RUBY BRIDGES - jtelusmaportfolio

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Feb 5, 2013 (3 years and 10 months ago)

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THE PURPOSE OF CIVIL RIGHTS
MOVEMENT WASN’T TO ALTER
THE AMERICAN DREAM BUT TO
REALIZE

IT



ITS CREDO WAS
NON
-
VIOLENT
MEANS TO ACCOMPLISH
SOCIAL CHANGE


Associated with the Civil
Rights Movement was … listen
to the power of music




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhnP
VP23rzo&feature=related




http://www.k
-
state.edu/english/nelp/american.studies.
s98/we.shall.overcome.html



Florida Apologies for slavery :
The resolution




WHEREAS, African slavery was sanctioned and enforced through laws enacted by Florida's first Territorial
Legislative Council in 1822, and


WHEREAS, the Council and its successors did, over four decades, construct a legal framework that perpetuated
African slavery in one of its most brutal and dehumanizing forms, and


WHEREAS, this legal framework included such lawful punishments as the following: "That any negro or other slave
duly convicted of robbery & or burglary shall suffer death or have his or her ears nailed to posts and there stand for
one hour and receive 30 lashes on his or her bare back at the discretion of the court," and


WHEREAS, in 1827, free Africans were denied the right to vote and in later years were, by law, so repressed,
restricted, and harassed that by 1850 most had been driven from Florida, and


WHEREAS, African slavery was entrenched within the plantation culture of Middle Florida to such a degree that by
the year 1860, 73 percent of the total population of Leon County were slaves, and


WHEREAS, there were early political leaders in Florida who advocated a vigorous defense of slavery, and


WHEREAS, the Florida Legislature has identified grave injustices inflicted upon African slaves and freemen by the
state, and


WHEREAS, even though the laws permitting such injustices have been repealed, it is important that the Legislature
express profound regret for the shameful chapter in this state's history and, in so doing, promote healing and
reconciliation among all


Floridians, NOW, THEREFORE,


Be It Resolved by the Senate of the State of Florida, the House of Representatives Concurring:


That the Legislature expresses its profound regret for Florida's role in sanctioning and perpetuating involuntary
servitude upon generations of African slaves.


BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Legislature calls for healing and reconciliation among all residents of the
state.






U.S. Congress apologizes for slavery



July 30, 2008



The U.S. House of Representatives issued an unprecedented
apology to black Americans for the institution of slavery and the
subsequent Jim Crow laws that for years discriminated against
blacks as second
-
class citizens in American society.


Eyes on the Prize


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ZWd
DI_fkns


NORMAN ROCKWELL’S


The Problem We All Live With



COMMEMORATES RUBY’S 1
ST

DAY OF SCHOOL, NOV 14, 1960


“Racism is a grown
-
up disease. Let's stop using kids to spread it."


In
1960
, when she was six years old, her parents responded to
a call from the
NAACP

and volunteered her to participate in the
integration of the New Orleans School system.


She became the first black child to attend William Frantz
Elementary School, and the first black elementary school child
to attend a white school in Louisiana.


As soon as Ruby got into the school, white parents went in and
brought their own children out


All but one of the white teachers also refused to teach while a
black child was enrolled. Only
Barbara Henry
, who was from
Boston
,
Massachusetts
, was willing to teach Ruby, and for over
a year Mrs. Henry taught her alone, "as if she were teaching a
whole class".


Ruby's family suffered for their decision to send her to William Frantz
Elementary: her father lost his job, and her grandparents, who were
sharecroppers

in Mississippi, were turned off their land.



GUIDELINES FOR TEACHING ABOUT RELIGION

APPROACH RELIGION ACADEMICALLY, NOT DEVOTIONALLY



STUDY ABOUT RELIGION, DO NOT
PRACTICE RELIGION


EXPOSE STUDENTS TO A DIVERSITY OF
RELIGIOUS VIEWS & BELIEFS, BUT DO NOT
IMPOSE CONFORMITY TO ANY
PARTICULAR VIEW


DO NOT PROMOTE OR DENIGRATE
RELIGION


PARTNER RESEARCH

Historic Civil Rights Places


http://www.nps.gov/history/nr/travel/ci
vilrights/



www.nps.gov/history/nr/travel/civilrights/
mainmap.htm


The World of Slavery


http://school.discoveryeducation.com/sc
hooladventures/slavery/world.html


HOW TO MAKE A TIMELINE

a graphic representation of how we think about time


Plot History on a Line

1.

Decide what the timeline will show: personal events, big political
events, events related to a geographic area, randomly chosen
events, and so on. How will y
ou choose which events to include and
exclude?


2.

Make a list of events that you wish to put on your timeline.


3.

List the events in a chronology, a sequence of earliest to latest.


4.

Decide what units of time you will use (days, months, years,
decades, centuri
es, etc.) to divide your timeline into segments.
These decisions may be a matter of trial and error, based on the size
of your paper.

5.

Calculate the number of segments that your timeline will have.

6.

Draw a line and divide it into the number of equal segments
that you
figure you will need.





















































7.
Label the dates on the appropriate segments, left to right





1700





1750





1800





1850


















8.
Using the chronology that you made of events and dates, figure out
where they would fall on your timeline. How will you mark and label
them? For ins
tance, you could write on the timeline, attach colored
labels, or make a code that refers back to your chronology.




What’s wrong with this timeline?


The Underground Railroad


www.nationalgeographic.com/features/9
9/railroad


Headlines from the past


http://www.nytimes.com/indexes/2010/02
/01/learning/learningnetworkemail/index.
html


I Have a Dream:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gZLvSnr6s50




Martin Luther King Jr.: A Clothesline Timeline


Students create a clothesline timeline depicting events
in the life of Martin Luther King


History/role playing.

Let students work in groups to write short
plays in which each group acts out one of the events.


Writing.

Martin Luther King's
"I have a dream..." speech

is one
of the most famous and often quoted speeches of all time. Read
the speech aloud. Invite students to listen to the speech. Write
on a chart some of the "dreams" that Martin Luther King
expressed in it. Ask students to think about the things they
dream for themselves, their families, their country, and the
world, and to express those dreams in their own "I have a
dream…" essays.



BEAUTY OF DIVERSITY.




Martin Luther King's dream was to see people of all countries, races, and
religions living together in harmony. Gather seeds of different kinds and
invite each student to plant a variety of seeds in an egg carton. The
seeds of different shapes, sizes, and colors will sprout side by side.
Once the plants are large enough, transplant them into a large pot in
the classroom or in a small garden outside. Each class in the school
might do the project on its own, culminating in the creation of a beautiful
and colorful (and diverse!) schoolwide garden. Source: Richard
Ellenburg, Orlando, Florida
--

Learning magazine, January 1994.






"I Have a Dream Too!"







I have a dream that one day this nation will
____________________________________





I have a dream that one day
_________________________________________________





I have a dream that one day
_________________________________________________





I have a dream that
________________________________________________________





I have a dream today.






I have a dream that one day
_________________________________________________


Langston Hughes


DREAMS


Hold fast to dreams


For if dreams die


Life is a broken
-
winged bird


That cannot fly



Hold fast to dreams


For when dreams go


Life is a barren field


Frozen with snow.

Langston Hughes

I,TOO




I, Too



I, too, sing America.


I am the darker brother.

They send me to eat in the kitchen

When company comes,

But I laugh,

And eat well,

And grow strong.


Tomorrow,

I'll be at the table

When company comes.

Nobody'll dare

Say to me,

"Eat in the kitchen,"

Then.


Besides,

They'll see how beautiful I am

And be ashamed
--


I, too, am America.




http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4CUKyVrhPgM



Langston Hughes

American Heartbreak


I am the American heartbreak
--

The rock on which Freedom

Stumped its toe
--

The great mistake

That Jamestown make

Long ago.


www.youtube.com/watch?v=4CUKyVrhP
gM



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hlKBO
D64OQc&feature=related



From the movie The Great Debaters


http://www.palmbeachschools.org/sc/AfricanAmericanStudies/Curri
culumUnits.asp