Genetic engineering - Homepages

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Dec 10, 2012 (4 years and 8 months ago)

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Education 325
Professor Karhoff
Sarah Burk
Liz Friesema
April TeKrony
Holly Van Beek
Thematic Statement and Biblical Perspective
Genetic engineering is a way to change traits of an organism by changing its
genes. In our world today, genetic engineering is composed of many areas including:
cloning of animals and humans, and agricultural hybrids. God created humans with the
intelligence to develop and use technology. Because of the fall into sin, genetic
engineering has become a means of controlling our society. Since genetic engineering
plays such a big part in our lives, we as Christians have a responsibility as Christ's
disciples, to further our understanding of God's Creation around us.
"The Earth is the Lord's and everything in it; the world and all that live in it."
.-Psalm 24:1
Goals:
Students will gain an understanding of how genetic engineering works.
Students will develop an appreciation for the intricacies of God's Creation.
Students will take a critical look at genetic engineering.
Students will interact and learn from other students.
2.
3.
4.
Objectives:
1. Students will explore the applications of genetic engineering to farming.
2. Students will be able to apply their knowledge of each lesson through hands-
on experiments and activities.
3. Students will explore the history and development of genetic engineering.
4. Students will understand their roles as responsive disciples of Jesus Christ.
5. Students will be able to show their understanding through authentic
assessment.
6. Students will demonstrate competence in writing, listening, speaking, and
presenting an argument, including an application of basic principles of logic
and reasoning.
7. Students will collaborate with peers, experts, and others to write and present
products using technology resources. Through the presentation of these
products, students will demonstrate and communicate curriculum concepts to
audiences inside and outside the classroom.
8. Students will interpret and display data used to present an argument.
9. Students will be able to keep track of what is happening in the world around
them.
10. Students will gain responsibility by taking care of a plant.
11. Students will be able to discuss topics with their classmates.
12. Students will gain responsibility by taking care of a plant.
13. Students will be introduced to the basics of human genetic engineering,
including: an overview of the process, uses, obstacles, and viewpoints on the
ethics of genetic engineering.
14. Students will understand the concept of probability in regard to gene
combinations during fertilization using an activity as a model of the process of
independent and random assortment of genes.
15. Students will begin to form their own opinion about human genetic
engineering and the ethics involved based on activities and the facts presented.
16. Students will be able to explain how genetic engineering can introduce a new
trait into an organism.
17. Students will apply the knowledge they have gained in the past lessons and
express their opinions in a fair and open environment.
18. Students will understand and have an appreciation for the various viewpoints
of genetic engineering issues.
19. Students will work together and discuss, compromise, and come to a group
consensus while respecting and appreciating other's views.
20. Students will learn about inherited traits and learned traits.
21. Students will learn about traits in their family history. Students will
understand how genetic engineering is working with animals.
22. Students will discuss the pros and cons of animal genetic engineering.
23. Students will create their own animal genetic engineering company.
Student Entry Level:
In order to assess what the students already know, we will have them complete a
semantic web where we provide the important words and topics in the unit and a pre-
made map. After completing the semantic map, the students will write a paragraph to sum
up what they already know about genetic engineering.
Materials and Equipment List:
. learning center box
,
. vocabulary words and definitions on separate sheets of paper
. soil
. several packages of tomato seeds
. cups to put the seeds in
. water
. example of an article on genetic engineering for bulletin board
. definitions for vocabulary words
. overhead ofF 48
. plain white paper to make diagrams on
. CrayoIis/markers/ colored pencils
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
"Future Farm 2050" bulletin board with blank space for students' additions of
vegetables and animals
Pair of flower seed and vegetable seed packages for every two students
Construction paper
Case Study-"New Choices, New Dilemmas"
Notes and overheads about human genetic engineering for explanation
empty cans or bags
poker chips, pieces of paper, etc.. .labeled with traits
lesson plans and questions
permission slips to go on field trip
traveling kit (emergency numbers, etc.)
students' journals
any written out questions that the students want to ask the experts at Trans Ova
Genetics
any materials that the group needs for their final preparations for their mock
debates (Internet resources, encyclopedia, etc.)
self-evaluation and group member evaluation forms
pencils
access to a computer
poster board
5 video cameras
5 tape recorders
Focusing Event:
The unit will be opened up with various activities such as: Fingerprint Fun,
Hybrid Factory, and DNA Match-up. Since the activities are self-explanatory, the
students will be encouraged to read and follow along with the directions to each activity.
Hopefully, the students will be able to tie together the activities and be made aware of the
similarities of each activity. These activities will prepare the students for what lies ahead
in this unit on genetic engineering.
Holly VanBeek
Day One
Objectives:
1. Students will be able to apply their knowledge of each lesson through hands-on
experiments and activities.
2. Students will interact and learn from other students.
3. Students will gain responsibility by taking care of a plant.
Materials Needed:
. learning center box
. vocabulary words and definitions on separate sheets of paper
. soil
. several packages of tomato seeds
. cups to put the seeds in
. water
Resources Needed:
. Discover the Wonder
New Word List:
. bacteria - group of microscopic nonphotosynthetic one-celled organisms
classified in the moneran kingdom
. chromosome - threadlike strand that is made up of genes; found in the nucleus
of a cell
. gene - a unit of infonnation that controls a trait
. genetic engineering - a technology to change the traits of an organism by
changing its genes
. hybrid - an offspring of parents with different traits
. trait - a particular characteristic or property of an organism
Lesson Activities:
Science Concepts:
. The students will get a basis for what genetic engineering is through the use of
the learning center.
. Definitions of vocabulary words
. What are the differences between the same kind of seed?
Process Skills:
. observing
. comparing/contrasting
. predicting
. recording data
. planning an investigation
Teaching Strategies:
1. Introduce the focusing event. (See Focusing Event)
2. Find Your Partner Activity
. Write each vocabulary word on a separate piece of paper. Also, write the
definition on a separate sheet of paper. Give each student a piece of paper.
They must go throughout the room and try to find the person that has the
match to the word or definition that they received. Once they have found their
match, they must check to make sure they have the correct answer by
checking with the teacher. Then, they must each go and write a sentence
using that word in the correct context. When they have each finished, pull the
group back together as a whole. State the word and have each student read his
or her sentence. The rest of the class should try to figure out the definition of
the word by the sentences. After the students have guessed, read the
definition that is on the sheet of paper.
Extension: .
Have the students do the Planting the Seed Activity on page F 44 in the textbook.
Make sure that each of the students make a chart in which they can record their data from
each day. The students will observe and record data about their plant each day-working
on these process skills: observing, recording data, and measuring.
Assessment:
Observe the students as they are doing the focusing event. Make sure that they
are staying on task. This can be written down. Also, observe how they are interacting
with each other when trying to find their partner.
Day Two
Objectives:
1. Students will explore the applications of genetic engineering to fanning.
2. Students will explore the history and development of genetic engineering.
3. Students will be able to show their understanding through authentic
assessment.
4. Students will be able to keep track of what is happening in the world around
them.
s. Students will gain responsibility by taking care of a plant.
Materials Needed:
. example of an article on genetic engineering for bulletin board
. definitions for vocabulary words
. overhead ofF 48
. plain white paper to make diagrams on
Resources Needed:
. Discover the Wonder
New Word List: (review from yesterday fot reading today)
. .
Lesson Activities:
Science Concepts:
. Genetic engineering is changing the traits of an organism.
. Bacteria are carrier organisms for genetic information.
. Scientists can use genetic engineering to develop new grain crops.
. Learn the steps for transferring a gene from one kind of plant to another kind
of plant.
Process Skills:
. comparing/contrasting
. predicting
. inferring
Teaching Strategies:
1. Introduce the bulletin board activity.
. lJactena
. chromosome
. gene
. genetic engineering
. hybrid
. trait
2.
3.
4.
. Students will bring in articles from magazines, newspapers, Internet, or any
other place. We will put them up on a bulletin board and read them over the
day they are brought in.
Review the vocabulary words by saying the word and then having the students
say the definition, if they remember. Ifnot, read the definition for them again.
Read pages F 46 - F 49 as a whole class. Have different students read throughout
the time. As they are reading page F 49, put the overhead up of page F 48. After
each paragraph, stop the reading and point to how far the process has gone on the
overhead.
Ask the students some questions about the reading to make sure they understand
what they just read. Some examples are:
. What does genetic engineering allow scientists to do?
. How do scientists use bacteria in genetic engineering?
Extension:
Have the students make a diagram (like the one on F 48) of how a gene from a
soybean plant might be put into a com plant to produce a com plant with nodules. Have
the students observe their plants and write down comments.
Assessment:
Observe the students as they are reading through the book. Make sure they are all
actively listening. Have the students hand in their diagrams - make sure they are
following the con-ect steps.
Day Three
Objectives:
1. Students will explore the applications of genetic engineering to farming.
2. Students will be able to apply their knowledge of each lesson through hands-on
experiments and activities.
3. Students will be able to show their understanding through authentic assessment.
4. Students will be able to discuss topics with their classmates.
5. Students will gain responsibility by taking care of a plant (every day of the unit).
Resources Needed:
. Discover the Wonder
New Word List:
. nitrogen - a nutrient that is needed for plants to grow
. legumes - certain plants whose roots have nodules that contain nitrogen-fixing
bacteria
Lesson Activities:
Science Concepts:
. Why nitrogen is needed
. The benefits of genetic engineering on crops
. Review of the steps of a gene donor to the receiver
Process Skills:
. inferring
. measunng
. comparing/contrasting
. observing
. recording data
Teaching Strategies:
1. Introduce the debate on whether or not Christians should be involved in genetic
engineering that is the final project at the end of the unit.
. The students will have to use all of the information that they have received
throughout the unit and apply it to their final debate answering the question,
"Should Christians be involved in genetic engineering?" Students will be on
both sides of the debate. They will have to argue their side using the
infornlation from the unit. Students will be graded using a rubric on how well
they presented their infornlation and the amount of infornlation they included.
They may work with the others in their group.
2. Go over the new word list with the students. State the words and then what they
mean. (They should be somewhat review so not much time should be spent on
them unless the students do not understand.)
3. Read pages F 50 - F 51 as a whole class. Students can volunteer to read. Discuss
with the students what they think about making a field that would not need to be
fertilized. What are the benefits? What are the negative aspects?
4.
Have the students take a few minutes to look at their plants. Have them write
down their observations.
Extension:
Review some of the information from yesterday. This can be done by having the
students role-play the travels of a gene from the donor plant to the receptor plant. Groups
of students can foml cells and chromosomes, some can be plasmids, others genes, and so
on. Have the student who plays the gene walk through each of the steps.
Evaluation:
Observe and make comments about how the students discussed with the class.
Also, see how well they remembered the steps a gene takes and how well they work in
their groups.
Liz Friesema
Lesson Four: Plant Genetic Engineering
Objectives:
1. Students will be able to explain how genetic engineering can introduce a new trait
into an organism.
2. Students will explore applications of genetic engineering to fanning.
3. Students will collaborate and create a future farm together and develop
interpersonal relationships.
4. Students will be amazed by the intricacies of God's creation, the way that God
created each plant and animal, and the God-given intelligence of man in designing
hybrids.
Materials Needed:
1. Crayons/markers/colored pencils
2. "Future Farm 2050" bulletin board with blank space for students' additions of
vegetables and animals
3. Pair of flower seed and vegetable seed packages for every two students
4. Construction paper
Resources Needed:
* Discover the Wonder. ScottForesman Science, Module F, 1996.
New Word List:
.Hybrid
Lesson Activities:
1. Students will be divided into groups of two and given a pair of flower seed
packages and a pair of vegetable seed packages. For each pair of packages,
students will list the traits such as height, gennination time, color, etc.. .for each
flower or vegetable.
2. Students will be asked to work together and brainstorm to create a hybrid
flowering plant and a hybrid vegetable plant that combines the traits of these two
flowers and vegetables and record the new traits of the flowering plant in a picture
on the construction paper provided.
3. Then the students will be allowed to choose two other groups to join up with
(making groups of 6) and each of these groups of 6 will be asked to draw their
favorite of the group's vegetable hybrids on the bulletin board. While a member
of their group adds their vegetable to the bulletin board, the other members will
brainstorm ideas for an animal hybrid.
4. The students will have about 20 minutes to think, discuss, decide, and draw their
hybrid animals on the bulletin board.
5. Each student in the group will be asked to turn in a short description essay of the
animal that their group added to the farm--describing what the animal is, what it is
a hybrid of, the advantages of their animal, and if they think this hybrid could
ever realistically be produced.
Science Concepts: genetics and chromosomes, applications to fanning
Process Skills: observing, recording data, inferring, predicting
Teaching Strategies: collaborative learning, integration of art, student involvement
in learning
Extension ActivitY: To review the process of genetic engineering of plants, students can
role-play the travels of a gene from the donor plant to the receptor plant. Groups of
students can form cells and chromosomes, some can be plasmids, others can be genes,
and so on. They can have one student at a time play the gene, and walk through all of the
steps.
Assessment: This lesson will be assessed using a scoring rubric to evaluate success on
the future farm activity.
Lesson Five:
Objectives:
1. Students will be introduced to the basics of human genetic engineering, including:
an overview of the process, uses, obstacles, and viewpoints on the ethics of
genetic engineering.
2. Students will understand the concept of probability in regard to gene
combinations during fertilization using an activity as a model of the process of
independent and random assortment of genes.
3. Students will begin to form their own opinion about human genetic engineering
and the ethics involved based on activities and the facts presented.
Materials:
1. Case Study-"New Choices, New Dilemmas"
2. Notes and overheads about human genetic engineering for explanation
3. empty cans or bags
4. poker chips, pieces of paper, etc. . .labeled with traits
Resources:
1.
2.
~://www.Qbs.org[gene/educator/41 discussion.html--Case study No. 1
ht!Q://www3.iDtv.orgjexoloremore/ge --"Gene Combination Probability"
extension activity, basic genetic engineering information and viewpoints
-Cystic Fibrosis
-Prenatal testing
New Word List:
-Gene/gene therapy
-Somatic cell gene therapy
-Germ cell gene therapy
Lesson Activities:
1
2.
3.
Students will be divided into groups of 4 and given the "New Choices, New
Dilemmas" case study. They will be asked to read it quietly to themselves, and
then will be given 5-10 minutes for group discussion answering the questions at
the end of the case study. They will provide one copy of the group's answers to
these questions at the end of the period.
Then a brief overview of human genetic engineering will be given in lecture
fonn--covering the basic process, uses, and obstacles. A doctor's viewpoint will
be presented and students will be asked to share their thoughts and views as well.
Gene Combination Probability Activity: Students will then be allowed to choose a
partner and will do a gene combination probability activity. They will be given
container that has pieces of paper in it labeled with different traits that a child cali
inherit (eye color, hair, face shape, etc.. .).
. Each student will take a turn choosing traits blindfolded, with the
assistance of their partner. Once all of their traits are chosen, they will
combine them and draw their resulting "child."
. Once their randomly selected child is drawn, they will be given the
opportunity to look through the traits available and choose which traits
they want, combine them and draw their "ideal" child.
4. This activity will be followed up with a class discussion answering these
questions:
. Which of your "children" is more attractive to you?
. Did it feel slightly strange to choose traits for your child? Why?
. Do you think this type of genetic engineering should be allowed, and the
research that is leading up to it should be allowed to continue?
Science Concepts: genetics, cell biology
Process Skills: comparing/contrasting, recording data, predicting
Teaching Strategies: problem-based learning, questioning, collaborative learning, and
integration of reading and art
Extension ActivitY: If students choose to extend their learning on this topic, they can go
to:
eneticssa2.html
There they can find a WebQuest that asks the question, "Should support for the Human
Genome Project continue?" They can complete this webquest and to prove that it was
completed they can write a one-page review of the quest, or provide the teacher a copy of
the letter to their congressman that the webquest requires.
Assessment: This lesson will be assessed informally based on participation in class
discussions, active leaI:ning in the gene combination probability activity, and teacher
observation of attention during the lecture. Also each group will receive points for
turning in their answers to the questions about the case study.
Lesson Six: Prep Debate--" At Least Two Sides to Every Issue"
Objectives:
1. Students will apply the knowledge they have gained in the past lessons and
express their opinions in a fair and open environment.
2. Students will understand and have an appreciation for the various viewpoints of
genetic engineering issues.
3. Students will work together and discuss, compromise, and come to a group
consensus while respecting and appreciating other's views.
Materials Needed:
*Lesson plans and questions
Resources Needed:
Lesson plan from:
ci6_atleast.cfrn
Lesson Activities:
1. Students will be asked the following questions, and given 5 minutes to form their
own opinions and jot down notes about them.
. Should parents be allowed to select the sex of their offspring before
fertilization?
. Should parents be allowed to select the physical characteristics of their
offspring before fertilization?
. Should plant and animal hybrids be allowed? Encouraged? How far is too
far?
2. After the students answer these questions for themselves, they will be put in a
group of four and be asked to form a collective opinion. After the groups of four
come to a consensus, they will be joined with another group of four and be asked
to form a collective opinion as a group of eight. This combining process will
continue until the class is divided into two equal groups.
3. These two groups will be asked to present their answers to the questions to each
other, and give a brief reason or two behind each answer.
4. If the groups disagree, they will be asked to switch opinions and try to defend the
other group's position as well.
5. The activity will end with a class discussion to form a whole group consensus
where everyone agrees. All of this opinion defending and switching will likely
cause the students some frustration, which will lead to a discussion of the ethics
of genetic engineering and the need to listen to opposing viewpoints and respect
other's ideas. And even though the class activity required compromise, the
students will be given an opportunity to express their personal opinions in a one-
page paper where they will answer the questions again from the beginning of the
activity for themselves after being confronted with all of the sides of the issue.
Science Concepts: genetic engineering
Process Skills: comparing/contrasting
Teaching Strategies: independent and collaborative learning,
Extension ActivitY; Once the students have come to grips with their own opinions, they
can write a letter to their congressman expressing their viewpoints on genetic engineering
Issues.
Assessment: Observing students working together and discussing opinions, and listening
to the final presentations that the groups make will assess this lesson informally. The
formal assessment will come in the grading of the one-page paper that the students will
turn in, grading it on thoughtful content and grammatical correctness.
S arab B urk
Day Seven: Family Genetics
Objectives:
1. Students will learn about inherited traits and learned traits.
2. Students will learn about traits in their family history.
Materials Needed:
1. Poster Board
2. Markers or Crayons
3. Paper and pencils
4. Access to a computer
Resources Needed:
1. http://www3.iptv.org/exploremore/ ge/T eacher_Resources/Resourcesiteaching_ma
terials/sci4 ~enetics.cfm: Genetics or Environment activity
New Word Lists:
1. Biological traits: characteristics that are caused by genes.
2. Environmental traits: characteristics that are caused by or learned from the
environment.
Lesson Activities:
1. Choose a trait which is not clearly biological and is present in several family members,
such as:
Musical ability
An unusual intellectual interest
Shyness/introversion
A love of acting or drama
Ability to roll up one's tongue or wiggle ears
2. Construct a family tree, beginning with your siblings and going back through at least
three generations of your ancestors. Trace the trait through the generations, indicating its
presence on the family tree through color-coding or some other means. Include a key,
which explains how the color-coding works.
Process skills: compare/contrast, planning an investigation
Assessment:
Have students present their family trees and discuss their findings. Students could
design the family tree on the computer, using a program for word processing,
publishing, or any other appropriate software. Students could also use poster board
and markers or crayons to design their family tree.
Day Eight: Animal Genetic Engineering
Objectives:
1. Students will understand how genetic engineering is working with animals.
2. Students will discuss the pros and cons of animal genetic engineering.
3. Students will create their own animal genetic engineering company.
Materials Needed:
1. Paper and Pencils
2. Markers or Crayons
3. 5 video cameras
4. 5 tape recorders
5. Computers Available
Resources Needed:
1. httg:/ /www .transgeni~ets.com
2. http://www .iptv .orgLexgloremore/ge/Teacher_Resources/createyourowncompany
New Word Lists: None
Lesson Activities:
1. I will ask students what they know about animal genetic engineering. We will
create a KWL chart together. I will write on the board what they know about
animal genetic engineering. Next, I will ask them to tell me questions they would
like to know about animal genetic engineering. I will divide students into groups
of four and give them equal amounts of questions. Then, I would ask them to go
to the computers and ask them to go to httQ://www3.igtv.orgLexgloremore/ge/.
This site has five areas that kids can go to and answer questions about animal
genetic engineering. After the students had answered their questions, I would
have a member from each group come up and report on the answers they found.
2.
A small company in Syracuse, New York called Transgenic Pets (see
http://www.transgenicpets.com) is in the process of developing a genetically
engineered cat, which will be allergen free. They hope to have produced the first
allergen-free cats by 2003, which will allow people who are now allergic to cats
to become cat owners.
In this activity, students will work in groups of four to create and market their
own genetically engineered product, which will be useful to society in some way.
Activity Outline
.
.
.
.
Brainstonn a genetically engineered product that could be useful to society.
Create a company name.
Write a persuasive essay or letter to potential investors.
Create a bumper sticker advertising their company or product.
Write and produce either a television or radio commercial marketing their new
product.
Process Skills: classifying, inferring, recording data
Day Nine: Create Your Own Company
Objectives:
1. Students will create their own animal genetic engineering company.
Materials Needed:
1. Paper and Pencils
2. Markers or Crayons
3. 5 video Canleras
4. 5 tape recorders
5. Computers Available
- -
2. http://www.iRtv .orglexuloremore/2e/Teacher Resourceslcreatevourowncomu311v
New Word List: None
Lesson Activities:
1. Students will continue to work on their companies as explained in Day Eight.
They will have forty minutes of the period to work on their product and
presentation.
2. During the last twenty minutes of the class period. we will watch the television
commercials or listen to the radio commercials.
Process Skills: planning an investigation. predicting. recording data
Extension Activity:
1. Students can try to market their product to other students in the school. Then,
students will explain, in a paper, why or why not their product sold to the public.
Assessment: Same as Day Eight.
Resources Needed:
1. http://www.transgenicpets.com
Assessment:
1. I will assess the fust activity on general participation and the effort each group
puts into time spent researching.
2. I will assess the second activity on participation, quality of product, market value
of product, and their television or radio conunercial.
April TeKrony
Day 10
Objectives:
1. Students will gain a better understanding of how genetic engineering works.
2. Students will be made aware of most, if not all, that goes on in genetic
engmeenng.
3. Students will explore the application of genetic engineering to farming.
4. Students will be able to apply their knowledge of each lesson through hands-on
experiments and activities.
5. Students will take a critical look at genetic engineering.
Materials Needed:
.
.
.
.
permission slips to go on field trip
traveling kit (emergency numbers, etc.)
students' journals
any written out questions that the students want to ask the experts
at Trans Ova Genetics
Resources Needed:
We will need a description of Trans Ova Genetics either by Internet, or by actual
book infonIlation and brochures. By reading up on Trans Ova Genetics, the students will
have a better understanding of the place, and how this field trip will impact their
knowledge of genetic engineering.
New Word List:
Some words that the students may come across while on their field trip to Trans
Ova Genetics are: cell meiosis, cell source, cloning, fusion, heterozygous, homozygous,
nuclear transfer, gene marker, mitosis, pH, phenotype, transgenic clones, and super
stimulation. Since vocabulary words are very important, we will spend a fair amount of
time going over some of these words in previous class periods so they will at least be a
little familiar with them when they hear them.
Lesson Activities:
Science Concepts:
Weare taking this field trip to give the students an opportunity to
observe what actually goes on during genetic engineering.
.
Process Skills.
Observing
Recording Data
.
.
Teaching Strategies.
In order to prepare the students for the field trip, we will spend
some time in prior class periods to discuss what goes on at Trans
Ova Genetics, and what the purpose of the field trip really is.
Encourage the students to write down questions in their daily
journals that they can ask the experts at Trans Ova Genetics.
.
.
Extension Activity:
After we return from our field trip, ask the students to write a 1-2 page reflection
on their overall experience to Trans Ova Genetics. Encourage them to write what they
liked and disliked about the trip, what things could have been different, and 2 to 3 things
they learned about genetic engineering. Their responses will be recorded in the class
newsletter that will be sent out at the end of the month.
Assessment:
For the final assessment over the unit, require the students to tie in the field trip to
Trans Ova Genetics with their final mock debate. Encourage them to use some of the
new information they learned on the field trip about genetic engineering. After taking the
field trip, students will have a better understanding of genetic engineering, and if as
Christians, we should really be taking partin it.
Day 11
Objectives:
1. Students will develop an appreciation for the intricacies of God's Creation.
2. Students will collaborate with peers, experts, and others to write and present
products using technology resources.
3. Students will be able to apply the knowledge they have gained throughout the unit
and work together to make their final preparations for their mock debates.
4. Students will interact and learn from other students.
5. Students will gain responsibility by taking part in the debate.
Materials Needed:
.
any materials that the group needs for their final preparations for
their mock debates (Internet resources, encyclopedia, etc.)
self-evaluation and group member evaluation forms
.
Resources Needed:
The class will just be working on their final preparations for the mock debates, so
whatever resources they need to complete the debate, make those available to them.
New Word List:
There will not be any new words to add to their list of vocabulary words in the
unit because they will just be working on their debates. However, if they come across
any unfamiliar terms while completing their debates, encourage them to write those
words in their journals.
Lesson Activities:
Science Concepts..
. The students will be tying in everything they learned throughout the course of the
unit into their final mock debates.
. Collaborative Leaming- students work with other peers in a group effort.
Process Skills:
. Planning an Investigation
. Comparing/Contrasting
Teaching Strategies:
. Encourage the students to include some of the infofnlation they learned from
Trans Ova Genetics to better equip their debates.
. Walk around the room and evaluate how well each person is taking part in the
group debate.
Extension Activity:
Encourage the students to practice their debates in order to be thoroughly
prepared for the [mal debate. Since they have done a mock debate about a week ago,
they should be pretty familiar with the routine. Challenge them to include new things
into their debate to make it even more superb.
Assessment:
Since the final assessment over the unit will be on the next meeting day, the
students will be assessment in a different manner on this day. The students will be
required to fill out a self-evaluation, as well as an evaluation over all of their group
members. They will be notified about the evaluations at the beginning of the unit, so this
should encourage each member to participate at their best levels.
Day 12
Objectives:
1. Students will be able to incorporate their knowledge of each lesson in their final
mock debate.
2. Students will be able to show their understanding through authentic assessment.
3. Students will demonstrate competence in listening, speaking, and presenting an
argument, including an application of basic principles of logic and reasoning.
4. Students will join forces with other peers to present their mock debates.
5. Students will demonstrate and communicate curriculum concepts to audiences
inside and outside the classroom.
6. Students will interpret and display data used to present an argument.
Materials Needed:
.
.
any materials the students need for their final debates
group evaluation forms
Resources Needed:
The class will just be presenting their debates, so resources such as power point
technology, overhead projectors, etc. that are need for the presentations will be made
available to them.
New Word List:
No new words will be introduced today. The students will be presenting their
debates. However, presenters will more than likely be using some vocabulary words
from previous days in their debates, so this will help familiarize the words for the rest of
the class.
Lesson Activities:
Science Concepts..
No new science concepts will be learned today because of the
final mock debate presentations.
.
Process Skills.
.
.
Inferring
Recording data
Teaching Strategies.
.
.
Introduce each group before they present
Each student that is not presenting will be required to evaluate 3
of the 7 debates that will be pres~ted.
Students will give their opinions on whether or not Christians
should be involved in genetic engineering
.
Extension Activity:
Students will be encouraged to write in their daily journals anything new that they
learned through the debates. As a class, we will compile a list of things that we learned
overall, as well as some important things to remember about genetic engineering.
Assessment:
The group presentation for the mock debate on whether or not Christians should
be involved in genetic engineering will be used as an authentic assessment over the entire
unit. A rubric will be used to evaluate the groups.
Diverse Populations:
In order to cover the needs of all the students in the classroom, it will be very
important to have a second resort when doing different activities. When working with
such a crucial topic like genetic engineering, it will be very important to take into
consideration the needs of all the students. When doing activities such as Family
Genetics (having students going home to do a project with their parents), students who
have been adopted or only have one parent living with them with be able to do the
activity with either a close-by neighbor, relatives, adoptive parent's, etc...
For activities in the unit like mock debates, the students will be allowed to work
in pairs (buddy system) if they need additional help communicating or understanding the
issues. For students who have difficulties with reading, the reading can be done with a
partner or independent note-taking will be encouraged to increase understanding of the
material.
Curricular Integration:
Genetic Engineering can be tied into a few other curricular areas. Genetic
engineering can be covered in math, language arts, art, Bible, and Social Studies. Math
ties into genetic engineering with measurements and addition of growth of their plants.
Through the use of reading and writing, the students will draw in their language arts
skills. The mock debate brings in Bible knowledge, because the students will use biblical
references to back up their opinions. The current events bulletin board and the review of
the history of genetic engineering will draw in social studies topics. Genetic engineering
is a topic which envelops a pleasant portion of all there is in God's awesome creation.
Closure:
In order to bring the unit to a close, the students will finish with a mock debate.
This debate will tie all of the information that they have learned in this unit together and
have students analyze their view of genetic engineering as a Christian student. They will
need to use all of the knowledge they have gained to formulate an educated stance on the
question that forms the base of this unit, "Should Christians be involved in genetic
engineering?" A rubric will be used to evaluate the students' participation in this activity
and their application of the knowledge they have gained in this unit.
Evaluation Procedure:
Since much of the assessment will be too tough to do by distributing pencil/paper
tests, rubrics will be used as authentic assessment, especially for the debates. Since this
unit is not primarily intended to gain factual knowledge, but rather to help the students
fonn an ethical opinion, much of our evaluation will be based on observation of student
participation and interaction in activities. Some of these observations will be written
down and more fonnal, while others will just be noticed infonnally.
Evaluation is such an important process in determining whether or not students
have grasped the information. Everyone learns their own way because everyone is
unique. Some students will perform better on written assignments, and some will
perfonn better through other authentic assessments. It is important to assess in the best
possible way in order to cover the needs of ALL the students, not just one or two of them
Resources:
. Discover the Wonder, ScOttForesman (1996) Science textbook and teacher's
edition
. httv://www.Dbs.orlillgene/educator/41_discussion.html--Case study No. 1
. httv://www3.iDtv.orlillexDloremore/ge --"Gene Combination Probability"
extension activity, basic genetic engineering information and viewpoints
. Lesson plan from:
://www3.i tv.or e loremore/ etreacher Resources/& materia1s/sci6 atleaslcfm
. Trans Ova Genetics- field trip
. httv://www.transgenicnets.com
Task is complete
and correct
(5 points)
Task is mostly
complete and
mostly correct
(3 poi~~)__-
Task is mostly
incomplete or
incorrect
(0 points)
SCORING
RUBRIC
Makes logical
decisions and
designs flower
h~rid
Makes logical
decisions and
designs vegetable
hybrid
Makes logical
decisions and
designs animal
hybrid
Clearly and
accurately
represents vegetable
and animal on
bulletin board
Completes required
essay, clear answers
to questions, well
written
Self-Evaluation Rubric for Mock Debate
1 Pnint
2 Pnint~
Little time was
put toward the
debate, but more
time was spent
towards other
things
.1 Pnint~
A fair amount of
time was spent
working with my
group on the
debate
4 Pnint~
~ Pnint~
Most of my time
was spent
helping the
group perfect the
debate
Little or no
time and
effort was
put toward
the debate
A great amount of
my time was spent
working on the
debate with my
group
I got along fairly
well with all of my
group members.
I did not
cooperate very
well with my
group
members.
I got along great
with all of my
group members.
I thoroughly
enjoyed having the
opportunity to
work with my
group members.
I was able to work
with a couple of
my group
members, but the
others were tough.
I made
absolutely no
suggestions
to make the
debate better.
Very few
suggestions
were made by
me to make the
debate better.
I feel that I made a
descent amount of
suggestions and
was helpful in a
few areas.
I did the best I
could on making
some suggestions
that would better
our group debate.
I made a thorough
amount of
suggestions in way
of bettering our
group debate.
Total:
/15
Comments:
Group Evaluation Rubric for Mock Debate
1 Point
2 Points
3 Points
4 Points
5 Points
Two of the five
requirements
were met by
the presenting
group.
Three of the five
requirements were
met by the group
that was presenting
Four of the five
requirements were
met by the group
that was presenting
AIlS
requirements
were met by the
group that was
presenting.
Zero or one
of the
requirements
were met by
the group.
The debate
was a flop.
Poor group
work was
displayed in
the debate.
One person did
all of the work
in trying to
make the group
debate a
success.
Most of the group
members had an
active role in
making the debate
a success.
For the most part,
everyone
participated, but a
couple people
could have took
part more in it.
All group
members had an
active role in
making the
debate a success
Total:
/10
Comments: