UNIVERSITY OF CANTERBURY

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Nov 14, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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UC/
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MHIT/1


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UNIVERSITY OF CANTER
BURY

Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha

CUAP
Proposal
-
New Qualification

Section A

Proposal Description


Purpose of the p
roposal

To introduce a

Master
of
Human Interface Technology
(MHIT)
degree
to be offered through the Human Interface
Technology Laboratory New Zealand (HIT Lab NZ) at the University of

Canterbury
.

Justification

The field of Human Interface
Technology involves the development of technology that can improve human interaction
with technology, and through using technology, such as computers and telecommunications, improve human
-
to
-
human
interaction. The overall goal of Human Interface Technology

is to improve users’ experience with technology. It is also
useful tool/element to be used in a wide range of application domains such as medicine, rehabilitation, education and
training, entertainment, business and other areas of human enterprise. Study
in the field incorporates a diverse range of
topic areas including User
-
Centred Design, the development of new interface devices and technologies (hardware and
software), evaluating these technologies within the application context, and studying the broade
r impact of interface
technology on human behaviour and society.


One example of the current topics of research in Human Interface Technology is the development of interactive touch
displays that allow multi
-
touch input (multiple people can touch the scree
n with multiple fingers at the same time). This
research involves the engineering of fundamental touch technologies, industrial and mechanical design of the touch
display enclosures, software development of interface libraries for providing multi
-
touch sup
port into desktop
applications, psychological studies of how people might perceive the affordances of touch displays, ethnographic
observation of how the technology may be used in a work setting and formal user evaluation studies. Thus, Human
Interface Tec
hnology encompasses interface design, technology development, and evaluation; it is a multi
-
disciplinary
field that involves related domains such as Computer Science, Engineering, Psychology, Communications, and Creative
Design.


Internationally, this is a
n active field of study with its own conferences (ACM (Association for Computer Machinery)
Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology (UIST) and the ACM Conference on Computer Human
Interaction (CHI), etc.), journals (Transactions on Computer Huma
n Interaction (ToCHI), Computers in Human
Behaviour, International Journal of Human
-
Computer Interaction, etc.), professional organisations (ACM's Special
Interest Group on Computer
-
Human Interaction) and centres of research (MIT Media Lab, Stanford D
-
Scho
ol, CMU
Human
-
Computer Interaction Institute, etc.).


Some of the underlying topics in the field of Human Interface Technology are currently studied at the University of
Canterbury (such as computer science, psychology and engineering), but until now ther
e has been no Master’s level
degree to focus on the more multi
-
disciplinary Human Interface Technology teaching and research areas. This programme
will allow students to undertake multi
-
disciplinary research and development (such as in psychology and compu
ter
science, or engineering and art) that focuses on hardware and software.


There are four key drivers for a new Master

s
D
egree:


1)
T
here is a need for a
multi
-
disciplinary

degree at the Master
s

level that complements and serves as a feeder or
preparation stage for the more integrative PhD.
multi
-
disciplinary

research degree that is currently being offered by the
HIT Lab NZ
.

2)
A

Masters

d
egree is needed
, which

capitalizes on the
opportunities

provided by the diverse nature of the research
activities encompassed by the HIT Lab
NZ and other UC departments and research centres
. The degree
provides a close
connection between students supported by the HIT Lab NZ and the research direction of the HIT

Lab NZ
.

3)
T
here is
currently
an unaddressed need from
I
ndustry for graduate students educated in Human Interface Technology
.


4) There is an unmet demand from students across the world that are approaching human interface technology from other
trajectori
es such as
A
rt,
D
esign,
P
sychology, and who do not fit into the traditional
E
ngineering and
C
omputer
S
cience
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disciplines.

Below
we
will
discuss these justifications in more detail.


Alignment of Students with HIT Lab NZ Research Focus

The HIT Lab NZ has be
en conducting research in Human Interface Technology for more than eight years
, starting in

2002. The lab
is now recognized as a national and international centre of excellence in the area
,
as evidenced by the
amount of competitive research grants (more th
an $1.4

m NZD funding secured in 2010)

and
peer
-
reviewed

publications
(more than 25 publications produced in 2010). It is currently one of largest and best funded research centres in this area in

New Zealand

and it

has a research focus on developing techno
logy to improve people’s experience with computers.


During this time
,

more than
20

postgraduate students have conducted research in the HIT Lab NZ through other
University of Canterbury d
epartments
;

there have been
eight

Masters
,
one

Honours

and
ten

PhD

degrees completed.
In
addition, 1
2

Master
’s

s
tudents from abroad
have
conducted their research at the lab

without necessarily being enrolled as
i
nternational
s
tudents
.


Currently the HIT Lab NZ has
ten

active research projects, over half of which are
mult
i
-
disciplinary

in nature and involve
collaboration with other university departments. As such
,

it needs students who reflect the
multi
-
disciplinary

nature of the
Human Interface Technology research field.


Current Master
s

s
tudents in the HIT Lab NZ are enr
olled in home departments outside of the HIT Lab NZ and conduct
research in the HIT Lab NZ
. The HIT Lab NZ currently has
eight

Masters

and
ten

PhD

students from
eight

different
departments undertaking research in Human Interface Technology topics.


Most o
f these students come from one department (Computer Science and Software Engineering) so the HIT Lab NZ
student composition is not as
multi
-
disciplinary

as it should be.

The remaining students come from departments such as
the Department of Mechanical Engi
neering, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the Department of
Psychology, the School of Fine Arts and the Department of Philosophy and Religious Studies. While this is ideal for
some research conducted at the HIT Lab NZ, there
are growi
ng opportunities
for students who are able to work across
departmental boundaries
.


Creation of a
Masters

in Human Interface Technology will facilitate formation of
multi
-
disciplinary

supervision teams.
The HIT Lab NZ currently collaborates with
five

departments across the University of Canterbury campus.

It is hoped
that
this will produce students who are comfortable working on multi
-
disciplinary research projects
, which are

typical
within Human Interface Technology. The main outcome will be a group
of Master
s

S
tudents
who are
engaged in research
activities that have the multi
-
disciplinary background and research interests
thus enabling
the HIT Lab NZ to better meet
its broader strategic research goals.


HIT Lab NZ will continue to host students who
wish to
work on Human Interface Technology projects that are dedicated
to
a single
discipline. The students will then
enrol in other departments (such as Computer Science and Software
Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Psychology,
etc.
) and
conduct t
heir research at the HIT Lab NZ.
This strategy
will allow the lab to focus on
multi
-
disciplinary

work while still being able to heavily collaborate with the other
departments.

The teaching
supervision
split will be negotiated for these students on an indiv
idual basis.


Meeting Industry Needs

In order to move its goods and services up the value chain, New Zealand industry needs to explore
the ways in which

to
add value to existing goods and services and
how
to identify new commercial opportunities.

Internati
onally, research has
shown that consumers are prepared to pay more for a higher quality user experience with technology and services (
note

for example
,

Pine and Gillmore’s work on the Experience Economy). Companies such as Apple (the iPod, iPhone, iPad),
N
okia (N95 mobile phone), Nintendo (Wii game console) and Microsoft (the Xbox Kinect), have all shown that excellent
Human Interface Technology can produce an outstanding end user experience and
so drive
product sales.


Recognising
the need for
innovative
commercial opportunities
, the New Zealand government recently created a Design
Industry Taskforce to raise the profile of New Zealand design and human
-
centred technology development. Their report,
Success By Design, identifies the development of education
a
l (or capital Education Initiatives)

initiatives as one of the
key efforts needed to increase industry capability. There are significant gaps in the current
d
esign
e
ducation in New
Zealand and a lack of engagement between Tertiary Education Organisations (
TEOs) and
Industry
. One of these gaps is in
the creation of skills
needed for
N
ext
G
eneration
I
nterface
T
echnology development. As New Zealand business moves to
a more design
-

centred future
,

there is increasing demand for Human Interface Technology skills
.
(
Letters of support from
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Industry
and academic
partners
,

providing

evidence of demand
,

are
available in Section B
.
)

We also surveyed the
previous graduates (Master and PhD) of the HIT Lab NZ. Two of them continued an academic career while nine of them
st
arted to work for companies (e.g.
Lockheed Martin
,
Mighty Power River
,
Telogis
,
Pure Depth
,
COMRAD
,
Stickman
Studios
). This ratio shows a healthy ratio between academia and industry. All the graduates remained in the HIT area,
which indicates clear opportu
nities for future graduates.
These factors
contributed to

the motivation for starting the HIT
Lab NZ
PhD

degree in Human Interface Technology
approximately
a year ago.

Moreover
, we recognize that
I
ndustry

requires expertise for interface design for safety
critical processes and operator control syste
ms
; interfaces

that enable
operators to perform
more effectively and efficiently

will create a market pull for such products.



Currently there are no other academic institutions in New Zealand offering postgraduate study in Human Interface
Technology. This
programme

will advance Human Interface Technology teaching and research in New Zealand by
providing a place for students to fu
rther their studies in this area. The Masters degree that complements the
PhD

will
create graduates capable of research in Human Interface Technology, and will help fulfil the future need for
academics

in
the field. In this way the Human Interface Technolo
gy Masters degree through the HIT Lab NZ will also fulfil its mission
of becoming an economic engine for New Zealand
. We

will

provide
the talent and impetus for the development of new
industry in the region
,

while supporting current industries that are imp
acted by having better interfaces between humans
and machines.


Meeting Student Needs

This programme

will give the HIT Lab NZ the opportunity to attract domestic and international students with diverse
backgrounds and interests in Human Interface Technolog
y
.

It will also

provide them an avenue to pursue Master
s

level
studies.

Historically
,

students have had to enrol in programmes that have not had a core focu
s in
Human I
nterface
T
echnology
. This

could be a challenge in

some

cases where the student’s backgro
und might not have fit into the focus of
the hosting
programme
.


We believe there are

local and international students
who

would come to the
university
to study human interface
technology if there were a better pathway provided. Experience has shown that m
any of the international students stay in
New Zealand
.

This increases

the quality of the talent base
that

fuel
s

New Zealand
I
ndustry. We also conducted a survey
on existing master
programme
s in the wider field of
Human
-
Computer

Interaction that are offered in English.
From this
survey

36
programme
s in the
North America
,

9 in the U
nited
K
ingdom
, 10 in Europe, and 3 in Australia

were identified
.
These numbers
suggest

that there is a demand for Human Interface Technology education
and that New Zealand’s
universities have not yet met this need.


Finally, this

programme

will also meet student needs by providing the type of multi
-
disciplinary graduate degree that is
becoming increasingly popular. Internationally there is a decline in s
tudent numbers in
C
omputer
S
cience and more
traditional engineering disciplines (e.g. the National Science Foundation

(NSF)

reports a 5% decline in the proportion of
science and engineering MScs since 1996). In contrast there is

increased

demand for multi
-
disciplinary
programme
s. For
example numbers of BioEngineering graduate students in the US more than doubled from 2001 to 2006 (an increase from
3000 to 7000 students).


Some of the types of
multi
-
disciplinary

research projects that the students could eng
age in include:



E
xploring how mobile phones can be used as a platform for social networking



R
esearching the impact of next generation teleconferencing on communication behaviour



D
eveloping visualization tools that can be used by medical practitioners



B
uild
ing authoring tools that will allow artists to create interactive installations that respond to emotion



P
roviding viable interactive tools for teaching science, mathematics and engineering



E
xploring how users interact with social robots



D
eveloping
graphical training environments for nurses, chemical engineers and audiologists



B
ridging the gap between complex control tasks and the human interaction


The
programme

will also meet student needs by providing a mechanism for industry engagement. Industries will be
encouraged to provide student sponsorship to offset the
tuition

fees (especially for
i
nternational
s
tudents). Sponsored
students will then conduct their thes
is research on a topic of interest to the company and spend time within the company.
This will reduce the high fees that would have been an obstacle for international students, and also provide a strong
connection between the students and
I
ndustry.


T
he ne
w
Masters

degree

will

incorporate the components of
Challenge, Concentrate and Connect from the University of
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Canterbury’s Statement of Strategic Intent, in the following ways:



Challenge:
Th
e

new curriculum reflect
s

a need for education in Human Interface

Technology. It will improve the
educational performance and capability of the HIT Lab NZ by providing a
programme

that HIT Lab NZ staff can
teach into, and curriculum material directly relevant to the HIT Lab NZ
research focus
.




Concentrate:
Th
is programme
increases the research output of the HIT Lab NZ and enables

us

to take advantage
of immediate strategic research opportunities. The increase in
Masters

students pursuing HIT lab NZ related
research will help

to

improve the PBRF
(Performance
-
Ba
sed Research Fund)
scores of the supervising staff.



Connect:
The MHIT degree will increase internationalisation through being attractive to
international

students
.

It
will also increase the engagement with research partners (CRIs, businesses, universities)

through the focus on
sponsored and applied Master

s thesis projects.

The multi
-
disciplinary nature of the degree will also improve UC
community engagement between departments and across colleges.


Acceptability

Extensive consultation
was conducted
with relevant student, academic, industrial, professional and other
community
bodies.
Initially, we contacted
51

people to give us feedback on the first draft of our p
roposal.
A full list of people w
e
have contacted
is
on request
.
We received 30

encouraging
responses and improved the proposal
by taking into account

the
suggestions and comments given.
Based on the
improved proposal we received 22

letters of support from
the University
of Canterbury,
U
niversities in New Zealand
, Industry,

and international academics. In addition, several companies
expressed their support of this
programme

and are looking forward to having access to the graduates of this
programme
.
The
lett
ers of support
are available
on request
.


The
following committees have reviewed
and commented on

the proposal:



HIT La
b NZ Academic Board of Studies



Postgraduate Committee of the
Faculty
of
Engineering and Forestry



Faculty of Creative Arts

Committee



Faculty of
Education Committee



Faculty of
Humanities and Social Science
Committee



Postgraduate Committee of the Faculty of Science


The proposal
was

presented at the following
Faculties
:



Faculty of Science



Faculty of
Engineering and Forestry

T
he PVC of the College of Engineering
is
supporting this proposal
.

We have been able to incorporate the feedback from
the Dean of Postgraduate Research
, and

she

too

supports our proposal.

Furthermore
,

we
have
received the agreement of
the HIT Lab NZ’s stude
nt representative.


Goals of the
Programme

The purpose of the
programme

is to:



P
rovide
Master
s

level
qualification

in Human Interface Technology




Provide

qualified graduates for New Zealand’s high tech industry



To offer a pathway into the
PhD

programme



The goal of the
Master
of
Human Interface Technology
is to

enable the students to:



S
ynthesise knowledg
e from the areas of design, prototyping and evaluation in
H
uman
I
nterface
T
echnology and
apply this to new and unfamiliar situations in
Human Interface Technology



C
onduct original research in Human Interface Technology



K
now and be able to apply multiple methods to create effective
U
ser
E
xperience designs



H
ave the ability to conduct qualitative and quantitative usability studies



B
e able to a
pply user
-
centred

design principles in technology development



B
e able to d
evelop H
uman Interface Technology hardware and software and optimize these technologies for
application in

areas such as

medicine, rehabilitation, business, entertainment, education and training sectors



B
e able to work independently and as part of a multi
-
discipli
nary team.


Graduate p
rofile

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Students who graduate with
the Master’s
in Human Interface Technology
(MHIT)
will
have
gained a detailed knowledge
of the research area of Human Interface Technology chosen for their thesis topic. In addition, from the
c
oursework
taken,
they
will

have
:



K
nowledge of key interface de
sign principles



T
he ability to describe and evaluate
of interface hardware and software



The ability

to
work in multidisciplinary teams



The

skills to conduct research and development in Human Interface Technology



The ideal industry job would be as a pro
ject leader or manager of an interface design and development team, a
researcher in an industry laboratory developing new human interface technology, or a user experience manager
responsible for evaluating the user experience of the companies’ products.
St
udents


Master
s research
will enable them to
lead and interact with
multi
-
disciplinary

groups and successfully complete Human Interface Technology projects.

Outcome statement

S
tudents will apply fundamental knowledge in Human Interface Technology to solve problems in the interaction betwe
en
humans and technology. They
will integrate knowledge from different disciplines to handle a complex problem as evident
from their thesis. The students will be able to communicate the results of their work through a thesis that is accessible to
a
multi
-
disciplinary audience.

Programm
e overview

The students will start with
a
twelve
-
week

course
(HITD

601)

in which they will be exposed to the fundamental
knowledge of
H
uman
I
nterface
T
echnology.
Students
will apply this knowledge during two short
group
project phases

and during

this time they will also prepare the topic of thei
r thesis.
Following this
, they will write a thesis proposal before
starting their thesis project

proper
.
Students
will then spend the remaining time on their thesis.

Proposed new regulations and p
rescriptions

(
use the

Calendar F
orm at
the end

of

Section
A)

See below.

Proposed teaching/delivery m
ethods

The
programme

will consist of a

0.25 EFTS course (HITD

601) and

a 0.75 EFTS thesis (HITD

690)
. HITD

601 will be
given during the first twelve weeks of the
programme

and offered in both
S
emester
O
ne and
S
emester
T
wo
.
Within
these
twelve weeks
,

the students will spend two blocks
,

of one and three weeks
,

on small
applied
projects in which they will
integrate their acquired knowledge into a
practical application
.
These small projects are not to be extended into theses.
Pr
oject work will be conducted in multi
-
disciplinary teams

and the

students will be asked to form teams in which
members will have different backgrounds.

T
he lectures and thesis will be predominantly individual work. After this
twelve week period
, the studen
ts will work on their thesis

during which
time
they may take up to five weeks of vacation
.


Students will work closely with
their
supervisor
/
s

to develop a research topic and plan, and then follow the plan to
generate original research suitable for the award of a
Masters

d
egree
. During th
is

process they will work closely with their
supervisor
to
start
publish
ing

research papers in the field of i
nterest, and they
may

have opportunities to attend leading
research con
ferences to present their work

in person
.


Senior
s
upervisors
and
c
o
-
s
upervisors
will be
normally
drawn from all of the departments engaging with the HIT Lab NZ
(
9

departments in 2010),

thereby,

ensuring that the student has faculty supervision suited

both

to the research topic and
drawn from different departments to provide a multi
-
disciplinary experience.

Each student will have
a
supervising team of
at least two academic staff, from th
e HIT Lab NZ and/or other partner departments. There are a number of faculty

leaders
/ members

outside the HIT Lab NZ who will be available to act as senior supervisors or co
-
supervisors, depending on the
interests of the student.

For

those thesis projects

that involve close industry collaboration, there may

also

be a co
-
supervisor from the partner company.


Assessment p
rocedures

Selection Procedure
:

Students will be required to complete an application form and provide a statement of research
interests, relevant employment record and experience,
along with
letters of support from previ
ous supervisors.
Students

will

have to submit their application two months before the start of the
programme

and applicants
will be evaluated by the
existing HIT Lab NZ Academic Board of Studies to
determine
whether they
are suitable for

the
programme
.
Final
approval will be made by the Dean of Engineering and Forestry based on the admission criteria prescribed in the Calendar
Regulations

and the recommendation of the Academic Board of Studies
.
S
tudents


progress in the thesis
will be
monitored as per th
e University of Canterbury General Course and Examinations
Regulations

outlined in the
C
alendar.


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In the HITD

601 course,
student
s

will be assessed on their performance in each of the three lecture
main subject areas

(11% per track), the results of the
second
team project (33%) and a final exam (33%).

Within 13 weeks of enrolment the
students will be required to submit a thesis proposal
,

which
outlines their planned course of research.

The proposal has to
be
assessed
by the

H
IT
Lab

B
oard of
S
tudies and
a
pproved by the Dean of Engineering and Forestry
.

The thesis will be
assessed as per the University of Canterbury General Course and Examination Regulations.


Predicted student numbers/EFTS

W
e expect to attract 10

to

20 students per
year
. D
uring the
initial
start
-
up phase of the
programme
,

we expect to start with
5

to
10 students per
year
.
These numbers are based on our previous numbers as explained above in the
Alignment of
Students with HIT Lab NZ Research Focus

Section.
The course and its
programme

are designed to attract international
as
well as domestic
students
.
We will have to limit the total number of students for the whole
programme

(semester 1 and
semester 2) to 25 due to the limitations in available space.

Re
s
ources

The HIT Lab NZ currently has space available to support 25 graduate students (both
PhD

and MHIT) with individual
workplaces. In addition to the student space, the HIT Lab NZ also has a number of dedicated research spaces, including
an immersive projection theatre, a usability lab, a computer vision lab, teleconferencing suite, and an ele
ctronics lab.
These spaces will provide all the physical facilities needed by students in the
programme
.

In the even
t

of unexpected high
student numbers, we intend to discuss the expansion of the HIT Lab NZ to some parts of the second floor of the Old Math

building.


Other University of Canterbury facilities are also available for students in the MHIT
programme
, such as the Blue Fern
Supercomputer, a Virtual Reality Laboratory in the Department of Psychology, and a Robotics Lab in the Department of
Mechanic
al Engineering.

The
students will

also

have access to the ethical committee of the university to verify their
experimentation with users.


The HIT Lab NZ has a diverse range of equipment relevant to Human Interface Technology research, such as high end
gra
phics computers, head mounted displays, tracking systems, force feedback devices, sensor hardware and simulator
devices. In addition, we are offering a desktop computer, with the appropriate software packages installed, to each
student.


The HIT Lab NZ has

a generous book
budget that

can be used to buy any required books to support research conducted
by the
Masters
students along with the
PhD

students. In previous years the HIT Lab NZ has always underspent this
budget and
therefore

we do not anticipate
the
need for

this budget to be increased. The library has a subscription to the
relevant journals and research publications, such as Presence, Computers in Entertainment, and Transaction of Computer
Human Interaction.


The HIT Lab NZ currently has the followin
g academic staff and expertise to supervise the students’ projects
.
Academic
staff from related disciplines will also be directly involved in the supervision of students.

The use of staff outside of
HITLAB has proved successful in the PhD programme.

The
Research Scientist and
Postdoctoral Researchers
are
also
encouraged to participate
:


HITLAB staff available to provide supervision are:


Professor Mark Billinghurst

(Director): Prof. Billinghurst has expertise is in the field of augmented reality, computer
supported collaborative work, teleconferencing and mobile interfaces.


Dr. Christoph Bartne
c
k

(Senior Lecturer, Academic Director): Dr. Bartneck has expertise is i
n the field of visual design,
human
-
robot interaction and the philosophy of science.


Dr. Andreas Duenser (
Research Scientist
)
:
Dr. Duenser

has expertise in psychology and related user evaluation
methods.


Dr. Gun Lee, Dr. Adrian Clark (
Post Docs
)
:
Two Pos
t

Doc
toral researchers

have expertise in the area of 3D interaction,
computer vision and artificial intelligence


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Professor Tom Furness III (
International Director
)
:
The part time international director has expertise virtual reality
and advanced human
interface technologies.


Plans for monitoring programme q
uality

As the
HIT
Lab
NZ
is a department within the College of Engineering, this
programme

will be carefully monitored by the
Faculty of Engineering and Forestry

through the
Graduating Year Reviews and
the
Programme

R
eviews
.

Results will be
monitored, reviewed and discussed by the Faculty of Engineering and Forestry at the mid
-
year and end of yea
r
E
xaminers


M
eeting process.


Furthermore
,

a

periodic review of the degree will be made by
the HIT Labs Academic Board of Studies and
external
academics involved in similar
M
aster
s

programme
s in other countries. The standard of the master research and the
number of publications generated from this research will provide a
n

indication of the quality of the
programme
. Other
measures such as

student feedback and HIT Lab NZ faculty PBRF

(Performance
-
Based Research Fund)
scores may also
be considered.


C
onfirm
ati
o
n

that Section B has been prepared and
is

available to CUAP on request

confirmed


F
or New Qualifications



TEC/NZQA/NZV
CC R
equirements


EFTS value of qualification

1


NZSCED code

020199


NZQA exit level

of qualification to go on the New

Zealand
Qualifications Framework

9


Statement regarding f
unding

This
programme

meets the criteria to be fully funded at the postgraduate level

Memorandum of u
nderstanding

n/a


Duration of the Qualification


Minimum number of points to complete

the qualification

120


Vacation/recess weeks

5


Work experience/placement hours per week

n/a


Tuition/teaching (full
-
time equivalent) weeks (including exam and study weeks)

47


Teaching hours per week


10
-
12


Self
-
directed learning hours per week

20


Calendar Form

New Qualification Regulations



2011 UC Calendar page 205


The Degree of Master of Human Interface
Technology
(MHIT)

See also General Course and Examination Regulations


1. Qualification Required To Enrol In The Degree

A candidate
for the degree of Master of Human Interface Technology
shall have
:

(a)

either

i.

q
ualified
for the award of the
B
achelor with
H
onours
Degree
in

an appropriate

field; or

0
1

UC/
11
MHIT/1


8


ii.


q
ualified

for the award of another appropriate degree in New Zealand; or

iii.

b
een admitted ad eundem statum as entitled to proceed to the Degree of Master of Human Interface Technology
;

and

(b)

b
een approved as a candidat
e for the degree by the Dean of Engineering and Forestry
.



Notes:

1.

Relevance and standard of previous study are the main criteria for approva
l

2.

Candidates will be approved only if appropriate research supervision and resources are available

3.

Candidates who d
o not have an appropriate background may be required to take an approved course or courses
prior to approval into the programme.


2. Structure of the degree

A candidate
shall:

a)

e
nrol in a
nd pursue full
-
time

study
for

one year
; and

b)

c
omplete a programme of study with a minimum total weight of 1.0EFTS. The programme of study consists of a
t
hesis (HITD

690

0.75

EFTS) and one course (HITD

601

0.25 EFTS)
.

Notes:

1.

The Master of Human Interface Technology is a full
-
time programme only and c
annot be taken part time

2.

Normally the programme will be completed in one year

of study; S
tudents will need to have prior approval by the
Dean of Engineering and Studies to extend their enrolment into the second year.


3. Master
s

of Human Interface T
echnolo
gy with
D
istinction

Candidates who obtain a GPA of 8.00 or more in their programme of study will be eligi
ble for the award of MHIT with
D
istinction
.


4. Theses

The
p
resentation of the thesis shall conform to the requirements of the General Course and
Examinations Regulations: L
,

to the guidelines for Master’s Thesis Work and to the Library Guide to the Presentation of Thesis.


5. Transfer from Master
of

Human Interface Technology to
PhD

When a candidate has demonstrated high research potential and has
the support of the

supervisor,

H
ead of the
D
epartment

and Hit Lab Board of Studies
, the candidate may apply to transfer to a
PhD

in Human Interface Technology
,

with such a
backdating of research thesis enrolment as may be approved by the
Dean of Postgradua
te
Research
.


6. Award of a MHIT instead of a
PhD

Where a thesis has been presented for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Human Interface Technology and the
examiners are of the opinion that it does not justify the award of that degree, they may recomm
end that it be presented for
the degree of Master of Human Interface Technology.

In
such a

case
,

the Dean of Engineering and Forestry may, if
required for the award of the degree, exempt the course work component of the degree.


Prescription entry

UC
Calendar page 659

HITD 601 Human Interface Technology

0.2500 EFTS

The Advanced Topics in Human Interface Technology course

will cover the prototyping of user interface,
their
aesthetical

design and the evaluation methods with users. The

students will work in a multi
-
disciplinary environment.
This

twelve week course consists of lectures and short course

project blocks.

P: Subject to approval of the Dean of Engineering and

Forestry

HITD601
-
12S1 (C) Semester 1

HITD601
-
12S2 (C) Semester 2


HITD 690 Thesis in Human Interface Technology


0.7500 EFTS

Thesis in Human Interface Technology.

P: Subject to the approval of the Dean of Engineering and

Forestry

HITD690
-
12W (C) Whole Year (S1 and S2)



0
1

UC/
11
MHIT/1


9