Biotech: A Women-Friendly Industry?

breadloafvariousBiotechnology

Feb 20, 2013 (4 years and 5 months ago)

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Biotechnology

Challenges and Opportunities
for Women

Proactive Strategies for Advancing Women in Science


ICI2004, Montreal, Canada

Carol Nacy

President, Sequella, Inc., Rockville, Maryland, USA

“Biotechnology” Today


Biological products produced by recombinant DNA
techniques




Specialty drug discovery and development



Diagnostics



IVD



Molecular probes


“Theranostics”




Life sciences Instrumentation



Technology
-
based “platform” companies



Stem cell



Genomics



RNAi



Drug Delivery



Agribusiness



Nutraceuticals




Essentially anything fits the mold these days…


1466 biotechnology companies in USA, 318 publicly traded


Biotech industry employed 194,600 people


Market Cap (total value of publicly
-
traded USA biotech
companies) is
$311 billion


Biotech revenues are now
$29 billion


Biotech is one of the most research intensive industries in the
world:


2002 R&D expenditures were
$20.5 billion


2002 R&D expenditures were
$101,200/employee


Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO)
Facts:

Biotech Business Model



Business model is totally upside
-
down




Consume $50
-
100M before you break even




Necessitates constant search for $$$



Generally run by Scientist
-
Founder(s)



May or may not have good business sense



Usually reach ‘Peter Principle’ within 3
-
5 years of company start



Wedded to first concept of company (most change focus in 3 years)



IP generally comes from own lab (or own concept) and find it
difficult to accept product failure (learn to “kill” your children)



Difficult to get “management/business experience”

unless you convince VC funders of “worth”



Many VC “bet on the jockey, not on the horse”

Biotechnology company positions
currently filled by women


Executives (CEO, President, Business Development, CFO, R&D)


Technician, Scientists, and Science Managers (basic and applied
research)


Program Directors (Chemistry, Microbiology, Immunology)


Product Managers (vaccines, diagnostics, drugs, devices)


Manufacturing and Quality Control/Quality Assurance (product
manufacture and release)


Regulatory staff and managers (work with Product Managers and
FDA/USDA/CDC)


Clinical Development (clinical trial design, execution, monitoring)


Marketing (presentations, education, preparing sales materials,
scientific press, actual sales)


Postmarketing reporting (adverse events reporting, product support)

Biotechnology Company Women
CEOs/Presidents:

Genetic Engineering News,

June 2004


Name



Company



Website





Sherri C. Oberg


Acusphere



www.acusphere.com



Pamela Marrone, Ph.D.

AgraQuest



www.agraquest.com



Ginger Graham


Amylin Pharmaceuticals

www.amylin.com



Una S. Ryan


Avant Immunotherapeutics

www.avantimmune.com


Laureen Higgens


BD Biosciences (SoAm)

www.bd.com



Helen Cunniff


BD Biosciences (Asia)


www.bd.com


Cynthia Fisher


BioMed 20/20 Technologies

www.biomed2020.com


Barbara Osband


Cambridge Biomedical Res

www.cambridgebiomedical.com


Elena Holden


Compucyte



www.compucyte.com



Elizabeth Panke


Genetica



www.genetica.com



Ruth M. Shuman, Ph.D.

Gentra Systems


www.genetica.com



Mara Espinal


Genzyme/genetics


www.genzyme.com



Judith Gwathmey VMD PhD.

Gwathmey



www.gwathmey.com



Julia Greenstein, Ph.D.

Immerge Biotherapeutics

www.immergebt.com



Mary Pat Moyer, Ph.D.

InCell



www.incell.com



Janice Pero, Ph.D.


OmniGene Bioproducts

www.omnigenebioproducts.com


Alison Taunton Rigby

RiboNovix



www.ribonovix.com



Carol Nacy, Ph.D.

Sequella



www.sequella.com



H. Stewart Parker


Targeted Genetics


www.targen.com


How Biotech Companies Survive

Business Model



Smart companies use a variety of funding sources to
continue product development and company growth




Founder and “friends and family” money




High net
-
worth Individuals/Angels




Small business grants
(SBIR, STTR)

and other gov’t grants
(ATP, DARPA)




Grants from philanthropic organizations
(patient associations, etc.)





Corporate Partnerships




Loans/payment of salaries/bills with equity




Venture financing



A significant source of money during tight financing times
is grants:





One place where scientists have edge over business execs!




Apply early and often: one
(or more)

grants each cycle




Enhance your funding probability by communication

Skills of Importance to Biotech



All classic scientific skills are important




Microbiology




Chemistry




Cell biology




Animal biology




Pharmacology



All business skills are useful




Creating a budget




Developing a timeline




Identifying milestones




Writing clearly



Cross
-
training (science and business) is very

valuable

Recognize the Currency of Your
Profession



Degrees



Knowledge increases with study: continue through lifetime



Know (and do) what you enjoy



Don’t get Ph.D. unless you like to write!



Consider alternative career degrees (MBA, MPH, Biotechnology)



Publications



Increases personal credibility



The more you write, the better you write



The more you publish, the more people want to collaborate with you



Increases company science credibility



Enhances options for grant support
(grants reviewed by academics)



Validates science for VC investors/corporate partners

Organizations and Resources for
Biotech Women:


Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) (
www.bio.org
)
committees


Women in Bio
(
www.womeninbio.org
, headquarters in Washington
DC, expanding from east coast)



Women in Biotechnology
(
www.womeninbiotechnology.com
,
global, headquarters in Palo Alto, CA)


Springboard
(
www.springboardenterprises.org
,

many
programs for entrepreneurs, national with headquarters in
Washington DC
)


Center for Women in Enterprise
(
www.cwe.org
, Boston)