Sudan University of Science and Technology College of Graduate Studies

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Nov 21, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Sudan University of Science and
Technology
College of Graduate Studies
MS Level Graduate course
on
Cryptography and Networking Security
By
Professor
Eltayeb
Salih
Abuelyaman
13
th
of November 2010

19
th
of February 2011





Sudan University of Science and Technology

College of Graduate Studies

_____________________________________________________

C
ryptography and Network Security


Syllabus


TIME: Saturday 9:00 am


12:00


P
LACE
: Izzeldi
n 7


INSTRUCTOR: Professor Eltayeb Salih Abuelyaman


OFFICE HOURS: Su
n
day 10:00 am


12:00




Overview

This
course
is
on
the subject of
cryptography taught at MIT by Sha Goldwasser and Mihir Bellare in the
summers of 1996

2002, 2004, 2005 and 2008. Crypt
ography is of course a vast subject. Much of the
material in Chapters 2, 3 and 7 is a result of scribe notes, originally taken by MIT graduate students who
attended Profes D’Ippolito who was a teaching assistant for the course in 1991. Frank also contribu
ted
much of the advanced number theoretic material in the Appendix. Some of the material in Chapter 3 is
from the chapter on Cryptography, by R. Rivest, in the Handbook of Theoretical Computer Science.
Chapters 4, 5, 6, 8, 9 and 11, and Sections 10.5 and 7
.4.6, are from the Introduction to Modern
Cryptography notes by Bellare and Rogaway [23], and we thank Phillip Rogaway for permission to include
this material. Rosario Gennaro (as Teaching Assistant for the course in 1996) contributed Section 10.6,
Section

12.4, Section 12.5, and Appendix D to the notes, and also compiled, from various sources, some of
the problems in Appendix E.


AIM



To understand the principles of encryption algorithms; conventional and
public key cryptography.



To have a detailed knowle
dge about authentication, hash functions and
application level security mechanisms.


OBJECTIVES



Become familiar with

the meth
ods of conventional encryption.



U
nderstand the concepts of public k
ey encryption and number theory



U
nderstand aut
hentication and
Hash functions.



Become familiar with

network s
ecurity tools and applications.



U
nderstand the system level security used.


UNIT I:
INTRODUCTION
:
10

Hours

OSI Security Architecture

-

Classical Encryption techniques


Cipher Principles


Data
Encryption Stan
dard


Block Cipher Design Principles and Modes of Operation
-

Evaluation criteria for AES


AES Cipher


Triple DES


Placement of Encryption
Function


Traffic Confidentiality


UNIT II
:

PUBLIC KEY CRYPTOGRAPHY
:

10 Hours

Key Management
-

Diffie
-
Hellman k
ey Exchange


Elliptic Curve Architecture and
Cryptography
-

Introduction to Number Theory


Confidentiality using Symmetric
Encryption


Public Key Cryptography and RSA.



UNIT III
:

AUTHENTICATION AND HASH FUNCTION
:

9

Hours


Authentication requirements


Authentication functions


Message Authentication
Codes


Hash Functions


Security of Hash Functions and MACs


M
D5 message
Digest algorithm



Secure Hash Algorithm


RIPEMD


HMAC Digital Signatures


Authentication Protocols


Digital Signature Standa
rd


UNIT IV
:

NETWORK SECURITY
:

8

Hours

Authentication Applications: Kerberos


X.509 Authentication Service


Electronic
Mail Security


PGP


S/MIME
-

IP Security


Web Security.


UNIT V:
SYSTEM LEVEL SECURITY
:
8

Hours

Intrusion detection


password man
agement


Viruses and related Threats


Virus
Counter measures


Firewall
Design Principles


Trusted Systems.


T
EXT BOOK

There is no text book requirement for this course. Nonetheless, it will follow closely


William Stallings'

“Cryptography And Network S
ecurity


Principles and Practices”,
Prentice Hall
,
4th

Edition, 200
6
.
The course will also rely heavily on lecture notes for
a similar course taught at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


REFERENCES

1.

Atul Kahate, “Cryptography and Network Securit
y”, Tata McGraw
-
Hill, 2003.

2.

Bruce Schneier, “Applied Cryptography”, John Wiley & Sons Inc, 2001.

3.

Charles B. Pfleeger, Shari Lawrence Pfleeger, “Security in Computing”, Third
Edition, Pearson Education,
2003.


TOTAL :
45

Contact Hours



GRAD
E

BREAKDOWN

1.

A
ttend
ance



:


5

points

2.

Homework


: 10 points

3.

Mid
-
Term Exam













:

25

points

4.

Final Exam





















:

40

points

5.

Group Term Project







:

20

points

GRADE DISTRIBUTION


1.

90 to 100


A

2.

80 to 89 B

3.

70 to

79 C

4.

Less than 69 F


COURSE POLICIES



No student will be allowed into the classroom after 9:05 AM.

No coursework will be accepted after the deadline

No makeup will be allowed

if absence is unexcused

Excuses must be sent via email
at least two hours prior to the time of any activity

Policies are strictly enforced without exception