3.2 The Domains for Interfaces to the Residential Gateway

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Oct 30, 2013 (4 years and 11 days ago)

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ISO/IEC

JTC

1/SC

25/WG

1

N

912


Date: 2000
-
04
-
01

ISO/IEC JTC

1/SC

25/WG

1

Interconnection of Information Technology Equipment

Home Electronic System

Title
:

CD1 15045
-
01: Information technology


Interconnection of information
technology equipment


Ar
chitecture for HomeGate, the residential gateway
(AHRG)

Source:

ISO/IEC JTC

1/SC

25/WG

1

Project:

Project: 25.01.03.02

Status:

Committee Draft 1 (CD1)

Requested Action:

SC25 Ballot

Distribution:

SC

25


ISO/IEC


CD1 15045
-
01

JTC

1/SC

25 WG

1 N 912

Proje
ct: 25.01.03.02






Committee Draft 1



CD1 15045
-
01: Information technology


Interconnection of information technology
equipment


Architecture for HomeGate,
the residential gateway (AHRG)

CD1 15045
-
01


ISO/IEC:2000


ISO/IEC JTC1 SC25 WG1 N912





Archit ect ure for HomeGat e, t he Resi denti al Gat eway (AHRG)

Forward
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Contents

1. SCOPE

1

1.1 PART 1
-

ARCHITECTURE OF THE
RESIDENTIAL GATEWAY

................................
.............

1

1.1.1 Architectural Overview

................................
................................
................................
........

1

1.1.2 Architectural Domains of the RG

................................
................................
..........................

1

1.1.3 System Descr
iption

................................
................................
................................
.............

1

1.2 PART 2 SYSTEM CO
MPONENTS

................................
................................
.........................

1

1.2.1 Logical Architecture and HomeGate Internal Protocol (HGIP)

................................
................

1

1.2.2 System and Network Addressing

................................
................................
.........................

1

1.3 PART 3
-

INTEROPERABILITY

................................
................................
.............................

2

1.3.1 Net work Interoperability
................................
................................
................................
.......

2

1.4 PART 4
-

SECURITY, PRIVACY AN
D SAFETY

................................
................................
......

2

1.5 PART 5
-

BASE LEVEL PROFILE

................................
................................
.........................

2

1.6 PART 6
-

GIP AND INTERFACES
-

PCI

................................
................................
.................

2

1.6.1 Physical Architecture
................................
................................
................................
...........

2

1.6.2 Residential Gateway Common Interface
-

PCI

................................
................................
......

2

1.7 PART 7
-

GIP AND INTERFAC
ES
-

CARD BUS

................................
................................
.....

2

1.8 SRG PROFILES
................................
................................
................................
....................

3

2. NORMATIVE REFEREN
CES
................................
................................
................................
...

4

3. DEFINITIONS AND A
BBREVIATI ONS
................................
................................
.....................

5

1. FUNCTIONAL DESCRI
PTION OF RESIDENTIAL

GATEWAYS

................................
................

1

1.1 GATEWAY FUNCTION
S

................................
................................
................................
.......

1

2. ARCHITECTURAL OVE
RVI EW FOR RESIDENTIA
L GATEWAYS
................................
............

3

3. ARCHITECTURAL DOM
AI NS FOR THE RESIDEN
TIAL GATEWAY
................................
.........

3

3.1 THE DOMAI N OF TH
E RESIDENTIAL GATEWA
Y

................................
................................
.

4

3.2 THE DOMAI NS FOR
I NTERFACES TO THE RE
SI DENTI AL GATEWAY
................................
.

4

3.3 DATA STREAMS

................................
................................
................................
..................

6

4. STANDARDISED COMP
ONENTS OF GATEW
AY
................................
................................
....

7

4.1 COMPONENTS OF GA
TEWAY

................................
................................
.............................

7

4.1.1 WAN Gateway Interface (WGI)

................................
................................
............................

8

4.1.2 LAN Gateway Interface (LGI)

................................
................................
...............................

9

4.1.3 HomeGate Internal Protoco
l (HGIP)

................................
................................
...................

10

4.2 STRUCTURAL IMPLE
MENTATI ONS OF RG

................................
................................
.......

11

CD1 15045
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01


ISO/IEC:2000


ISO/IEC JTC1 SC25 WG1 N912





Archit ect ure for HomeGat e, t he Resi denti al Gat eway (AHRG)

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4.2.1 Simple Gateway Example (i nformati ve)

................................
................................
..............

11

4.2.2 Complex Integral Gateway Example (i nformati ve)

................................
...............................

11

4.2.3 The Complex Modular Gateway Exampl e (informati ve)
................................
........................

12

4.2.4 Distributed Gateways Example (informati ve)
................................
................................
.......

13

5. HOMEGATE SOFTWARE

FUNCTIONAL REQUIREME
NTS
................................
...................

15

5.1 ESSENTIAL TERMIN
OLOGY

................................
................................
..............................

16

5.1.1 HES

................................
................................
................................
................................

16

5.1.2 CONTROL CHANNEL

HES Cl ass 1

................................
................................
................

16

5.1.3 DATA CHANNEL

HES Class 2 or Cl ass 3

................................
................................
........

17

5.1.4 WAN

................................
................................
................................
................................

17

5.1.5 LAN

................................
................................
................................
................................

17

5.1.6 HomeGate
................................
................................
................................
........................

17

6. HOMEGATE SOFTWARE

ARCHITECTURE

................................
................................
..........

17

6.1 SUMMARY

................................
................................
................................
.........................

17

6.2 HESA

................................
................................
................................
................................

18

6.3 WASA

................................
................................
................................
................................

18

6.4 LASC

................................
................................
................................
................................

19

6.5 HODC

................................
................................
................................
................................

19

6.6 SECURITY DECODER

................................
................................
................................
........

19

6.7 HGIP

................................
................................
................................
................................

19

7. HOMEGATE APPLI CAT
IONS

................................
................................
...............................

20

8. PRIVACY AND FIREW
ALL FUNCTIONS

................................
................................
...............

20

1. LANGUAGE AND ADDR
ESSING FOR RESIDENTI
AL GATEWAY

................................
...........

1

1.1.1 Addressing

................................
................................
................................
.........................

1

1.1.2 Commands
................................
................................
................................
.........................

1

1.1.3 APIs

................................
................................
................................
................................
..

1

1. NETWORK INTEROPER
ABILITY FOR THE RESI
DENTIAL GATEWAY

................................
...

2



CD1 15045
-
01


ISO/IEC:2000


ISO/IEC JTC1 SC25 WG1 N912





Archit ect ure for HomeGat e, t he Resi denti al Gat eway (AHRG)

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Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) a
nd IEC (the International
Electrotechnical Commission) form the specialized system for worldwide
standardization. National bodies that are members of ISO or IEC participate in the
development of International Standards through technical committees establis
hed by the
respective organization to deal with particular fields of technical activity. ISO and IEC
technical committees collaborate in fields of mutual interest. Other international
organizations, governmental and non
-
governmental, in liaison with ISO an
d IEC, also
take part in the work.

In the field of information technology, ISO and IEC have established a joint technical
committee, ISO/IEC JTC 1. International Standards adopted by the joint technical
committee are circulated to national bodies for votin
g. Publication as an International
Standard requires approval by at least 75% of the national bodies casting a vote.

This Committee Draft 15045
-
01 was prepared by Joint Technical Committee ISO/IEC
JTC 1, Information technology, Subcommittee SC 25, Intercon
nection of Information
Technology Equipment.
CD1 15045
-
01


ISO/IEC:2000


ISO/IEC JTC1 SC25 WG1 N912


Introduction

Archit ect ure for HomeGat e, t he Resi denti al Gat eway (AHRG)

Int roduct i on
-

Page
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INTRODUCTION & SCOPE


Architecture for Residential Gateways (AHRG)

1.

Scope

This document defines HomeGate, the Architecture for Residential Gateways (AHRG)
for Home Electronic System (HES) according to the standar
disation process of ISO/IEC.

The AHRG provides the definitions and requirements to which any Residential Gateway
shall conform if it is to be classed as compliant with the International Standard for
Residential Gateways. It identifies the generalised archi
tecture, the system boundaries,
system addressing requirements, the physical interfaces and the requirements for
security, privacy and safety to which Residential Gateways and their components,
conformant with the standard, shall comply.

The format of th
is standard document is designed to offer a "future proof," forward and
backward compatible standard for Residential Gateways and for networks and devices
to which they are interfaced.

The following requirement categories define the scope of the document a
nd provide the
framework for an expandable standard and document structure:

1.1

Part 1
-

Architecture of the Residential Gateway

1.1.1

Architectural Overview

This section provides a generalised discussion of the requirements, architecture and
permissible profiles
for Residential Gateways. (15045
-
01)

1.1.2

Architectural Domains of the RG

This section of the document defines the domains of each element of a Residential
Gateway. (15045
-
01)

1.1.3

System Description

This section of the document defines the main components and descr
ibes potential
structural implementations of a Residential Gateway (15045
-
01)

1.2

Part 2 System Components

1.2.1

Logical Architecture and HomeGate Internal Protocol (HGIP)

This section describes the protocols, addressing, functions and commands which control
data tr
affic between Networks and the RG. The HES language described is a necessary
component of the Architecture for Residential Gateways. (15045
-
01)

1.2.2

System and Network Addressing

CD1 15045
-
01


ISO/IEC:2000


ISO/IEC JTC1 SC25 WG1 N912


Introduction

Archit ect ure for HomeGat e, t he Resi denti al Gat eway (AHRG)

Int roduct i on
-

Page
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This section defines how components of the RG refer and communicate with one
ano
ther and with devices beyond the domain of the RG on internal and external
networks.


(15045
-
02)

HES SOFTWARE?

1.3

Part 3
-

Interoperability

1.3.1

Network Interoperability

This section defines the requirements for a RG for interoperability between Networks.
(150
45
-
02). This section does not mandate specific network protocols.

1.4

Part 4
-

Security, Privacy and Safety

This section defines the requirements for security, privacy and safety which a RG shall
support to comply with the standard. There is provision for lev
els of support in order to
provide a measured trade off between risk and cost. (15045
-
03)

1.5

Part 5
-

Base Level Profile

This Part of the Standard for Residential Gateways defines the requirements for
gateways compliant with the "Base Level Profile". This Sta
ndard 14045
-
04 calls on the
requirements and specifications of Parts 1, 2 and 3 of this Standard.

1.6

Part 6
-

GIP and Interfaces
-

PCI

1.6.1

Physical Architecture

This section defines the physical requirements of interfaces between the Gateway
Internal Protocol and

devices interfacing to the GIP. (15045
-
01)

1.6.2

Residential Gateway Common Interface
-

PCI

This section defines a set of common standard interfaces and internal protocols for the
PCI bus to which the RG shall comply
-

each interface and protocol accommodates a

particular level of capability and provides increased levels of capability for future
requirements. (15045
-
05,..,09)

1.7

Part 7
-

GIP and Interfaces
-

Card Bus



CD1 15045
-
01


ISO/IEC:2000


ISO/IEC JTC1 SC25 WG1 N912


Introduction

Archit ect ure for HomeGat e, t he Resi denti al Gat eway (AHRG)

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1.8

SRG Profiles

The Standard for Residential Gateway is designed such that many Gateway topologies

may comply with the standard. Thus there is a set of clearly defined profiles which
determine the functionality of a Standard compliant Residential Gateway. These are
shown in Table 1.1 below.

Level

Document Reference

Description

01

15045
-
01

Architecture
, System Description, Addressing

01

15045
-
02

System Components

01

15045
-
03

Network Interoperability

01

15045
-
04

Security, Privacy, and Safety

01

15045
-
0X

Additional requirements to 1
-
04 to 1
-
09

01

15045
-
10

Base Level Profile Residential Gateway: 2000:

1
-
01 through 1
-
09

Supports Levels 01

Suitable for WAN:LAN (1:1) Residential Gateways

02

15045
-
11

Common Interface and Internal Protocol Standard
-

PCI

02

15045
-
12

Common Interface and Internal Protocol Standard

Card Bus/PCMCIA

02

15045
-
13

Common Inte
rface and Internal Protocol Standard
-

IEEE1394

02

15045
-
14

Common Interface and Internal Protocol Standard
-

TBD in future

02

15045
-
15

Common Interface and Internal Protocol Standard
-

TBD in future

12

15045
-
20

Profile Level 2
-

Modular Residential Gat
eway: 2000: 4,5/6

Supports Levels 2
-
05 through2
-
09

Suitable for multiple WAN:LAN Residential Gateways

01

15045
-
16

Language and Addressing requirements for devices, messages
and routing within the SRG

01

15045
-
05

Uniform Device Driver

01

15045
-
06

OS Ser
vices

01

15045
-
07

Network Addressing Applications

02

15045
-
08

Network Interoperation Applications

02

15045
-
09

Applications essential for Network and RG

01

15045
-
16

Security and Privacy Application Level 1

02

15045
-
17

Security and Privacy Application L
evel 2

01

15045
-
18

Tests Specification and Safety Requirements

Gateways comply to the standard if they conform to:

01

15045
-
10 2000: 1,2,3

Base Level Profile

10

15045
-
20 2000:10,11

Modular Level Profile using PCI

10

15045
-
20 2000:10,12

Modular Level
Profile using Card Bus/PCMCIA

10

15045
-
20 2000:10,13

Modular Level Profile using IEEE1394c High Speed.

Table 1.1 Profiles and Levels of the Residential Gateway

Note: The term level in this table corresponds to architecture level


Table entries in
Italic
s

denote future developments for this standard


CD1 15045
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01


ISO/IEC:2000


ISO/IEC JTC1 SC25 WG1 N912


Introduction

Archit ect ure for HomeGat e, t he Resi denti al Gat eway (AHRG)

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2.

Normative References

This Technical Report incorporates by dated or undated reference, provisions from other
publications. These normative references are cited at the appropriate places in the text
and the
publications listed hereafter. For dated references, subsequent amendments to,
or revisions of any of these publications apply to that standard only when incorporated in
it by amendment or revision. For undated references the latest edition of the publicat
ion
referred to applies.

CCITT V.41

Code
-
independent error
-
control system

EN 300 402

ISDN
-

DSS1 protocol

-

Data link layer

EN 300 403

ISDN
-

DDS1 protocol
-

specification for ISDN signalling network layer for
circuit mode basic call control.

EN 301 240

Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT); Data Services
Profile (DSP); Point
-
to
-
Point Protocol (PPP) interworking for internet access
and general multi
-
protocol datagram transport

EN 50083
-
1

Cabled distribution systems for television, sound an
d interactive multimedia
signals
-

Part 1

: Safety requirements

EN 50090
-
2
-
2

Home and Building Electronic Systems (HBES) Part 2
-
2 : System Overview
General Technical Requirements

EN 50173

Information Technologies. Generic cabling

EN 60603
-
7

Connector fo
r frequencies lower than 3 MHz for use with printed circuit
boards

ETR 328

Transmission and Multiplexing (TM); Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line
(ADSL); Requirements and performance

ETS 300 001

Attachment to PSTN
-

General technical requirements for equ
ipment
connected to an analogue subscriber interface in the PSTN

ETS 300 007

ISDN
-

Support of packet mode terminal by an ISDN (SAPI 16)

ETS 300 701

Digital Enhanced Cordless Telecommunications (DECT); Data Services
Profile (DSP); Generic frame relay ser
vice with mobility (service types A and
B, class 2)

IEC61883

Consumer audio/video equipment
-

Digital interface

IEEE1394

IEEE Standard for a High Performance SerialBus", IEEE Std 1394
-
1995

ISO/IEC 8802.3

Information technology
--

Telecommunications and
information exchange
between systems
--

Local and metropolitan area networks
--

Specific
requirements
--

Part 3: Carrier sense multiple access with collision detection
(CSMA/CD) access method and physical layer specifications

ISO/IEC 8802.5

Information te
chnology
--

Telecommunications and information exchange
between systems
--

Local and Metropolitan Area Networks
--

Specific
requirements
--

Part 5: Token ring access method and physical layer
specifications

ISO/IEC
8482

:1993/12

Standard for Electrical Ch
aracteristics of Generators and Receivers for user
in Balanced Digital Multipoint Systems

prEN 301 145

ISDN
-

DSS1 protocol
-

Teleaction Bearer Service
-

protocol (SAPI 12)

prENV 50090
-
6
-
4

Home and Building Electronic Systems, HBES : Part 6
-
4 : Interface
s
-

Gateway between HBES and Wi de Area Communi cati on Networks

RFC 791

Internet Protocol

TBR21

Termi nal Equi pment (TE); Attachment requi rements for pan
-
European
approval for connecti on to the anal ogue Publ i c Swi tched Tel ephone
Networks (PSTNs) of TE (excl
udi ng TE supporti ng the voi ce tel ephony
servi ce) i n whi ch network addressi ng, i f provi ded, i s by means of Dual Tone
Mul ti Frequency (DTMF) si gnal l i ng

TBR3

Integrated Servi ces Di gi tal Network (ISDN); Attachment requi rements for
termi nal equi pment to connec
t to an ISDN usi ng ISDN basi c access

TS GSM 02
-
63

GSM data
-

Packet data on signalling channel service (PDS)

UTE C 15
-
100

Low
-
voltage electrical installations



CD1 15045
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01


ISO/IEC:2000


ISO/IEC JTC1 SC25 WG1 N912


Introduction

Archit ect ure for HomeGat e, t he Resi denti al Gat eway (AHRG)

Int roduct i on
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3.

Definitions and Abbreviations

ADSL

Asymetric Digital Subscriber Loop
-

a high bandwidt h
service
superimposed on analogue PSTN lines to the premise

API

Application Programmi ng interface

AHRG

Architecture for HomeGate, the Residential Gateway

ATM

Asynchronous Transfer Mode

CATV

Community Antenna TV

CLIP

Calling line identification Presenta
tion

CMP

Connection Management Procedure (defined in [7])

CPE

Customer Premises Equipment

DAVIC

Digital Audio Video Council

DCM

Device Control Module (defined in [14])

DHCP

Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol

DL

Datalink Layer

DS

Data
-
Strobe

DV

Dig
ital video format used by digital Camcorders

DVB

Digital Video Broadcasting

DVB
-
C

DVB cable transmission standard (ETS

300

429)

DVB
-
MC

DVB Microwave Multipoint Distribution Systems (MMDS) below 10 GHz

DVB
-
MS

DVB Microwave Multipoint Distribution System
s (MMDS) below 10 GHz

DVB
-
S

DVB satellite transmission standard (ETS

300

421)

DVB
-
SMATV

DVB satellite master antenna television delivery standard (ETS

300

473)

DVB
-
T

DVB terrestrial transmission standard (ETS

300

744)

DVCR

Digital Video Cassette Record
er

DVD

Digital Versatile Disk

D
-
VHS

Digital VHS

EBU

European Broadcasting Union

EMC

Electromagnetic Compatibility

ERG

European Residential Gateway

FAV

Full Audio
-
Video device (defined in [16])

FCM

Function Control Module (defined in [16])

FCP

Func
tion Control Protocol

FTP

File Transfer Protocol

GI

GIP Interface
-

Specific interface to the GIP to which LGI and WGI
modules shall conform

GIP

Gateway Internal Protocol
-

Protocol, Addressing and Data format for
interchangi ng data between the LGI and
WGI

GSM

Global Systeme Mobile
-

Mobile phone standard

HAB

Home Automation Bus
-

Any electronic networking system that
interconects equipment and devices in the home

HAE

Home Automation Equipment
-

Appliances and/or domestic equipment
capable of being in
terfaced to a Home Automation Bus Such equipment
may be capable of requesting addresses in the WAN or of being
addressed from the WAN via the ERG

HAI

Home Automation Interface
-

Interface between the LGI and HGM

HAI/HAI
-
RF

Home Automation Interface/Radio

Frequency Home Automation Interface

HAN

Home Access Network

HAVi

Home Audio Video interoperability

HBES

Home and Building Electronic System
-

Any electronic networking system
that interconects equipment and devices in the home

HCS

Home Control System
-

Any electronic networking system that interconects
equipment and devices in the home

HDD

Hard disk drive

CD1 15045
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01


ISO/IEC:2000


ISO/IEC JTC1 SC25 WG1 N912


Introduction

Archit ect ure for HomeGat e, t he Resi denti al Gat eway (AHRG)

Int roduct i on
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HES

Home Electronic System
-

ISO
Technical Report Type 2 number 14543
describes the architecture of HES, as specified by ISO/IEC
JTC

1/SC

25/WG

1.

HGM

Home Automation Bus Gateway Module

HHU

Hand Held Unit
-

Hand Held computer used to initialise equipment

HLN

Home Local Network

HPCF

Hard Polymer Clad
-
Fiber

HTTP

Hyper Text Transfer Protocol

IAV

Intermediate Audio
-
Video device (defined in [16])

I
DTV

Integrated Digital TV, i.e. a TV containing a STB

IETF

Internet Engineering Task Force

IHDN

In
-
Home Digital Network

IP

Internet Protocol

IRD

Integrat ed Receiver Decoder

ISDN

Intergrated Services Digital Network

ISN

Interface to Specific Local Are
a Network

LAN

Local Area Network capable of carrying voice, data and entertainment
services within the premise. LANs may utilise existing mains cabling,
telephone wiring, RF or wide bandwidt h services such as Fibre Optical
Cables, Coax, TP using standard
protocols as IEEE1394, ISO 8802.3
etc…

LGI

LAN Gateway Interface
-

Functional Module which interfaces the ERG to a
Local Area Network

LI

LAN Interface
-

Generic interface between LGI and HAI

LLC

Link layer Control

MAC

Medium Access Protocol

MMDS

Mi
crowave Multipoint Distribution Systems

MMI

Man Machine Interface

MPEG

Moving Pictures Experts Group

MPEG2
-
pTS

MPEG2 Partial Transport Stream (defined in [15])

MPEG2
-
TS

MPEG2 Transport Stream (defined in [14])

MPTS

Multi Program Transport Stream

NAT

Network Address Translation

NT

Network Termination

OAM

Operations And Maintenance

OSI

Open System Interconnection

PC

Protocol Conversi on

PHY

Physical Layer

PID

Packet IDentifi er

PIU

Pulse Interface Unit

PLC

Power Line Carrier

POF

Plastic Optic
al Fiber

PPP

Point of Presence Protocol

PSTN

(analogue) Public Switched Telephone Network

PSU

Power Supply Unit

RBB

Residential Broadband

RC

Return Channel

RF

Radio Frequency

RFI

Radio Frequency Interference

RG

Residential Gateway

RS

Reed
-
Solomon

RU

Remote User

SDH

Synchronous Digital Hierarchy

SI

Service Informat i on

SIU

Serial Interface Unit

SLI

Specific Lan Interface

CD1 15045
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ISO/IEC:2000


ISO/IEC JTC1 SC25 WG1 N912


Introduction

Archit ect ure for HomeGat e, t he Resi denti al Gat eway (AHRG)

Int roduct i on
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SNAP

SubNetwork Attachment Point

SONET

Synchronous Optical Network

SP

Service Provider
-

any organisati on or operator which

provides a service to
or via equipment in the premise (often) from the WAN

SPTS

Single Program Transport Stream

STB

Set Top Box
-

Equipment which allows a TV to receive cable, satellite and
digital broadcasts

STB

Set Top Box

SWI

Specific WAN Interface


TP

Twisted Pair

UI

User Interface

User

Any person who has access to to a home automation system (including
service providers)

UTP5

Unshielded Twisted pair (cat. 5)

WAN

Wide Area Network capable of carrying voice, data and entertainment
services to a
nd from the premise. WANs are external to the premise and
may be telecommunication networks, data networks or entertainment
networks such as Cable, or Satellite.

WGI

WAN Gateway Interface
-

Functional Module which Interfaces the ERG to
a Wide Area Network

DEFINITIONS

application

Software the runs on the operating system

bus

A communicati on path connects several bus members

bus address

An identifier associated with a bus member

device

A consumer device in the Home Electronic System (HES).

device drive
r

Operating system software for interacting with a device

operating
system

Controlli ng software within the Home Electronic System

user

Any person who has access to to a home automation system (including
service providers).






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PART 1
-

Architecture
of Residential Gateways

1.

Functional Description of Residential Gateways

The Residential Gateway (RG) is a component of home control and data networking
systems. It allows communication between devices within the premises and systems,
service providers, oper
ators and users in the external environment outside the premise.
The RG enables Service providers to deliver tele
-
services such as tele
-
care, home
appliance control and preventive maintenance, remote metering and security monitoring;
other service provide
rs may provide energy management, entertainment services or
information. The RG connects the remote user with the equipment, appliance or service
in the home.



Diagram 2.1: Service provision for home automation applications

1.1

Gateway Functions

The RG acts
as a connection between the external world outside the premises and
networks within it. Operators, service providers and other systems communicate with
appliances, equipment and systems attached to local networks within the home via a
gateway to wide area
communication networks. Thus the gateway may



Carry data between WAN and LAN

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Route data and voice communication securely between the WAN and LAN



Route data and voice between LANs



Ensure only the correct data is allowed in and out of the premises (Firewall p
roperty)



Convert between internal and external addresses



Convert protocols and data



Interface to one or more WANs



Interface to one or more LANs



Accommodate application
-
specific controllers



Include a repository for WAN service providers



Select channels fo
r bandwidth
-
limited LANs, such as IEEE 1394



And/or………

Some of the potential elements of a Residential Gateway are shown in the following
diagram
1
. In all cases the gateway provides the mechanism whereby Wide Area
Networks communicate with Local Area Networ
ks. The gateway may be a standalone
gateway; it may be embedded in another device; or more than one gateway unit may be
used. A number of distributed gateway units may display the behaviour of a single
gateway.


Diagram 2.2: Schematic of Residential Gatew
ay




1


Note: it is not expected that a single gateway would accommodate all these options
-

rather one or two WAN types of
Access Network and one or two types o
f Local or Home Network

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2.

Architectural Overview for Residential Gateways

The Residential Gateway (RG) is a physical or logical device that provides a common,
secure, safe and intelligent interface between Wide Area Networks (WAN) in the
external environment (to the premise) an
d internal (to the premise) Local Area Networks
(LAN) and devices. The interface and mediation capabilities of the RG enable
independent evolution of the technologies and physical media used in the WAN and
LAN. This attribute of the RG makes evolution and
innovation in both the service
delivery and consumer arenas feasible. It enables service providers and application
vendors to offer a variety of multimedia services while masking the complexity of the
service access from the consumer.

The physical architec
ture of a residential gateway is outside the scope of this standard.
This standard will accommodates a range of potential configurations. Such
configurations may range from a "black box" approach, where the functionality for
interfacing between two or mor
e WANs and LANs is provided within the single box, to a
modular, dedicated residential gateway, to situations where multiple residential
gateways are distributed to physically separate locations within a premise
2
.

A residential gateway that conforms to th
is standard shall conform to the functional
requirements of this standard for Interoperability between networks, Residential
Gateway Internal Protocols (addressing, commands, and language), Security, Privacy
and Safety. This requirement allows two or more
standard conforming "black box"
residential gateways to interoperate if attached to the same network.


3.

Architectural Domains for the Residential Gateway

This standard applies to systems within the domain of the Residential Gateway and to
the components of
a Home Electronic System which are directly responsible for the
functions and operation of the gateway. These components are:



The Internal Gateway Architecture



The Network Interfaces



The Requirements of Distributed Gateways

This is shown in the following s
ections:




2


The "black box" approach may appeal to manuf acturers of simple "application
-
specif ic" gateways, set
-
top boxes, cable
modems, and broadband access providers. However, where there are multiples of such boxes, they shall be capable

of
interworking as a "distributed" gateway to conf orm to this standard.

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3.1

The Domain of the Residential Gateway


Diagram 2.3. The Domain of the Residential Gateway Standard

This standard only applies to the transmission of information between the external
environment of a premise (the Wide Area) and the internal envir
onment of the premise
(the Local Area). In the external environment, information is delivered using Wide Area
Networks (WANs) such as telephone or cable networks, In the internal environment
information is transmitted across Local Area Networks (LANs) such

as internal telephone
connections or Home Electronic Systems. The Residential Gateway is solely concerned
with ensuring that information can be transmitted between networks in a secure, safe
and transparent manner. There are many WAN and LAN systems, the

primary function
of the RG is to ensure that information exchanged between them is presented in a
standard format conforming to the Gateway's Internal Protocol. The Interface to specific
WANs and LANs (see the portion of Diagram 2.4 labelled "Network Doma
in" is the
responsibility of other international and national standards, and proprietary
specifications.


3.2

The Domains for Interfaces to the Residential Gateway

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Diagram 2.4 Functional Domains of the Interfaces between Networks and the
Internal Architectu
re of the Residential Gateway.

A conforming Residential Gateway should convert information in the form of data,
entertainment services or voice transmissions between the protocols, addresses and
data structures of a WAN to those of a LAN and vice versa. Wh
ere there is more than
one possible WAN or LAN to be considered, the data traffic passing through the
gateway may be normalised. This applies equally in a RG where a number of Networks
are interfaced within a single (Integral) device or where flexibility i
n the form of a
"modular" architecture is to be offered.

A conforming Residential Gateway shall transform the data, packaging and addressing
to a form and format suitable for the Network Interface and the WAN or LAN. A
conforming Residential Gateway should

transform data to the Gateway Internal Protocol
to permit interoperability among components.

NOTE: Conceptually, the WAN/LAN Interface device is modular, a circuit of an
integrated design or is split into two parts whether realised as a collection of mod
ules, or
as an integrated circuit or is implemented in firmware,. One part is in the domain of the
Network and has the responsibility of ensuring that it provides the correct presentation to
the network it interfaces to. The second part interfaces to the c
ore Gateway Internal
Protocol and Architecture and conforms to the Residential Gateway standard in ensuring
that it provides the correct presentation to the GIP of the Residential Gateway.

NOTE: The designer of the interface may use a Network
-
Specific Priv
ate MIB to control
the processes that adapt data from the Gateway to the required presentation of the
Network and a GIP MIB to control the processes that adapt data to the presentation
required by the GIP. Furthermore, there will be information which is re
quired for both
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domains and this is held in a Shared MIB and this is shared across the Domain of the
Network and the Domain of the Gateway.



3.3

Data Streams


Diagram 2.5:
-

Data Streams and Terminations

For any data stream transmitted or received at a Netwo
rk Interface there are typically
three components.

a.

The User Services path, consisting of user data, and service control and
configuration signals, extends through i) the Access Network card to the
backplane of the RG, and from there to a home network, and
ii) from the
Home Network card to the backplane of the RG, and from there to an access
network.. Note that this stream does not pass through the cards
unchanged
;
it may, in fact, undergo significant processing by the protocol translation
function of the c
ards.

b.

The Residential Gateway path penetrates to the GIP domain, the region that
contains the backplane interface and the
shared

MIB; this allows i) the
network OSS, and ii) the Home Network Management System, each to
interact with the RG functions themse
lves.

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c.

On the Wide Area side of the Residential Gateway, the Wide Area Network
line termination signals (the bottom path) penetrate only into the Wide Area
Network domain of the card, where the access line termination functions
reside. This region contains

the access network transceiver, the
microprocessor and associated access network software, and the
private

access network MIB that contains data that are accessible only to the network
OSS.

d.

On the Local Area side of the Residential Gateway, the Local Area

Network
line termination signals (the bottom path) penetrate only into the Local Area
Network domain of the card, where the home network line termination
functions reside. This region contains the home network transceiver, the
microprocessor and associat
ed access network software, and the
private

home network MIB that contains data that are accessible only to the home
network’s Network Management system.


4.

Standardised Components of Gateway

A conforming Residential Gateway may include one or more of the co
mponents
described in this subclause.

Diagram 2.6 depicts the components of this subclause.

4.1

Components of Gateway


Diagram 2.6: Components of Residential Gateway




WGI

-

W
AN
G
ateway
I
nterface



HGIP

-

H
ome
G
ate
I
nternal
P
rotocol



LGI

-

L
AN
G
ateway
I
nterfa
ce

These components may be realised as:



separate, physical modules (such as Network Interface Cards attached to an intelligent
backplane, the HGIP)

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Firmware or software modules (such as might be found in an integral single box Residential
Gateway)



subset
s using some or all modules realised physically or logically (in software or firmware)

Details of Components

4.1.1

WAN Gateway Interface (WGI)

The WAN Gateway Interface (WGI) consists of the following parts:



A Specific WAN Interface part (SWI) which conforms to

the standards and requirements for
connection to that wide area network. This part of the WGI presents the network with an
interface or network termination which conforms to the standards of that Network
3

The
information which is WAN specific may be store
d in a WAN specific private MIB.



A Processing and Protocol Conversion (PPC) part. This part of the WGI ensures that signals
and data from the HGIP are converted to the correct format for transmission to systems in the
Wide Area over the communication chann
el which the SWI has opened
4

and vice versa. The
PPC will require information about the address(es) of the data it is handling, the addresses
and their characteristics in the Wide Area and how these relate to objects in the LAN and their
addresses. This in
formation needs to be stored in a shared MIB



A HGIP Interface part (RI). This is an interface common to all modules which interface to the
HGIP. It ensures that all signals between the WGI and the HGIP are presented to the HGIP in
the correct manner for th
e HGIP Interface. It also needs to know which other modules are
attached to the HGIP and which signals should be routed to and from these other modules via
the HGIP. This information needs to be stored in a private HGIP MIB.

Diagram 2.7 : WGI with sub ele
ments and functions




3


For instance if the network were a telephone network, the interf ace would present the correct voltage and loop conditions
f or the network to determine that the interf ace was on or
of f hook. Then, the interf ace would present the correct tones for
dialling and receive the correct electrical and audio inf ormation to determine the state of connection. It would detect
other equipment going of f hook and act accordingly and would return
the line to an on hood condition at the close of
communication

4


An example of this would be a modem converting packets of data f rom a device on a LAN to Audio modulations f or
transmission over a telephone network, or to suitable packets f or transmission
over a digital link.

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4.1.2

LAN Gateway Interface (LGI)

The LAN Gateway Interface (LGI) consists of the following components:



A HGIP Interface part (RI). This is an interface common to all modules which interface to the
HGIP. It ensures that all signals between t
he LGI and the HGIP are presented to the HGIP in
the correct manner for the GGIP Interface. It also needs to know which other modules are
attached to the HGIP and which signals should be routed to and from these other modules via
the HGIP. This information

needs to be stored in a private HGIP MIB.



A Processing and Protocol Conversion (PPC) part. This part of the LGI ensures that signals
and data from the HGIP are converted to the correct format for transmission to systems in the
Wide Area over the communica
tion channel which the SWI has opened
5

and vice versa. The
PPC will require information about the objects in the LAN, their addresses and characteristics
in the Local Area and how these relate to systems and objects in the WAN and their
addresses. This in
formation needs to be stored in a shared MIB



A Specific LAN Interface part (SLI) which conforms to the standards and requirements for
connection to that local area network. This part of the LGI presents the local network with an
interface or network termin
ation which conforms to the standards of that Network
6

The
information which is LAN specific may be stored in a LAN specific private MIB


Diagram 2.8 : LGI with sub elements and functions

It will be noted that the functions of the LGI and WGI are similar

and in many ways
symmetric.




5


An example of this would be a transceiver converting packets of data f rom a system on a WAN to electrical modulations
f or transmission over a power line carrier network or to suitable packets f or transmission over a digital radio li
nk.

6


For instance if the network were a PLC network, the interf ace would receive and act on signals which were addressed to
its node on the network. Then, the interf ace would broadcast the signal onto the PLC network with the address of a
device attache
d to the network, having f irst ascertained that there was no traf f ic already on the network. It would
determine if the network device was ready to accept data and carry out suitable handshaking to set up dialogue between
the device, the HGIP and devices or

systems linked to other modules attached to the HGIP

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4.1.3

HomeGate Internal Protocol (HGIP)

The HomeGate Internal Protocol shall consist of the following elements:



Common Interfaces to the HGIP



A standard set of functions for the operation of the HGIP



A standard protocol (commands, a
ddressing, etc,) for invoking the functions



A mechanism for routing data between WGI and LGI modules (and optionally between LGI
modules)



Management processes to control the activity of the HGIP and of modules attached to it.



Security Mechanisms to prevent

unauthorised access or egress of data to or from the
premises and to implement other security functions



Diagram 2.9 : GIP with sub elements
7




7


Note: the HGIP may f unction in the Residential Gateway at a number of levels. The level illustrated below is the f ully
specif ied modular version and may be realised in hardware, f irmware and sof tware
. Subsets of this version are allowable
where the HGIP is realised in f irmware or sof tware alone or even where there is direct connection between elements of
WGI and LGI

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4.2

Structural implementations of RG

The RG may be realised in a variety of implementations, ranging from:
a simp
le 1:1
integral box implementation

to a
many WAN to many LAN modular realisation

and
may interface to any Local Area Network such as Ethernet, IEEE1394 or any of several
Home Busses

It is intended that the RG standard shall be modular and that elements suc
h as the WGI
and LGI can be merged (as in the case of a simple WAN
-
to
-
LAN gateway) and that
elements can be selected as required as the complexity of the gateway increases.

Wherever elements are explicitly interfaced, they and their interfaces shall confo
rm to
the protocols, addressing and data formats specified in the standard.

Some examples of gateway implementations are given below
8
.

4.2.1

Simple Gateway Example (informative)

In the "Simple" implementation example, the gateway is a 1:1, WAN:LAN configuration
.
To conform to this Standard for Residential Gateways, only the elements for Security
(Part 2 of this Standard) and Interoperability (Part 3 of this Standard) must be compliant.
This configuration may include additional connection and interfacing specific
ations that
are outside the domain of the Residential Gateway Standard. This type of gateway may
use the paradigm of the GIP and have internal interfaces to the GIP which shall conform
to the requirements of this standard. This configuration is shown in Di
agram 2.10.



Diagram 2.10 : The simple 1:1 implementation of a Residential Gateway

4.2.2


Complex Integral Gateway Example (informative)




8

Note Where a GIP is directly connected to one or more additional GIPs (case b.) the
multiple GIPs must f unction as if they
were a single GIP

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In the Complex Integral implementation of the gateway one or more WANs or one or
more LANs interface to the Residential Gat
eway. The Gateway is a "one box" device but
it may have three or more interfaces. To conform to this standard for Residential
Gateways, this configuration must comply with the requirements for Interoperability and
security and must utilise the GIP. Also,
this configuration shall implement processes to
adapt the data and addresses of the WANs to which it interfaces for presentation to the
GIP and similarly for the LANs to which it interfaces. Instances of this Residential
Gateway Configuration will be Set
Top Boxes delivering Satellite DTV or cable TV with
Interactive Applications such as Video on Demand, DSL Adaptors and Cable modems
and certain proprietary Gateways. This configuration is shown in Diagram 2.11.


Diagram 2.11 : The Complex Integral Gateway

Configuration

4.2.3


The Complex Modular Gateway Example (informative)

The Complex Modular implementation of the Residential Gateway enables flexibility in
the functions of the gateway and the services it can offer. In this configuration "plug
-
in"
interface mod
ules sit between the Network and the Gateway Internal Data Transfer
Architecture and interface to the GIP. In this implementation, the gateway and its
modules shall comply with the requirements for Security and Interoperability specified in
Parts 2 and 3 o
f this Standard for Residential Gateways. Additionally, the modules shall
be compliant with the physical and logical GIP interface(s) specified by this standard and
present their data flows in the correct format at both the network interfaces and to the
GI
P interface. Each Module shall carry out Processes to adapt Data and Protocols as
described in section 3.1.2 and interface with the GIP as specified in Parts 5,6,7... of this
Standard for Residential Gateways.

Note: It is anticipated that there will be ov
erlap between the Complex Modular
configuration and the Complex Integral configuration where designers wish to utilise
particular WANs but interface to multiple LANs. This configuration is shown in Diagram
2.12

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Diagram 2.12 : The Complex Modular Resident
ial Gateway configuration

4.2.4


Distributed Gateways Example (informative)

More than one Residential Gateway unit may be installed in a premise. This Standard
requires that the behaviour of Residential Gateway units compliant with this standard
shall be the equ
ivalent of a single complex gateway. Also, a conforming RG must be
capable of complying with the requirements of Interoperability and Security as specified
in Parts 2 and 3 of this Standard. In addition to the requirements for the Residential
Gateways de
scribed in sections 3.3.4.1 to 3.3.4.3, Gateways in a distributed
configuration shall function as if their GIP were a contiguous element with routing and
addressing between LANs and WANs equivalent to a single Residential Gateway. Some
potential configurat
ions of distributed gateways are shown in Diagrams 2.13, 2.14 and
2.15.

There are three generic ways in which the GIPs of Residential Gateways may be linked
to form a distributed gateway.

a.

The Link may be implemented on the LAN side and can use the Home N
etwork
or Higher Speed Networks such as ISO 8802.3 or IEEE1394.

b.

The Link may be implemented directly from the GIP of one RG to the GIP of a
second RG. In this case, the Gateway Internal Data Transfer Architecture shall
be the same for both RGs and be an e
xtension of the bus (or other
architecture) type used.

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c.

The Link may be implemented over the WAN and may be a high speed IP link
between two "always on" devices
-

for instance a cable modem for one RG and
a xDSL modem for the other.

Note: there may be two
or more distributed gateways in any premise(s).




Diagram 2.13
-

Distributed Gateways linked over the LAN



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Diagram 2.14
-

Distributed Gateways linked directly





Diagram 2.15
-

Distributed Gateways linked via the Wide Area Network.

5.

HomeGate Software

Functional Requirements



Language translation



Firewall (security, privacy) providing bi
-
directional protection



Encoding agreement between resident & service provider



Limit service provider from going beyond the service agreement with the
provider

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Figure

1


HomeGate Functions

5.1

Essential Terminology

5.1.1

HES

HES (Home Electronic System) is defined as a home network (LAN) system that
conforms to the HES reference models and architecture describing common structures
between home networks including protocols and a
pplication languages for home
networks. In the HES model, Home LANS can be comprised of three classes of service:



Class 1


Control services (e.g., control, monitoring, measurement, alarm or low
speed data).



Class 2


Medium bandwidth data (information) s
ervices (e.g., voice telephony,
baby monitor, etc.).



Class 3


High bandwidth data (information) services (e.g., computer data,
video, high speed isochronous data, etc.).

An HES Class 1 is the most basic service and provides a signaling system for Class 2
and Class 3 services. For instance, HES Class 1 might serve stand alone functions
such as lighting control, energy management, security monitoring, and also manage
signaling paths for Class 2 and Class 3 services. Managing a signal path would include
re
source allocation (i.e., channel allocation, address assignment, etc.), start, stop, and
network management. In summary, HES Class 1 is a signaling overlay network or
backbone for basic home control functions and for supporting HES Class 2 and Class 3
ser
vices.

5.1.2

CONTROL CHANNEL

HES Class 1

Control information or data information may be carried on the Class 1 control channel.
Control information is information that is meaningful to the home control network
operation. Data information is program material or

other high volume data that has no
meaning to the HES network but is being transparently passed to some information
appliance on the HES for display or interpretation by specific application devices.

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5.1.3

DATA CHANNEL

HES Class 2 or Class 3

5.1.4

WAN

Wide Area Netwo
rk is a term used here to denote any external network service
(originating outside the home or premises) and under the control of external service
providers. A WAN might employ a wide range of protocols and services such as cable
television, conventional
switched voice telephony (PSTN), ISDN telephony and data
services, electric power, DBS (Direct Broadcast) satellite, broadcast radio or television,
internet access (perhaps via xDSL or cable), MMDS or any number of newly emerging
broadband consumer service
s.

5.1.5

LAN

Local Area Network is a term used here to denote any internal home network service
(originating inside the home or premises) and under the control of the resident or
applications installed in the residence under the authority of the resident. A LAN

might
employ a wide range of protocols, services and products such as television recievers or
other video products, conventional voice telephony (POTS) devices, ISDN telephones
and data devices, electric power devices, home comptuers, internet access appl
iances,
and home control or automation devices (e.g., lighting controls, security systems,
thermostats, HVAC systems, metering devices and domestic appliances).

5.1.6

HomeGate


A gateway is an interface between two dissimilar networks and operates on OSI layer 7

(application layer), in contrast to Bridges (OSI layer 2) and Routers (OSI layer 3).
HomeGate is a standardized residential gateway between any number of home
networks (one of which may be an HES premises network) and any number of WANs.
HomeGate perfor
ms such functions as WAN termination, protocol translation, resource
arbitration, firewall security and privacy assurance.

6.

HomeGate Software Architecture

6.1

Summary

A generalized HomeGate architectural model is shown in Figure 2. Note that the home
control c
hannel illustrated may operate on multiple media that are interconnected via
routers. The primary controlling element of the HomeGate model is the HESA (HES
Agent). Other elements are the WASA (WAN Service Agent), the HODC (Home Data
Channel) and the LAS
C (LAN Application Specific Controller). The HESA
communicates with the WASA, the HODC and the LASC using a special HES Gateway
Meta Language (HGIP).

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Figure 2


HomeGate Software Generalized Architectural Model

6.2

HESA

The HESA monitors the activity on t
he HES control channel (HES Class 1) and on the
WANs. The HESA translates and arbitrates processes between them according to
application
-
specific procedures. A HomeGate has only one HESA. The HESA passes
information directly between the WAN and the LAN o
r directs the transfer of information
between the WAN and the LAN data channels (HES Class 2 or 3). The HESA
communicates with the WASA, the HODC and the LASC using a set of HGIP service
primitives (e.g., READ, WRITE, INDICATE, CONFIRM, REQUEST, RESPONSE,

etc.) to
initiate or respond to service requests or needs originating either from the WAN or from
the LAN.

6.3

WASA

The WASA is the application riding above the application layer (layer 7) of a WAN
protocol stack that is connected at its lowest layer to the p
hysical WAN medium. A
dedicated WASA resides in the HomeGate for each specific WAN connection.
Therefore, a typical HomeGate may consist of several WASAs, one for each WAN
protocol or service (or service provider). The service specific WASA receives and
initiates messages or data flow between the HomeGate and the WAN. The WASA
passes control information or data to the HESA and data only to the HODC. The WASA
may physically reside on a plug
-
in module in the HomeGate.

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6.4

LASC

The LASC is an LAN application s
pecific process controller. The LASC knows about the
capabilities of various HEADs (LAN Application Devices) residing somewhere on the
LAN network. The LASC communicates with the HESA and with HEADs. The LASC
serves as an application manager. The LASC
also knows or learns about the
capabilities of WAN services relevant to the LASC application and initiates or responds
to service requests from either WAN services or LAN devices (HEADs). The LASC may
physically reside on a plug
-
in module or may reside el
sewhere on the LAN network. If
the LASC is co
-
located with the HomeGate, it may communicate directly with the HESA
using HGIP. If the LASC resides elsewhere, it must communicate with the HESA by
tunneling HGIP constructs to the HESA via the LAN Class 1 p
rotocol. The LASC could
also be co
-
located with a LEAD.

6.5

HODC

The HODC is a data channel/medium
-
specific application riding above the application
layer (layer 7) of a home network protocol stack that is connected at its lowest layer to
the physical LAN dat
a channel medium. An HODC resides in the HomeGate for each
home network data channel/medium. In particular, there will be an HODC for each LAN
(Class 2 or 3) data channel/medium. The HODC is entirely under the control of the
HESA using HGIP. The HODC s
ends or receives data from an appropriate WASA as
directed by the HESA. The HODC is not under control of any WASA, since all HODC
operations must be negotiated through the HESA. The HODC may physically reside on
a plug in module in the HomeGate.

6.6

Security

Decoder

Optionally, one or more security decoder agents (modules) can be attached to the
HODC for decoding or decryption of the incoming WAN data stream for such
applications as might require it. A security decoder agent module may also provide
encoding
or encryption of an outgoing LAN data stream or may manage firewall
functions or enforce various other security policies within the HomeGate architecture.
The security decoder agent operates under control of the HESA although it may contain
functions, cod
es or algorithms not accessible (i.e., readable or modifiable) outside of
itself.

6.7

HGIP

The HGIP is a special HomeGate control language that consists of a defined set of
service primitives, a set of objects and a syntax. It is used to monitor activity on t
he LAN
and on the WAN and to exercise control of the WASA, the HODC, the security/decoder
module and the LASC.

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7.

HomeGate Applications

A home may be equipped with one or more HomeGate units. The HomeGate units can
interconnect via a home network control cha
nnel (e.g., the HES Class 1) and share all of
the network media in the home. The HESA is equipped with arbitration
features/protocols to avoid conflicts. In cases where more than one HomeGate unit is
installed, a specific LASC must be associated with onl
y one HomeGate, which is
accomplished during the installation/configuration process.

WASAs are WAN service
-
specific (i.e., medium or service provider specific) and can be
supplied by WAN service providers. LASCs and HODCs are LAN media
-
specific and
can be

supplied by WAN service providers or by home LEAD appliance providers. The
HESA and the HomeGate unit(s) can be provided independently. A typical physical
model of the HomeGate is shown in Figure 3.


Figure 3


HomeGate Physical Illustrative Model

(Des
cription of physical model and comparison with architectural model

to be supplied.
Description of typical application examples

to be supplied).

8.

Privacy and Firewall Functions

The HESA is the primary control element of the HomeGate. Some privacy, security

and firewall
functions of the HomeGate are embedded in the HESA or provided for by the architecture of the
HomeGate, but since many such functions are application
-
specific, they are embedded in the
LASC and/or the security/decoder module. In some cases,
functions such as decoding,
compression or decompression, and conditional access may be incorporated into the
security/decoder module or may need to be embedded, at least partially, in the actual LEAD.
This approach is consistent with other standards curr
ently under development, such as set
-
back
boxes, renewable security and digital television.

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PART 2


System Components

1.

Language and Addressing for Residential Gateway

In order to ensure compatibility between all devices and Residential Gateways, a short
se
t of standardised commands, addresses and APIs is defined by this standard. These
enable the Gateway Internal Bus to direct information, data and voice efficiently between
networks interfaced to the Residential Gateway.

1.1.1

Addressing


1.1.2

Commands


1.1.3

APIs

T

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PART 3

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Network Interoperability

1.

Network Interoperability for the Residential Gateway






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PART 4
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Security, Privacy & Safety



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PART 5
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Base Level Profile for Residential Gateways




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Common Bus and Internal Protocol for Residential Gateways
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Card
Bus

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PART 6
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Common Interface and Internal Protocol

for PCI Bus Reside
ntial Gateway



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Card
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PART 7
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Common Bus and Internal Protocol

for Residential Gateways
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Card Bus