Department of Computer and Information Science, Gannon University

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Nov 18, 2013 (3 years and 1 month ago)

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Department of Computer

and

Information Science, Gannon University


CIS286/GCIS563 Advanced Object
-
Oriented Programming/

Object
-
Oriented Problem Solving in Java


Instructor

Dr. Frank

Xu

Office

Zurn

312






























Email

x
u001

Phone

(814)871
-
5708



































Credit

3



Description
:


This course covers application of object
-
oriented programming to software development which
includes the general topics of encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism. Topics also include GUI objects
event
-
driven programming, exception handling, networkin
g programming and web programming.
Each student will
be responsible for several programming projects, in
-
class quizzes, and a final exam. Students should have a solid
programming background in a language such as C or C++.


Course Objective
:

Upon completing this course student will be able to:



Understand the concept of OO language



Design
software systems using OO concept



Implement small application in Java


Prerequisite
:


CIS216

Textbook:

Introduction to Java Programming, Comprehensive
Version (
9
th Edition), by Daniel E. Liang. ISBN:
0132936526



Tentative

Topics
:

Topic

Chapter 1 Introduction to Computers, Programming, and Java

Chapter 2 Elementary Programming

Chapter 3 Selections

Chapter 4 Loops

Chapter 5 Methods

Chapter 6
Single
-
Dimensional Arrays

Chapter 7 Multidimensional Arrays

Chapter 8 Objects and Classes

Chapter 9 Strings

Chapter 10 Thinking in Objects

Chapter 11 Inheritance and Polymorphism

Chapter 12 GUI Basics

Chapter 13 Graphics

Chapter 14 Exception Handli
ng and Text I/O

Chapter 15 Abstract Classes and Interfaces

Chapter 16 Event
-
Driven Programming

Chapter 17 GUI Componenets

Chapter 18 Applets and Multimedia

Chapter 19 Binary I/O

Chapter 20 Recursion

Department of Computer

and

Information Science, Gannon University


Chapter 21 Generics

Chapter 22 Lists, Stacks,
Queues, and Priority Queues

Chapter 23 Sets and Maps

Chapter 24 Developing Efficient Algorithms

Chapter 25 Sorting

Chapter 26 Implementing Lists, Stacks, Queues, and Priority Queues

Chapter 27 Binary Search Trees

Chapter 28 Hashing

Chapter 29 AVL
Trees

Chapter 30 Graphs and Applications

Chapter 31 Weighted Graphs and Applications

Chapter 32 Multithreading and Parallel Programming

Chapter 33 Networking

Chapter 34 Java Database Programming



Course Assessment Methods:


Assessment Methods

Objective 1

Objective 2

Objective 3

Quizzes

X

X


Projects

X

X

X



Grading Polices:

Grade

Grade Scale

Points

A

90% and above

360+

B

80%
-

89%

320~359

C

70%
-

79%

280~319

D

60%
-

69%

240~279

F

59% and below

below 240




Item

Points

Assignments

100

Quizzes

100

Midterm

100

Final

100

Total

400



How to Submit Your Project
:





Source code (.java)



Other source files (.txt and .jpg etc.,)



Result
s
creenshots



Pack all above files to a zip file. The name convention:
P
_projectNumber_yourfirst
N
ame
_lastName
.
zip



Submit to Angle

Department of Computer

and

Information Science, Gannon University


Course Policies:




Homework is due by the beginning of the next class.



Late homework will be given zero.



You cannot start a new assignment until the previous assignment has been received by the instructor.



No make
-
up
quizzes
/exams will
be allowed without prior arrangements being made.



Do not ask questions such as "How do you solve Problem X?" Explain what you have done and ask a
specific question in that context.



Be seated, quiet, and ready to learn when the class time begins.

Do not spe
ak when someone else is
speaking.




Do not eat or drink in class because the sights, smells, and noises can be distracting to others. Be
considerate and respectful of everyone.




To appeal a grade, send an e
-
mail to your instructor's e
-
mail address within t
wo weeks of the grade having
been received. Overdue appeals will not be considered.



All noise
-
make devices, such as cellular phones, pagers, CD players, radios, and similar devices are
prohibited in the classroom and laboratory facilities.



Calculators and
computers are prohibited during examinations and quizzes, unless specified.



Reasonable laptop
-
size computers may be used in lecture for the purpose of taking notes.


Cheating Policy
:



(Cheatin
g) Turning in someone else's work as your own (with or without his or her knowledge). Turning in
a completely duplicated assignment is a flagrant offense.



(Cheating) Allowing someone else to turn in your work as his or her own.



(Cheating) Several people wr
iting one program and turning in multiple copies, all represented (implicitly
or explicitly) as individual work.



(Cheating) Using any part of someone else's work without the proper acknowledgment.



(Cheating) Stealing an examination or solution from the ins
tructor. This is an extremely flagrant offense.



(Not Cheating) Turning in work done alone or with the help of the course's staff.



(Not Cheating) Submission of one assignment for a group of students if group work is explicitly permitted
(or required).



(Not
Cheating) Getting or giving help on using the computer for the course.



(Not Cheating) Getting or giving help on how to solve minor syntax errors.



(Not Cheating) High level discussion of course material for better understanding.



(Not Cheating) Discussion of

assignments to understand what is being asked for.