comp4_unit5_java_resources.doc

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Aug 15, 2012 (5 years and 2 months ago)

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Health IT Workforce Curriculum

Introduction to Information and Computer Science

1

Version 3.0/Spring 2012

Computer Progr
amming



This material was developed by OHSU funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the National Coordinator

for Health
Information Technology under Award Number
[award number here]
.

Introduction to Information and Computer Science:
Computer Programming

Java

Resources


Java

Environment
:

Java SDK (Software Development Kit) or JRE (Java Runtime Environment):
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/index.html

Note: Depending on which editor you install, you may need the SDK or JRE or both.
Some editors come bundled with Java included, so you won’t need to download any
additional Java resour
ces. Check the specification details for the editor.

Java code editors:

1.
Text editors:

You can write Java code in any text editor; Notepad for Windows can even be used.
Compiling code written in general purpose text editors is more complicated, howeve
r.
Oracle provides a tutorial for writing code in Notepad:
http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/getStarted/cupojava/win32.html

Oracle also provides a tutorial
for writing code using Linux or Solaris operating systems:
http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/getStarted/cupojava/unix.html


2.
Eclipse:


http://www.eclipse.org/

Eclipse is an open
-
source, free Java

integrated

development environment

(IDE)
.
It
provides the ability to write code and compile it.
It supports Windows, Mac OS X, Linux,
Solaris and other operating systems.

Ec
lipse provides a tutorial for getting started (this is for the latest version of Eclipse):

http://help.eclipse.org/indigo/index.jsp

3.
Net
Beans
:

http://netbeans.org/index.html

NetBeans is an open
-
source, free

IDE that supports Java development. It can be
installed on Windows, Mac OS X, Linux and Solaris.

Oracle provides a tutorial for getting started with NetBeans (you can also find links to
NetBeans on the Oracle Java website):

Health IT Workforce Curriculum

Introduction to Information and Computer Science

2

Version 3.0/Spring 2012

Computer Progr
amming



This material was developed by OHSU funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the National Coordinator

for Health
Information Technology under Award Number
[award number here]
.

http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/getStarted/cupojava/netbeans.html


4. BlueJ:

http://www.bluej.org/download/download.html

BlueJ is a free Java IDE that was created for students learning Java. It supports
Windows, Mac OS X and Linux. Note: BlueJ heavily focus
es on teaching objects in
Java and may not be appropriate for the introductory material in this component. For
stude
nts who want to learn more about object oriented programming, UML diagrams
and Java, BlueJ would be a good resource.

There is a tutorial for getting started with BlueJ:

http://www.bluej.org/tuto
rial/tutorial
-
201.pdf


Java Tutorials

Essentials of the Java Programming Language, Part 1.
Monica Pawlen,

1999.
http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/basicjava1
-
135508.html

jGuru: Language Essentials: Introduction. Jerry Smith and Terence Parr, 2001.
http://java.sun.com/developer/onlineTraining/JavaIntro/

Java Coffee Break. David Reilly, 2006
.
http://www.javacoffeebreak.com/index.html