E EC CE E3 33 35 5 E ET TI I

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Nov 16, 2013 (4 years and 1 month ago)

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(
Required course for ELE and elective course for CPE
)

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Electrical and Computer Engineering

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Branislav M. Notaros, Assistant Professor

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Fundamentals of time
-
invariant electric and
magnetic fields and time
-
varying
electromagnetic fields leading to general Maxwell’s equations. Topics include the
electromagnetic model, vector calculus, electrostatic fields, steady electric currents,
magnetostatic fields, electromagnetic induction, slow
ly time
-
varying electromagnetic fields,
and Maxwell’s equations in integral and differential form; solutions of Maxwell’s equations
in the presence of boundary conditions are presented. Maxwell’s equations in complex
domain are introduced and utilized. Cir
cuit theory and its relationship to electromagnetics is
presented as an approximate form of Maxwell’s equations. Numerical techniques for field
computation are introduced. Simulations in a computer classroom include visualization of 2
-
D and 3
-
D electric an
d magnetic fields, and exercises in vector calculus.

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1.

Knowledge and understanding of basics of electricity and magnetism (PHY 112 or PHY
114).

2.

Ability to solve integrals, derivatives, and differential equations by classical analytica
l
techniques (MTH 212, MTH 213 [or MTH 211]).

3.

Ability to analyze linear circuits with time
-
invariant currents (ECE 201).

4.

Ability to use vector algebra in three
-
dimensional problems in space (MTH 213 or MTH
211).

5.

Knowledge of standard orthogonal coordinate
systems (MTH 213 or MTH 211).

6.

Working knowledge of geometry and trigonometry (MTH 213 or MTH 211).

7.

Knowledge of basics of vector calculus (MTH 213 or MTH 211).

8.

Basic engineering problem
-
solving skills (EGR 105, EGR 108).

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3
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0
-

3 (class

hours per week
-

laboratory hours per week
-

credits)

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Branislav M. Notaros,
Electromagnetic Theory I
. University of Massachusetts Dartmouth,
2002.

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(a) College
-
level mathematics and ba
sic sciences:

0.9 credits

(b) Engineering topics (science and/or design):

2.1 credits

(c) General education:

0 credits


________________________________
________________________________
________________________________
__________________


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Students who successfully complete this course meet the following ABET program outcomes:


[CPE program

outcomes]

[ELE program outcomes]


(a)

[1a, 1b; 2b, 2c; 3f]

(a)

[1a, 1b; 2b, 2c; 3f]


(k)

[5a, 5c]

(k)

[5a, 5c]

ECE 335


Electromagnetic Theory I

(
Required course for ELE and elective course for CPE
)

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This junior
-
level course is required of all ELE majors. The objectives of the course are for
the students to develop an understanding of electromagnetic
-
field fundamentals by
emphasizing both mathematical analytical rigor and physical
conceptual reasoning, as
applied toward practical engineering problems. Students learn to analyze engineering
systems based on electrostatic fields, steady electric currents, and magneto static fields in
arbitrary material media, and to apply vector calcul
us to solve a large variety of static field
problems. Students develop a solid grasp and true appreciation of Maxwell’s equations and
use these equations to solve time
-
varying field problems. By the end of this course, students
should be able to:

1.

Appreciat
e fields.
(2c)

2.

Understand electric and magnetic properties of material media and how these properties
can be exploited in engineering applications.
(3f)

3.

Solve realistic electromagnetic
-
field problems utilizing physical conceptual reasoning
and mathematical

synthesis of solutions, and not pure formulaic solving.
(3f)

4.

Visualize electric and magnetic fields and understand associated abstract field
phenomena.
(2c)

5.

Utilize three
-
dimensional vector differential and integral concepts to solve real
-
life
electromagn
etic
-
field problems.
(1b)

6.

Appreciate fundamental laws and work of pioneering giants of electromagnetics, their
historical perspective in the development of science and engineering and current
relevance in cutting
-
edge engineering applications.
(2b)

7.

Mathema
tically model electromagnetic
-
field physical structures and processes.
(5a)

8.

Geometrically represent and spatially visualize realistic three
-
dimensional devices and
systems.
(1a)

9.

Appreciate electromagnetic field theory as a foundation of circuit theory and
electrical
engineering as a whole.
(2c)

10.

Understand limitations of circuit theory as an approximation of field theory.
(5c)

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1.

Electrostatic field in a vacuum
(2 weeks)






2.

Electric scalar potential
(1 week)









3.

Gauss’ law
(1 week)










4.

Conductors in electrostatic fields
(1 week)







5.

Dielectrics in electrostatic fields
(1 week)







6.

Capacitors and multibody electrostatic systems
(1 week)





7.

Steady electric currents
(2 weeks)








8.

Magneto static field in a vacuum
(2 week)







9.

Mag
neto static field in material media
(1 week)


10.

Time
-
varying fields and Maxwell’s equations
(1 week)






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Y
:
:

Branislav M. Notaros

D
ATE
:

September 2002

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B
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:
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Branislav M. Notaros

D
ATE
:

March 2004