ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

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DEPARTMENT OF WATER AFFAIRS AND FORESTRY




ENVIRONMENTAL

MANAGEMENT

FRAMEWORK




FIRST DRAFT




MAY 2002

















DEPARTMENT OF WATER AFFAIRS AND FORESTRY






ENVIRONMENTAL

MANAGEMENT

FRAMEWORK


First Draft




(A strategy to align Integrated Environmental Management principles, Environmental
Assessment processes and other environmental management tools and pro
cesses with the
functions and responsibilities of DWAF)








May 2002







The commitment of the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry to
sustainable is reflected in the following vision statement

Our Vision

We have a vision of a democratic, people
-
centred nation

working towards human rights, social justice, equity and

prosperity for all.

We have a vision of a society in which all our people enjoy

the benefits of clean water and hygienic sanitation services.

We have a vision of water used carefully

and productively

for economic activities which promote the growth, development

and prosperity of the nation.

We have a vision of a land in which our natural forests and

plantations are managed in the best interests of all.

We have a vision of a people who

understand and protect

our natural resources so as to make them ecologically stable

and safeguard them for current and future generations.

We have a vision of a Department that serves the public loyally,

meets its responsibilities with energy and compassi
on and acts

as a link in the chain of integrated and environmentally

sustainable development.

We have a vision of development and co
-
operation throughout

our region; of playing our part in the African Renaissance.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS


This integrated Environmental Management Fr
amework has been developed by the
Directorate: Social and Ecological Services in DWAF to align Integrated
Environmental Management principles, Environmental Assessment processes and
other environmental management tools and processes with the functions and
responsibilities of DWAF.
The project was undertaken by a core group from
DWAF supported by consultancy services from the CSIR. The project has been
conducted through a consultative process that included key stakeholders from
within DWAF, the Department
of Environmental Affairs and Tourism (nationally
and provincially) and consultants to these organisations. The role and contribution
of all stakeholders in the process has defined the content of this document. The
contribution of all stakeholders in grat
efully appreciated.







Preface


The following document has

been prepared in Draft format for discussion
purposes. The authors would appreciate any constructive comment and
review that will enhance the applicability of the Environmental Management
Framework for the Department. All comments will be noted and resp
onded to,
either through corrections in the text, or through response in a Comments
Response Report.



i

DEPARTMENT OF WATER AFFAIRS AND FORESTRY


ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK


FIRST DRAFT


Table of Contents



1.

INTRODUCTION

................................
................................
................................
.......

1

1.1

Overview and background

................................
................................
.............

1

1.2

Vision of the EMF

................................
................................
...........................

2

1.3

Aims and objectives of the EMF

................................
................................
.....

2

2.

USERS GUIDE

................................
................................
................................
..........

3

2.1

Purpose of this document

................................
................................
..............

3

2.2

Who should use this document?

................................
................................
....

3

2.3

EMF structure and contents

................................
................................
...........

4

2.4

How to use this document

................................
................................
..............

5

3.

DWAF FUNCTIONS AND A
CTIVITIES, AND THEIR

ENVIRONMENTAL LEGAL
COMPLIANCE REQUIREME
NTS

................................
................................
.............

6

3.1

Introduction and overview of DWAF structure, functions and a
ctivities

...........

6

3.1.1

Water Resource Management functions and activities

........................

9

3.1.1.1

WRM Impacting Functions

................................
......................

9

3.1.1.2

WRM Managing Functions

................................
......................

9

3.1.2

Water Services

................................
................................
.................

16

3.1.2.1

WS Impacting Functions

................................
.......................

16

3.1.2.2

WS Managing Functions

................................
.......................

17

3.1.3

Forestry

................................
................................
............................

22

3.1.3.1

Forestry Impacting Functions

................................
................

22

3.1.3.2

Forestry Management Functions

................................
...........

23

3.2

Environmental legislation and policy overview

................................
.............

26

3.2.1

Environmental laws, other than those administered by DWAF, which
may have an influence on activities undertaken by DWAF in the
execution of their statutory mandate

................................
.................

26

3.2.1.
1

Water Services

................................
................................
.....

26

3.2.1.2

Water Resource Management

................................
..............

27

3.2.1.3

Forestry

................................
................................
................

28

3.2.2

Environmental laws administered by DWAF

................................
.....

29

3.2.3

International conventions, common law and important legislative
developments that may influence DWAF

................................
..........

32

4.

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESS
MENT AND MANAGEMENT
TOOLS

.......................

36

4.1

Introduction

................................
................................
................................
..

36

4.2

The Evolution of Environmental Asses
sment

................................
...............

37

4.3

Environmental Assessment Tools

................................
................................

38

4.3.1

Strategic Environmental Assessment

................................
................

38

4.3.2

Environmental Impact Assessment

................................
...................

42

4.3.3

Environmental Management Systems

................................
...............

43

4.3.4

Environmental Economics

................................
................................

45

ii

4.3.5

Life Cycle Assessment
................................
................................
......

46

4.3.6

Risk Assessment

................................
................................
..............

47

4.3.6.1

Health Risk Asses
sm
e
nt

................................
.......................

47

4.3.6.2

Ecological Risk Assessment

................................
.................

48

4.3.7

Cumulative Effects Assessment

................................
........................

51

5.

THE ENVIRONMENTAL MA
NAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

................................
......

53

5.1

Introduction

................................
................................
................................
..

53

5.2

Environmental Management and the Policy Formulation & Rev
iew Process

53

5.2.1

Introduction

................................
................................
.......................

53

5.2.2

Environmentally Sound Policy Formulation and review

.....................

54

5.2.2.1

Step 1: The identification of a broad goal

..............................

55

5.2.2.2

Step 2: Policy development

................................
...................

56

5.2.2.3

Step 3: Implem
entation

................................
.........................

57

5.2.2.4

Step 4: Monitoring and review

................................
...............

57

5.3

Environmental Assessment and management for plans and programmes

...

58

5.3.1

Introduction

................................
................................
.......................

58

5.3.2

Conducting an SEA

................................
................................
..........

58

5.3.2.1

Creating the Organisational Fr
amework

................................

58

5.3.3

Co
-
ordinating the SEA

................................
................................
......

59

5.3.3.1

Project Leader

................................
................................
......

59

5.3.3.2

The SEA Team

................................
................................
.....

59

5.3.3.3

Description of the SEA process

................................
.............

59

5.4

Undertaking development projects

................................
...............................

60

5.4.1

Introduction

................................
................................
.......................

60

5.4.2

EIA in the Project Life
-
cycle

................................
..............................

61

5.4.2.1

Roles and responsibilities in the EIA process

........................

64

5.4.2.2

Proponent

................................
................................
.............

64

5.4.2.3

Consultant
................................
................................
.............

65

5.4.2.4

Interested and affect
ed parties

................................
..............

67

5.4.2.5

Competent Authority

................................
.............................

67

5.4.3

The EIA process

................................
................................
...............

68

5.4.3.
1

Pre
-
screening consultation

................................
....................

68

5.4.3.2

Screening

................................
................................
.............

71

5.4.3.3

Scoping

................................
................................
.................

72

5.4.
3.4

Impact Assessment

................................
...............................

75

5.4.3.5

Record of decision and appeal

................................
..............

78

5.4.3.6

Conditions of approval

................................
..........................

78

5.4.3.7

Auditing

................................
................................
.................

79

5.4.4

Regulatory Authorities in the EIA process

................................
.........

79

5.5

Revisions in IEM

................................
................................
..........................

80

6.

RECOMMENDATIONS

................................
................................
...........................

81

7.

REFERENCES

................................
................................
................................
........

82


APPENDIX 1: SCREENING CHECKLIST



iii

List of Figures


Figure 4.1

Broadening participation in project design and evaluation

................................
.........

36

Figure 4.2

Hierarchy of Environmental Assessment and Management Tools

.............................

38

Figure 4.3

The Environmental Assessment Process and relationships

................................
.......

38

Figure 4.4

Generic SEA process diagram

................................
................................
....................

41

Figure 4.5

Risk assessment process

................................
................................
...........................

50

Figure 5.1

EMF Structure Diagram

................................
................................
...............

54

Figure 5.2

Generic P
olicy formulation process in South Africa (after CSIR, 2002)

........

55

Figure 5.3

EIA in the DWAF project lifecycle

................................
................................
.

62

Figure 5.4

Engineering a
nd environmental feasibility studies linkages

..........................

64



List of Tables


Table 3.1

Structure and organization of the Water Resource Management Chief Directorates,
Directorate
s and Sub
-
Directorates as at 1 September 2001.

................................
.......

6

Table 3.2

Structure and organization of the Water Services Chief Directorates, Directorates and
Sub
-
Directorates as at 1 September 2001.

................................
................................
..

8

Table 3.3

Structure and organization of the Forestry Chief Directorates, Directorates and Sub
-
Directorates as at 1 September 2001.

................................
................................
..........

8

Table 3.4

D
etails of Water Resource Management functions and activities (DWAF 2000)

.......

12

Table 3.5

Details of Water Services functions and activities (DWAF 2000)

...............................

19

Table 3.6

Details of Forestry functions and activities (DWAF 2000)

................................
..........

24

Table 3.7

Legal requirements for DWAF to administer statutory mandates

...............................

30

Table 3.8

International conventions and agreements for which DWAF is responsible
...............

32

Table 4.1

Positive and negative aspects of Environmental Ass
essment

................................
...

37

Table 4.2

Comparing SEA and EIA

................................
................................
............................

38


iv

Glossary




Affected environment

Those parts of the socio
-
economic and biophysical
environment impacted on by the deve
lopment



Alternatives

A possible course of action, in place of another, that would
meet the same purpose and need. Alternatives can refer to
any of the following but are not limited hereto: alternative sites
for development, alternative site layouts, alte
rnative designs,
alternative processes and materials. In Integrated
Environmental Management the so
-
called "no action"
alternative may also require investigation under certain
circumstances.


Assessment

The process of collecting, organising, analysing, int
erpreting
and communicating data that are relevant to some decisions.



Activity

A development action, either planned or existing, that may
result in environmental impacts through pollution and/or
resource use.


Auditing

The process through which an EIA is

inspected which then
provides an opportunity and mechanism to learn from
experience and to refine project design and implementation
procedures.


Compliance



To act in accordance with the rules and regulations.



Development

The act of altering or modifyi
ng resources in order to obtain
potential benefits.


Environment

In its broadest sense, the word environment embraces the
conditions and / or influences under which any individual or
thing exists, lives or develops. These surroundings can be
placed into th
ree categories:



The combination of physical conditions that affect and
influence the growth and development of an individual or
community;



The social and cultural conditions that affect the nature of
an individual or community; and



The surroundings of an i
nanimate object of intrinsic social
value.

The environment of the human being includes the abiotic
factors of land, water, atmosphere, climate, sound, odour and
taste. The biotic factors being, fauna, flora, ecology, bacteria
and viruses, and social factor
s that make up the “quality of
life”.

v

The European Commission defines the environment as “the
combination of elements whose complex interrelationships
make up the settings, the surroundings and the conditions of
life of the individual and of society, as th
ey are or as they are
felt.

Environment includes the land, water and air, including all
layers of the atmosphere, all organic and inorganic matter and
living organisms, and the interacting natural systems


Environmental impact

The degree of change in an en
vironment resulting from the
effect of an activity on the environment, whether desirable or
undesirable. Impacts may be the direct consequence of an
organisation’s activities or may be indirectly caused by them.


Environmental impact

A process of examinin
g the environmental effects of an
activity,

Assessment



such as development


Environmental impact

A report describing the process of examining the

statement

environmental effects of a development proposal, the expected
impacts and the proposed mitigating

measures


Environmental aspect


A human activity or environmental element


Environmental issue

A concern felt by one of more parties about some existing,
potential or perceived environmental impact.


Environmental impact

A report describing the process o
f examining the environment

report

effects of a development proposal, the expected impacts and
the proposed mitigating measures.


Evaluation

The process of weighing information, the act of making value
judgements or ascribing values to data in order to re
ach a
decision.


Independent environmental

A consultant not in the permanent service of the applicant. In

consultant

addition a
consultant ceases to be independent if:



Involved in any design or work of the same project;



Earns more than 50% of his or her
work from the same
company;



Payment depends on the successful authorisation of the
application.

Consultants in the permanent services of the applicant are
referred to as "in house" consultants.


Integrated environmental

IEM provides an integrated approache
d for environmental

management (IEM)

assessment, management, decision
-
making and to promote
sustainable development and the equitable use of resources.
Principles underlying IEM provide for a democratic,
participatory, holistic, sustainable, equitable and

accountable
approach.



vi

Interested party

Individuals or groups concerned with or affected by an activity
and its consequences. These include the authorities, local
communities, investors, work force, consumers, environmental
interest groups and the genera
l public.


Irreversible impact

When the character, diversity or reproductive capacity of an
environment is permanently lost.


Land use



The activities that take place within a given area or space.


List of activities

Development actions that are likely to

result in significant
environmental impacts as identified by the Minister of
Environmental Affairs and Tourism in terms of sections 21 of
the Environment Conservation Act, 1989.


Mitigation



Measures designed to avoid, reduce or remedy adverse
impacts.


Monitoring

The repetitive and continued observation, measurement and
evaluation of environmental data to follow changes over a
period of time to assess the efficiency of control measures.


Negative impact

A change that reduces the quality of the environmen
t (for
example, by reducing species diversity and the reproductive
capacity of the ecosystem, by damaging health, property or by
causing nuisance).


Participation

Interested and affected individuals and groups will have an
opportunity to participate in dec
isions about ways in which
environmental concerns are addressed


Positive impact

A change that improves the quality of the environment (for
example, by increasing species diversity and the reproductive
capacity of the ecosystem, by removing nuisances or
im
proving amenities).


Pristine



Undisturbed natural landscape.


Pro
-
active:

Taking action in anticipation of a problem rather than in
reaction to the problem.


Rehabilitation

Restoration of landscape more or less to is former scenic
appearance.


Relevant a
uthority

The environmental authority on national, provincial or local
level entrusted in terms of the Constitution and in terms of the
designation of powers in Notice No. R. 1184 of 5 September
1997 with the responsibility for granting approval to a propos
al
or allocating resources.


Resort

Place frequented by people for holiday, sport, recreation,
health or similar purpose.




vii

Scoping

The process of identifying the significant issues, alternatives
and decision points, which should be addressed by a particu
lar
EIR, and may include a preliminary assessment of potential
impacts.


Significant impact

An impact that, by its magnitude, duration or intensity alters an
important aspect of the environment.


Screening

The process whereby the responsible department(s)
decides
whether or not a project requires assessment, and the level of
assessment that may be required.


Scheduled activities

Development actions that are likely to result in significant
environmental impacts.


Upgrade

Includes the enlargement or expansion

of an activity, but
excludes regular or routine maintenance and the replacement
of inefficient or old equipment, plants or machinery where such
does not have a detrimental effect on the environment.


Value Judgement

A statement of opinion or belief, which

is not capable of being
falsified by comparison with fact.







Department of Water Affairs a
nd Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch

First Draft: May 2002


1


1.

INTRODUCTION

1.1

Overview and background


The Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF) has endeavoured to apply elements
of the Integrated Environmental Management (IEM) process to the d
evelopment and
implementation of the Department’s development projects prior even to the establishment of
environmental management and assessment regulations in South Africa. The following
DWAF initiatives provide an indication of the Department’s past an
d ongoing commitment to
IEM:




Formulating Departmental procedures for applying the IEM process in 1989;



Compiling a manual for applying the IEM process in 1990;



Amending the 1989 Departmental procedures to comply with the National IEM
Guideline Series of 1
992;



Amending and documenting the DWAF IEM procedure again in 1995;



Developing and documenting the Relevant Environmental Impact Prognosis
(ROIP) Manual in 1995; and



Updating the DWAF IEM procedures through the development of an EMF for
application and imp
lementation at a strategic level by the Water Resource
Management Branch (2001


ongoing).


New environmental management practices, which received prominence in South Africa after
1995 together with recent South African environmental legislative developmen
ts, have
necessitated the updating and alignment of the DWAF’s existing IEM procedures with
current national environmental assessment and management requirements, and
international trends. The need for integrated and overarching Departmental IEM procedure
s
is strengthened by the overlapping environmental considerations of several Departmental
policies, strategies, guidelines and regulations including the Integrated Catchment
Management Strategy, Resource Directed Measures and the Stream Flow Reduction
Acti
vities (SFRA)

Water Use Licensing System
.


DWAF aims to proactively address these needs through its five
-
phase project entitled
“Revision of the Integrated Environmental Management and Development of an
Environmental Management Framework within the Departm
ent of Water Affairs and
Forestry”. The first phase of this project includes developing an Environmental Management
Framework (EMF) (this document) for application specifically in the Department’s Water
Resource Management Branch. The remaining phases wi
ll focus on implementation,
application and capacity building.


From a national environmental perspective, this initiative will help to ensure that DWAF
abides by the National Environmental Management Act (Act No. 107 of 1998) (NEMA)
principles (refer to
C
hapter 3
) and the current NEMA Chapter 5 IEM provisions. It will also
satisfy the anticipated requirements of the redrafted Chapter 5 of NEMA and its associated
national IEM Regulations (which have not as yet been released).


The EMF will also assist DW
AF to abide by international conventions and international
environmental considerations, provisions and requirements for water resource projects,
while also complying with international trends that promote environmental sustainability
through responsible “
cradle
-
to
-
grave” integrated environmental management. Pertinent
international examples include the World Commission on Dams’ working paper
“Environmental and Social Impact Assessment for Large Dams” (Sadler
et al.,
2000) and the
World Bank’s Environmental

Assessment Sourcebook (World Bank 1997). Chapter 8 of the
Department of Water Affairs a
nd Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch

First Draft: May 2002


2


Sourcebook provides environmental assessment guidance for irrigation and drainage
projects, large dams and reservoirs. Chapter 9 provides guidance for water supply and
sewerage, while Chapter 10
provides guidance for hydroelectric projects.


1.2

Vision of the EMF


The EMF’s vision is to ensure that environmental considerations and the associated legal
compliance requirements are efficiently and adequately addressed during all stages of the
development

processes undertaken through DWAF related functions, activities and projects.


1.3

Aims and objectives of the EMF


The objectives of the EMF include (DWAF CEIMP, 2001):




Aligning and optimising the environmental management processes required by
the relevant l
egislation, including
inter alia
the National Water Act (Act No. 36 of
1998), National Forest Act (Act No. 84 of 1998), Water Services Act (Act No. 108
of 1997), National Environmental Management Act (Act No. 107 of 1998) and the
Environment Conservation A
ct (Act No. 73 of 1989);



Ensuring that environmental considerations are efficiently and adequately taken
into account during all stages of development and implementation processes
within DWAF, which will assist to effectively perform Departmental environme
ntal
functions;



Ensuring that activities and projects are compatible with the environmental
legislation and meet the environmental requirements, thus ensuring compliance;



Ensuring that in
-
house and funded DWAF Water Resource Management projects
apply, and
thus conform, to minimum environmental standards through the use of
environmental procedures;



Ensuring the integration, development and implementation of environmental
management tools and processes within DWAF, thus promoting the National
Environmental Ma
nagement principles as set out in NEMA; and



Encouraging integrated resource management, sustainable environmental
development and utilisation and sound environmental management practices
within DWAF.


The EMF aims to promote and facilitate these objectives

by serving as a strategic
environmental decision
-
support framework for the Water Resource Management Branch of
the Department. Ultimately, it is hoped that an overarching EMF, that takes cognisance of
all DWAF related activities and functions will be dev
eloped, thus ensuring the application of
sound integrated environmental management practices throughout the Department.


Department of Water Affairs a
nd Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch

First Draft: May 2002


3



2.

USERS GUIDE


2.1

Purpose of this document


This Environmental Management Framework document
is intended to inform and guide the
Departmen
t of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF) Wa
ter Resources Management Branch at
a strategic decision
-
making level. The document
has been developed with the purpose of
promoting and ensuring environmental legal compliance and achieving environmental
sustainabi
lity through the promotion of sound environmental management practices by the
Water Resources Management Branch of the Department.


As a strategic environmental decision
-
support framework, the document is neither
prescriptive nor does it include excessive
information or detailed guidelines on any of the
EMF components. The provision of more detailed information and
application/implementation guidance forms part of the capacity building and implementation
phases (Phases Two, Three, Four and Five) of the ove
rall project to revise the IEM
procedures within the DWAF. Phase Two and Phase Three deliverables will include a
“Manual for Application of Environmental Management within DWAF” and an
“Implementation Strategy for Integrated Environmental Management withi
n DWAF”
respectively.


2.2

Who should use this document?


This document is intended for use by anyone who:




Is directly involved in any of the current DWAF Water Resource Management
functions, activities and projects;



Requires an understanding of the environme
ntal legal compliance requirements
for DWAF functions, activities and projects;



Needs to know how Integrated Environmental Management is applied within the
Department;



Needs to know the recommended DWAF Water Resource Management related
environmental manag
ement roles and responsibilities;



Needs to understand which environmental management and assessment tools
are incorporated in the EMF and how they are integrated with the project lifecycle
approach as applied by DWAF; and



Requires an understanding of the s
tructure and functioning of the Water
Resource Management EMF.


The users, therefore, may include:




DWAF national and provincial water resource management branch staff;



Water Resource Management activity and project consultants, sub
-
consultants,
contractor
s and sub
-
contractors;



Environmental consultants; and



Members of the general public.

Department of Water Affairs a
nd Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch

First Draft: May 2002


4



2.3

EMF structure and contents


The EMF document is structured in a sequential manner to assist the reader to understand
the background to, and basis for, developing the EMF
, through to understanding what
components make up the EMF and how these components are integrated.
.


Chapter One

provides background information to the need for the EMF and an introduction
to some of the more important considerations for developing the EM
F. The chapter also
provides an overview of the Department’s past and current approaches to IEM and the
environmental management requirements as detailed in key DWAF documents including the
Environmental Implementation and Management Plan (DWAF, 2001) and

the Strategic Plan
2000/2001 (DWAF, 2000).


Chapter Two

(this chapter) contains document user information.


Chapter Three

documents the key DWAF Forestry, Water Services and Water Resource
Management branch functions and activities. The chapter also high
lights the applicable
legislation, bills, common law, regulations, ordinances and conventions that the Department
should consider for ensuring environmental compliance. This Chapter is supported by the
EMF Legal Register.


Chapter Four

presents an overvie
w of the Integrated Environmental Management (IEM)
concept, including an overview of past and present South African IEM developments such as
the 1992 Integrated Environmental Management Guideline Series (DEA, 1992), the current
EIA Regulations (DEAT, 1998)
, the National Environmental Management Act (Act No. 107 of
1998)(NEMA), the current revision of NEMA and the associated current drafting of IEM
guidelines. The application of IEM by DWAF is also discussed.


Chapter Five

outlines how the EMF integrates an
d aligns IEM with the DWAF project
lifecycle approach and associated project engineering phases. The chapter details how and
where IEM and the relevant Environmental Assessment and Management (EA & M) tools
should be included as part of the project lifecy
cle approach

The chapter details various
aspects associated with the different stages of the IEM lifecycle including their aims, their
application and the associated roles and responsibilities. The environmental assessment
and management tools incorporat
ed in the EMF are discussed in terms of their definitions,
aims and objectives, principles, benefits and weaknesses, applications and associated roles
and responsibilities.


The Chapter considers the most appropriate way to align the DWAF Resource Directed

Measures (RDM) activities as well as the current DWAF licensing procedures with the
broader IEM requirements for ensuring that they can be integrated with the EMF.


Chapter Six
draws the previous chapters together to indicate how their respective
componen
ts combine to form the EMF. The chapter outlines how the EMF:




Fits the functions of DWAF and covers all DWAF Water Resource Management
activities;



Complies with the principles and requirements of IEM;



Considers all components of the environment, all deve
lopment phases and all
I&APs, including national, provincial and local authorities, key stakeholders and the
general public; and



Focuses on sustainable development rather than on environmental conservation.

Department of Water Affairs a
nd Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch

First Draft: May 2002


5



2.4

How to use this document


Readers requiring deta
ils of the structure and function of the EMF should only read
Chapter
Six
. The chapter

contains an overview of the EMF in the form of a summary of the salient
EMF points contained in the previous chapters. The reader should refer to the respective
chapte
rs indicated below where more information on the different EMF components is
required.


Chapter One

should be consulted to familiarise the reader with the requirements of Phase
One of the DWAF IEM procedure revision project.


Chapter Three
will help the re
ader

to identify potential environmental legal liabilities and
associated compliance requirements when deciding on and planning any of the listed Water
Resource Management functions and activities.


The reader should consult

Chapter Four

when planning Wate
r Resource Management
functions and activities to ensure that they take the EMF requirements into account.


Chapter Five

will assist the reader to identify how to go about ensuring that the relevant
functions, activities and projects achieve environmental
compliance. The reader will be able
to identify what IEM steps need to be incorporated into the project lifecycle phases and
which environmental tools would be most appropriate for satisfying the relevant
environmental “best practice” requirements.


Chapt
er Six

should be referred to by readers involved in DWAF RDM functions and
activities, as well as readers involved in water resource management activities and projects
that must take cognisance of the DWAF licensing procedures.


Department of Water Affairs a
nd Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch

First Draft: May 2002


6



3.

DWAF FUNCTIONS AND ACTIVI
TIES, AND THEIR
ENVIRONMENTAL LEGAL COMPLIANCE
REQUIREMENTS

3.1

Introduction and overview of DWAF structure, functions and activities


The Department of Water Affairs and Forestry’s strategic vision includes “A society in which
all people enjoy the benefits of

clean water and hygienic sanitation services; water used
carefully and productively for economic activities which promote the growth, development
and prosperity of the nation; and a land in which our natural forests and plantations are
managed in the best

interest of all” (DWAF, 2001).


This vision is achieved primarily through the functions and services of the Department’s
three core branches, namely:




Water Resource Management;



Water Services; and



Forestry.


Each of these branches is organised into Chief

Directorates, which in turn comprise a
number of Directorates and Sub
-
Directorates (refer to
Table 3.1
,
Table 3.2

and
Table 3.3
).


Table 3.
1

Structure and organization of the Water Resource Management Chief
Directorates, Directo
rates and Sub
-
Directorates as at 1 September 2001.


Chief Directorate

Directorate

Sub
-
Directorate

Planning

Strategic Planning

Water use studies

Water resources management

Policy formulating

Sub
-
sahara

Planning systems

Project planning

4 regi
ons

Water resources planning

4 regions

Development

Civil design

Canal systems

Earth and rockfill dams

Concrete dams

Region water supply

Civil contract administration

Dam safety

Building materials laboratory

Hydraulic studies

Stru
ctural studies

Drawing services

Mechanical/electrical engineering

Technical design services

Dam outlets

Pumping projects

Special projects

Heavy current electrical plant

Radio telemetry systems

Mechanical engineering services

Elect
rical engineering systems

Technical support services

Department of Water Affairs a
nd Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch

First Draft: May 2002


7


Chief Directorate

Directorate

Sub
-
Directorate


Construction

Construction equipment and drilling
services

Construction projects A, B and C

International
projects

LHWP

Dam contracts

Tunnel contracts

International liaison

International rel
ations

Dam safety office

Scientific services

Hydrology

Hydrometry

Water resources studies

Network services

Flood studies

Hydrological data quality

Hydrological data management

Geohydrology

Ground water information

Geohydrological in
formation

Groundwater resource assessment

Groundwater studies

Geomatics

Land information

Photogrammatry

Specialised surveys

GIS (data management)

Regions

Social and ecological services

Institute for water quality studies

Analytical
services

Water quality monitoring

Information systems development

Water resource quality assessment

Water use and
conservation

Water utilization

Operation systems

Irrigation

Water loss control

Water apportionment

Water pricing

Stre
am flow reduction allocation

Water quality management

Urban development and agriculture

Mines

Waste management

Management systems

Water conservation

Catchment management

Working for water


Department of Water Affairs a
nd Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch

First Draft: May 2002


8


Table 3.
2

Structure a
nd organization of the Water Services Chief Directorates,
Directorates and Sub
-
Directorates as at 1 September 2001.


Chief directorate

Directorate

Sub
-
directorate

Water services

Macro planning and
information support

Macro planning head office

Informat
ion support

Local development planning

Local institutional and
social development

Water institutions support

Sanitation support

Technical support

Training and capacity building

Project development
support

Business plan appraisals

Develop
ment support

Contract administration support

Donor co
-
ordination

Intervention and
operations support

Commercial services

Water services regulatory intervention

Operation and maintenance support

Policy co
-
ordination and communications suppor
t



Table 3.
3

Structure and organization of the Forestry Chief Directorates,
Directorates and Sub
-
Directorates as at 1 September 2001.


Chief directorate

Directorate

Sub
-
directorate

Forestry

Forestry policy

National planning

Technology and information

International liaison

Community forestry

Policy and planning

Technical assistance

Commercial forestry

Production

Processing

Harvesting/mechanical

Forestry northern regions

Northern area

Mpumalanga

Corpora
te services

Forestry southern regions

Commercial forestry east griqua

Commercial forestry matiwane

Commercial forestry kei area

Community and conservation forestry
western cape area

Community and conservation forestry
umzimvubu area

Corpor
ate services

Forestry central regions

Commercial forestry marketing and
processing

Commercial forestry KZN northern
region

Conservation and community forestry
central regions

Corporate services

Indigenous forest
management

Conservation forestr
y scientific
services

Operations

Legislation implementation

Forestry regulations


Department of Water Affairs a
nd Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch

First Draft: May 2002


9


3.1.1

Water Resource Management functions and activities


The historical focus of the Water Resources Management Branch has been on the
development of systems to store and

transport water. This included the construction and
operation of large dams, tunnels and pipelines, and the local construction of systems of
weirs, pump stations and irrigation canals. In recent years, the Water Resources
Management focus has changed fr
om constructing major structures to alleviating water
shortages and to a more balanced approach of equity in access to water, as well as to water
conservation and demand management (DWAF, 2001).


The Water Resources Management Branch is mandated by the Nat
ional Water Act (NWA)
(Act No. 36 of 1998) to ensure that South Africa’s water resources are protected, used,
developed, conserved and controlled in an integrated, sustainable, equitable, efficient and
optimal manner, to the benefit of all persons.


From a

broad environmental perspective, the Water Resources Management Branch
functions can be divided into those that impact on the environment and those related to
managing the environment. Impacting functions include water resource infrastructure
planning, d
evelopment and operation, while managing functions include policy and strategy
development, water resource protection and regulating water use.


3.1.1.1

WRM Impacting Functions


Water Resource Infrastructure Planning, Development and Operation


This function entai
ls the implementing actions related to the management and development
of water resources and involves the planning, design, implementation and operation of water
resources infrastructure and intervention programmes, to ensure sufficient water availability
of adequate quality (DWAF 2001).


The infrastructure of large dams, canals, tunnels, pump
-
stations and pipe
-
lines required to
ensure the reliable abstraction and availability of bulk unpurified water supplies is referred to
as water resource management (WR
M) infrastructure (DWAF 2001).


The purification works, pump
-
stations, reservoirs, pipelines and reticulation networks
required to carry purified water from bulk raw water sources to the individual domestic and
industrial end
-
users, are referred to as
wate
r services (WS) infrastructure
(DWAF 2001).
Such infrastructure ensures that the availability of water is not interrupted or uncertain.


Although the broader objective of the implementation and operation of WRM infrastructure is
of benefit to society at l
arge, it impacts on the environment. These impacts are addressed
via environmental impact assessments and related procedures and the subsequent
development and implementation of environmental management plans in co
-
operation with
the National DEAT and its

provincial counterparts (DWAF 2001).


3.1.1.2

WRM Managing Functions


The NWA mandates National Government as the public trustee of the country’s water
resources and states that water resources are a national asset to be utilised in the best
interests of all citi
zens in a sustainable manner to guarantee the needs of future generations
(DWAF 2001).


Department of Water Affairs a
nd Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch

First Draft: May 2002


10


The needs of the environment are also guaranteed in the Act, flowing from the Constitutional
right of all to a safe, healthy environment. This means that Government is

tasked to ensure
that water resources, as well as water users, are protected (DWAF 2001).


Water resources are protected through Chapter 3 of the NWA and water use is controlled
and regulated through Chapter 4 of the Act, which outlines permissible water
use and all
matters pertaining to authorisation of water use (DWAF 2001).


Policy and Strategy Development


This function entails developing coherent policies, strategies and regulatory frameworks for
other functions to implement, and includes:




Long
-
term
strategic planning and visioning for the WRM function;



Developing legislation and regulations, ensuring coherence and integration;



Developing the National Water Resource Strategy, e.g. undertaking water situation
assessments, developing and applying a Nati
onal Water Balance Model, and
developing national scenarios for reconciling water requirements with available
resources;



Developing Catchment Management Strategies, which include water use allocation
plans, at a regional or water management area level;



Dev
eloping methodologies and guidelines for WRM;



Financial planning and business planning for the WRM function;



Formulating the organisational roles and responsibilities of water institutions; and



Formulation of the national pricing strategy for water use.


W
ater Resource Protection


The water resource protection function is fundamental to the new approach to water
resource management and compliance with sustainability principles. This function includes
the following components:


1.

Implementing
Resource Directe
d Measures

(RDMs). These measures focus on
the water resource as an ecosystem rather than on just water itself as a
commodity. They serve as tools to determine the sustainable levels of water use.
The following RDMs are specified by the NWA:



A
national
classification system

for water resources;



Determining the
Reserve
; and



Setting
Resource Quality Objectives
(RQOs).


2.

Implementing
Source Based Controls

(SBCs). SBCs are used to control the
sources of impacts in such a way that any impact on a water resour
ce does not
exceed the requirements set by the RDMs. They include the following measures:



Standards to regulate the quality of waste discharges to water resources;



Requirements for on
-
site management practices (e.g. to minimise waste
at source and to cont
rol diffuse pollution);



Requirements to minimise impacts of water use generally, not just water
quality aspects; and



Requirements for clean
-
up and rehabilitation of water resources that
have already been polluted.


These measures are implemented,
inter ali
a
,

through their incorporation in
licence conditions.


Department of Water Affairs a
nd Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch

First Draft: May 2002


11


Other protection measures include economic incentives to foster the development of low
-
waste and non
-
waste technologies. These measures also include mandatory and voluntary
water conservation
and
dema
nd management

(WC/DM).


WC/DM strategies will form part of the National Water Resource Strategy as prescribed in
the NWA and will identify national objectives and goals that will lead to the development of
action plans and key measures to be implemented by

the various water institutions.


DWAF’s role in the above is to:




Promote institutionalisation of WC/DM;



Develop policies, strategies and regulations;



Integrate WC/DM in DWAF’s other relevant functions;



Undertake capacity building, awareness creation and
communication activities;
and



Monitor and evaluate compliance and performance.


Regulating Water Use


This function comprises giving effect to the policies, strategies, frameworks, plans and
regulations for managing the use of water resources, and includes
:




Authorising and registering water use

Section 21 of the NWA lists eleven broad categories of water use, including water
abstraction and storage, waste discharges and disposal, and instream activities.


Authorisation of water use (through general authori
sations and licences etc.) is a
mechanism that will enable the Department to give effect to the principles of
sustainable utilisation of water resources.


Registration of water use is conducted prior to authorising water use, and is one
of the highest prio
rity actions currently being undertaken by the Department as
part of the implementation of the national water policy (DWAF 2001).




Waste management

This component deals with the permitting of waste disposal sites as required by
Section 20 of the Environmen
t Conservation Act (Act No. 73 of 1989) (ECA).
DWAF has been acting as an agent to DEAT in the permitting of waste disposal
sites. The two departments signed a co
-
operative agreement on 4 February
2000, whereby DWAF will continue to act on behalf of DEAT
.




Setting and collecting water use charges


Department of Water Affairs and Forestry




Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch




First Draft: May
2002








12


Table 3.
4

Details of Water Resource Management functions and activities (DWAF 2000)


Responsible Chief Directorates

Functions

Activities

Planning

Determine the availability of water
resources, project future water
requirements, and identify structural and
non
-
structural options to reconcile water
requirements with available resources

Undertake water situation assessments for 19 water management areas

Develop the National Water Bala
nce Model

Develop national scenarios for reconciling water requirements with available
resources

Undertake international joint studies on the Limpopo, Inkomati and Maputo river
basins

Undertake catchment planning studies and provision of inputs to

Catchment
Management Strategies

Investigate management and
development solutions for bulk water
supply problems, and recommend
measures to be taken in the public
interest

Ensure progress on joint pre
-
commitment study with Lesotho on Lesotho
Highlands Wa
ter Project (LHWP) Phase II

Complete joint pre
-
feasibility study with Namibia on the Lower Orange River

Complete Phase 2 of the Mooi
-
Mgeni Transfer feasibility study

Complete Thukela
-
Vaal Water Transfer feasibility study

Complete Eastern Highve
ld System Augmentation feasibility study

Complete Southern KwaZulu
-
Natal pre
-
feasibility study.

Review, amend and revise existing
internal policies, develop new internal
policies and implementation strategies,
and analyse the implications of externall
y
-
developed policies and legislation

Prepare the National Water Resource Strategy

Establish Departmental disaster management structures

Co
-
ordinate municipal water management software (Muniwater)

Participate in the South African Rainfall Augmentat
ion Project

Ensure progress on feasibility studies for the National Water Utility

Co
-
ordinate strategies to implement the National Water Act

Develop, implement and maintain
appropriate and cost
-
effective information
systems and information technolo
gy
infrastructure, and support information
technology users

Ensure web
-
enabling of the Water Quality Management System

Complete the hard
-
rock module of the National Groundwater System

Complete the supply and demand module of Muniwater

Complete the

Regional Office support module of the Water Supply and
Sanitation Information System

Complete the Spatial Data Engine (SDE) component of the Integrated Water
Management System

Ensure progression of the Water Authorisation Management System Secon
d
Release

Complete the Afforestation Permit System

Development

Undertake civil design for the
development of water resources and the
Design dams and betterments

Design canal systems and betterments

Department of Water Affairs and Forestry




Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch




First Draft: May
2002








13


Responsible Chief Directorates

Functions

Activities

surveillance of state dams

Design regional water

supply schemes

Administer civil contracts

Undertake dam safety evaluations

Provide professional services to other Directorate.

Provide technical support services

Undertake mechanical / electrical and
electronic design and professional
servic
es for the betterments to, and
maintenance of, water works

Undertake design and implementation

Provide professional services towards the betterments to and maintenance of
projects

Implement and monitor the Occupational Health and Safety Act in the
De
partment

Construct water works and support
services in respect of drilling services,
workshops and construction machinery

Construct Dams

Construct Weirs

Reconstruct existing schemes

Construct Water Treatment Plants

Construct community Wat
er Supply Schemes

Safeguarding of dams

Provide support services in respect of drilling and workshop, and the purchase,
refurbishment and management of capital equipment

International Projects

Facilitate the implementation of the
Lesotho Highlands Wa
ter Project (LHWP)

Formulate policy and procedures for implementation

Consider budgets

Consider claims and variation orders

Negotiate agreements

Resolve disputes and maintain good working relations at LHWC level

Promote the image of the LHWP

Advise Senior Management

Monitor project implementation

Facilitate the implementation of the
Komati River Development Project

Facilitate, advise and monitor implementation of Komati River Development
Project

Investigate social and developme
nt programmes to be linked to above capital
development

Facilitate good relations between the
Department and external bodies and
other countries

Formulate policy, strategy and procedures

Coordinate participation in Southern African Development Com
munity Water
Sector activities

Facilitate contact with foreign delegations

Facilitate activities of bi
-
national and multi
-
national Committees / Commissions

Department of Water Affairs and Forestry




Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch




First Draft: May
2002








14


Responsible Chief Directorates

Functions

Activities

Facilitate contact with donors

Monitor implementation (for compliance) of Agreements with othe
r countries /
donors

Provide secretariat services

Maintain database

Enhance safety of dams in South Africa

Classify and register dams.

Consider applications for licences (permits) to construct, alter, impound,
abandon dams

Manage dam safety i
nspection programme

Address shortcomings at dams

Revise dam safety regulations

Audit status of dam safety

Scientific Services

Monitor and assess water resources

Maintain national and regional resource monitoring networks

Maintain water resourc
e and related databases, digital cartographic data and
geo
-
spatial data systems

Provide scientific and technical support
for water resources management

Assess license applications

Implement Resource Directed Measures

Provide analytical laborato
ry services

Undertake water quality assessments

Provide geohydrological service

Provide survey and mapping service

Provide hydrological service

Provide environmental service

Undertake special surveys

Undertake development in support of
water resources management

Develop information systems and tools for implementation of provisions and
requirements of the National Water Act

Develop resource monitoring and assessment strategies

Water Use and Conservation

Facilitate and co
-
ordinate

catchment
management and institutional
development

Facilitate establishment of Catchment management Agencies (CMAs)

Transform irrigation boards (IBs) to Water User Associations (WUAs), and
establish new WUAs

Build catchment management capacity natio
nally

Monitor and audit catchment management, and develop information systems

Promote and institutionalise water
conservation and water demand
management (WC / DM)

Develop policies, strategies and regulations

Integrate WC / DM into all relevant dep
artmental functions

Undertake education, capacity building, awareness creation, marketing and

Department of Water Affairs and Forestry




Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch




First Draft: May
2002








15


Responsible Chief Directorates

Functions

Activities

communication activities

Provide support to water services institutions

Develop sectoral WC / DM strategies: Mining, Power and Industry, Agriculture
and Forestry

Undertake monitoring and evaluation

Promote international Cupertino

Promote equitable allocation, and
beneficial and sustainable utilisation of
water resources

Promote efficient use of water for irrigation

Implement raw water pr
icing strategy

Review catchment and systems operation

Promote water loss control in bulk water systems

Develop strategic framework for stream flow reduction activities

Register and authorise water use: water abstraction and storage.

Promote i
ntegrated sustainable protection
and management of the water quality of
water resources

Develop water quality elements of NWRS

Develop policies and strategies for water resource protection

Develop pollution prevention strategies, guidelines and suppo
rt

Review licensing procedures

Develop pricing strategy for waste discharges and provide financial assistance
for water quality protection

Monitor, audit and assess Regional offices

Promote sustainable control of invading
alien plant species

Cle
ar invasive alien vegetation and maintain cleared areas

Develop bio
-
control methods

Develop legislative tools

Raise awareness of the negative impacts of invading alien plants



Department of Water Affairs and Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch



First Draft: May 2002


16

3.1.2

Water Services


While the responsibility for ensuring the provision
of services to communities in an
equitable
and sustainable

manner falls on Local Government (Section 152 [1] of the Constitution),
Section 155 gives National Government (DWAF) the legislative and executive authority to
ensure that Local Government provides

adequate and effective water services to
communities (DWAF 2001).


In this context, the Department currently performs the following functions in terms of water
services delivery:



DWAF is the custodian and regulator of water service delivery, in terms of a
n
interim Cabinet mandate (managing function);



Implementation of projects in the rural areas due to the lack of capacity and
backlog of service provision by Local Government (impacting function); and



Operation and maintenance of inherited schemes from the
former homelands.


The future long
-
term role of the Department will be to monitor and regulate basic and high
-
level water services for both rural and urban areas (DWAF 2001).


As for the Water Resource Management functions, DWAF's Water Services (WS) funct
ions
can be divided into those that impact on the environment and those that manage the
environment.


3.1.2.1

WS Impacting Functions


Project Development and Implementation


This function includes the following components:




Sustainable implementation of the water
and sanitation capital programme via
development and implementation of water services business schemes; and



Co
-
ordination with other infrastructure programmes (DWAF 2001).


Implementation of the above programmes is controlled through a decision making proc
ess.
All potential negative impacts of these programmes are highlighted by feasibility studies and
environmental impact studies, which

are conducted for all sanitation projects and are the
responsibility of District Councils’ management (DWAF 2001).


Oper
ation and Maintenance of Schemes


This function includes the following components:




Operating and maintaining
water and sanitation schemes from the former
homelands; and



Transferring of works to Water Services Authorities (WSAs) and providing them
with tec
hnical, commercial, institutional and regulatory support.







Department of Water Affairs and Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch



First Draft: May 2002


17

3.1.2.2

WS Managing Functions


The following DWAF functions manage the environment and mitigate significant impacts on
the environment. These functions support the DWAF’s custodianship role mandated
by the
Constitution and the Water Services Act (Act No. 108 of 1997).


Water Services Planning


The Department is responsible for overseeing national planning for water services. This
function includes:




Overseeing and the effective planning for sustainab
le water services
provision on a national, provincial, regional, and local government, planning,
project and scheme level;



Developing and maintaining a framework for effective project and scheme
selection;



Assisting the WSAs to develop a planning culture a
nd assisting them in the
preparation of their Water Services Development Plans (WSDPs); and



Developing an appropriate sanitation programme in co
-
ordination with,
amongst others, the National Sanitation Co
-
ordinating Office (DWAF 2001).


Developing and Main
taining Policy and Strategy


This entails the development of coherent policies, strategies and frameworks to create an
enabling environment for the water services sector. It also includes developing the tools
required to support and regulate the water ser
vices sector, e.g.:




Norms and standards for tariffs;



Compulsory national standards for water services;



Model contracts and bylaws; and



Development of policies, guidelines and regulations (DWAF 2001).


Regulation and Intervention


The Water Services Act wa
s promulgated to provide a supportive regulatory structure for the
provision of water services by clearly defining the roles and responsibilities of the different
sector institutions. Even though the Department currently performs a dual function (being
bo
th manager and implementer), the future role of the Department, in terms of water
services, will change to that of monitoring and regulation (DWAF 2001).


Monitoring and Auditing


The Department is responsible for developing and maintaining systems that wi
ll provide
information to the WSA, the Water Service Provider (WSP) and other water services
institutions. Examples of such systems and databases are:




The National Information System (an umbrella system), required by both the
NWA and the Water Services A
ct. This system enables
understanding,
alignment, integration and sustainable development in addition to monitoring
the performance and compliance of the water services sector, as well as
national water resources;



The Monitoring and Evaluation system.
In

line with the requirements of the
Water Supply and Sanitation White Paper (DWAF 1994), it was essential to
develop an effective Monitoring and Evaluation system (M&E) which ensures
Department of Water Affairs and Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch



First Draft: May 2002


18

that all projects meet the required standards and that the goals of the Wh
ite
Paper are met; and



A monitoring system for WSDPs (this system has been developed and is
operational along with a database on Local Governments and their WSDPs)
(DWAF 2001).



Department of Water Affairs and Forestry




Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch



First Draft: May 2002









19


Table 3.
5

Details of Water Services functions an
d activities (DWAF 2000)



Responsible Chief Directorates

Functions

Activities

Water Services

Ensure effective planning for
sustainable water services
provision

Oversee national planning for water services


establish and maintain national, provincial
and

regional water services strategies

Support water services development planning (WSDP) processes through



Further developing WSDP framework and process, and



Continuing to support the development of WSDPs

Support project selection and scheme plannin
g for next round of projects through the
development of appropriate systems

Create national information systems and related monitoring and evaluation systems

Ensure effective implementation
of the capital programme for
water and sanitation service
s
provision

Support Regional staff in sustainable implementation of water and sanitation capital
programme in terms of



functions decentralised and training received,



defining scope of work for Institutional and Social Development staff,



developing

contractual documentation,



defining scope of work for Project and Programme managers,



implementation of Build, Operate, Train and Transfer (BoTT) process,



refining design guidelines,



ensuring management support,



ensuring capital budget allo
cation,



establishing policy for budget allocation to WS, sanitation, manage and BoTT, and



developing multi
-
year programme to enhance sanitation infrastructure development.

Facilitate external funding and promote the capital development programme t
o donors,
and concessionary and commercial financiers in order to access funding

Develop and implement a monitoring and evaluation system through creation of Capital
Programme Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Unit at Head Office and in the Regional
O
ffices, and through ongoing evaluation studies

Co
-
ordinate with other infrastructure development programmes through



ongoing bi
-
laterals with other departments and the Policy Unit of the Presidency,



reviewing of implementation strategy on i
mpact of poverty alleviation, and



participating in SDI initiatives.

Department of Water Affairs and Forestry




Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch



First Draft: May 2002









20

Responsible Chief Directorates

Functions

Activities

Enhance business planning process by



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敳瑡tlis桩湧/摩s敳瑡扬is桩湧 WBsⰠ,s⁲敱畩r敤.

䑥D敬o瀠p慰慣ity⁢畩l摩湧 a湤⁴牡i湩湧
CB&T)⁡ 灲p慣桥s⁡ 搠d瑲慴a杩敳⁦潲潣al
杯v敲湭敮琠瑨r潵杨



灲潶idi湧 i湳ti瑵ti潮慬⁳u灰潲琠⼠o慰慣ity 扵il摩湧⁳敲eic敳,



摥v敬潰i湧 愠a異灯r琠tys瑥m⁴ ⁰牯
id攠edvic攠e漠WSAs⁴ r潵杨⁒敧i潮慬
摥灡r瑭敮瑡t fic敳Ⱐ,湤



liaisin朠睩瑨ti湳瑩瑵ti潮s 睯wki湧⁩渠n桥 l潣慬⁧ v敲湭敮琠t湤⁣慰慣ity 扵ildin朠g散t潲o

Pr潶id攠e散h湩cal⁡湤⁦i湡nci慬⁳u灰潲琠o桲潵杨



慰灲pvi湧⁳u扳idi敳⁴ l潣al⁡ 瑨tri瑩敳,




s異灯r瑩湧 敶慬畡ti潮 潦⁃ 湳潬i摡t攠e畮ici灡l⁉ fr慳瑲畣瑵牥⁐ro杲慭m攠⡃䵉e)
慰plic慴i潮s,



s異灯r瑩湧⁴桥 灲数慲慴a潮 潦⁧ id敬i湥s⁦潲⁥o杩n敥rin朠g敲eic敳⁦潲⁩m灬敭敮瑡ti潮
慮搠潰敲e瑩o渠nf⁣潭m畮i瑹 睡瑥爠t異ply⁡湤⁳慮i瑡瑩潮
CWSS)⁦潲⁨om慮

瑴t敭敮瑳,



s異灯r瑩湧⁴桥 摥vel潰m敮琠tf WS䑐⁧ i摥lin敳Ⱐ,nd



慤visin朠g渠牥n畲扩s桭敮琠tf⁴牡湳f敲⁳c桥m敳⁡ 搠睡瑥爠t潳s⁰牯杲慭m敳.

䑥D敬o瀠p渠np灲潰pi慴a⁳a湩瑡瑩o渠nro杲慭m攠e渠no
-
潲摩n慴a潮 睩瑨t乡Ni潮慬 Sa湩t慴ao渠䍯
-
潲摩n慴a湧⁏ffic攠e桲潵
g栠h
-



s異灯r瑩湧 灯licy 摥velo灭敮琠t湤 杵i摥li湥s⁦潲⁩m灬敭敮瑡ti潮 ⁴ 攠牵eal
灲潧p慭m攬



慤v潣慴a湧⁦潲⁡o搠d敶敬o灩湧⁴ 攠e敡l瑨ta湤 hygi敮攠灲潧p慭m攬



s異灯r瑩湧 剥Ri潮s⁴漠om灬敭敮琠tr潧r慭m攬e慮d



摥v敬潰i湧 慰灲p灲楡瑥t䴦E⁴ 潬sⰠ,
湤 敮s畲u湧⁥v慬u慴ao湳⁡ 搠dlig湭敮琠睩瑨
CWSS⁍ E⁳ys瑥t.

Pr潶id攠e散h湩calⰠ,潭m敲ci慬Ⱐ
䑥D敬o瀠
瑯潬sⰠ灯licy,⁧ idelin敳⁡ 搠牥d畬a瑩o湳⁴ ⁳up灯r琠t 扵sin敳s⁡ 灲p慣栠h漠w慴敲e
Department of Water Affairs and Forestry




Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch



First Draft: May 2002









21

Responsible Chief Directorates

Functions

Activities

institutional and regulatory
support to water services
institutions to ensure water
services works and systems give
rise to sustainable water services

services.

Facilitate and support institutional arrangements for viable water services providers for
sustainable operations.

Provide technical expertise to s
upport improved efficiency (including water loss
management, Operation and Maintenance promotion, and improving water quality).

Develop policy and strategy in respect of the Water Services Regulator.


Department of Water Affairs and Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch



First Draft: May 2002


22

3.1.3

Forestry


DWAF forestry functions include mana
ging commercial and indigenous forests, providing
community forestry services, and providing the policy and regulatory framework for the
forestry sector.


As for both the Water Resource Management and Water Services functions, DWAF's
forestry functions can

also be divided into those that impact on the environment and those
that manage the environment.


3.1.3.1

Forestry Impacting Functions


Forestry functions that impact significantly on the environment include facilitating and
supporting community forestry and the
development of the industrial/commercial forest
sector. It should be noted that these functions have both management and impacting
dimensions and that their focus will gradually shift towards that of regulation and
management.


Facilitating and Supporting

Community Forestry


DWAF community forestry facilitation and supporting functions include:




Managing DWAF
-
owned woodlots;



Managing the process of devolving ownership, control and management of
woodlots to communities;



Supporting the development of new aff
orestation, both commercial and for
community needs
in accordance with the NWA;



Promoting the sustainable use of natural forest and woodland resources by
working in partnership with Local Government and other service providers;



Assisting Local Government i
n the development of the urban forestry aspects
of urban greening;



Supporting Local Government and other service providers in working with
communities to develop sustainable rural livelihoods; and



Providing information and promoting the implementation of a
ppropriate
legislation, particularly the

NVFFA.


Industrial/Commercial Forest Sector Development


This function entails ensuring the sustainable, profitable and scientific management of State
forest timber plantation areas and participation in general busi
ness matters pertaining
thereto. Further commercial forestry functions include:




Promoting the sustainable development of the wider industrial forest sector;



Achieving an agreed basis for managing the impacts of forest sector
development on water resource
s and the environment;



Promoting value addition to the industrial forest sector;



Assisting South Africa’s industrial forest sector to realise its full potential in
global markets;



Promoting the participation of small
-
scale growers in the forest sector;



De
velopment of appropriate timber
-
products standards for South Africa; and



Regulating negative impacts of industrial forestry and create conditions for
positive impacts.


Department of Water Affairs and Forestry


Environmental Management Framework

Water Resource Management Branch



First Draft: May 2002


23

3.1.3.2

Forestry Management Functions


Sustainable Management of Natural Forests


This function

entails ensuring the conservation, optimal utilisation and scientific management
of State forest conservation areas and participation in general nature conservation matters
and includes:




Actively managing all assets in a participatory manner through, for

example,
developing a National indigenous forest database and management plans for
all indigenous forests;



Issuing licences and facilitating community use within a framework for
Participatory Forest Management. The current licensing/permitting system fo
r
access and use of state forests is, however, still based on the old Forestry
Act;



Overseeing Provincial forests as well as delegations and assignments based
on environmental management audits; and



Undertaking ongoing research, observations and rehabilita
tion.


Fire Management


This function includes aspects such as:




Developing and maintaining a fire danger rating system;



Developing a framework for and forming fire protection associations as well
as registering these associations;



Developing and maintaini
ng a framework for fire information and statistics;



Undertaking National public awareness campaigns; and