Course Syllabi - Suffolk County Community College

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Oct 26, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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TO:


Gobi Gopinath, Associate Dean for Instructional Computing


FROM:

Robert L. Arrigon, Executive Dean for Curriculum and Instruction


DATE:

November 19, 2001


RE:


LETTER OF INTENT: Proposed Conversion of Special Topics Cisco

Courses into Permanent Cou
rses



Thank you for your letter of intent proposing that four courses currently being offered as
special topics courses be converted into permanent offerings within the Information
Technology curriculum. It is my understanding that these four special top
ics courses will
be consolidated into two four
-
credit courses (each one 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab), to be
entitled CISCO COMPUTER NETWORKING I and CISCO COMPUTER
NETWORKING II. It is also my understanding that the course designations will be TE51
and TE5
2 and that these Cisco courses will become required core courses in the
Networking track of the Information Technology curriculum.


Through the special topics mechanism, the CISCO courses have been tested and have
proven successful. I therefore endorse yo
ur proposal to adopt them as permanent offerings
and integrate them into our Information Technology curriculum. Please proceed with the
development and submission of your formal proposal to the College Curriculum
Committee. You should also prepare and su
bmit full course outlines for both courses.


Again, my thanks to you, Pete Maritato and all those responsible for incorporating these
courses into Suffolk's Information Technology program.


RLA:sjl


c.c.:

Vice President Canniff


Dean Braxton


Dean Connors


Dean Pryputniewicz


Dean Chirch


Dean Hanley


Dean Stratmann


Dean Manning


Dean Shearer


Professor Maritato

Professor Baird

FORMAT FOR NEW COURSE/CURRICULUM PROPOSALS

OR COURSE/CURRICULUM MODIFICATION


ORIGINATING CAMPUS: College


To meet the ideals of
Suffolk County Community College, new courses/curriculum should, if
appropriate, consider issues arising from elements of cultural diversity.
1

Among the areas in which
this can be realized are: textbook choice, selection of library and audio
-
visual materi
als, and
teaching methodology.


Guidelines:


Not every item in this format is applicable to every course proposal. Responses of
NOT
APPLICABLE

are acceptable in such instances.


The Counseling Office and Library of each campus have materials which can hel
p locate answers
about transferability (II d.) and other colleges that offer similar courses (VI a. and b.).


Information about offerings at other colleges does not require complete listings where such
offerings are numerous. A summary or sampling will su
ffice.




AREA/DIVISION: Engineering

DEPARTMENT:



TITLE:
Cisco Computer Networking I



CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

Computer Networks I (6 contact hours, 4 credit hours)

First of the two semester sequenced courses in Local and Wide area networking. With
ext
ensive hands on laboratory exercises and group projects, the course educates and trains
students the skills needed to design, build, and maintain small to medium
-
size computer
networks, enabling students to enter the workforce and/or further their educatio
n and
training in the computer networking field.


Prerequisites

-

CS28 or CS66

Co
-
requisites

-

None


I.

Upon successful completion of the course, student will be able to:



Explain the importance of the OSI model and industry standards



Explain various network
topologies and their characteristics



Demonstrate the implementation IP addressing and including subnet masks



Identify and explain various networking components



Explain the elements of basic network design



Perform simple router configurations



Explain va
rious routed and routing protocols


II.

RELATIONSHIP TO STUDENTS


A.

Eligibility
-

meet prerequisite requirement

B.

Credit


4 credits, 6 contact hours

C.

Required/Elective


Required course for students in the “Information Technology:
Local/wide area networks and
telecommunications

” track

D.

Transferability


May transfer to other Information Technology, Computer Information
Systems, Computer Technology or Engineering programs.

E.

Proposed cycle for offering


fall

F.

Estimate of student enrollment
-

28

G.

Prerequisites


CS
28 or CS66

Co
-
requisites
-

None


1

Cultural diversity includes, but is not limited to, societal sex
-
roles, race, ethnicity, geographical origin, religious
background, current religious practice, family composition, ethical style, political stance, socio
-
e
conomic background,
and socio
-
economic expectation.


ORIGINATING CAMPUS: College


III.

RELATIONSHIP TO FACULTY


A.

Number of current faculty available to teach proposed course


5 and number of
additional faculty required


None.

B.

Number of other staff positions r
equired


None.

C.

Discipline(s) required and/or minimum preparation in order to teach the course


Masters in Computer or Engineering discipline.


IV.

RELATIONSHIP TO LIBRARY


A.

Books, periodicals, and audio
-
visual materials now available in Library




The librar
y owns over 90 books on the general subject of computer networking.


The library currently subscribes 6 computer related print journals. Student also
have access to full
-
text computer related electronic journals through the library’s
subscriptions to elect
ronic databases such as Expanded Academic ASAP, Internet
& Personal Computing Abstracts, Applied Science and Technology Abstracts,
Microcomputer Software.


B.

List audio
-
visual equipment required.


Now handled by the department.

Is this equipment available?
Now handled by the department.


C.

List additional books, periodicals, and resource material to be used in teaching this
course




Additional books specific to Computer Networks I

would have to be purchased.


D.

List additional audio
-
visual instructional mater
ial to be used in teaching the course


Better handled through Computer Based Training Software


V.

RELATIONSHIP TO EXISITING CURRICULUM AND/OR COURSES


A.

Is this course a substitution for an existing course or an addition?
-

Addition

B.

How is this course differe
nt from existing courses?


The computer networking
profession requires students have hands on experience to be successfully employed.
Course provides students hand on experience.

C.

Effect on curriculum offerings of the College.


Expected to increase enr
ollment

D.

If the course is an elective or required course in the General Studies program, how
does it meet the generic requirements of critical thinking, computer proficiency,
writing
-
across
-
the
-
curriculum, library/information literacy, and integrated knowle
dge?
(It is understood that not every course will meet all five requirements.)

A required course for students enrolled in “Information Technology:
Local/wide area
networks and telecommunications
” track.


VI.

RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER COLLEGES AND/OR CAREER GOALS


A.

List other two
-
year colleges that offer this course.

Westchester Community College

Genesee Community College


B.

List four
-
year colleges in New York State that offer this course.

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

SUNY Farmingdale

Touro College


C.

State ratio
nale for offering this course at the freshman
-
sophomore level.

Career minded students who seek immediate employment with an Associate Degree
would greatly benefit from this course.


D.

Application to career objectives.

The course serves as a stepping
-
stone
for those students who wish to obtain their
“Cisco Certified Network Associate” certification.


VII.

ADDITIONAL COSTS


List additional costs and space requirements that have not already been recorded in the
document.

None


VIII.

COURSE OUTLINE


Include course outl
ine following prescribed format from the Faculty Handbook. (See
Attachment I)
-

Attached


ORIGINATING CAMPUS: College


IX.

VOTES AND RECOMMENDATION CHECKLIST (CHECK AS APPROPRIATE TO
YOUR CAMPUS AND INDICATE DATE.)


( ) Consultation with Campus Head Librar
ian

( ) Signature of Campus Head Librarian:










( ) Notification of other departments/campuses affected

( ) Notification of Class Size Committee

( ) Letter of Intent Response from Dean of Faculty

( ) Vote of Department: For:



Agai
nst:



Circle one:

APPROVED DISAPPROVED

Date of Vote:

( ) Signature of Department Head:











( ) Signature of Divisional Chairperson/Area Dean:


(Assistant Dean of Instruction)










( ) Vote of Curriculum Commit
tee (Academic Affairs)


Circle one:

APPROVED DISAPPROVED

Date of Vote:

( ) Vote of full Faculty Senate/Assembly/Congress


Circle one:

APPROVED DISAPPROVED

Date of Vote:

( ) Class Size Committee


cc:

Vice President for Academic a
nd Campus Affairs


Deans of Faculty


Chairs of Curriculum Committee


Campus Head Librarian











Revised: 11/19/98

ATTACHMENT I


COURSE OUTLINE


CATALOG NUMBER: TE51


COURSE TITLE:

Cisco Computer Networking I



INSTRUCTOR:


SEMESTER: Spring




Y
EAR: 2002



CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

Computer Networks I (6 contact hours, 4 credit hours)

First of the two semester sequenced courses in Local and Wide area networking. With
extensive hands on laboratory exercises and group projects, the course educates and t
rains
students the skills needed to design, build, and maintain small to medium
-
size computer
networks, enabling students to enter the workforce and/or further their education and
training in the computer networking field.


Prerequisites

-

CS28 or CS66

Co
-
requisites

-

None

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:



Explain the importance of the OSI model and industry standards



Explain various network topologies and their characteristics



Demonstrate the implementation IP addressing

and including subnet masks



Identify and explain various networking components



Explain the elements of basic network design



Perform simple router configurations



Explain various routed and routing protocols

Course Syllabi:

Fundamental Concepts:



Identi
fy and describe the functions of each of the seven layers of the ISO/OSI
reference model.



List the key internetworking functions of the OSI Network layer.



Identify at least three reasons why the industry uses a layered model.



Define and explain the five co
nversion steps of data encapsulation.



Describe connection
-
oriented network service and connectionless network service,
and identify their key differences.



Define flow control and describe the three basic methods used in networking.


Data Link and Network L
ayer and Transport Layer



Describe data link and network addresses and identify key differences between
them.



Describe the two parts of network addressing, then identify the parts in specific
protocol address examples.



Define and describe the function of a
MAC address.



Describe the different classes of IP addresses [and subnetting].



Identify the functions of the TCP/IP network
-
layer protocols.



Identify the functions performed by ICMP.



Identify the parts in specific protocol address examples.



List problems th
at each routing type encounters when dealing with topology
changes, and describe techniques to reduce the number of these problems.



Identify the functions of the TCP/IP transport
-
layer protocols.


Router Configuration



Examine router elements (RAM, ROM, CDP
, show).



Log in to a router in both user and privileged modes.



Use the context
-
sensitive help facility.



Use the command history and editing features.



Control router passwords, identification, and banner.



Check an initial router configuration using the setu
p command.



Identify the main router software commands for router startup.



Prepare the initial configuration of your router and enable IP.



Configure IP and verify IP addresses.



Add the RIP routing protocol to the router configuration.



Add the IGRP routing p
rotocol to the router configuration.



Configure standard access lists to filter IP traffic.



Monitor and verify selected access list operations on the router.



Configure extended access lists to filter IP traffic.



Monitor and verify selected access list opera
tions on the router.



List the commands to load router operating software from: flash memory, a TFTP
server, or ROM.



Prepare to backup, upgrade, and load a backup router operating system software
image.


Grade Breakdown:



Quizzes/Homework 15%



Exam I 25%



E
xam II 25%



Final 35%


To successfully complete this course all students must complete ALL lab projects and
demonstrate proficiency on all quizzes and projects. To rely solely upon reading will not
be sufficient to pass this course. Diligent reading, not
e
-
taking and study, as well as
knowledgeable participation in class activities and discussions, are required. All deadlines
will be maintained unless specific permission for extension is granted by the instructor.


College Attendance Policy

All students a
re expected to attend every session of each course for which they are
registered. Students are responsible for all that transpires in class whether or not they are in
attendance. Absence is NOT and excuse for a missed assignment or unpreparedness for an
e
xam. The College defines excessive absence or lateness as more than the equivalent of
one week (four hours) of class meeting during the semester. Excessive absence or lateness
may lead to failure in a course or removal form the class roster.


Code of Condu
ct

All students are expected to read the “Student Code of Conduct and Judicial Process”. The
article can be found on the Web at
http://www.sunysuffolk.edu/forms/Policies.pdf
.



FORMAT FOR NEW
COURSE/CURRICULUM PROPOSALS

OR COURSE/CURRICULUM MODIFICATION


ORIGINATING CAMPUS: College


To meet the ideals of Suffolk County Community College, new courses/curriculum should, if
appropriate, consider issues arising from elements of cultural diversity.
1

Among the areas in which
this can be realized are: textbook choice, selection of library and audio
-
visual materials, and
teaching methodology.


Guidelines:


Not every item in this format is applicable to every course proposal. Responses of
NOT
APPLICABL
E

are acceptable in such instances.


The Counseling Office and Library of each campus have materials which can help locate answers
about transferability (II d.) and other colleges that offer similar courses (VI a. and b.).


Information about offerings at o
ther colleges does not require complete listings where such
offerings are numerous. A summary or sampling will suffice.




AREA/DIVISION: Engineering

DEPARTMENT:



TITLE: Cisco
Computer Networking II



CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

Cisco
Computer Networking
II (6 contact hours, 4 credit hours)

Second of the two semester sequenced courses in Local and Wide area networking.
Building on knowledge gained from Computer Networking I course, with extensive hands
on laboratory exercises and threaded case studies, th
e course educates and trains students
the skills needed to design, build, and maintain small to medium
-
size computer networks,
enabling students to enter the workforce and/or further their education and training in the
computer networking field.


Prerequis
ites


TE51

Co
-
requisites
-

None


X.

Upon successful completion of the course, student will be able to:

1.

Explain LAN switching theory and VLANs

2.

Design advanced LAN and LAN switched networks

3.

Perform advanced router configurations

4.

Explain various WAN technolog
ies including PPP, Frame Relay, and ISDN

5.

Perform Novell IPX configuration and troubleshooting

6.

Explain WAN theory and perform basic WAN design

7.

Troubleshoot network errors

8.

Pass the Cisco’s “Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA)” exam.


XI.

RELATIONSHIP TO
STUDENTS


H.

Eligibility
-

meet prerequisite requirement

I.

Credit


4 credits, 6 contact hours

J.

Required/Elective


Required course for students in the “Information Technology:
Local/wide area networks and telecommunications

” track

K.

Transferability


May tra
nsfer to other Information Technology, Computer Information
Systems, Computer Technology or Engineering programs.

L.

Proposed cycle for offering


fall

M.

Estimate of student enrollment
-

28

N.

Prerequisites


CS28 or CS66

Co
-
requisites
-

None


1

Cultural diversi
ty includes, but is not limited to, societal sex
-
roles, race, ethnicity, geographical origin, religious
background, current religious practice, family composition, ethical style, political stance, socio
-
economic background,
and socio
-
economic expectation.


ORIGINATING CAMPUS: College


XII.

RELATIONSHIP TO FACULTY


D.

Number of current faculty available to teach proposed course


5 and number of
additional faculty required


None.

E.

Number of other staff positions required


None.

F.

Discipline(s) required and/or minimu
m preparation in order to teach the course


Masters in Computer or Engineering discipline.


XIII.

RELATIONSHIP TO LIBRARY


D.

Books, periodicals, and audio
-
visual materials now available in Library




The library owns over 90 books on the general subject of compu
ter networking.


The library currently subscribes 6 computer related print journals. Student also
have access to full
-
text computer related electronic journals through the library’s
subscriptions to electronic databases such as Expanded Academic ASAP, Inte
rnet
& Personal Computing Abstracts, Applied Science and Technology Abstracts,
Microcomputer Software.


E.

List audio
-
visual equipment required.


Now handled by the department.

Is this equipment available? Now handled by the department.


F.

List additional book
s, periodicals, and resource material to be used in teaching this
course




Additional books specific to Computer Networks I

would have to be purchased.


E.

List additional audio
-
visual instructional material to be used in teaching the course


Better handl
ed through Computer Based Training Software


XIV.

RELATIONSHIP TO EXISITING CURRICULUM AND/OR COURSES


E.

Is this course a substitution for an existing course or an addition?
-

Addition

F.

How is this course different from existing courses?


The computer networking

profession requires students have hands on experience to be successfully employed.
Course provides students hand on experience.

G.

Effect on curriculum offerings of the College.


Expected to increase enrollment

H.

If the course is an elective or required cou
rse in the General Studies program, how
does it meet the generic requirements of critical thinking, computer proficiency,
writing
-
across
-
the
-
curriculum, library/information literacy, and integrated knowledge?
(It is understood that not every course will m
eet all five requirements.)

A required course for students enrolled in “Information Technology:
Local/wide area
networks and telecommunications
” track.


XV.

RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER COLLEGES AND/OR CAREER GOALS


E.

List other two
-
year colleges that offer this course
.

Westchester Community College

Genesee Community College


F.

List four
-
year colleges in New York State that offer this course.

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

SUNY Farmingdale

Touro College


G.

State rationale for offering this course at the freshman
-
sophom
ore level.

Career minded students who seek immediate employment with an Associate Degree
would greatly benefit from this course.


H.

Application to career objectives.

The course serves as a stepping
-
stone for those students who wish to obtain their
“Cisco C
ertified Network Associate” certification.


XVI.

ADDITIONAL COSTS


List additional costs and space requirements that have not already been recorded in the
document.

None


XVII.

COURSE OUTLINE


Include course outline following prescribed format from the Faculty Han
dbook. (See
Attachment I)
-

Attached


ORIGINATING CAMPUS: College


XVIII.

VOTES AND RECOMMENDATION CHECKLIST (CHECK AS APPROPRIATE TO
YOUR CAMPUS AND INDICATE DATE.)


( ) Consultation with Campus Head Librarian

( ) Signature of Campus Head Librarian:











( ) Notification of other departments/campuses affected

( ) Notification of Class Size Committee

( ) Letter of Intent Response from Dean of Faculty

( ) Vote of Department: For:



Against:



Circle one:

APPROVED DISAPPROVED

Date of Vote:

( ) Signature of Department Head:











( ) Signature of Divisional Chairperson/Area Dean:


(Assistant Dean of Instruction)










( ) Vote of Curriculum Committee (Academic Affairs)


Circle one:

APPROVED

DISAPPROVED

Date of Vote:

( ) Vote of full Faculty Senate/Assembly/Congress


Circle one:

APPROVED DISAPPROVED

Date of Vote:

( ) Class Size Committee


cc:

Vice President for Academic and Campus Affairs


Deans of Faculty


Chairs of Curri
culum Committee


Campus Head Librarian











Revised: 11/19/98

COURSE OUTLINE


CATALOG NUMBER: TE52


COURSE TITLE:

Cisco
Computer Networking II


INSTRUCTOR:


SEMESTER: Spring




YEAR: 2002


CATALOG DESCRIPTION:

Cisco
Computer Networking II (6 conta
ct hours, 4 credit hours)

Second of the two semester sequenced courses in Local and Wide area networking.
Building on knowledge gained from Computer Networking I course, with extensive hands
on laboratory exercises and threaded case studies, the course ed
ucates and trains students
the skills needed to design, build, and maintain small to medium
-
size computer networks,
enabling students to enter the workforce and/or further their education and training in the
computer networking field.


Prerequisites


TE51


Co
-
requisites
-

None

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

1.

Explain LAN switching theory and VLANs

2.

Design advanced LAN and LAN switched networks

3.

Perform advanced router configurations

4.

Explain various WAN technologies includ
ing PPP, Frame Relay, and ISDN

5.

Perform Novell IPX configuration and troubleshooting

6.

Explain WAN theory and perform basic WAN design

7.

Troubleshoot network errors

8.

Prepare for the Cisco’s “Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA)” exam.

Course Syllabi:

IP
X



Enable the Novell IPX protocol and configure interfaces.



Monitor Novell IPX operation on the router.



List the required IPX address and encapsulation type.



Configure IPX access lists and SAP filters to control basic Novell traffic.


Network Design



Describ
e the advantages of LAN segmentation.



Describe LAN segmentation using bridges.



Describe the benefits of network segmentation with bridges.



Describe LAN segmentation using routers.



Describe the benefits of network segmentation with routers.



Describe LAN seg
mentation using switches.



Name and describe two switching methods.



Distinguish between cut
-
through and store
-
and
-
forward LAN switching.



Describe the operation of the Spanning Tree Protocol and its benefits.



Describe the benefits of network segmentation wit
h switches.



Describe the benefits of virtual LANs.


Ethernet



Describe the features and benefits of Fast Ethernet.



Describe the guidelines and distance limitations of Fast Ethernet.



Describe full
-

and half
-
duplex Ethernet operation.



Describe network congest
ion problem in Ethernet networks.


Wide area

networking



Differentiate between the following WAN services: LAPB, Frame Relay,
ISDN/LAPD, HDLC, PPP, and DDR.



Recognize key Frame Relay terms and features.



List commands to configure Frame Relay LMIs, maps, and

subinterfaces.



List commands to monitor Frame Relay operation in the router.



Identify PPP operations to encapsulate WAN data on Cisco routers.



State a relevant use and context for ISDN networking.



Identify ISDN protocols, function groups, reference points
, and channels.



Describe various vender specific implementations of ISDN BRI.


Grade Breakdown:



Quizzes/Homework 15%



Exam I 25%



Exam II 25%



Final 35%


To successfully complete this course all students must complete ALL lab projects and
demonstrate prof
iciency on all quizzes and projects. To rely solely upon reading will not
be sufficient to pass this course. Diligent reading, note
-
taking and study, as well as
knowledgeable participation in class activities and discussions, are required. All deadlines

will be maintained unless specific permission for extension is granted by the instructor.


College Attendance Policy

All students are expected to attend every session of each course for which they are
registered. Students are responsible for all that tran
spires in class whether or not they are in
attendance. Absence is NOT and excuse for a missed assignment or unpreparedness for an
exam. The College defines excessive absence or lateness as more than the equivalent of
one week (four hours) of class meeting

during the semester. Excessive absence or lateness
may lead to failure in a course or removal form the class roster.


Code of Conduct

All students are expected to read the “Student Code of Conduct and Judicial Process”. The
article can be found on the Web

at
http://www.sunysuffolk.edu/forms/Policies.pdf
.