San Diego Mesa College Fall 2013

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Nov 16, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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San Diego Mesa College

Fall

2013


Physics 196 Electricity and Magnetism


CRN

60423, 60446



Course Website
: h
ttp://classroom.sdmesa.edu/kwong/





Instructor:



Dr. S.K.Wong




Office:


K112A


Phone:
619
-
388
-
2252

Email
: kwong@sdccd.edu


Office

Hours:



M 9:00 am
-
12:00 pm

Th

9:00 am
-
11
:00 pm

Other times
by appointment.


Lecture Hours:


T and Th. 11:30 am
-
1:35 pm (K104
)







Laboratory Hours:


T or Th: 1:45 pm
-
4:4
5

pm (K110A)





Textbook :

(Optional) Fundamentals of Physics
, Vol.2,
Hali
day, Resnick, and Walker, 9
th
Edition,

Wiley


Course description
:


This is the second of a three
-
semester calculus
-
based general physics
sequence, intended to satisfy the transfer requirements of students planning to major in the
physical sciences and in e
ngineering. The topics of study include the basic principles and
applications of electrostatics, magnetostatics, time
-
varying electric and magnetic phenomena,
direct and alternating current circuits, elementary electronics and electromagnetic waves.
Emphas
is is placed on the mathematical analysis of physical problems.


Prerequisites
:


PHYS 195 with a grade of C or better, or equivalent.


Course Objectives
: Introduces students to fundamental physics concepts and principles and
develops their problem solving
skills in electromagnetism.


Course Content
: Coulomb’s law, electric field, Gauss law, electric potential, capacitance,
Ohm’s law, DC circuits, Kirchhoff rules, magnetic force on moving charges and current wires,
Biot
-
Savart’s law, Ampere’s law, magnetic
properties of materials, Faraday’s law, Lenz law,
inductance, AC circuits, Maxwell’ equation, electromagnetic waves.


Student Learning Outcomes:

Communication

Students will be able to demonstrate ability to report and/
or explain scientific information
appropriately.


Critical Thinking

Students will be able to utilize critical thinking skills and the scientific method to solve
problems, analyze and interpret data.


Technology Awareness

Students will be able to use modern technology to investigate questions.


2


Personal Responsibility

Students will come prepared for class and complete assigned work thoughtfully.


Environmental Responsibility

Students will be able to explain or describe the impact of the physical sciences on the
environment.


CATALOG COURSE DESCRIPTION



This is the second of a three
-
semester calculus
-
based ge
neral physics sequence, intended to satisfy the
transfer requirements of students planning to major in the physical sciences and in engineering. The topics
of study include the basic principles and applications of electrostatics, magnetostatics,

time
-
varyi
ng electric and magnetic phenomena, direct and alternating current circuits, elementary

electronics and electromagnetic waves. Emphasis is placed on the mathematical analysis of physical

problems. Laboratory work on various aspects of electric and magnetic

phenomena emphasizing direct
current and alternating current circuits is included.



STUDENT LEARNING OBJECTIVES:


Upon successful completion of the course the student will be able to:

1. Examine the nature of electrostatic phenomena and calculate the for
ces between electric charges.

2. Calculate the electric field and electric potential at field points due to various distributions of charge.

3. Describe the phenomenon of capacitance and the effects of dielectrics.

4. Explain the relationship between curre
nt and resistance and apply these concepts in the analysis of

direct current circuits.

5. Explain the nature and sources of magnetic fields and how to calculate them from simple current

distributions.

6. Describe the phenomenon of magnetic induction and em
ploy its mathematical expression in the

solution of problems involving inductance.

Status: Active page 1 of 5 Date Printed: 01/13/2012

7. Analyze alternating current circuits with combinations of resistive and reactive components, and

express the phase rel
ationships between the voltages and currents in these circuits.

8. Describe the nature of electromagnetic radiation; explain its generation and propagation.

9. Demonstrate essential laboratory skills, such as the ability to construct circuits from circuit

schematics and the ability to use basic electrical instruments and computers.

10. Compose laboratory reports that are the result of the collection, organization and analysis of

laboratory data for the purpose of evaluating the validity of physical theories
.

11. Apply appropriate quantitative techniques from algebra, geometry, trigonometry and calculus as

necessary in the understanding of physical principles and solution of physical problems.

12. Analyze the results of problems solved and assess the real
-
wor
ld applications.




COURSE OUTLINE AND SCOPE:



Outline Of Topics:

The following topics are included in the framework of the course but are not intended as limits on

content. The order of presentation and relative emphasis will vary with each instructor.


I. Electrostatic Phenomena


3

A. Examination of properties of electric charges

B. Calculation of electric forces through the use of Coulomb's law

C. Charging by induction


II. The Electric Field and Electric Potential

A. Analysis of electric lines of force

B.

Calculation of electric fields

1. Due to discrete distributions of charge

2. Due to continuous distributions of charge

C. Examination and calculation of electric field flux

D. Motion of charged particles in a uniform field

E. Use of Gauss's law

F. Experim
ental verification of Gauss's law

G. Calculation of electric potential

1. Due to discrete distributions of charge

2. Due to continuous distributions of charge

H. Calculation of electric potential energy

I. Calculation of the electric field from the potenti
al

J. Millikan's oil drop experiment

K. Applications of electrostatics


III. Capacitors and Dielectrics

A. Calculation of capacitance for various geometries of charge

B. Calculation of energy storage in electric fields

C. Analysis of effects of dielectrics

in capacitors

D. Combinations of capacitors

E. An atomic description of dielectrics


IV. Current, Resistance and Direct Current (D.C.) Circuit Analysis

A. Examination of current, current density, resistivity and resistance

B. A model of conduction

C. Vari
ation of resistance with temperature

D. Electromotive Force (EMF)

E. Interpretation and application of Ohm's law

F. Analysis of electrical networks via Kirchhoff's rules

G. Analysis of transient and steady
-
state behavior of Resistance and Capacitance (RC)
circuits

H. The Magnetic Field and its Sources

I. Examination of the magnetic forces and torques on current carrying conductors

J. Analysis of charged particle trajectories in magnetic fields

K. Use of Biot
-
Savart law and Ampere¿s law in the calculation of

magnetic fields

L. Calculation of the magnetic properties of solenoids and toroids

M. Calculation of magnetic flux

N. Ampere's law

O. Applications of motion of charged particles in electric and magnetic fields

P. Magnetism in matter


V. Induction and Indu
ctance

A. Use of Faraday's Law & Lenz's law in calculating induced elctromotive forces (emfs) and

currents

B. Calculation of induced electric fields

C. Use of self and mutual inductance in the analysis of inductors

D. Calculation of energy storage in magne
tic fields

E. Analysis of transient and steady
-
state behavior of Resistance and Inductance (RL) circuits

F. Generators and motors

G. Eddy currents

H. Maxwell's equations


4


VI. Alternating Currents

A. Analysis of the RLC circuit, voltage, impedance and curre
nt characteristics

B. Examination of undamped and damped oscillatory LC circuits

C. Analysis of circuits through the use of impedance and phasors

D. Calculation of instantaneous power, average power and phase in AC circuits

E. Inspection of transformer pro
perties and applications


VII. Electromagnetic Radiation

A. Interpretation of Maxwell's equations with analysis of plane wave solutions

B. Calculation of the Poynting vector, energy and momentum transport by electromagnetic

waves

C. Analysis of radiation f
rom an oscillating electric dipole

D. Electromagnetic Spectrum


VIII. Laboratory topics may include but are not limited to:

A. Electrostatic Phenomena (Electrostatic Induction)

B. Electric Fields & Equipotentials (Mapping of Electric Field Lines)

C. Magnet
ic Fields due to Constant Currents (Magnetic Field due to a Straight Wire)

D. Resistance and Capacitor (RC) and Inductance (RL) Circuits (Time Constant,

Determination of L)

E. Electromotive Force (EMF) & Sources of EMF (Bridge Circuits)

F. Ohm's Law and Di
rect Current (D.C.) Circuits (Verification of Ohm's Law)

G. RLC Circuits and Resonance (Determination of Inductance)

H. Magnetic Induction (Determination of Magnetic Flux)

I. Impedance, Resonance and Phase in AC Circuits (Determination of Phase Difference)

J. Charged Particle Trajectories in Magnetic Fields (Charge/mass of the electron


Attendance:

Students are to sign in for each period.
It is the student’s responsibility to drop

all
classes in which he/she is no longer attending
.
It is the instructor’s d
iscretion to withdraw a
student after the add/drop deadline due to excessive absences.

Students who remain enrolled in a
class beyond the published withdrawal deadline, as stated in the class schedule, will receive an
evaluative letter grade in this class
.

The final grade in this class will be affected by active
participation, including attendance, as

described under the paragraph on Class

W
ork.


Classroom behavior and student code of conduct:

Students are expected to respect and obey
standards of studen
t conduct while in class and on the campus. Refer to Policy 3100, Procedures
3100.1 and 3100.2, current college catalog and student handbook for guidance. In particular,

cheating, plagiarism or other forms of academic dishonesty are not acceptable and will

not be
tolerated.


Accommodation of disability:
Students with disabilities who may need academic
accommodations should discuss options with the professor during the first two week of class.


Examinations:

There will be four quizzes
lasting two hours

ea
ch
covering recent course
materials throughout the semester.
The best three scores
will
count toward the final grade.
There
will also be a
mandatory
final comprehensive
two
-
hour
examination. The exams are all closed
book, but a note card is allowed for the

quizzes and a note sheet will be provided for the final
exam.


Class Work:

To encourage interactive learning, students will be presented with class problems
to solve in each lecture period.
Turning in the solution or s
igning in
for each lecture period

5

pro
vide
s

evidence of participation, for which credits are earned. In cases of absence or late show,
credits can be restored only if valid excuse is given.


Homework:

Fifteen sets of homework are assigned. Each set is due at the first class period of
the week
.
Full score is based on successfully solving 70% of each assigned set.
They will be
selectively graded and they all co
unt toward the final grade. A 2
0% reduction applies to late
submission within the week. No credit will be given for later submission. The

work should be
neat and legible. Reasoning should be clear. Answers will be posted on the course website after
the due dates.


Laboratory
:

Students work in a team of about 6, and compose a group report to be turned in at
the end of the lab period. Lab
manual for each experiment can be downloaded from the course
website. There will be no make
-
up for absences. Scores are based on correctness, clarity,
accuracy, and active participation. The best 9 scores of 10 experiments are counted toward the
final gra
de.


Reading:
Since the number of topics covered is very large, it will be impossible to go over all of
them in class. The lectures will be devoted to discussions of critical concepts and methods.
Students are expected to learn many of the topics by readin
g the
lecture notes available freely
online, or the recommended
textbook, and to come to the class having alr
eady read the relevant
sections.

They should consult the schedule for the sections to be covered in each class period.



Evaluation
:

The weights f
or the course components for evaluation are as follows:




Homework


20
%

Class Work


15
%

Lab Reports


15
%

Quizzes


30%

Final Exam


20
%




Letter grades are assigned according to the following schedule, assuming a full
score of 100:






A (90
-
100) B (
80
-
89) C (70
-
79) D (60
-
69) F (less than 60)


Important Dates:

August 30


Last day to enroll, last day to drop with no “W” recorded

October 25


Last day to withdraw. (Students are encouraged to discuss
with the instructor prior to withdr
awal)


6



Schedule (Subject to change)


Week


Lecture (Tuesday)



Lecture (Thursday)


Lab (Tuesday or Thursday)

1

(8/19
)

Lesson 1: Atoms and
electricity



Lesson 2:
Coulomb’s law






1. Scotch tape electricity

2

(8/26
)

HW1

Lesson 3:
Electric field of
p
oint charges


Lesson 4:
Motion of point
charge in electric field



2.Electrostatics


3

(9/2
)

HW2

Lesson 5: Electric field of
c
ontinuous charge
distributions


Lesson 6:
Gauss law,
Electric
field of conductors



Revie
w

4

(9/9
)

HW3

Lesson 7:
Electric poten
tial
of point charges


Lesson 8: Conservation of
energy, electric potential of
continuous charge distribution



Exam 1 (
Lessons 1
-
5
)

5

(9/16
)

HW4


Lesson 9: Electric potential
energy, Electric potential

and electric field

Lesson 10:
Capacitance



3.
Equ
ipotential

surfaces

6

(9/23
)

HW5

Lesson 11:

Connection of
capacitors,
dielectrics


Lesson 12
Currents, Ohm’s law



4. Capacitance


7

(9/30
)

HW6

Lesson 13:
Combination of
resistances
, emf and internal
resistance


Lesson 14: Ammeter and
voltmeter,
Kirchh
off rules


Exam 2 (
Lessons 6
-
11
)

8

(10/7
)

HW7

Lesson 15:
RC circuit

Lesson 16: Magnetic force on
point charges and currents


5. Simple circuits

9

(10/14
)

HW8

Lesson 17:
Motion of
point
charge in magnetic field


Lesson 18:
Torque on current
loop
, magneti
c moment, DC
motor



6. Measurement of e/m


10

(10/21
)

HW9

Lesson 19: Biot

Savart’s
law, magnetic field of
current loops and solenid


Lesson 20: Magnetic field of
currents in straight wires, force
between currents



Exam 3

(
Lessons 12
-
17)

11

(10/28
)

HW
10

Lesson 21:
Ampere’s law


Lesson 22:
Magnetic materials




7. Earth’s magnetic field

12

(11/4
)

HW11

Lesson 23: Motional emf,
AC generator


Lesson 24: Faraday’s law, Lenz
law



8. Force between currents


13

(11/11
)

HW12

Lesson 25:
Inductance, RL
circu
its


Lesson 26: Undriven LC and
RLC circuits, phasors


Exam 4 (18
-
24
)


14

(11/18
)

HW13

Lesson 27:

AC circuit elements,
reactance and impedance

Lesson 28: Driven RLC circuits,
transformers



9. RC time constant


15

(12/2
)

HW14

Lesson 29:
Maxwell
equati
ons

Lesson 30:
EM waves



10. Decay of electric
o
s
cillations

16

(12/9
)

HW15

Review

Final Exam
(Lessons 1
-
28)