Labs 9 and 10: Analog Study at Kilbourne Hole and Aden Crater

breezebongAI and Robotics

Nov 6, 2013 (3 years and 5 months ago)

53 views

Planetary Geology


J. Hurtado

November 29, 2010


1

Lab
s 9 and

10: Analog Study at Kilbourne Hole and Aden Crater

Due
December 8, 2010


These labs are focused around our field trip to Kilbourne Hole and Aden Crater, as well
as the Squyres et al. (2010) paper we read
(Squyres et al., 2010, Pyroclastic Activi
ty at Home Plate
in Gusev Crater, Mars:
Science
, v. 316, p. 738
-
742)
. You worked in teams in the field and you
will remain in the same teams for the follow
-
up work.


Part I:

Field Work at Aden Crater


In the field at Aden Crater, each team was tasked with

coming up with a traverse plan for
exploring the site as though you were field geologists on another planet. This traverse
was to take no more than 1 hour and was to be done on foot. The goal was to visit the
key places at Aden Crater for understanding:

(a) what it is; (b) its geologic history; and
(c) the materials exposed there. The traverse plan was to be based on the geologic map
you had and the aerial imagery, as well as your ground observations from our “landing
site”. Each team was issued a set
of sample bags to collect a limited suite of samples and
each team was to take field notes using the still image and video recording capabilities of
their digital cameras.


Each team is to
:

1)

Produce a

traverse map (made using KML in Google Earth) showing yo
ur
traverse path and your stations (where you stopped to make observations and take
samples).

2)

Write a

short (1
-
2 page)
narrative explaining how you came up with your traverse
and how you executed it. Explain any changes you made to your traverse and
why y
ou made them. Also include an assessment of how well your traverse met
the goals listed above.

How would you have done things differently? Can you
say anything about how you would explore a real (non
-
terrestrial) planetary
surface?

3)

Contribute your mater
ials

to the class website being put together by John Olgin.
This contribution will be your team’s KML file and the photos/videos you took, as
well as a PDF of your written narrative

(item 2 above)
.


Part II: Field Work at Kilbourne Hole


In the field at K
ilbourne Hole, each team was tasked with making a detailed description
of an outcrop of the base flow and surge deposits erupted during the Kilbourne Hole
event. Again, each team was to take representative samples and record observations
using digital sti
ll images and video.


In addition to the teams’ observations, Dr. Hurtado took a GigaPan image of an outcrop
similar to the one your examined. This GigaPan (which has been geolocated in Google
Earth) and other imagery is available at the class website:


http://www.geo.utep.edu/pub/hurtado/planetary/lectures_index.htm

Planetary Geology


J. Hurtado

November 29, 2010


2


Each team is to:

1)

Contribute

to the class website being put together by John Olgin. This
contribution will be

your team
’s photos/videos

2)

Write a short (1
-
2 page) summary of your observations. This will also be placed
on the website as a PDF.


Part II:
Analysis of

Kilbourne Hole

Data


Each team is to take their Kilbourne Hole data/observations (including the GigaP
ans) and
their samples and use them to compare to the data/observations presented by Squyres et
al. (2010). An additional set of data will be spectral data you can collect using one of two
spectrometers we have in the Department. One is a simple, handhel
d spectrometer
designed for educational use (ALTA). You will

also have access to

the
GER 3700
research
field/lab spectroradiometer in room 320.
Attached is a

brief checklist
for the
GER 3700, some background reading for the ALTA device,
and a set of spec
ifications for
both

instrument
s.


Each team is to:

1)

Acquire reflectance spectra for your Kilbourne Hole samples, calibrate the
measurements,
and
plot the
spectra
.

2)

Analyze your spectra and t
ry to identify the materials you have based on their
spectra. In pa
rticular, do you see evidence of water? How do these spectra
compare with the spectra presented by Squyres et al. (2008)
(Squyres et al., 2008,
Detection of Silica
-
Rich Deposits on Mars: Science, v. 320, p. 1063
-
1067)
?

3)

Write a short (1
-
2 page) report summ
arizing your findings and your
comparison
of Kilbourne Hole to

Home Plate on Mars.

Planetary Geology


J. Hurtado

November 29, 2010


3

OPERATING CHECKLIST FOR THE GER 3700


1.

Turn light on and point at target
.

2.

Connect power to computer
.

3.

Connect spectrometer to battery with cover off and power off
.

4.

Connect sp
ectrometer to computer parallel port (make sure computer’s
parallel port is not set to floppy


see step 13 below)
.

5.

Turn on computer
.

6.

Clean off calibration plate
. Do not damage the calibration plate!

7.

Run the software from the link on the desktop and hit
OK
.

8.

Turn on spectrometer
.

9.

Align spectrometer with target using laser and paper target (ca. 30 cm
above table needed)
.

10.

Do calibration
:

Control > Sys Volt

(#'s should match and no errors)

Control > Measurement


> Ref

(to calibrate)


> Target

(to meas
ure)

11.

Run calibration after every ca. 5 measurements
.

12.

When finished, turn light off, spectrometer off, cover on, exit program
.

13.

To retrieve data, restart computer with floppy connected and delete button
down and at the menu choose
:

Setup > Peripheral > Enabl
e FDD

Press escape to save and exit and restart
.

14.

Your data will be saved in the data folder linked to on the desktop. They
will be a series of numbered text files. The numbering convention uses
the current date (in two
-
digit format) and a sequential numb
er e.g.
GR<month><day><year>.<number>
. Copy these files to a floppy
disk. These files can be imported to Microsoft Excel where you need to
calibrate your spectra. You will se three columns of data in a data file:
wavelength and two columns of reflectanc
e (unknown and illumination).
To calibrate your unknown’s spectrum, divide the numbers in column 2 by
those in column 3. You can then plot spectra using Excel by using the
wavlength column and your new calibrated reflectances. You can also
save those tw
o columns of numbers to a new text file and import them to
MATLAB, a spectral library in ENVI, or anything else you need to do.