Windows 2000 Professional in a NetWare Environment

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Oct 27, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

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Operating System

Windows 2000 Professional in a
NetWare

Environment

Scenario Deployment Guide

Abstract

This guide outlines the steps to install and configure Microsoft® Windows® 2000 Professional in a
Novell
NetWare
-
based network. Specifically, it focuse
s on how to plan and deploy the various
NetWare

client services.


© 2000 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

The information contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft
Corporation on the issues discussed as of the date of
publication. Because Microsoft
must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a
commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the accuracy
of any information presented after the date of publication.

Thi
s document is for informational purposes only. MICROSOFT MAKES NO
WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, IN THIS DOCUMENT.

Microsoft, Active Directory, Windows, Windows NT and the Windows logo are
registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.

Other product or c
ompany names mentioned herein may be the trademarks of their
respective owners.

Microsoft Corporation • One Microsoft Way • Redmond, WA 98052
-
6399 • USA

0200



INTRODUCTION

................................
................................
.............

1

Scenario Requirements

2

Scenario Tasks

2

PLANNING

................................
................................
......................

3

INSTALLATION
................................
................................
...............

5

Upgrading Clients

5

CONFIGURATION

................................
................................
...........

6

Configuring the Logon Process

6

Configuring the NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Protocol

8

Internal Network Number

8

Frame Type and Network Num
ber

9

External Network Number

9

WINDOWS 2000 SERVER
INTEROPERABILITY OPT
IONS
........
10

Gateway Services for NetWare

10

Services for NetWare (SF
N)

10

Microsoft Directory Synchronization Services

10

File Migration Utility

10

File and Print Services for NetWare Version 5.0

11

File
and Print Services for NetWare Version 4.0

11

Directory Service Manager for NetWare

11

SUMMARY

................................
................................
.....................
12

For More Information

12


CONTENTS



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2000 Depl oyment Guide

1

This guide outlines the steps to install and configure Microsoft® Windows® 2000
Professional operating system in a Novell NetWare
-
based network. To demonstrate
the options for connecting Windows 2000
-
based desktops to Novell NetWare
servers, it refers to

a fictional company, Litware Incorporated, which has outgrown
its current infrastructure and is upgrading to Windows 2000 Server and
Professional. The Litware accounting system is not being migrated and will stay on
NetWare Servers for another year. As a
result, the CFO, Peter Houston, is worried
about the interoperability with the rest of the network. He is relying on the MIS
department to address his concerns.

Litware has selected Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional as its desktop operating
system Window
s 2000 is ideal for mixed environments where users must interact
with Novell NetWare, UNIX or mainframe servers, as well as Windows 2000 Server
or Windows NT Server.

Windows 2000 Professional includes the tools needed to connect and share data
with NetWare

Servers. The tools used to achieve this are the Windows 2000 Client
Services for NetWare and the NWLink Protocol.

The Client Services for NetWare provides access to NetWare file, print, and
directory services. This gives users the ability to:



Store and re
trieve documents from NetWare file servers.



Print to NetWare print queues.



Log on to Novell Directory Services (NDS), which is included with NetWare 4.x
and 5.x.

NWLink is the Windows 2000 32
-
bit implementation of the Internetwork Packet
Exchange/Sequenced

Packet Exchange (IPX/SPX) protocol that, in the past, has
been the primary way to communicate with NetWare Servers. Use of NWLink and
Client Services for NetWare allows a Windows 2000 Professional
-
based computer
to connect to NetWare servers running IPX/S
PX.

The goal of this document is to assist administrators with planning, installation and
configuration of Client Services for NetWare and the NWLink (IPX/SPX) Compatible
Protocol by using the Litware, Inc. scenarios.


INTRODUCTIO
N


2

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2000 Depl oyment Guide

Scenario Requirements

This guide ass
umes that a NetWare server is already configured in your
environment, and that the reader is familiar with NetWare terminology. For more
information on NetWare terminology, consult your NetWare documentation.

For more information on deploying Windows 2000
Professional, refer to the
Deployment Planning Guide at
http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/library/planning/default.asp

Scenario Tasks

This document describes the following tasks.

Planning



Inf ormation needed f or installation



Understanding NetWare v ersio
n specif ic issues.

Installation



Installation of Client Serv ice f or NetWare and the
NWLink IPX/SPX/NetBIOS Compatible Transport
Protocol.



Upgrading to Windows 2000 Prof essional

Configuration



Conf iguring Windows 2000 Prof essional in a
NetWare
-
based network
.




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3

Planning is the key to a successful installation or migration. It is important to have
all of the information that you will need before you start the installation. You should
have the following information before you proceed with installation
or configuration:



What version of NetWare am I connecting to?



Am I using Novell Directory Services?



What Protocol am I using?



What is the Network Frame type and External Network Number?



What is the name of my NDS Tree or Preferred Server?



What context is m
y user object located in?

The first of these two points work together. Generally, the version of NetWare that
you are using will determine whether you are using Novell Directory Services or not
Table P
-
1 shows which versions of NetWare support Novell Direc
tory Services and
which support Bindery Services.

NetWare Version

Bindery

NDS

NetWare 3.x

X


NetWare 4.x

X

X

NetWare 5.x (IPX Only)

X

X

Table P
-
1 NetWare Versions

Note that NetWare 3.x versions support Bindery Services only, whereas NetWare
versions 4
.x and higher support Novell Directory Services. NetWare 4.x servers are
compatible with a Bindery logon when Bindery Emulation is used in conjunction with
NDS. Consult your NetWare documentation for more information on Bindery
Emulation.

In a NetWare vers
ion 5 environment, the client can use all of the services that are
available on IPX over TCP/IP. The Microsoft client for NetWare does not support
connection to a NetWare server over TCP/IP; however, you can work around this
limitation by installing the No
vell NetWare client.

Knowing your frame type is very helpful for troubleshooting purposes. The IPX/SPX
protocol uses frame type for certain networks. When the NWLink protocol is
initialized, it attempts to autodetect the frame type. (This is discussed in d
etail in the
configuration section of this document.) Refer to Table P
-
2 for supported frame
types.

Network Type

Supported Frame Types

Ethernet

Ethernet II, 802.3,802.2, 802.2 SNAP

Token Ring

802.5 and 802.5 SNAP

FDDI

802.2 and SNAP

Table P
-
2 Supported

Frame Types

Whether you use NDS or Bindery Services, it is important that you know the name
of the NDS tree you are logging into. Also, when using NDS you need to know
PLANNING


4

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2000 Depl oyment Guide

where your user object is located in the Tree

this is known as your
context
.

At Litware
, the MIS department has documented all NetWare information prior to
the migration, and thus has all necessary data on hand to configure the accounting
department to interact with the existing NetWare servers.



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5

Client Services for NetWare is th
e tool that the MIS group will use to integrate the
accounting department with both the new Windows 2000 infrastructure and the
existing NetWare environment. This solution will allow them to give the users in the
accounting department the ability to authen
ticate, share files, and print to the
existing NetWare environment, as well as to the Windows 2000 environment.

Configuring Windows 2000 Professional for a NetWare environment is simple. The
first step is installing Client Services for NetWare. Client Serv
ices for NetWare
installs the NWLink protocol automatically.

I mportant:

To install Client Services for NetWare, you must have Administrative rights to the
computer running Windows 2000 Professional.

To install Client Service for NetWare

1.

On the
Start

menu,

choose
Control Panel
, and then open
Network and Dial
-
Up Connections
.

2.

Right
-
click the local area connection for which you want to install Client Service
for NetWare, and then click
Properties
.

3.

Click the
General

tab, and then click
Install
.

4.

In the
Select Ne
twork Component Type

dialog box, click
Client
, and then
click
Add
.

5.

In the
Select Network Client

dialog box, click
Client Service for NetWare
,
and then click
OK
.

After the file copy operation is complete, you are prompted to configure the client for
your en
vironment.

Upgrading Clients

Peter Houston (the Litware CFO) points out that all of his employees have the
Novell NetWare Client installed already, and is concerned about the downtime of
uninstalling the client and installing Client Services for NetWare. P
ete shouldn’t fret.

Windows 2000 Professional has many new features, one of which is that it will
upgrade Windows 95, Windows 98, and Microsoft Windows NT® Workstation
operating system, version 4.0. With previous version upgrades, users that had
Novell Cli
ent 32 installed were required to uninstall the client, upgrade, reinstall the
client, and reconfigure. Windows 2000 Professional, however, can upgrade Novell
Client 32 version 4.7 when upgrading from Windows 95, Windows 98, or

Windows NT Workstation 4.0.

(Note that Windows 2000 Professional does not
perform a full installation of the Novell Client 32; it upgrades only those systems
where the Novell Client 32 is already installed. For a full installation of the Novell
Client 32 contact Novell directly.)

INSTALLATION


6

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2000 Depl oyment Guide

Once the file copy process of the client installation is complete, the Select
NetWare Logon dialog box appears. This allows you to configure the logon
process within Client Services for NetWare.

Configuring the Logon Process


Figure C
-

1

Client Services for NetWare Configuration.

To configure NetWare logon

1.

Select either
Preferred Server

or
Default Tree and Context
:



For NetWare 3.x servers, select
Preferred Server
, and identify a Preferred
Server name for a Bindery lo
gon.

Point
Preferred Server

to a NetWare server that has a valid user account. If
you set Preferred Server to None, Client Services for NetWare performs a
Get Nearest Server request. The first server that responds to this request
becomes the preferred ser
ver. If authentication fails, verify that the user has
a user account on that server or specify a server in Preferred Server that
contains a valid account.



For NetWare 4.x or higher, select
Default Tree and Context
, and identify
the Tree and Context for lo
gging on to Novell Directory Services.

Default Tree

is used when connecting to servers participating in Novell
Directory Services. In this case, users do not have a user account; they
have a user
object
. This object provides them a single logon to the NDS
tree. Client Services for NetWare will only allow you to logon to one tree at a
time.
Context

describes the location of the container object that holds the
user object for the logon process. For example, with in the Litware
organization, there is an Organi
zational Unit called “Redmond.” Under the
CO
NFIGURATION



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7

Redmond Organizational Unit is another Organizational Unit called
“Administration.” Within the Administration Organizational Unit is a user
object “JohnF.” The Context for John would be


.OU=ADMINISTRATION.OU=RE
DMON.O=LITWARE

This is the
typefull

name format that tells Client Services for NetWare where
the user object JohnF will be located. Another way to express this is the
typeless

name format


.ADMINISTRATION.REDMOND.LITWARE

Both name formats are accepted wit
hin the
Context

field of the Client
configuration.




2.

Select
Run Login Script
to instruct the client to process the NetWare Login
Script upon logon. A NetWare Login Script is a list of commands that are
performed every time a user logs the network. This ca
n be anything from
setting environment variables to mapping drives. This selection is where you
can enable or disable the process.

3.

Click
OK
.


8

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Configuring the NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Protocol


Figure C
-

2

NWLink Configuration.


As stated previously, when you install Client Services for NetWare it installs the
NWLink IPX/SPX Compatible Protocol. Generally, the protocol will configure itself
but it is good to be familiar with these settings for trouble shooting purposes.

Note:

Settings that are all zeros (0) are considered to be autoconfigure
-
enabled.

Internal Network Number

Internal network numbers are used for internal routing and are generally only
needed for servers. Because Windows 2000 Server and Professional have the
sa
me implementation of the NWLink Protocol, they share the same configuration
dialog. You will only need to change this feature only if you are hosting IPX
Services. In most cases, you should not need to change this option for Windows
2000 Professional.




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9

Fra
me Type and Network Number

Frame types define the packet formats that are used by different networks. It is
important that all computers in a network have the same frame type, so that they
can communicate with the rest of the network.

Windows 2000 Professi
onal attempts to autodetect the frame type for the client. In
most cases, this is successful. However, occasionally the autodetect feature
chooses an inappropriate frame type, usually because more than one frame type
exists on the network. If this happens,

you should manually set the frame type to
match the one designated on your NetWare Server. Note that if more than one
frame type exists, choose the one that would be detected first. For example, if frame
type Ethernet 802.2 and Ethernet 802.3 are bound to

the same segment, then
configure frame type Ethernet_802.2. The order of detection is Ethernet 802.2,
Ethernet 802.3, Ethernet II, and then Ethernet SNAP.

External Network Number

External Network numbers are unique numbers that identify a segment on an
I
PX/SPX network. Each External Network number must be unique. Client Services
for NetWare tries to autodetect this setting as well. If you would like to set this
manually you can get the necessary information from your NetWare server by
typing CONFIG at the

NetWare Console (see Figure C
-
3 for sample
CONFIG

command output).


Figure C
-

3

NetWare Configuration Screen

Note:

Client Services for NetWare can only connect to NetWare Servers that use the NWLink
IPX/SPX protocol. It does n
ot support connecting or authenticating using TCP/IP. To use IP for
connections to a NetWare server or to use any management utilities such as NetWare Nwadmin, you
must use the NetWare Client from Novell.


10

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2000 Depl oyment Gui de

In a
ddition to the interoperability features included with Windows 2000 Professional,
Microsoft offers tools in Windows 2000 Server to assist with Novell interoperability.
These include Gateway Services for NetWare (GSNW) and Microsoft Services for
NetWare (SF
N).

Gateway Services for NetWare

With Gateway Services for NetWare, you can create a gateway through which
Microsoft client computers without Novell NetWare client software can access
NetWare file and print resources. In the Litware network, GSNW permits u
sers who
have Windows 2000 Professional running on their desktop computers to access
information on the NetWare server
-
based accounting system.

Gateway Services for NetWare allows you to provide gateways for resources
located on Novell Directory Services (
NDS) trees, as well as for resources on
servers with bindery security. These resources include volumes, directories,
directory map objects, printers, and print queues. GSNW is included with Windows
2000 Server.

Services for NetWare (SFN)

Microsoft Services

for NetWare version 5 provides customers with a complete set of
new interoperability services and tools for integrating the Windows 2000 Server
product family and Windows NT Server 4.0 into their existing NetWare
environments.

Note that Services for NetWa
re version 5 is an add
-
on product for Windows 2000
Server.

The new interoperability technologies of Services for NetWare include the following:



Microsoft Directory Synchronization Services



File Migration Utility



File and Print Services for NetWare versio
n 5

Services for NetWare also includes the following interoperability technologies
available in previous versions:



File and Print Services for NetWare version 4



Directory Service Manager for NetWare

Microsoft Directory Synchronization Services

Microsoft
Directory Synchronization Services (MSDSS)

enables customers to
synchronize a wide variety of data stored in the Active Directory™ service with
Novell Directory Service (NDS) and NetWare 3.x binderies.

File Migration Utility

File Migration Utility (FMU) enables customers to move large amounts of f
ile data
from all versions of NetWare to Windows 2000, while preserving directory structures
and security permissions.

WINDOWS 2000 SERVER
INTEROPERABILITY
OPTIONS



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11

File and Print Services for NetWare Version 5.0

File and Print Services for Netware version 5.0 emulates NetWare servers, which
eases the

transition from NetWare to Windows 2000 by not interfering with the
NetWare network, by maintaining a single logon for the clients, requiring no client
configuration changes, and allowing customers to benefit from the strengths of
Windows 2000 Server whil
e maintaining their current investment and infrastructure.

File and Print Services for NetWare Version 4.0

File and Print Services for NetWare version 4 performs the exact same functions as
File and Print Services for Netware version 5.0, but for Windows N
T Server 4.0
instead of Windows 2000.

Directory Service Manager for NetWare

Directory Service Manager for NetWare can be used specifically to manage
NetWare 2.x and 3.x binderies with Windows NT Server 4.0 Directory Service.
DSMN copies the NetWare user ac
counts to the Windows NT Server 4.0 Directory
Service and then propagates any changes back to the NetWare server.



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Microsoft Windows 2000 Professional provides you with Client Services for
NetWare. This allows any Windows 2000 Professional Client
to access data on
NetWare volumes, print to NetWare print queues and access Novell Directory
Services.

For More Information

For more in
-
depth information on Windows 2000 Professional and NetWare
Interoperability, consult the Windows 2000 Professional Reso
urce Kit.

For the latest information on the Windows

2000, visit the World Wide Web site at

http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/default.asp


SUMMARY