An Overview of NSF and the ECCS Division

bouncerarcheryAI and Robotics

Nov 14, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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An Overview of NSF


and the ECCS Division

Robert J. Trew

Division Director

Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems (ECCS)
Division

Engineering Directorate

National Science Foundation

Arlington, VA

Presentation Overview


NSF Organization


Emerging Research Programs and
Initiatives:


Science and Engineering Beyond Moore’s Law
(SEBML)


Flexible Electronics


Science, Engineering, and Education for
Sustainability (SEES) and Clean Energy (Solar)


Cyber
-
Physical Systems (CPS)


Enhancing Access to the Radio Spectrum (EARS)


National Robotics Initiative (NRI)

NSF’s Origin, Mission, and Structure


Independent federal agency established by Congress in the
NSF Act of 1950


“To Promote Progress of Science,” and “Advance National
Health, Prosperity, and Welfare,” and “Secure the National
Defense”


Supports fundamental research and education across all fields
of science and engineering


Sponsors research primarily through grant mechanism, but
operates no laboratories


Discipline
-
based structure with cross
-
disciplinary mechanisms


Uses “rotators” or IPAs primarily from universities


FY2011 budget of $5.6 billion for Research and Related
Activities (R&RA)

National Science Foundation


Mathematical

& Physical

Sciences

(MPS)

Geosciences

(GEO)

Engineering

(ENG)

Computer &

Information

Science &

Engineering

(CISE)

Biological

Sciences

(BIO)

Office of the

Inspector General

(OIG)

Director

and Deputy Director

National Science
Board (NSB)

Social,

Behavioral,

& Economic

Sciences

(SBE)

Education

& Human

Resources

(EHR)

Budget,
Finance, &
Award
Management
(BFA)

Information

& Resource

Management

(IRM)

Office of
Cyberinfrastructure

Office of Diversity &
Inclusion

Office of the General
Counsel

Office of Integrative
Activities

Office of International
Science & Engineering

Office of Legislative &
Public Affairs

Office of Polar Programs

NSF R&RA Funding ($M)

FY 2010
Omnibus
Actual

FY 2010
ARRA
Actual

FY 2010
Enacted/

Annualized

FY 2011 CR

FY 2012

Request

Change over

FY 2010

Enacted

Amount

Percent

BIO

$714.77

$0.35

$714.54

$794.49

$79.95

11.2%

CISE

618.71

-

618.83

728.42

109.59

17.7%

ENG

775.92

-

743.93

908.30

164.37

22.1%

GEO

891.87

0.40

889.64

979.16

89.52

10.1%

MPS

1,367.95

15.70

1,351.84

1,432.73

80.89

6.0%

SBE

255.31

0.25

255.25

301.13

45.88

18.0%

OCI

214.72

-

214.28

236.02

21.74

10.1%

OISE

47.84

0.10

47.83

58.03

10.20

21.3%

OPP

451.77

2.23

451.16

477.41

26.25

5.8%

IA

274.89

420.15

275.04

336.25

61.21

22.3%

U.S. Arctic

Research
Commission

1.58

-

1.58

1.60

0.02

1.3%

Total,

R&RA

$5,615.33

$439.17

$5,563.92

$6,253.54

$689.62

12.4%

NSF ENG Organization

Emerging Frontiers in

Research and Innovation

(EFRI)

Sohi Rastegar

Chemical,

Bioengineering,

Environmental,

and Transport

Systems

(CBET)

John McGrath

Civil,

Mechanical, and

Manufacturing

Innovation

(CMMI)

Steven McKnight

Electrical,

Communications,

and Cyber

Systems

(ECCS)

Robert Trew

Engineering

Education and

Centers

(EEC)

Theresa Maldonado

Industrial

Innovation and

Partnerships

(IIP)

Kesh Narayanan

Office of the Assistant Director

Thomas Peterson, Assistant Director

Kesh Narayanan, Deputy Assistant Director

Program Director of
Diversity and Outreach

Omnia El
-
Hakim

Senior Advisor for

Nanotechnology

Mihail Roco

Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems (ECCS)


Senior Engineering Advisor:

Lawrence Goldberg


Samir El
-
Ghazaly


Microwave/mm
-
Wave/THz Devices & Circuits


Novel & Next Generation Devices


Vacuum Devices & Electronics Antennas


Electromagnetic Propagation & Scattering


Microwave Metamaterials
-
Based Devices


Device /Circuit Simulation & Modeling

Pradeep Fulay


Flexible & Printed Electronics


Light Emitting Devices & Displays


Molecular /Organic Electronics & Photonics


Energy
-
Efficient Green Electronics


Next Generation Memories, Memristors, & other
Novel Devices

Usha Varshney


Bioelectronics & Biomagnetics Devices


Science & Engineering Beyond Moore’s Law


Quantum Devices


Magnetics, Multiferroics, & Spintronics


Sensor Devices & Technologies

John Zavada &


Dominique Dagenais


Optoelectronics & Photonics


Nanophotonics


Plasmonics & Optical Metamaterials
-
Based
Devices


Large
-
Scale Photonic Integration


Ultrafast Photonics

Zygmunt Haas


Cyber
-
Physical Systems (CPS)


Embedded Systems


Wireless Communications Algorithms &
Networking


Integrated Sensing, Communications, &
Computational Systems


Signal Processing & Coding


Cyber Security

Vacant


Sensors, Actuators, & Electronic Interfaces


Chemical, Biological, & Physical Diagnostic
Systems


Implantable & Wearable Systems


Environmental Sensing & Monitoring


MEMS/NEMS Devices


System
-
Level Fabrication, Packaging, &
Assembly

Andreas Weisshaar


RF/Wireless, Optical, & Hybrid Communications


Broadband & Low Power Communications


RF/Microwave & mm
-
Wave Components/Circuits


Inter
-

and Intra
-
Chip Communications &
Networking


Submm
-
Wave/THz Imaging & Sensing


Mixed Signal Circuits & Systems


Enabling Technologies for Intelligent
Communications Systems


Interconnects & Packaging Techniques

Kishan

Baheti


Control Theory & Hybrid Dynamical Systems


Distributed & Mobile Networked Control


Systems Theory in Molecular, Cellular, &
Synthetic Biology/Medicine


Estimation in Sensing & Imaging Systems


Sensor Networks for Energy
-
Efficient Buildings


Transportation Networks


Human
-
Robot Interaction


Stochastic Modeling & Applications

George Maracas


Energy Collection, Photovoltaics, & Thermal
Devices


Novel Energy Conversion Devices


Renewable Energy Devices & Systems


Power Conversion, Generators, Motors &
Network Interfacing


Energy & Power Sensing Technologies


Energy Storage Technologies


High Voltage, High Power Switching &
Conversion Devices

Paul Werbos


Adaptive & Intelligent Systems


Transmission & Distributed Systems


Intelligent Power Grid


Quantum Systems & Modeling


Neural Networks


High Performance & Multiscale Modeling


Cognitive Optimization & Predication


Intelligent Vehicles &Robots

Electronics, Photonics, and
Magnetic Devices (EPMD)

Communications, Circuits,
and Sensing
-
Systems (CCSS)

Energy, Power, and Adaptive
Systems (EPAS)

Division Director: Robert Trew


ENG Funding ($M)

FY 2010
Omnibus
Actual

FY 2010
Enacted/

Annualized
FY 2011 CR

FY 2012
Request

Change Over

FY 2010 Enacted

Amount

Percent

CBET

$157.08

$156.82

$194.03

$37.21

23.7%

CMMI

189.40

188.00

226.10

38.10

20.3%

ECCS

93.97

94.00

131.00

37.00

39.4%

EEC

125.86

124.11

132.40

8.29

6.7%

IIP

180.63

152.00

191.57

39.57

26.0%

SBIR/STTR

156.84

125.77

146.88

21.11

16.8%

EFRI

28.99

29.00

33.20

4.20

14.5%

Total, ENG

$775.92

$743.93

$908.30

$164.37

22.1%

ENG and NSF Research Grant
Proposals and Awards

0.%
5.%
10.%
15.%
20.%
25.%
30.%
0
2,000
4,000
6,000
8,000
10,000
12,000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Funding Rate

ENG Proposals & Awards

ENG Proposals
ENG Awards
ENG Funding Rate
NSF Funding Rate
Research Grant Proposals and
Awards ECCS & ENG

0.%
5.%
10.%
15.%
20.%
25.%
30.%
35.%
0
200
400
600
800
1,000
1,200
1,400
1,600
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Funding Rate

ECCS
Proposals & Awards

ECCS Proposals
ECCS Awards
ENG Funding Rate
ECCS Funding Rate
CAREER Proposals and Awards

ECCS, ENG, NSF

0.00%
5.00%
10.00%
15.00%
20.00%
25.00%
30.00%
35.00%
0
50
100
150
200
250
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Funding Rate

ECCS Proposals & Awards

CAREER Funding Rates

ECCS Proposals
ECCS Awards
ECCS Funding Rate
ENG Funding Rate
NSF Funding Rate
Geographic Distribution

Average Award Size

$0.00
$50,000.00
$100,000.00
$150,000.00
$200,000.00
$250,000.00
$300,000.00
$350,000.00
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
All Awards
Core Research Awards
Supporting Research Collaboration

0%
5%
10%
15%
20%
25%
30%
35%
40%
45%
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
2008
2009
2010
Collaborative Proposals
Collaborative Awards
Funding Rate
Reviewer Demographics FY 2008
-
2010

Reviewer Demographics FY 2008
-
2010


Women
constitute
9.7%

of
Electrical Engineering Faculty


Underrepresented Minorities
(Black, Hispanic, and Native
American) constitute
3.6%

of
Electrical Engineering Faculty

No

92%

Yes

8%

Panelist Minority Status

* 48.7% Reporting Rate


Female

15%

Male

85%

Panelist Participation by
Gender

* 60.1% Reporting Rate

FY 2007, Nelson Diversity Surveys, “Top 50” Departments,
http://chem.ou.edu/~djn/diversity/Faculty_Tables_FY07/07Report.pdf

Reviewer Demographics FY 2008
-
2010

0%

2%

9%

3%

30%

38%

18%

Institutional
Distribution (N=1781)

2 Yr
4 Yr
Business, State &
Local, Foreign, Other
Masters
PhD Institutions
Research Intensive
PhD Institutions (Top
100)
Yes

25%

No

75%

First Time Panelist
Status

* 34.2% Reporting Rate


Funding Opportunities


Core programs


Unsolicited: Two windows (Fall and Winter)


Eager (Early Concept, Can be submitted anytime)


Directed programs (Special CFP’s)


CAREER


Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI)


Interdisciplinary Research (IDR)


Cyber
-
Physical Systems (CPS)


Major Research Instrumentation (MRI)


Broadening Participation Research Initiation Grants in Engineering
(BRIGE)


REU, RET Supplements


Others….

Early
-
Concept Grants for
Exploratory Research (EAGER)

Formerly: Small Grants for Exploratory Research (SGER)


Supports
high
-
risk, exploratory
, and potentially
transformative research


Began Jan. 1, 2009


Up to $300K over two years


May be submitted any time; contact program
officer prior to proposal submission



Also, Grants for Rapid Response Research (RAPID)
s
upports
research of great urgency


Emerging Frontiers in Research
and Innovation (EFRI)


Supports
high
-
risk, high
-
payoff

opportunities that:


Are potentially
transformative


Address a national need or grand challenge


FY 2012 topic areas:


[1] Flexible Bioelectronics Systems (BioFlex)


[2] Origami Design for the Integration of Self
-
assembling
Systems for Engineering Innovation (ODISSEI)


[3] Photosynthetic Biorefineries (PhotoBio)


FY 2011 topic areas:


[1] Engineering New Technologies Based on Multicellular
and Inter
-
kingdom Signaling (MIKS)


[2] Mind, Machines, and Motor Control (M3C)

Engineering Research Centers (ERCs)


Partnerships in Transformational Research, Education
and Technology


A Focused Call for Nanosystem
ERCs (NERCs)


At this time, some discoveries are at the phase to explore
their integration into nanosystems, thus leading to adoption
in applications critical for their commercial use.


To enable
this integration, the Engineering Research Centers (ERC)
program is launching this new competition targeting the
Transformational Nanotechnology of Engineered Systems
Centers or NanoSystems ERCs (NERCs).



Supplements


Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU)


$6000/student, max students/grant=2


Research Experiences for Teachers (RET)


$10,000/grant


GRS/GRDS


One student/grant (stipend & tuition)


GOALI


Up to $60K


Instrument


Up to $30K
-
$35K


International


Co
-
funded with OISE, amount varies


Interagency

Grant Opportunities for Academic
Liaison with Industry (GOALI)


Effectively promotes the transfer of knowledge
between academe and industry, student
education, and the exchange of culture


Supports:


Faculty and students in industry (≤ 1 year)


Industry engineers/scientists in academe (≤ 1 year)


Industry
-
university collaborative projects (≤ 3 years)


$5M available for co
-
funding with all NSF
Directorates


Proposals submitted to appropriate Divisions; ~70
awards each year

What are the future program
directions?

Key Technologies


Five Key Technologies to Produce Global
Economic Transformation*


Computing


Telecommunications


Biotechnology


Alternate Energy


Nanotechnology


Enabling technology


*John Gibbons, OSTP, IEEE Proc., March 1998

National Academy Grand Challenges*

(Study performed at the request of NSF)


Make solar energy economical


Provide energy from fusion


Provide access to clean water


Reverse
-
engineer the brain


Advance personalized learning


Develop carbon sequestration methods


Engineer the tools of scientific discovery


Restore and improve urban infrastructure


Advance health informatics


Prevent nuclear terror


Engineer better medicines


Enhance virtual reality


Manage the nitrogen cycle


Secure cyberspace

IEEE Spectrum Magazine

Top 11 Technologies of the Decade


Smartphones


Social Networking


Voice Over IP


LED Lighting


Multicore CPUs


Cloud Computing


Drone Aircraft


Planetary Rovers


Flexible AC Transmission


Digital Photography


Class
-
D Audio

Emerging Research Opportunities



Subsequently:


4 Unsolicited Proposals Awarded (3 yrs)


4 CAREER Awards (5 yrs)

EAGER


(Early Concept Grants For Exploratory Research)


Ex: In FY 2008

24 Awards

WORKSHOPS

/

CONFERENCES



Ex: 50 Workshops (FY 2008
-
2010) that reviewed the State
-
of
-
the
-
Art & Collected
Recommendations for Future
Research from Experts in the
field

Science & Engineering Beyond
Moore’s Law

3

2

1.5

1

0.4

0.35

0.25

0.18

0.13

0.09

0.065

0.045

0.5

0.6

0.01

0.1

1

10

1980

1990

2000

2010

Year

Lithography Trends

Above

wavelength

Near

wavelength

Below

wavelength

g
-
line

l
=436湭

i
-
line

l
=365nm

DUV

l
=248nm

l
=193湭

l
=157湭

0.032

l

=EUV 13.5 nm

Resolution (um)

l
‘=133nm

Modern CMOS

10
m
m


1

m
m

100 nm

10 nm

1970

1980

1990

2000

2010

2020

40 Years

of Scaling History

Every generation


Feature size shrinks by 70%


Transistor density doubles


Wafer cost increases by 20%


Chip cost comes down by 40%

90 nm in 2004

Generations occur regularly


On average every 2.9 years over the past 35 years


Recently every 2 years

45 nm in 2008

Presumed Limit
to Scaling

Deep UV Litho

1
m
洠C䵏S

Semiconductor Scaling

1 nm

What’s Next?

Possible Directions:



Nanotube devices



Graphene transistors



ABCS Devices



Topological Insulators


(Hg, Cd)Te, Bi
2
Se
3

Flexible Electronics

Electronics and Healthcare


Healthcare
: embedded medical devices
and smart prosthetics;
operating room of
the future;

integrated health care delivery


Patient records available at every point of
care


24/7 monitoring and treatment

Aging populations


In seven years (2019), 32% more people in the US will be
over 65 years than today. By 2025 1.2 billion people will be
over 50 years old, twice as many as in 2006.

Sources: World Health Organization (WHO), National Health Expenditure Report 2009, Databeans, Frost & Sullivan, Economic Time
s

Remote and emerging markets


China healthcare expenditure increased from 3.7%

of GDP in 1995 to 5.6% in 2007


India government proposed in 2008 to increase public
expenditure on health care from 1% to 3% of GDP

Personal healthcare


33% of medical semiconductor revenue in 2008

went into consumer medical devices

Rising healthcare costs


U.S. healthcare spending more than 17% of GDP, Europe not far behind


Costs expected to grow from $2.5 trillion in 2009 to $4.5 trillion in 2019

Medical Electronics

Third Generation Revolution: Ultra Low Power
Electronics for Healthcare

1980s

1990s

2000 and beyond

Computing
transformed

Communications
transformed

Healthcare
transformed

Computing

revolution

Communications

revolution

Healthcare

revolution

Energy and Power

Surface Area Required To Power The World With

Solar & Wind Power

http://www.ez2c.de/ml/solar_land_area/

Solar power systems installed in the areas defined by the dark disks could provide a little more than the world's current tot
al
primary energy demand (assuming a conversion efficiency of 8%). That is, all energy currently consumed, including heat,
electricity, fossil fuels, etc., would be produced in the form of electricity by solar cells. The colors in the map show the
loc
al solar
irradiance averaged over three years from 1991 to 1993 (24 hours a day) taking into account the cloud coverage available from

weather satellites." Note that current solar panels have an efficiency higher than 8% (more than double that, in many cases).

Fo
r
more info and details on the sources, see
this page
. Via
Reddit
. Thanks to Matthias Loster!

See also:
::Incredible Growth for Solar Power Industry
,
::Video: Past, Present and Future of the Solar Industry
,
::TreeHugger:
Solar Archives

LandRequiredToPowerWorldWithSolar&Wind.mht

Solar Technology Landscape

http://www.stirlingenergy.com/solar
-
technologies.htm

Photovoltaic Physics

Sunlight (Photons)

Solar Spectrum and Semiconductor
Bandgap

PV Collection & Conversion Challenges

Absorbing
Regions

Eg3

Eg2

Eg1

Window

Transparent

Conductor

Substrate

Metal Contact

Optical Coupler (Anti
-
reflect)

Concentrator

Light coupling, concentration and confinement


Mechanisms Affecting High Performance

Transparent conductors

Surface & interface recombination, defects

Scaling performance to large sized solar cells





Full solar spectrum use

High efficiency multi
-
junction cells

New, higher efficiency materials

Basic Issue: How to reach the thermodynamic limit to efficiency?

Nanostructures

Multi
-
exciton generation

Intermediate bands

More…

Device Performance Metrics:

Efficiency, V
oc
, I
sc
, Fill Factor

Eliminate solar tracking

Environmental stability

Environmentally benign materials

Some PV technology
-
specific issues


Silicon

low photocurrent because of cracked cell


CdTe

high series resistance because of back
contact


CIGS

high series resistance because of hydrolysis
of ZnO transparent conductor


Amorphous silicon

reduced photocurrent from
light
-
induced degradation


All technologies see some degradation of
photocurrent, photovoltage, and fill factor

Efficiency & Next Generation PV

MRS BULLETIN • VOLUME 33 • APRIL 2008

31% Shockley

Queisser limit

single
-
junction

I


First Generation
-

primarily crystalline and poly
-
Silicon materials. => 85% of market

II


Second Generation


amorphous Si; CdTe, CIGS => small % of market

III


Third Generation


Concentrator & multijunction high efficiency cells,
nanotechnology

~85%
-

thermodynamic
theoretical limit

Major challenge


How to effectively generate and manage
electricity from the environment by
integrating multiple technologically
-
different alternate energy sources to the
electric grid


Wind, solar, thermal, vibrational, wave, ocean,
tidal


Cyber
-
Physical Systems (CPS)

What’s a Cyber
-
Physical System?


A
cyber
-
physical system

(CPS) is a system
featuring a tight combination of, and
coordination between, the system’s
computational and physical elements


CPS originated from, but is now greater than,
embedded systems


First generation embedded systems emphasized the
computational elements, with less focus upon the
strong link with the hardware


CPS emphasizes the network of interacting elements,
rather than focusing upon stand alone elements

CPS Characteristics


Cyber



computation, communication, and
control that are
discrete, logical, and
switched


Physical



natural and human
-
made
systems governed by the
laws of physics

and
operating in continuous time


Cyber
-
Physical Systems


systems in which
the cyber and physical are
tightly
integrated
at all scales and levels

CPS at NSF


CPS at NSF is a joint program with strong
collaboration between the CISE and ENG
Directorates


CISE focuses upon the intelligent, computational,
and networking aspects


ENG/ECCS focuses upon the integration and
hardware aspects


Budget


FY09: $45M, including $15M ARRA funds


FY10: $34M


FY11: anticipate ~$34M


Application Areas


CPS Systems will find wide application in a
wide diversity of areas. Examples include, but
are not limited to:


Healthcare


Environmental sensing and monitoring


Energy


Manufacturing and process control


Robotics


Transportation


CPS is an
ideal

area for interagency
collaboration


CPS will offer partial solutions to the NAE Grand
Challenges



Enhanced Access to the Radio
Spectrum (EARS)

U.S. Frequency Allocation Chart, 2003

54.0MHz

806.0MHz

698.0MHz

572.0MHz

The Use of the Radio Spectrum is

Integrated into the Fabric of Our Society



Demand for spectrum access, and growth
in that demand, are increasing exponentially


Cellular data traffic is up 6000% since the introduction of smart
phones


Growth in wireless cellular backhaul is growing accordingly


Additional high
-
growth demand for spectrum exist across
multiple sectors: Aviation, Homeland Security, Public Safety,
National Defense


all increasingly data
-
driven


On demand entertainment will represent 55%
-
60% of peak
internet traffic by 2011


Netflix, YouTube, others

NSF & Spectrum Research


NSF funds a wide variety of research directly related to
wireless technology and policies


Wireless networks, RF hardware, propagation
, auction and market theory,
antennas, security & encryption
, policy and standards,
interference
mitigation, software
-
defined radios, dynamic spectrum access/cognitive
radio systems
, ...


Approximate direct investment is $64 million per year


$700 million over past 11 years


The results of NSF
-
funded research have been
incorporated in a large number of highly successful
applications:


Wi
-
Fi, 911 cell phone location technology, explosives and biohazard
detection, ground
-
penetrating radar, GPS, digital TV, adaptive antennas,
body scanners, ultrawideband communications systems, WiMAX, the
Internet...


EARS Background


Not a recent development


first conceived by NSF’s
Electromagnetic Spectrum Management Unit in 2006


“Perfect storm” of opportunity


2008: Congress mandates National Broadband Plan, with
spectrum as a critical component


2009: spectrum becomes a priority of the new administration


Shortly after, OSTP learns that NSF has already conceived of
EARS


2010: DoD independently contacts NSF to encourage
investments in spectrum research to help meet long
-
term
national defense goals


In the last 18 months, NSF’s EARS has quickly become the
center of national attention for spectrum R&D

Radio Spectrum as a National Priority


National Broadband Plan (March 2010)


Congressionally
-
mandated FCC plan to connect all Americans
to broadband


NSF appears in five separate recommendations in the NBP


Recommendation 5.14:


The FCC should initiate proceedings to enhance research and
development that will advance the science of spectrum access. A
robust research and development pipeline is essential to ensuring that
spectrum access technologies continue to evolve and improve. As
described in Chapter 7, the FCC should start a rule
-
making
proceeding to establish more flexible experimental licensing rules.
Additionally, the National Science Foundation, in consultation with the
FCC and NTIA, should fund wireless research and development that
will advance the science of spectrum access.


Additional recommendations for NSF involvement in

networking, testbeds, accessibility, and technology

transfer (see next slide for details)


http://www.broadband.gov


The President’s Wireless Innovation &
Infrastructure Initiative (Wi3)


Goals:


Free up 500 MHz of spectrum for mobile
broadband


Provide at least 98% of Americans with access to
high
-
speed wireless


Catalyze innovation through a Wireless
Innovation (WIN) Fund


Develop and deploy a nationwide,
interoperable wireless network for public safety


Cut the deficit by $9.6B over the next decade

The President unveils Wi3

at a public event at

Northern Michigan University in Marquette, MI

February 10, 2011

Wireless Innovation Fund


$3B over five years, to be funded by reinvesting ~10% of
spectrum auction revenues


WIN breakdown (five year run
-
out)


$1B for NSF


$300M for EARS (MPS, ENG, CISE, SBE)


$200M for general wireless research (Led by CISE & ENG)


$500M for the Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI)
(CISE)


$500M for DARPA for “secure, reliable, and scalable networks”


$500M to NTIA for Spectrum Relocation Fund


$500M to NIST for Public Safety wireless technologies


$100M each to ARPA
-
Energy, ARPA
-
Education, Centers for
Medicare & Medicaid, Research & Innovative Technology
Administration, and Economic Development Administration


EARS in the FY12 NSF Budget Request


EARS is also a line item in the NSF budget, in
addition to WIN investment


Small amount that could be used to fund
exploratory work while we await passage of Wi3
legislation


Cross
-
disciplinary commitments:


MPS: $3M


ENG: $4M


CISE: $7M


SBE: $1M


A corresponding solicitation is being drafted


Thank you!


Questions?