On successful completion of master level students should be ...

bistredingdongMechanics

Oct 31, 2013 (4 years and 8 days ago)

278 views

INTERNATIONAL BURCH UNIVERSITY

DEPARTMENT

OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING










SECOND CYCLE STUDY PROGRAM SPECIFICATION



















SARAJEVO

March, 2012



1. PROGRAM DESCRIPTI
ON

................................
................................
................................
................................
...................

2


2

1.1

G
ENERAL

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
..........

2

1.2

M
ISSION

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
............

2

1.3

P
ROGRAM

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.........

3

1.4

L
EARNING AND
T
EACHING

................................
................................
................................
................................
.................

3

1.5

T
EACHING
/
LEARNING METHODS AND

STRATEGIES

................................
................................
................................
...............

3

1.6

A
SSESSMENT
P
ROTOCOLS

................................
................................
................................
................................
.................

4

1.6.1 Assessment

................................
................................
................................
................................
...........................

4

1.7

L
EARNING OUTCOMES

................................
................................
................................
................................
........................

4

1.8

S
KILLS AND OTHER ATTR
IBUTES

................................
................................
................................
................................
..........

5

ON SUCCESSFUL COMPLE
TION OF MASTER LEVEL

STUDENTS SHOULD BE A
BLE TO DEMONSTRATE T
HEY:

.....

5

1.8.1 Intellectual skills

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....................

5

1.8.2 Discipline
-
specific Practical skills

................................
................................
................................
............................

5

1.8.3 Transferable skills

................................
................................
................................
................................
...................

5

1.9

M
ETHODS FOR
E
VALUATING AND
I
MPROVING THE
Q
UALITY AND
S
TANDARDS OF
T
EACHING AND

L
EARNING

......................

6

1.10

I
NDICATORS OF
Q
UAL
ITY AND
S
TANDARDS

................................
................................
................................
........................

6

1.11

C
RITERIA FOR
A
DMISSION

................................
................................
................................
................................
................

6

2. CURRICULUM

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
.......

8

















1. Program des
cription


1.1
General


The

advances in electrical and electronics engineering

have added new fuel to the development of almost all of the
science and engineering applications. Because of its role in the improvement of civilization, this discipline becam
e a separate
engineering professio
n. In today’s age, Electrical and Electronics

Engineering is one of the main branches of engineering
that contribute through professional services towards more prosperous and sustainable society.



1.2
Mission


The mis
sion of the Depart
ment of Electrical and Electronics Engineering

is to educate the students to gain an
understanding of the fundamentals of science a
nd engineering so that they can develop solutions to Electrical and

3

Electronics

Engineering problems and en
hance their
research
skills. It is aimed to especially emphasize teamwork,
independent and innovative thinking and leadership qualities. In part
icular, Electrical and Electronics Engineering

Program
aims to:


a)

Train the students to have theoretical backgrou
nd in basic sciences and engineering and to be equipped with
necessary technical skills,

b)

Develop students' competency in reading, writing and oral communication,

c)

Provide practical experience which will enable students to utilize and enhance their enginee
ring knowledge,

d)

Promote students' self
-
discipline and self
-
assurance and the ability to learn on their own,

e)

Encourage team work, collaboration and development of interpersonal skills,

f)

Motivate the students towards contributing to the progress of science

and technology,

g)

Teach the importance of ethical behavior in social and professional life,

h)

Produce graduates for the engineering and the business communities who are observant, inquisitive and open to
new technologies for developing better solutions,

i)

Pr
oduce graduates for the engineering and business communities with integrity, determination, judgment,
motivation, ability and education to assume a leadership role to meet the demanding challenges of the society.



1.3
Program


The Electrical and Elect
ronics Engineering program is based on three year Bachelor Degree and two

year
dissertation free Masters Degree Program. The Curriculum of the program includes elective courses, which give an
opportunity to students to improve their professional skills acc
ording to their interests. Some of them are nontechnical and
free elective courses, the remaining are technical electives. The requirements for a Dip
loma in Electrical and Electronics
Engineering

include the completion of minimum of 180 ECTS credits of for
mal course work and 60 days of approved
practical training. The students who completed the bachelor degree leve
l can continue to attend master

level on their
demand and if they meet the minimum GPA of bachelor level conditions.




1.4 Learning and Teac
hing


Learning and teaching methods provide high quality learning opportunities that enable students to demonstrate
achievement of the learning outcomes of the course and those of the modules which constitute their chosen route of study.


The course aims
to foster the development of independent study skills and autonomy of learning and encourage a
commitment to lifelong learning and continuous professional development. Teaching and learning methods increasingly
promote the capacity for students to assume
responsibility for their own learning and development. Progressive use of
project learning, integrated assessment and product/problem based learning allow students to take on greater self
-
direction
of their learning. Emphasis is often placed on group and

team working throughout the study.


The course employs a wide range of learning opportunities and teaching methods, informed by curriculum review, pedagogic
research and continuous staff development. Particular methods for each module or cohort are ident
ified prior to delivery
through the annual planning process. Innovative approaches to teaching, learning and assessment are encouraged. The
course seeks to expand the application of technology in the delivery of teaching and learning support wherever appr
opriate.



Scheduled sessions will include the use of lectures, seminars and practical sessions. Advantage will be taken of both
technology and supportive activities to ensure that effective learning takes place. These activities will include the use of

s
imulations, role play, case studies, projects, practical work, work based learning, workshops, peer group interaction, self
managed teams and learner managed learning.



1.5 Teaching/learning methods and strategies


Lectures/classes:

offer information
, literature review and illustrative application and present and explore core
ideas in the subject. A student will apply intellectual skills to prepare solutions to examples sheet questions which will be

discussed in a small class.


Practical sessions:

co
mputational methods are taught as a series of computer
-
based practicals with short
introductory lectures on theory. This enables a student to understand issues in application of computational methods to
simulated and real problems and also develop computin
g skills relevant to the rest of the course including the research
project. Practicals, computer
-
based and experimental lab based, provide an opportunity for a student to consolidate the
theory they have learned about in lectures and apply it to problems.




4

Group project:
provides an opportunity to study a real computer engineering problem in depth, practice analytic
and problem
-
solving skills, and work in a team.


Individual project:

involves a literature review, problem specification and experiments/anal
ysis written up in a
report. This enables a student to practice the application of techniques they have learned about to a technology problem in
some depth as well as put into practice general research skills.


Expert (guest) lectures and seminars:
provide

a student with the opportunity to hear internal speakers and
external speakers from industry. This enables a student to gain appreciation of some applications, needs and roles of
computer engineers as well as career opportunities.



1.6 Assessment Pro
tocols




The purpose of outcomes
-
based learning assessment is to improve the quality of learning and teaching in
Information Technology department. The fundamental principles are:



Student learning is the central focus of the department‘s efforts.



Each

student is unique and will express learning in a unique way.



Students must be able to apply their learning beyond the classroom.



Students should become effective, independent, lifelong learners as a result of their educational experience.


Assessment o
f the IT Learning Outcomes (ITLOs) begins with the normal assessment process in the major courses that are
taken by students. Each course defines course outcomes and relates the course outcomes to the ITLOs. Students also
prepare portfolios that reflect th
eir achievements and capabilities, and the evaluation of the portfolios by a faculty committee
represents the final assessment of a student‘s achievement in the ITLOs.



1.6.1 Assessment


Assessment of knowledge and understanding is by:

Unseen w
ritten examinations

Written essay assignments

Assessment of practical work

Group project report write
-
up and team presentation

Individual project report and short presentation/viva



1.7 Learning outcomes


The Master of Science in Electrical and

Electronics program will enable graduates to understand and articulate the
different levels and aspects of
production and consumption of electrical energy
.
The Major Learning O
utcomes for
department of Electrical and Electronics

are as follows:


Critical
Thinking
and Quantitative Reasoning in Electrical and Electronics
:
Electrical and Electronics
graduates will be able to use critical thinking and quantitative processes to identify, analyze and solve problems,

and
evaluate solutions in an electrical engine
er

context.


Electrical and Electronics Technology

Application:
Electrical and Electronics

graduates will be able to sel
ect
existing electrical engineering

tools and procedures to develop modules and systems.


Electrical and Electronics

Technology Manageme
nt:
Electrical and Electronics

graduates will be able to assess
and determine information resource requirements to d
evelop solutions suitable for electrical

and business managers
operating in a multinational and multicultural environment.


Electrical and E
lectronics

Technology Professional Practice:
Electrical and Electronics

graduates will be able
to work effectively in individual and group situations, understand how groups interact, be able to assume a leadership role
when required, and understand the fun
damentals of professional and ethical conduct.


Electrical and Electronics

Technology Systems Theory and Practice:
Electrical and Electronics

graduates will
be able to understand and communicate the fundamentals of systems theory in the development of appr
opriate systems that
function in a global environment.


On successful completion,
Electrical and Electronics

department

master students will be able to demonstrate:



5



a systematic understanding of key aspects of computing, including acquisition of coherent
and detailed knowledge,
at least some of which is at, or informed by, the forefront of defined aspects of a discipline



an ability to deploy accurately established techniques of analysis and design



a wide breadth of understanding that enables them to devise

and sustain arguments and solve problems using
ideas and techniques, some of which are at the forefront of computing practice, and describe and comment upon
particular aspects of current research, or equivalent advanced scholarship



an appreciation of the
uncertainty, ambiguity and limits of knowledge



consistent application of the development methods and techniques that they have learned to review, consolidate,
extend upon, and to initiate and carry out projects to a professional level



an ability to critica
lly evaluate arguments, assumptions, abstract concepts and data, to make judgements, and to
frame appropriate questions to achieve a solution


or identify a range of solutions


to a problem.



1.8

Skills and other attributes


On successful completion

of master level students should be able to demonstrate they:



have the ability to manage their own learning, and make use of scholarly review and primary sources (for example,
referred research articles and/or original materials appropriate to the discipli
ne)



can communicate information, ideas, problems and solutions to both specialist and non
-
specialist audiences



they have the qualities and transferable skills requiring the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility,
decision
-
making in complex and
unpredictable contexts and the learning ability needed to undertake appropriate
further training of a professional or equivalent nature





1.8
.1 Intellectual skills


By the end of the course a student will have developed skills in:



Synthesis:

integrate theory and practice, and devise appropriate theoretical models of computer engineering
systems.



Computational analysis: select and apply appropriate computational techniques to solve a given problem



Experimental analysis: acquire, analyse and
interpret synthetic and experimental data and understand the
strengths and limitation of using each type of experimental data analysis.



Critical analysis: read, critique and discuss scientific articles, especially those that cross discipline boundaries
be
tween engineering and other fields. Present a written argument based on reading from a variety of sources.



Problem solving: apply engineering principles to solve different problems.



Evaluation: interpret experimental data scientifically and demonstrate s
kills necessary to plan, conduct and report
on a research project



1.8
.2 Discipline
-
specific Practical skills


By the end of the course a student will be expected to have practical skills to enable them to:



select and apply appropriate computati
onal methods to solve different engineering problems.



use information technology for the collection and analysis of experimental data.



undertake a research project independently and with minimal supervision/guidance.



understand issues in and have gained

experience in working in multi
-
disciplinary teams.



1.8
.3 Transferable skills


By the end of the course a student will have developed a range of transferable skills including skills in:



Managing their own learning and conducting independent thinking an
d study



Problem specification and modelling



Applying mathematical and computational methods to solve (engineering) problems



Use of general information technology



Managing a research project, including planning and time management



Conducting an enginee
ring
-
based research
-
based work, from hypothesis to report writing



Working in a multi
-
disciplinary team



Critical analysis


6


1.9

Methods for Evaluating and Improving the Quality and Standards of Teaching and

Learning




Student Focus groups and t
he annual student survey



Class room observation of Lecturers



Advanced Professional Diploma in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education



Membership of the Higher Education Academy



External Examiners reports



Accreditation Visits



Curriculum Area Review



Course

Committees



Annual and periodic review


a)

Mechanisms for gaining student feedback on teaching quality and their learning experience


Questionnaries collected for each component of the course and considered by the course director/tutors in a department
meeti
ng and acted on as appropriate. Termly individual meetings between students and the Course Director. Self
-
assessment progress reports completed by students at the end of each term.


b)

Mechanisms for the review and evaluation of teaching, learning, assessme
nt, the curriculum and outcome
standards


Departmental meeting in June/July at which course tutors consider current course structure, delivery arrangements, student
performance in assessment, and student feedback and make recommendations for change and im
provement. Also used to
help spread best practice for teaching and learning techniques. Examiners reports (both internal and external) on the
examinations in a particular year, commenting on pass rates, standards of learning and examination performance. Te
aching
evaluation questionnaires.

Annual Course Director report to the Department Academic Committee with details on admissions, staffing, course changes
and feedback, student performance, destination of graduated MSc students, and any difficulties encoun
tered on the course.
Student destination, whether employment or further study. An Advisory Board (from industry and clinical practice) providing
occasional and valuable comments on the progress and development of the course from their respective perspectiv
es.




1.10

Indicators of Quality and Standards




Student feedback



Retention and success rates for each level for each course



Student Module Evaluations



Annual Student Questionnaires



First Destination Statistics



Professional accreditation



External Examiner

reports




1.11

Criteria for Admission


The admissions policy for overall Scheme, in which the Computing course operates, is to admit any applicant who is capable
of benefiting from and successfully completing their chosen course. Where selection criteri
a are devised they will be tuned
to satisfy the widening participation agenda and equal opportunity policy of the University. Admissions profiles will be
reviewed annually as will selection criteria and will provide a fair and objective basis for selectio
n to oversubscribed courses.
Admission with advanced standing will follow University Procedures. Applications will normally be considered in the light of
a
candidate’s ability to meet the following criteria:


a)

Academic ability


1)

The applicant has provided

appropriate indications of proven and potential academic excellence. Appropriate
indicators include two or more confidential references, academic transcripts or their equivalent, (on the application
form) a statement outlining how the course will help pro
gress the applicant’s career, and performance at interview.

2)

The applicant has provided sufficient evidence, in the view of the assessor, to suggest that they have the academic
ability and commitment to pursue the chosen programme to a successful conclusio
n within the required time limits.
This includes; a sufficient level of mathematics and/or computer programming completed on the first degree or
otherwise as a foundation for successful completion of the course; an understanding of how the MSc will help th
e
applicant progress their career, and evidence of the ability (prior experience or potential) to work in a multi
-
disciplinary team.


7

3)

Applicants are normally expected to have achieved a Honours Degree (or equivalent) in engineering, physical
sciences, math
ematics, computer science subject, or a related subject.


b)

English Language Requirement



Applicants whose first language is not English are required to provide evidence of proficiency in English. Candidates are
normally expected to meet the following crit
eria:

For IELTS an overall score of 5 For TOEFL an overall score of 450, or for the computer
-
based test, an overall score of 200
or equivalent score.


c)

Suitability



1)

The programme of study that the applicant wishes to pursue is well suited to the academic

interests and abilities to
which they have drawn attention in their application and (where appropriate) the applicant has undertaken any
preliminary academic work or course which is normally considered indispensable to acceptance on the proposed
programme

of study.

2)

The Department of IT is able to provide appropriate supervision and facilities for the candidate’s chosen
programme of work



8

2. CURRICULUM


First Semester

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

C

ECTS

EEE xxx

Elective I

3

0

3

7.5

EEE xxx

Elective II

3

0

3

7
.5

EEE xxx

Elective III

3

0

3

7.5

EEE xxx

Elective IV

3

0

3

7.5


Total

12

0

12

30


Second Semester

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

C

ECTS

EEE xxx

Elective V

3

0

3

7.5

EEE xxx

Elective VI

3

0

3

7.5

EEE xxx

Elective VII

3

0

3

7.5

EEE xxx

Elective VIII

3

0

3

7.
5


Total

12

0

12

30


Third Semester

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

C

ECTS

EEE 599

Master’s Thesis

M

M

M



bbb‵
V
N

Master’s Seminar

M

M

M




Total

0

0

0

30


Forth Semester

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

C

ECTS

EEE 599

Master’s Thesis

M

M

M




Total

0

0

0

30


Elec
tive Courses

CODE

COURSE NAME

T

P

C

ECTS

EEE 50
1

Biomedical Signal Processing

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 50
2

Biomedical Image Processing

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 50
3

Advanced Biomedical Instrumentation

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 50
4

Advanced

T
opics in Biomedical Engineering

3

0

3

7.5

EE
E 51
1

Optoelectronic Devices

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 51
2

Semiconductor Device Manufacturing

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 51
4

VLSI Physical Design

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 51
6

Nanoscale Fabrication

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 51
7

Low Power Electronic Circuits

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 51
8

VLSI Testing And Reliab
ility Engineering

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 51
9

Mixed Analog/Digital IC Design

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 52
0

Microwave Electronic Circuits

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 52
1

Electromagnetic Waves And Applications

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 52
2

Advanced Electromagnetics

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 52
3

Antenna Theory

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 52
4

Computational Electromagnetics

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 52
6

Satellite Communications And Microwave System Design

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 53
0

Statistical Signal Processing

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 53
1

High Frequency Filter Design

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 53
8

Advanced Digital S
ignal Processing

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 53
9

Speech Signal Processing

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 54
0

Mobile and Wireless Communication

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 54
1

Advanced Communication Systems

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 56
0

Stability Theory Of Dynamical Systems

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 56
1

Design o
f Elec
trical Machines

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 56
2

Mechanical Aspects Of Electric Power Apparatus

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 56
3

Electric And Magnetic Fields In Electric Power Engineering

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 56
4

Power Engineering Analysis

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 56
5

Advanced Power System protec
tion

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 56
9

Advanced High Voltage Techniques

3

0

3

7.5


9

EEE 5
70

Computer Methods In Electric Power Engineering

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 5
72

Insulation Coordination

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 5
74

Advanced Topics In Microcontrollers

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 5
75

Industrial Au
tomation Systems

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 5
76

Fuzzy Systems And Control

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 5
77

Adaptive Control

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 5
79

Optimal Control

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 5
80

System Identification

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 58
1

Advanced Robotics

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 58
4

Robust Control Systems

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 58
7

Fault Tolerant Control Systems

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 58
8

Variable Structure Control Systems

3

0

3

7.5

EEE 5
89

Embedded Control Systems

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 552

Data Mining

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 553

E
-
Bus./E
-
Commerce

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 557

Digital Image Processin
g

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 558

Computer Vision

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 559

Machine Learning

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 563

Network Programming

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 564

Distributed Systems

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 565

Mobile and Wireless Networking

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 566

Mobile Programming

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 5
73

Advanced Bioinformatics

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 574

Advanced Methods in Bioinformatics

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 576

Computational Methods in Bioinformatics

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 581

Computer Graphics

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 582

Computer and Network Security

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 583

Parallel Co
mputer Architecture

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 584

Embedded Systems

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 585

Advanced Computer Networks

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 591

Neural Networks

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 592

Pattern Recognition

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 593

Evolutionary Computing

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 594

Artificial Intelli
gence

3

0

3

7.5

CEN 595

Scientific Research Methods

3

0

3

7.5






















Course Code :
EEE 5
01

Course Title :
BIOMEDICAL SIGNAL PROCESSING

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Tot
al Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course introduces two fundamental concepts of signal processing: linear systems and

10

stochastic processes. Various estimation, detection and filtering methods are developed and
demonstrated on biomedical

signals. The methods include harmonic analysis, auto
-
regressive
model, Wiener and Matched filters, linear discriminants, and independent components. All
methods will be developed to answer concrete question on specific data sets in modalities such
as ECG,

EEG, MEG, Ultrasound.

COURSE OBJECTIVES


COURSE CONTENTS



Introduction



Linear systems



Impulse response



Discrete Fourier transform and z
-
transform



Convolution



Sampling



Random variables and stochastic processes



Moments and Cumulants



Multivariate distribut
ions



Statistical independence and stochastic processes



Examples of

biomedical signal processing



Probabilistic estimation



Linear discriminants



Harmonic analysis



Auto
-
regressive model



Matched and Wiener filter



Independent components analysis
-

analysis

of ME
G signal

TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Mi
dterm Examination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theories, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practi
tioner” with particular regard
to an understanding of legal and ethical issues;



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon
, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specia
list and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Langu
age of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)



Eugene N. Bruce,

Biomedical Signal Processing

and Signal Modeling, John Wiley &
Sons,2000



Steven Kay, Fundamentals of Statistical Signal Processing, Prentice Hall, 1998



Monson H. Hayes, Statistical Digital Signal Pro
cessing and Modeling, John Wiley &
Sons,1996



Iranpour, R. and Chacon, P., Basic Stochastic Processes: The Mark Kac Lectures.



MacMillan, 1988





11

Course Code :
EEE 5
0
2

Course Title :
BIOMEDICAL IMAGE PROCESSING

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Cre
dits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Different diagnostic imaging modalities (Radiography, Ultrasound, Magnetic resonance

imaging etc.), role of photonics in biomedical engineering, co
ncepts imaging, sensory response
and their assessment in clinical medicine.

COURSE OBJECTIVES


COURSE CONTENTS



Digital image fundamentals



Review of matrix theory results



Review of Image transforms



Image enhancement



Frequency domain methods



Fundamentals o
f Colour image processing



Image compression



Redundancy.



Fundamentals of JPEG, MPEG, Fractals.



Image segmentation

TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theorie
s, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with particular regard
to an understanding of legal and ethical issues;



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the devel
opment and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Presen
t issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisa
tion and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)



Gonzalez and Woods, Digital Image Processing, 2 Ed, Pearson Education, 2002.



Anil K. Jain, Fundamentals of Digit
al Image Processing, Pearson Education, 2003


12



Course Code :
EEE 5
0
3

Course Title :

ADVANCED

BIOMEDICAL

INSTRUMENTATION


Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION


COURSE OBJECTIVES


COURSE CONTENTS


TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Descri
ption(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theories, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically
review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with particular regard
瑯⁡渠t湤敲獴慮摩湧映汥条氠慮s 整桩捡氠e獳略猻



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and pr
oduct design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communi
cate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related
attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)



Course Code :
EEE 5
0
4

Course Title : ADVANCED TOPICS IN
BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elec
tive

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION


COURSE OBJECTIVES


COURSE CONTENTS


TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3
. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examination




25%

25%


13

Final Examination





50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theories,

principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with particular regard
to an understanding of legal and ethical issues;



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the develop
ment and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Present
issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisati
on and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)




Course Code :
EEE 5
11

Course Title :
OPTOELECTRONIC DEVICES

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits

: 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Principle of semiconductor lasers. Modulation dynamics. Single frequency lasers. Fundamental
AM and FM noise properties, linewidth. Tunable semiconducto
r lasers. Quantum well lasers.
Electrooptic modulators and switches. Detectors. Integrated optoelectronic circuits. Optical
amplifiers
-
semiconductor and Erbium fiber. Low coherence sources
-
superluminescent diodes.
Tunable optical filters.

COURSE OBJECTIVE
S

The objecives of this course are to provide the students with a solid understanding on: Passive
and active fiber components, semiconductor lasers and amplifiers, optical detectors, multiplexers
and demultiplexers, transmitters and receivers, and optical
switches.

COURSE CONTENTS



Introduction to optical fibers



Fiber losses, dispersion and nonlinearities



Passive fiber components



Active fiber components



Planar waveguides



Semiconductor lasers



Semiconductor amplifiers



Optical modulators



Optical detectors: Pin

photodiodes



Optical detectors: Avalanche photodiodes



WDM components: Multiplexers and demultiplexers



WDM components: Transmitters and receivers



Optical switching



Time domain switching

TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive l
ectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning out
comes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theories, principles and

14

practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with particular regard
to an understanding of legal and ethical issues;



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a frame
work of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individ
ually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)



Govind P. Agrawal, Lightwave Technology:

Components and Devices, Wiley
-
IEEE,
2004.



Course Code :
EEE 5
12

Course Title :
SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE MANUFACTURING

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COU
RSE DESCRIPTION

Integrated circuit device fabrication and surface micromachining technology. Thermal oxidation,
ion implantation, impurity diffusion, film deposition, expitaxy, lithography, etching, contacts and
interconnections, and process integration is
sues. Device design and mask layout, relation
between physical structure and electrical/mechanical performance. MOS transistors and poly
-
Si
surface microstructures will be fabricated in the laboratory and evaluated.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Gain a "big picture"
understanding of the steps involved in making and packaging an integrated
circuit. Learn the jargon associated with the microelectronics manufacturing industry. Learn the
key concepts and process parameters of each process step

COURSE CONTENTS



Initial ove
rview of key components in microelectronics industry



Silicon processing



Device operation



Photolithography processing



Interconnect processing



Connections to device and circuit design



Packaging



Testing and reliability



Future technologies to be incorporated i
nto manufacturable schemes

TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Meth
ods

Project





Midterm Examination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theories, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professiona
l computing practitioner” with particular regard
瑯⁡渠t湤敲獴慮摩湧映汥条氠慮s 整桩捡氠e獳略猻



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participat
e in, reflect upon, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional

15

development;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and c
lients from specialist and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake
employment.

Language of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)



Microchip Manufacturing, by Stanley Wolf, 2004, Lattice Press, ISBN 0
-
9616721
-
8
-
8.


Course Code :
EEE 5
14

Course Title :
VLSI PHY
SICAL DESIGN

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.
5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Basic physical design requirements for VLSI; performance
-
oriented formulation and optimization
of chip partitioning, module placement and interconnection; op
timized design and layout of on
-
chip modules; circuit extraction; high
-
speed VLSI circuits; yield and reliability analysis; advanced
VLSI packaging and parametric testing.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

To learn the theory and practice of VLSI Phisical Design.

COURSE

CONTENTS



Introduction



EDA industry roadmap



Design methodologies



Time complexity



Problem tractability



Deterministic algorithm classes



Graph algorithms



Global routing



Steiner
-
tree



Maze routing



Buffer insertion, Congestion



Floorplanning and placement

TEACHI
NG/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examinatio
n




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theories, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with par
瑩捵污t⁲敧慲搠
瑯⁡渠t湤敲獴慮摩湧映汥条氠慮s 整桩捡氠e獳略猻



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take respo
nsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
spe
cialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instructi
on

English


16

Textbook(s)



Vlsi Physical Design Automation: Theory and Practice Authors: Sadiq M. Sait, Habib
Youssef



Course Code :
EEE 5
16

Course Title :
NANOSCALE FABRICATION

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/E
lective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course discusses various top
-
down and bottom
-
up approaches to synthesizing and
processing nanostructured materials. The topics include fundamentals of self assembly, nano
-
impri
nt lithography, electron beam lithography, nanowire and nanotube synthesis, quantum dot
synthesis (strain patterned and colloidal), postsynthesis modification (oxidation, doping, diffusion,
surface interactions, and etching techniques). In addition, techni
ques to bridging length scales
such as heterogeneous integration will be discussed.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The objective of this course is to bring forth understanding of frontiers of 21st
-
century research,
with implications for electronics, optics, material d
esign, computers, and biology.

COURSE CONTENTS



Introduction and Overview



Review of Microfabrication principles



Quantum mechanics



Semiconductor electronics



Semiconductor optoelectronics



Fabrication method



Properties and applications



Epitaxial method



Soluti
on
-
based method



Carbon nanotubes fabrication method



Purification, Properties



Lithography and its botlenecks



Micro
-
contact printing and nano
-
stamping techniques



Advanced Characterization Techniques

TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. I
nteractive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theories, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with particular regard
瑯⁡渠t湤敲獴慮摩湧映汥条氠慮s 整桩
捡氠楳獵敳c



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, wi
thin a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision,
both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)



Goddard, et al., Handbook of

Nanoscience Engineering and Technology, CRC Press,

17

Boca Raton, 2002.



Course Code :
EEE 5
17

Course Title :
LOW POWER ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Modeling and sources of power consumption, Power estimation at different design levels (circuit,
transistor, and gate) , Power optimization for combinational circuits, Power optimization for
sequential circuits, Power
optimization for RT and algorithmic levels, High level synthesis for low
power, Circuit and layout level design for low power, Low power design flow and libraries, Voltage
scaling approaches, Low power random access memory circuits, Power analysis and desi
gn at
system level.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

To learn the theory and practice of low power electronic circuits.

COURSE CONTENTS



Introduction



Power consumption in CMOS circuits



Low voltage devices and dual
-
voltage systems



Dual
-
threshold low leakage power devices



Reducing dynamic power



Power analysis



Logic families



Adiabatic and energy recovery logic



Memories



Power
-
aware processors



Multi
-
core parallelism and low
-
power systems



Power reduction in FPGA



Clock distribution network and its power consumption

TEACHING/AS
SESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examination





Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theories, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with particul
慲⁲敧慲搠
瑯⁡渠t湤敲獴慮摩湧映汥条氠慮s 整桩捡氠e獳略猻



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take responsibi
lity for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
speciali
st backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instruction

En
glish

Textbook(s)



Low Voltage, Low Power VLSI Subsystems (Hardcover) by Kiat
-
Seng Yeo , Kaushik
Roy, McGraw
-
Hill Professional




18

Course Code :
EEE 5
18

Course Title :
VLSI TESTING AND RELIABILITY ENGINEERING

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credi
ts : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

VLSI testing and design
-
for
-
test techniques are covered. The course also emphasizes reliability
predictions and characterizations for integrated circu
its and systems. Topics covered include:
Fault Models, Test Pattern Generation, Design
-
for
-
Testability, Built
-
in Self
-
Test (BIST), System
-
on
-
a
-
Chip (SOC) Testing.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

To learn the theory and practice of VLSI testing.

COURSE CONTENTS



Fault m
odeling



Automatic test pattern generation



Fault simulation



Testability measurements



Design for testability and scan test



Boundary scan testing



Built
-
in self testing



Memory testing



Case studies using CPU testing papers



Other most up
-
to
-
date research topics

TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Exa
mination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theories, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” w
ith particular regard
to an understanding of legal and ethical issues;



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and tak
e responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and
non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of In
struction

English

Textbook(s)



VLSI Test Principles and Architectures: Design for Testability (Systems on Silicon) by
Laung
-
Terng Wang, Cheng
-
Wen Wu, Xiaoqing Wen, Morgan Kaufmann



Course Code :
EEE 5
19

Course Title :
MIXED ANALOG/DIGITAL IC DESIGN

Leve
l :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Fundamentals of analog IC design and CAD layout, beginning with basic amplifier building blocks
and continu
ing through fully differential operational amplifier design and compensation. Core
building blocks for mixed
-
signal designs, including comparators, switched capacitor circuits, and

19

data converters. Addresses system level design methodologies and integratio
n of analog and
digital circuitry in simulation and layout.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The objectives of this course are to provide the students with a solid understanding on: Design
and building custom analog/digital integrated circuits that are optimized for tar
get devices,
providing enhanced functionality and lowered cost in finished products.

COURSE CONTENTS



The Sandbox



Fabs and Processes



Economics



Design Tools



Standard Cell Design



Peripheral Circuits



Specialty Logic Structures & Memory



Logic, Binary Mathemati
cs & Processing



Analog Circuit Introduction and Amplifiers



The Bandgap Reference



Oscillators, Phase Locked Loops and RF Introduction



Converts and Switched Capacitor Techniques



Packaging and Testing



Odds and Ends

TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teachi
ng Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theories, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with particular regard
to an understanding of

legal and ethical issues;



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimu
m supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)



Keith Barr, A
sic Design in the Silicon Sandbox: A Complete Guide to Building Mixed
-
signal Integrated Circuits, McGraw
-
Hill, 2006.




Course Code :
EEE 5
20

Course Title :
MICROWAVE ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

C
ompulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Techniques of analog circuit technology in the gigahertz high
-
frequency regime. Transmission
lines and distributed circuit elements; S
-
parameter design of high
-
frequency
active circuits;
computer
-
aided analysis and design. Emphasis on design of planar high
-
frequency integrated

20

circuits employing CMOS and SiGe technology. Circuit building blocks for broadband wired and
wireless communication will be emphasized including osc
illators, low
-
noise amplifiers, and power
amplifiers.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Techniques of analog circuit technology in the gigahertz high
-
frequency regime. Transmission
lines and distributed circuit elements; S
-
parameter design of high
-
frequency active circui
ts;
computer
-
aided analysis and design. Emphasis on design of planar high
-
frequency integrated
circuits employing CMOS and SiGe technology. Circuit building blocks for broadband wired and
wireless communication will be emphasized including oscillators, low
-
noise amplifiers, and power
amplifiers.

COURSE CONTENTS



Introduction. Analog circuit technology at gigahertz frequencies.



Transmission lines and distributed circuit elements.



Microstrip transmission lines



S Parameters.



Smith chart and impedance matching



Computer
-
aided analysis and design



Amplifiers



Low
-
noise amplifiers



Broadband amplifers



Oscillators, VCOs



Mixers



Power Amplifers



Project presentations

TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
s
tudents

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and

critical understanding of the theories, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with particular regard
to an understanding of legal and ethical issues;



Creatively apply contemporary theo
ries, processes and tools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and cont
inued professional
development;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
dem
onstrating the interpersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)



Microwave Engineering, David M. Pozar, 2nd ed., John Wiley & Sons,1998, IS
BN 0
-
471
-
17096
-
8


Course Code :
EEE 5
2
1

Course Title :
ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES AND APP
L
ICATION
S

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Introdu
ction to basic concepts and applications of electromagnetics waves, including plane
-
wave
propagation, oblique incidence, energy flow and Poynting vector, Geometrical and physical optics,

21

parallel plate waveguides, coaxial waveguides, rectangular waveguides
, dielectric waveguides
and fiber optics, cavity resonators, dipole antennas, aperture antennas, antenna arrays, wireless
and radar applications.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

This course is intended to give some important applications of electromagnetic and the micr
owave
systems to graduate students.

COURSE CONTENTS



Maxwell’s equations and basic concepts of electromagnetics,



Solutions of the wave equations as plane waves,



Energy flow and Poynting vector,



Geometrical optics approximations



Physical optics approximatio
ns,



Wave solutions for arallel plate waveguides,



Wave solutions for coaxial waveguides,



Wave solutions for rectangular waveguides,



Wave solutions for dielectric waveguides



Wave solutions for fiber optics,



Waves in cavity resonators,



Radiation from dipole a
ntennas and aperture antennas,



Antenna arrays, principle of pattern multiplication, array factor



Wireless and radar applications.

TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussion
s and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understandi
ng of the theories, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with particular regard
to an understanding of legal and ethical issues;



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and t
ools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional
de
velopment;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interp
ersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)



“Electromagnetic Waveguides: Theory and Applications”, S. F. Mahmoud, IET, 1991,
ISBN: 08634123
27, 9780863412325



Course Code :
EEE 5
22

Course Title :
ADVANCED ELECTROMAGNETICS

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Maxwell's equation
s, reciprocity theorem, integral equations, Green's function, singularity analysis
of Green's function, scattering of electromagnetic waves, integral representations, inverse
problems, contrast function.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Reciprocity theorem, integral equ
ations, Green’s functions, waves scattering , inverse problems.


22

COURSE CONTENTS



Maxwell’s equations in the time domain and frekanquency domain



Vector potentials A and F in terms of J and M



Solutions of the wave equations for A



Solutions of the wave equati
ons for F



Reciprocity theorem in electromagnetics



Field equivalence principles



Integral equations in electromagnetics



Green’s function for the wave equations



Singularity analysis of Green’s function



Scattering of electromagnetic waves



Integral representati
ons for the scattering problems



Scattering from cylindrical objects



Inverse scattering problems



Contrast function.

TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactive lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group wor
ks

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theor
ies, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with particular regard
to an understanding of legal and ethical issues;



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the dev
elopment and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a framework of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Pres
ent issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both individually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organi
sation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)



“Electromagnetics”, Edward J. Rothwell, Michael J. Cloud, CRC Press, 2001, ISBN:
084931397X, 9780849313974


C
ourse Code :
EEE 5
23

Course Title :
ANTENNA THEORY

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Maxwell's equations, electric and magnetic field, r
adiation pattern, directivity, gain, matching
techniques, wire antennas, array antennas, aperture antennas, Huygens's principles, microstrip
antennas, reflector, antenna design, smart antenna systems.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The main objective of the course is
to introduce some of the fundamental concepts of the analysis
and design of antennas and antenna systems.

COURSE CONTENTS



Introduction, Antenna Types and Radiation Mechanism



Fundamental Parameters of Antennas



Radiation Integrals, Auxiliary Potential Funct
ions, Duality and Reciprocity Theorem



Linear Wire Antennas, Infinitesimal Dipole and Finite Length Dipoles



Loop Antennas


23



Array Antennas: Linear, Planar and Circular Arrays



Antenna Synthesis and Continuous Sources



Matching Techniques



Broadband Antennas



Freq
uency Independent Antennas, Antenna Miniaturization and Fractal Antennas



Aperture Antennas and Equivalence Principle



Microstrip Antennas and Reflectors



Smart Antennas



Antenna Measurements

TEACHING/ASSESSMENT

Description




Teaching Methods

1. Interactiv
e lectures and communications with
students

2. Discussions and group works

3. Presentations(4
-
5 students per semester)


Description(%)

Student Assessment
Methods

Project





Midterm Examination




Final Examination





25%

25%

50%

Learning
outcomes



Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of the theories, principles and
practices of computing;



Critically review the role of a “professional computing practitioner” with particular regard
to an understanding of legal and ethical issue
s;



Creatively apply contemporary theories, processes and tools in the development and
evaluation of solutions to problems and product design;



Actively participate in, reflect upon, and take responsibility for, personal learning and
development, within a fr
amework of lifelong learning and continued professional
development;



Present issues and solutions in appropriate form to communicate effectively with peers
and clients from specialist and non
-
specialist backgrounds;



Work with minimum supervision, both indi
vidually and as a part of a team,
demonstrating the interpersonal, organisation and problem
-
solving skills supported by
related attitudes necessary to undertake employment.

Language of Instruction

English

Textbook(s)



Antenna Theory: Analysis and Design
-
T
hird Edition, Constantine A. Balanis, Wiley,
2005, ISBN: 0
-
471
-
66782
-
X;



Antennas: For All Applications
-
Third Edition, John D. Kraus and Ronald J. Marhefka, Mc
Graw Hill, 2002, ISBN: 0
-
07
-
232103
-
2;



Foundations of Antenna Theory and Techniques, Vincent F. Fu
sco, Pearson, 2005,
ISBN: 0
-
130
-
26267
-
6



Course Code :
EEE 5
24

Course Title :
COMPUTATIONAL ELECTROMAGNETICS

Level :
Graduate

Year :


Semester :

ECTS Credits : 7.5

Status :

Compulsory/Elective

Hours/Week :

3

Total Hours :
45

Instructor :

COURSE DES
CRIPTION

Review of numerical solution of matrix equations and matrix eigenvalue problems, method of
moments, finite difference and finite element methods, variational methods, spectral domain
approach. The use of above methods in the solution of various an
tenna and scattering problems,
and in the analysis of passive microwave components.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

Review of numerical solution of matrix equations and matrix eigenvalue problems, method of