Ryerson University Department of Computer Science

brainystitchAI and Robotics

Nov 14, 2013 (4 years and 1 month ago)

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Ryerson University

Department of Computer Science



CPS 841


Advanced Topics in Computer Science


Human Robot Interaction

Course Management Form (Winter 2006)


Instructor:

Alex Ferworn


Office:

ENG258, 979
-
5079 ext. 6968


email:

aferworn@scs.ryerson.ca


TAs:

Two Graduate students with CPS607 experience.


Description:


From the first time humanity picked up a stick and attempted to knock down some food
from an unreachable location we have attempted to use technology to extend our
influence on the world.

This course will examine physical systems designed to extend the
notion of human presence to remote locations. Topics may include Presence,
Telepresence, Telerobotics and Agency. The course is designed to provide students with a
practical introduction tha
t will involve the design and construction of working interactive
systems designed to interact with remote environments.


Prerequisite:

CPS607

Lecture 2 hours, Lab 2 hours.



Course Limitations:
Maximum of 20 students. Competition by CGPA


Text and referen
ce material:


Course Web Site:

http://www.scs.ryerson.ca/~aferworn/courses/CPS841/INDEX.HTML


Course Text:


There is no course text.

Evaluation:


Item

Value

Tentative Dates

Mid
-
Term test (take home)

30%

To be determined in consultation with
students.

L
ab 1

10%

Week 3

Lab 2

10%

Week 5

Lab 3

10%

Week 8

Lab 4

10%

Weel 11

Final (exercise)

30%

Exam Week


The exam will take the form of a
final exercise.

A supplemental examination will NOT be given.





General:




The amount of work in this course is comp
arable to CPS607.



The amount of money you will spend on parts is comparable to CPS607.



Students are responsible for checking the course web site for all instructions relating to
the course. This must be done at least once on the day of a class.




All labs m
ust be completed in teams of four. You will not be allowed to work alone.



A team will share marks for each of the labs. Do not screw
-
over your team. You may
form your own team. If you wish to change teams you must receive instructor
permission.



All labs ar
e performance
-
based. This means that the team will be expected to
demonstrate a robot that does what is required when the lab is due. To make it
absolutely clear, YOU WILL HAVE TO WORK OUTSIDE OF THE LAB TO CREATE A
ROBOT FOR IT TO COMPLETE THE ASSIGNED TA
SK IN THE LAB PERIOD.



If you do not wish to actually build robots,
DROP THE COURSE BEFORE YOU GET
TO THE LAB!




If you still wish to take the course, good luck. The course will consist of lectures, labs
and a test.



Modifications to the course procedures w
ill be made in consultation with the course
students.


Course Outline Selected topics

1.

Human Robot Interaction Introduction, Taxonomy, Agency, Delegation

A discussion of different models of robot interaction and control with humans and with
each other.

2.

Imp
lementation 1: Building

A review of building techniques and introduction to rapid prototyping

3.

Implementation 2: Computing and Network Crash Course

The fundamentals of getting a camera
-
equipped, WiFi
-
enabled, robot
-
interaction
-
enabled Pocket PC to do what y
ou want while sitting on your robot.

4.

Basic Robotic Interfaces

Standard interface components, video, audio, telemetry, control metaphors

5.

Alternative Robotic Interfaces

What you do when the stuff above just doesn’t cut it.

6.

Presence and Telepresence

We will e
xamine the notion of being “present” when you are not.

7.

Projecting Persona

Ok, now you;re rolling along and you want someone to know your robot will pass on
the right…whose right? A discussion of making your presence felt at a distance and
what is at a dist
ance felt by you.

8.

Urban Search and Rescue Robots

Two percent of casualties found in the World Trade Center Collapse in New York were
found by robots. Neat trick, we will examine this growing area of telerobotics.

9.

Social Robots

Getting a robot to work is o
ne thing but getting anyone to deal with it means you must
make it fit in to the norms of behavior…how?

10.

Tour Guide Robots

Robots that lead people around in museums and public areas. Kind of like
teleoperation in reverse.

11.

Space Robots

NASA, the Canadian Spa
ce Agency and virtually everyone with some liquid hydrogen
and a match have plans for robots in space. We will examine some of the applications
of robots in this area.

12.

Assistive Robots

We will examine how robots are used to assist various groups including
the elderly and
the disabled. How are these devices perceived? How can they help? Why don’t people
like robots in their homes?

13.

Medical Robots

A growing and lucrative field for HRI. Tele
-
diagnosis, Tele
-
surgery and other topics in
Tele
-
health will be introd
uced.

14.

Biological Augmentation

Robots are extremely bad at doing most things in an ad hoc environment but what if
we could put bits of robots on biological agents that know how to deal with the world?

Labs

Labs are a lot of work, it is strongly advised tha
t each group come up with a division of
labor that spreads the work over all the members of the group. For example, one person
might be responsible for the basic connectivity, interface and robot. Someone else might
work on a mechanism for picking up block
s, etc.



Lab 1:

Interface Matters.


Purpose:

Expose groups to the experience of
performing the same control task given
different interfaces and communication
modes.


Description:

Groups are to build wire
-
guided mobile
robots capable of driving between
lines
and negotiating fixed hallways without
obstacles on a surface similar to the one
depicted in the diagram below. In the
diagram, thin lines represent white tape
on the black surface. Thick lines
represent walls. Exits/entrances are
shown.


Groups will

guide their vehicles under a
number of circumstances including

1) Surface directly visible.

2) Surface visible through two video
displays showing overlapping views
of the surface.

3) Surface visible by one group
member through video displays with
instr
uctions relayed with delay and
distortion to controller who does not
see the surface,

4) Surface seen in mirror view.


Scoring:

The maximum score for this lab is 40. Each group starts with 10 points per task. One
point is lost per collision with a wall or

if a line is touched by a non
-
sensing component of
the robot.


Lab 2:

Accessibility, Mobility and Accommodation


Purpose:

Groups will be exposed to several of the impediments to and
accommodations for indoor mobility.


Description:

Groups are to modify

their existing wired robot and convert it to a wireless
mobile robot capable of traversing a model indoor environment. A typical environment is
depicted in the diagram below.



Starting at the entrance, the group is to control their robot and traverse a
ramp that
provides a slight rise and a corresponding descent. The robot will than negotiate a
handicapped access button
-
equipped door by first pressing the activating button and then
moving through the doorway (before the door closes in 15 seconds). The ro
bot must then
move through the crowded room of vibrating “people”. Following this, the robot will move
to the elevator and press the call button, enter the elevator, press one of the floor
selection buttons and exit the elevator through the other doors (be
fore the door closes in
15 seconds).


Scoring:

The lab will be marked out of 40 with 10 points allocated for each of the four skills.

Lab 3:

Manipulation and Cooperation

Purpose:

Groups will examine some of the
problems, uncertainties and protocols of
multiple robots cooperating to accomplish
a goal.


Description:

Two groups at a time are to use their
existing wireless robot and modify it in
order to carry a single wooden toy block
similar to the ones depicted below.



The environment for this task wi
ll be similar to the one depicted below.




Each group will control their robot through its interface and will not be able to see the
entire surface nor will they be allowed to communicate with the other group while their
robot is on the surface.


A robo
t will start in each of the entrance locations. One robot will be carrying the block.
The robots will drive and meet in the transfer area. The robot that is carrying the block
will transfer it to the receiving robot. The robots will maneuver past each othe
r and leave
through the exit (where the other robot had entered). Each robot must make the run at
least twice. Once as a “carrier” and once as a “receiver”


Scoring:

The lab will be marked out of 0 with 5 points for each of the two activities. Points will
be
deducted for the block touching the surface or any of the walls, collisions with walls and
collisions with the other robot.


Lab 4:

Time and Pressure


Purpose:

Groups will be exposed to performing a time
-
critical task remotely.


Description:

Groups w
ill use their wirelessly controlled robots to shoot/push balls
over a scoring area given the environment below.




Again, groups will only see the environment through their interface. Each robot will have 2
minutes to shoot as many of the 5 balls into the

scoring areas as possible. The outer
scoring areas are worth 1 point each. The centre area is worth 2 points. Robots cannot
cross the “Shoot Line” at any time (doing so will cause the loss of the ball involved). Balls
will be affixed to the surface and wi
ll not roll until touched by the robot.


Scoring:

The maximum possible score of this lab is 10. A bonus of two points will be awarded if all
balls are shot within the allocated time.


Final Exercise:



Each group is to field a robot capable of doing the
following:

1)

Carrying a wooden toy block

2)

Picking up a wooden block

3)

Wirelessly controlled using WiLan networking

4)

Pressing a button

5)

Traveling approximately 200 meters


Each group will have their robot start from the robotics lab carrying a wooden block. They
w
ill control the robot as it moves through the halls of the second floor of the Computing
and Engineering building around a circular path that will end up back in the lab. Halfway
through the course, the robot must press a button. When the robot makes its w
ay back to
the lab it must pass off its block to the next group.


This will continue until all groups have completed the course. Groups may not touch their
robot once it is in motion but they may remove obstacles from its path. The robot
controller must r
emain in the robotics lab while controlling the robot.