows generic development of stand-alone
standard Java programs. BlueJ is well-suited
to project work at GCSE and A-level, and
is specifically designed to help understand
concepts of object orientation.
In the session, participants will be introduced
to BlueJ by the software’s authors and will
be shown how its features can support
teaching of object orientation in Java, with
practical hands-on examples. BlueJ is open
source, and freely available for Windows,
Mac OS X and Linux.
Neil brown
Computing Education Researcher,
University of Kent
Neil Brown is a computing
education researcher at
the University of Kent. He
works on the Greenfoot
and BlueJ software
projects: Java
programming
environments tailored
specifically for education. Neil is the lead
developer of these systems and also
created (and now runs) the new CAS
membership site, CAS Online.
Phil and Jane will be sharing practical ways in which they have evolved their ICT curricular
into computing ones. They will be looking at what computational thinking means for primary
pupils and what programming languages they have used. They are both more than happy to
answer questions after the session.
Phil bagge and Jane Waite
Primary School Teacher and Teacher & ICT Coordinator
Phil Bagge is a primary school teacher who works at five schools
teaching a strand of computer science. He also works for Hampshire
eLearn eTeach, training teachers and advising on all aspects of
computing. He facilitates the CAS primary group and has been involved
in advising on the reshaping of the new computing curriculum.
Jane Waite is a year 1 teacher and ICT coordinator at a large infant school
in Brighton and Hove. She has only been teaching for six years, and before
that she spent over twenty years in the IT industry designing and building
systems for banks and blue chips. A rain-soaked London Bridge epiphany
sent Jane hurtling into a profession of caring, dedicated and overworked
individuals, who encourage and enable her to become a better teacher;
maybe she can share and support them to teach computing?
20/21
WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS
uSiNg PROgRAmmAbLE RObOtS (AutiSm)
Room LC-ug05 at 13:50
Dr Karen Guldberg, Director of the Autism
Centre for Education and Research, and Ian
Lowe, Head Teacher at Topcliffe School,
will talk about how they have worked
together with children and teachers on
several technology-enhanced learning
(TEL) research projects for children on the
autism spectrum. Their work has included
investigating i) how children learn through
innovative technologies; ii) participatory
methods for developing technologies and iii)
enablers and barriers to embedding these
technologies in the classroom.
Karen and Ian will illustrate their talk by
describing three key TEL research projects
that focus on cutting-edge work. The TEL
environments include a virtual environment
with an intelligent agent, a project
investigating how innovative, research-led
technologies can be embedded and used
creatively in the classroom and ground-
breaking work with robotics company
Aldebaran in their development of a strategy
for autism.
The projects that will be discussed include:
ECHOES: www.echoes2.org.uk
Shape: www.birmingham.ac.uk/shape
Share-It: http://shareitproject.wordpress.com
Aldebaran Ask NAO:
http://www.aldebaran-robotics.com/en/
Solutions/For-Autism/The-Ask-NAO-
initiative.html
Karen guldberg and ian Lowe
Director of the Autism Centre for Education and
Research and Head Teacher at Topcliffe School
Dr Karen Guldberg is a
senior lecturer in Autism
Studies at the University of
Birmingham and Director of
the Autism Centre for
Education and Research.
She conducts a wide range of research on
educational interventions and provision for
children and young people on the autism
spectrum. She has a particular interest in
technology-enhanced learning for children
on the autism spectrum. In recent years,
she has been engaged in a number of
projects funded by the Economic Social
Research Council and the Engineering and
Physical Sciences Research Council.
Ian Lowe is the head
teacher of Topcliffe Primary
School, a one-form entry
school providing a 60-place
resource base in
Birmingham. His experience
is in school improvement in challenging
circumstances. He has supported several
schools in special measures and has taken
his current school, Topcliffe, from a failing
school to one which is now highly
regarded, through the use of technology to
support children with autism. He has
developed a school and curriculum that
innovate teaching and learning within a
mainstream setting. Ian has used his
extensive skills to create a broad and
far-reaching ethos that empowers teachers
and enhances opportunities for all children
to succeed morally, socially, and
academically. Sean O’Toole (winner of
Educational Consultant of the year 2013)
referred to him as ‘an educational maverick
who generates and inspires creativity’.
miCROSOFt tOuChdEvELOP
Room LC-ug07 at 13:50
Learn to use Microsoft’s free app
development platform TouchDevelop to
develop apps or games on mobile devices
for mobile devices with David Renton of
Reid Kerr College and Microsoft’s Partners
in Learning team. These applications can
be published to the Windows Phone or
Windows 8 stores or can be released as
web or Facebook apps. A wi-fi enabled
device (laptop, tablet or smartphone) with an
HTML5 browser (IE10 or the latest versions
of Chrome or Safari) will be required to
participate in this session.
david Renton
Lecturer, Reid Kerr College
David wrote his first
program on the ZX81 at
the age of nine and his
first game on the ZX
Spectrum. After
graduating from
Strathclyde University in
1993 he worked as a
database programmer
doing work for the likes of Land Rover and
Glasgow City Council. For the past 13
years he has lectured in games
development at Reid Kerr College. In the
past few years he has become
increasingly interested in the role that
educational computer games can play in
the classroom and has developed a
number of award winning educational
games, making use of gaming technology
such as wireless controllers and Kinect.
CREAtivE CROSS-CuRRiCuLAR
COmPutiNg
Room LC-ug09 at 13:50
This workshop will exploring the many ways
in which computing can be integrated into
other subjects in creative ways. Computer
science is a great stand-alone subject.
However there are many ways in which it
can be interlinked with other aspects of the
curriculum. This practical workshop aims
to leave you brimming with enthusiasm
for teaching computing in creative, cross-
curricular ways and, although applicable to
all teachers, might be particularly suited to
primary colleagues.
Zoe Ross
Computing and ICT Teacher
Zoe is a computing and
ICT teacher who is
passionate about creative
and engaging teaching. A
CAS Master Teacher and
former Head of ICT, Zoe
has delivered training to
many teachers throughout
the UK at both primary and secondary
level, helping them to understand how
computing can be taught in practical, fun
and innovative ways.
Zoe is also a Google Certified Trainer and
runs her own company www.dodigital.
co.uk/education
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS 22/23
WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
mOdELLiNg ACtivitiES At KS3
Room LC-Lg14 at 13:50
If the term ‘modelling’ conjures up visions of spread-sheets, it’s time to rethink. This session
will introduce some small projects and a wonderful, free visual programming environment
in which to develop dynamic systems. If you’ve used Scratch and love it, this is an obvious
‘next step’. Developed by Mitch Resnick (the inventor of Scratch), StarLogoTNG constructs
models using the same approach of ‘snap together’ blocks. The difference is that StarLogo
allows you to program thousands of ‘agents’ at once. Think Scratch on steroids! You (and
your pupils) can observe emergent behaviour growing out of very simple programs and
investigate the impact different factors can have on that behaviour. The possibilities are
endless. Aimed at KS3 teachers, this session will let you take away a project ready to use in
the classroom (with all supporting material) and a host of other ideas, including kinaesthetic
activities to support the programming challenges. With no previous experience needed, this
session is aimed at ICT teachers keen to build on the concepts initially developed in Scratch.
Roger davies
Director of IT, Queen Elizabeth School, Kirkby Lonsdale
Roger is the editor of SwitchedOn, the CAS termly newsletter. He is
probably representative of many teachers who find themselves teaching
the subject with little background knowledge. A late entrant to teaching,
he trained initially as a design and technology teacher. He has taught IT
since 1991, stumbling into teaching A level computing almost by
accident twenty years ago. Director of IT at Queen Elizabeth School,
Kirkby Lonsdale, Cumbria, his passion stems from seeing the way
‘computational thought’ develops childrens’ thinking skills, which are
applicable to many aspects of their lives, not just computing.
COmPutAtiONAL thiNKiNg iS
iNFORmAtiONAL thiNKiNg
Room mECh-g36 at 13:50
This workshop will explore an approach
to programming rooted in drawing out
information structures from concrete problem
scenarios, building strongly on ideas from
computational thinking. The approach is
explicitly language and implementation-
neutral, focusing on identifying appropriate
uses of generic high-level information
structures with simple construction, inspection
and modification operations. Following a
20-minute presentation, the workshop will
be based around group interaction through
paired problem solving. While the workshop
focuses on pedagogy for teachers, supporting
material, which could form the basis of
classroom activity, will be available.
greg michaelson
Professor of Computer Science
at Heriot-Watt University
Dr Greg Michaelson is
Professor of Computer
Science at Heriot-Watt
University, researching the
design and implementation
of programming languages,
in particular functional
languages for multi-
processor systems. Greg
has taught initial programming for over 35
years, to specialist and non-specialist
undergraduate and postgraduate students.
Along the way, he has published
introductory textbooks on functional
problem solving methodologies, with
varying degrees of success programming
through lambda calculus and on Standard
ML. While head of department, he wrote his
first novel “The Wave Singer”.
EXCitE, iNSPiRE ANd ENgAgE yOuR
COmPutiNg CLASSES
Room mECh-g28 at 13:50
Alan will enthral and entertain you as he
whisks you along an interactive rollercoaster
ride of his pedagogical practice. From his
‘Teach Computing’ courses, Alan has carefully
selected a rich feast of tricks and treats that
you can use to excite, inspire and engage
children in your classroom with. Expect to
leave this workshop buzzing with a whole
host of totally free, easy-to-master ideas that
are guaranteed to get the children you teach
enthusiastic about computing and believing
that you are a computing science genius.
More a theatrical sideshow than a workshop,
this interactive seminar will provide you with
imaginative, innovative and practical ways of
teaching computing and programming.
Alan O’donohoe
Principal Teacher of Computing, Our Lady’s High
School, Preston
Alan O’Donohoe believes
in trying to inspire the
digital creators of
tomorrow with initiatives
like Hack To The Future
and Raspberry Jam. Alan
is the principal teacher of
computing at Our Lady’s
High School where he
introduced computing into the curriculum
five years ago. You can read more on his
Teach Computing blog, follow @
teknoteacher’s tweets and download his
weekly Teach Computing podcast from
iTunes. As well as being a Computing At
School Master Teacher, Alan holds hub
meetings in Preston for teachers wishing to
develop computer science in their schools.
In the last 12 months, 140 teachers have
attended his ‘Teach Computing’ courses
http://about.me/alanodonohoe.
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS 24/25
WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
PiFACE
Room mECh-g42 at 13:50
This workshop is about bringing computing alive by connecting it with the real world and
having fun! Meet the tweeting chicken and discover how to build your own techno-birdbox
with a Raspberry Pi. See how to connect up sensors to gather data, then process this
information to discover new trends and insights. Explore how easy it is to collect and share
data online. Learn how to make a computer respond to this data, by making things move
through motors and actuators. Discover why teaching computing is a gift and tremendous
fun. Participants will learn how computer science can be integrated across almost all subject
areas. What will you make?
Andrew Robinson
Inventor, Pi Face
Dr Andrew Robinson can trace his first interest in computers back to
making a model lighthouse aged five. Since then he’s been drawn to
anything with flashing lights and generally all things tech. Pursuing his
interest in computers, Andrew studied and then worked at the University
of Manchester. A firm believer that education should be fun and
engaging, Andrew works to share his passion to get more people
interested in computer science. Andrew is the inventor of the PiFace
interfaces and learn-pi educational website, and co-author of the
‘Raspberry Pi Projects’ book. He also works in education, showing how
practical application can bring the subject alive in schools.
hOW tO buiLd AN OutStANdiNg COmPutiNg CuRRiCuLum
Room LC-ug06 at 14:40
This session will help you unpick national challenges to the Program of Study for 2014,
correctly interpret the curriculum and clarify timeline for changes. Develop a vision for your
department/school, strategies to make more creative computing lessons a reality and
understand how to demonstrate progression through the key stages. Scaffold the learning
to make your curriculum relevant and accessible. The session involves best practice and
innovative schemes of work from leading schools in the Network of Excellence.
mark dorling and matthew Walker
OCR CPD Programme Manager (P/T) and Head of Computing at Rodborough School & Technology College
Mark has a first-class computing degree and is a primary-trained
teacher with secondary teaching and industry experience. He has taught
in both all-ability and selective schools and across all key stages. In
2008 he established and currently leads a cross phase (key stage 2/3)
transition project called the Digital Schoolhouse at Langley Grammar
School. This project focuses on the teaching of ICT and computer
science across the curriculum. In this time, he has also lead the
introduction of computing at key stages 3 and 4. He is a lecturer on the postgraduate
programme (primary) at Brunel University and his practitioner research has been
published through the Higher Education Academy (TLAD) conferences and CS
Unplugged website. Mark is on the board of management of Computing At School.
Mark’s secondment is funded by OCR.
Matthew is Head of Computing at Rodborough, an 11-16 non-selective
academy in the south of Surrey, and a CAS Master Teacher. In addition
to teaching he is also finalising a part-time PhD in theoretical computer
science. He has previously taught across key stages 3, 4 and 5. His
primary focus is introducing a successful, relevant and engaging
computer science curriculum for all students from year
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS
WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
26/27
OPEN bAdgES
Room LC-ug05 at 14:40
Open badges: what are they and how can
you use them in your classroom? Using
the new computing PoS, together we will
create badges that could be used for the
assessment or attainment of the specific
criteria. Finally we’ll be looking at CPD
badges for existing and new computing
teachers. There will be a follow-up
Google Hangout.
genevieve Smith-Nunes
Teacher in Computing and Software Development,
Sussex Downs College
A computing and software
development teacher at
Sussex Downs College,
Genevieve values the
experience and
knowledge gained from
working with professionals
across all phases of
education and industry.
She is an advocate for including
programming in the curriculum and
believes you are never too young to learn
about computer science. She has
volunteered in a number of local primary
schools, teaching programming to
six-year olds. Genevieve’s current projects
include: the art of computer science, a
digital performance piece and GameLab,
an unity3D overnight event that is part of
the Brighton Digital Festival. Computer
science should have a creative aspect
“STEAM” not just “STEM”!
KiNAESthEtiC ACtivitiES
Room LC-ug07 at 14:40
During this workshop we will investigate
computational thinking without the use of
computers with tried and tested methods to
engage and develop students with differing
learning styles. Activities will range from
programming concepts through to theoretical
concepts such as binary logic and image
representation. These activities will be
delivered to demonstrate how they can be
used and adapted at different key stages
from KS2 through to KS5.
Peter marshman
Head of Computer Science at Park House School,
Newbury
Peter Marshman is a CAS
Master Teacher,
advanced skills teacher
and Head of Computer
Science at Park House
School in Newbury,
Berkshire. Peter has done
various projects around
primary and secondary
computer science, including the Primary
Computing Olympiad, and organised LA
projects. Peter assisted in developing
resources that engage young people and
a significant number of female computer
science students in his own school. Peter
has also developed resources used
nationally in collaboration with corporate
organisations.
LOgiCAL thiNKiNg AS A PRECuRSOR tO COmPutER PROgRAmmiNg
Room LC-ug09 at 14:40
bECOmiNg A CAS mAStER tEAChER
Room LC-Lg14 at 14:40
By the time they reach secondary school all
students have learned that teachers want to
hear the right answers. To that end, students
can learn about creating variables, writing
‘if’ statements and using loops with relative
ease. What they find much more difficult
is identifying strategies and designing
programming solutions to the problems we
pose. Students want to just spit out the right
answer, despite the fact that programming
is about developing a working solution and
there often isn’t a right or wrong answer.
Based largely on resources “stolen
” curated
from within the CAS community, we will
explore a range of techniques to encourage
students to think independently about how
they can solve problems in a logical manner
outside a programming context. We will also
look at how these skills can then be utilised
when students start to develop their own
programming solutions for problems.
mark Clarkson
Head of ICT and Computing, Egglescliffe School
Mark is the head of ICT
and computing at an 11-18
state school in Teesside.
He is a long-standing and
active member of the CAS
community, with various
roles including CAS hub
leader, CAS Master
Teacher and CAS board member.
Mark has always been determined to teach
more computer science at all key stages,
and to integrate it with existing and
developing fields of ICT. He believes that
computing is about much, much more than
coding and both an understanding of the
hardware and the ability to independently
tackle new and interesting problems are
areas that will help all young people.
One of the central strands of the CAS/
BCS Network of Excellence are the CAS
Master Teachers. Over the next five years
we will recruit and train a further 500
teachers (primary and secondary) to be
at the forefront of supporting colleagues
and helping them engage with computer
science in their classrooms. The challenge of
implementing the curriculum for computing
cannot be underestimated but CAS has a
network of the best teachers of computing
who are in the vanguard of the new
developments. Will you be one of the next
team of CAS Master Teachers? Come and
find out more!
Simon humphreys
National CAS Coordinator
Simon is the coordinator for
CAS. Simon taught music
before a hearing impairment
forced a change in direction
and he went back to
university graduating with
first class honours in 2002.
He taught A level computing
in Cambridge. He has
overseen, with colleagues, CAS’s
development from a small group of 20 to an
organisation of over 4000 members. Simon
is also responsible for the development of
the CAS/BCS Network of Excellence.
COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS
WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
28/29
A bROAd viEW OF COmPutAtiONAL thiNKiNg
Room mECh-g36 at 14:40
What is computational thinking?
Computational thinking is not only building
useful new information-processing systems,
but also trying to understand complex old
things: e.g. seeing the universe as made
of matter, energy and information, all
interacting; trying to understand how they
interact; building and testing explanatory
theories; and using that understanding in
many fields of study; understanding things
as well as building things.
Who needs it?
Not only engineers but also biologists,
psychologists, neuroscientists,
educationalists, and many more who are
trying to understand complex information-
processing systems (e.g. human minds).
Why?
Many reasons: often lack of computational
thinking leads to shallow research and
inadequate theories.
How can it be learnt?
There’s no easy way: you need to learn to
build and test ever more complex working
models. Analyse their strengths and
weaknesses and comparisons with rival
models.
Can it be taught?
Yes – but it has many facets. Different
teachers can and should choose different
facets to promote diversity of computational
expertise.
Related slide presentation and linked Video:
http://tinyurl.com/BhamCoTh
Aaron Sloman
Aaron took his first degree
in maths and physics in
Cape Town in 1956
followed by a DPhil in
philosophy of Mathematics
at Oxford in 1962. He
decided AI was the best
way to do philosophy
around 1970, and so learnt
to program. Aaron helped to found the
School of Cognitive and Computing
Sciences, including an undergraduate
degree in artificial intelligence at Sussex
University. He also helped to manage and
contribute to the development of Pop-11
and Poplog a toolkit for teaching,
research and development sold by
Integral Solutions Ltd for several years,
and also contributed to teaching libraries.
Aaron moved to Birmingham in 1991, and
helped to develop cognitive science, AI
and robotics (as a science). He is now
officially retired, but working on a Turing-
inspired meta-morphogenesis project.
COdERdOJO
Room mECh-g28 at 14:40
CoderDojo is creating a generation of
open source developers, seeding a skilled
workforce through a growing network
of free coding clubs, aimed at children
aged between 7 and 17. At CoderDojos
young people learn how to code, develop
websites, apps, games and more, in a social,
collaborative learning environment. Dojos are
guided by just one rule: Above all, be cool.
Each session is mentored by volunteers,
who give up their time and expertise to teach
young people that are passionate about
technology about its real-world applications.
The clubs are based on the principles of
martial arts clubs, where past students are
encouraged to mentor, and peer to peer
learning is fostered. This session will firstly
cover the history, ethos and philosophy
behind CoderDojo. It will then move on
to detail how to set up a Dojo, the most
common problems faced and solutions for
overcoming them. The session will finish with
sharing the future vision for CoderDojo.
Eugene O’donough
Ambassador, Hello World Foundation
An industrial design
graduate, Eugene has
worked for several years
in the web development
and IT sector. In August
2011, while working on a
start-up idea, Eugene
heard about a new club
that had started in Cork a
few weeks before hand and decided to
help get it started in Limerick. This club
has gone on to become the global
movement that is now CoderDojo, spread
across 200 clubs in 20 countries and
expanding. Eugene now works for the
Hello World Foundation supporting the
CoderDojo movement worldwide.
EXCitE, iNSPiRE ANd ENgAgE yOuR
COmPutiNg CLASSES
Room mECh-g42 at 14:40
Another chance to catch this session. Alan
will enthral and entertain you as he whisks
you along an interactive roller-coaster-ride
of his pedagogical practice. From his ‘Teach
Computing’ courses, Alan has carefully
selected a rich feast of tricks and treats that
you can use to excite, inspire and engage
children in your classroom. Expect to leave
this workshop buzzing with a whole host of
totally free, easy-to-master ideas that are
guaranteed to get the children you teach
enthusiastic about computing and believing
that you are a computing science genius.
More a theatrical sideshow than a workshop,
this interactive seminar will provide you with
imaginative, innovative and practical ways of
teaching computing and programming.
Alan O’donohoe
Principal Teacher of Computing,
Our Lady’s High School, Preston
Alan O’Donohoe inspires
the digital creators of
tomorrow with initiatives
like Hack To The Future
and Raspberry Jam. Alan
is principal teacher of
computing at Our Lady’s
High School where he
introduced computing five
years ago. You can read more on his Teach
Computing blog, follow @teknoteacher and
download his weekly Teach Computing
podcast from iTunes. As well as being a
CAS Master Teacher, Alan is a regional hub
leader in Preston. In the last 12 months,
140 teachers have attended his ‘Teach
Computing’ courses http://about.me/
alanodonohoe
30/31 COMPUTING AT SCHOOL 5TH CONFERENCE FOR TEACHERS 2013 WORKSHOPS AND SEMINARS
WORKShOPS ANd SEmiNARS
At OCR, we are the only awarding body to o￿ er you
quali￿ cations, teacher training and support materials
at Entry Level, GCSE and A Level in Computing.
Find out more at ocr.org.uk/computerscience
For the first choice in Computer Science,
there’s only OCR
OCR is proud to support the CAS 5th Annual
Teacher Conference
LEADING THE WAY IN
COMPUTER SCIENCE