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Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



78







1.

Appendix








Course Characterization




















Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



79

Course Characterization:

Course
Code

FLEn1011

Course Title

Sophomore English

Degree
Program

B.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Common Courses

Module Coordinator

English Department

Lecturer

NN

Course load

3
Cr. Hrs or 4
ECTS

Contact Hours

lec+tut+lab+home

3+0+0
+3

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Course Objectives



To familiarize the students with the fundamentals of
writing texts, scientific reports, handouts using English
language



To provide the student with a comprehensive
paragraph and essay writing



To prepare the student to effectively use English
language to

write different research proposals,
scientific reports, publications etc.



To provide a comprehensive study of Paraphrasing,
Summarizing, and Quoting in writing



To provide students with the knowledge of technical
report writing

Student Learning Outcome


write effectively the specific varieties of discourse
needed within your academic areas and future
profession including paragraphs, essays, exams,
cases, and Scientific reports,;


Read flied
-
specific materials (e.g. handouts,
textbooks, books, etc.) effici
ently and use them as
models when writing notes, outlines, summaries, and
technical reports.


listen and reproduce notes, structured outlines, simple
summaries, etc. in simple and clear English that can
easily be understood, and


Make effective oral represe
ntations.


Express yourself in writing using simple but logical and
clear language, and


Evaluate critically variety of texts.

Course
Description/Course
Contents

Factors in Writing



Preparing to write: having the right attitude



Preparing to write : subject knowledge



Prewriting techniques



Outlining: organizing content



Drafting and Revising


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



80

Fundaments of Paragraph and Essay Writing



The differences between a Paragraph and an Essay



Learning to write Paragraphs and Essays



The
Parts of a paragraph and an Essay



I mportant points about the essay



Paragraph and Essay Formats



Analyzing model essays

The four Steps in Essay Writing



making a point



Supporting with specific evidence



Organizing and connecting specific evidence



Writing

clear and error


free sentences



Clearing away fragments



correcting fused sentences and comma splice



dealing with subject

verb agreement and
pronoun antecedents



understanding parallelism



remedying misplaced and dangling modifiers



rephrasing wordy
sentences and paragraphs



varying sentences

Modes of Discourse


Exposition


defining


providing examples


explaining a process


comparing and contrasting


dividing and classifying


providing causes and effects


Description


Narration


Argumentation and persuasion

Paraphrasing, Summarizing, and Quoting in writing



Practice on paraphrasing, summarizing and quoting

Writing technical reports



Components of technical report writing



Principles in writing technical reports: clarity, accuracy,
conciseness. completeness, an
d correctness

Giving Oral Presentation



planning and organizing your presentation



devel opi ng Eff ecti ve presentati on styl e

Business Letters Writing



parts of Business letter



Business letter formats

Pre
-
requisites

None

Semester

First

Status of Course

Service course

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lectures



I ndividual and group works


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



81



Whole class discussion



Role plays and I mprovisation

Assessment/Evaluation &
Grading System

Written Examination



Mid
-
term examination (30%)



Final examination (40%)

Continues
assessments



Class activity (10%)



Assignments (10%)



Presentation (10%)

Attendance
Requirements



Lecture attendance (85%)



Assignment Submission (100%)

Literature

1.

John Langan,
College Writing Skills with Readings: Text &
Student CD,

2005

-

Student Edition
.

2.

Joseph F. Trimmer,
Writing With a Purpose
,

Jul 13, 2005.

3.

Jeff Coghill and Stacy Magedanz,
English Grammar (Cliffs
Study Solver),

Jun 27, 2003.

4.

National Writing Project and Carl Nagin,
Because Writing
Matters: Improving Student Writing in Our Schools,

Feb

10,
2006.

5.

Getachew Seyoum,
A Manual of Report Writing for
College Students.

Jimma University. I V


Discourse types,
1991.

6.

Thomas E. Tyner,
College Writing Basics: A Progressive
Approach,

Jul 1995.

7.

Stegberg C. Norman,
An introductory English Grammar,

New

York. MC Graw Hill Book Company, 1981.





Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



82

Course
Code

FLEn

1022

Course Title

Communication Skills

Degree Program

B. Eng. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Humanities and social sciences

Module Coordinator

English Department

Lecturer

NN

Course load

2
Cr

Hrs or 3 ECTS

Contact Hours

(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

2+0+0+3

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Course Objectives



To train students the basic communicative skills to be
successful in their feature career to communicate with
English



To provide students a comprehensive knowledge on
how to present oral repots and written reports.



To provide students with the basic knowledge of
persuasive arguments



I t gives them a broad knowledge on the structure of
spoken and written discourse



To provi
de students how to interpret orally figures,
charts, maps, graphs, and tables.



To provide a comprehensive study of arguments

Student Learning Outcome



By the end of the course, trainees will be able to



attend lectures



present oral report



complete written
reports



read various materials and make their own notes



Express their ideas effectively in various
communicative contexts.



Master skills of persuasive arguments



Deliver their ideas with clarity and conviction



I dentify the structure of spoken and written di
scourse

Course
Description/Course
Contents



Listening for gist and details




Discriminating major and minor ideas




Taking notes, features of active listening




Reading and reacting to selected texts




Summary writing



Group discussion skills




I nterpreting texts, stories, pictures, charts, and tables;




Brief oral and written reports



Arguments.



Basic functions of English




I ntroducing oneself and others, giving advice,
expressing opinions, describing, showing probability
and certainty




I nterpre
ting orally figures, charts, maps, graphs, and

Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



83

tables



Summarizing and reviewing;




Critiquing



Debating;



Public speaking (impromptu and prepared)

Pre
-
requisites

FLEn 1011

Semester

Second

Status of Course

Service course

Teaching & Learning
Methods



I ndividual work



Pair / group work on problem solving activities and
projects



Whole class discussion



Role plays and I mprovisation



Open debating forums



Students’ keeping their Journal writing’ of their day to
day reading and presentations

Assessment/Evaluation &
Grading System

Written Examination



Final examination (20%)

Continues assessments



Group projects and discussion (20%)



I ndividual oral and written reports (10%)



Journal writing (10%)



Listening (10%)



Debates(10)



Public speaking (10%)



I nter
-
presentation(10)

Attendance
Requirements



Lecture attendance (85%)



Assignment Submission (100%)

Literature

1.

Bough Bennie,
101 Ways to Improve Your Communication
Skills Instantly, 4th Edition,

Sep 15, 2005.

2.

Kathryn Sue Young and Howard Paul Travis,
O
ral
Communication: Skills, Choices, and Consequences,

Mar
1, 2004.

3.

G. Adams, T. Peck, and H. Piotrowski,
202 Useful Exercises
for IELTS
,
Nov 30, 2002
.

4.

L. Wholey,
Reading Matters 1
, Houghton Mifflin Company,
Boston, 2000.

5.

Davy E. and Davy K.:
Reading

and vocabulary workbook,

(1992) TOEFL.

6.

Gerememew Gebre (2000)
English Conversation
. Addis
Ababa: Mega Publishing Enterprise.






Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



84

Course
Code

MEng 2102

Course Title

Research Methods

Degree Program

B. Eng in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Research
Methods

Module Coordinator

Mechanical Engineering Department

Lecturer

NN

Course load

2 Cr. Hrs or 3 ECTS

Contact Hours
(
(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

2+0+0
+3

Course Objectives &

Competences to be
Acquired

Course Objectives


The purpose of this course is to
present an introduction to the
major considerations and tasks involved in conducting a
research project. This course ensures that engineering students
are familiar with library resources, database searches, patent
searches, and industry standards. The cour
se also covers
strategies for formulating research questions and approaching
the research task as well as literature surveys and bibliographic
conventions. I t also provides opportunities for students to
explore the implications of technology and to lead gr
oup
discussions of issues arising from their research. Generally, this
subject teaches the student from problem selection to
completed research report with practical suggestions based
on a solid theoretical framework and an educationally sound
learning pro
cedure.


Competences (Learning Outcomes)




At the conclusion of this course, the student will have
developed an understanding of how to identify research
topics, formulate research questions / hypotheses, select an
appropriate research and, where applicable
, experimental
design.



The student will also be capable of performing required
statistical analyses for any variant application in a business /
industrial setting, regardless of data form, and will be
familiar with major indices for measuring correlation a
nd
association.



The course will enable the students to select an appropriate
investigative strategy, select an appropriate statistical
analysis plan (mindful of the nature of the data available,
and the underlying assumptions associated with the test
involved), correctly
execute the analytical plan, and make
recommendations for further research / action in a format
consistent with the presentation of such
data in a business
environment.




Course
Description/Course

(1)
Introduction



(2)
Identifying the Type and P
urpose of the Research Study


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



85

Contents



Historical Methods Of Generating Knowledge



The Scientific Method



Developing The Statement Of The Problem



Types Of Research Studies



Operationally and the Statement of the Problem:
Research Questions and Hypotheses.

(3)
Developing the Experimental Design



Definitions Of Terms



The Basic Logic and Purpose of an Experimental Design



Type of Experimental Designs



Designing the I ndustrial Experiment



Assessing the Experiment for Adequacy and Efficiency


(4)
Environmental Mod
els



Sampling Procedures and



Considerations



Types of Sampling Plans



Misconceptions Related to Randomness



Sample Size and Experimental Precision


(5)
Establishing the Integrity of the Data



A Review of Measurement Scales and Types of Data



Establishing the
Reliability and Validity of the Data in
(Predominantly) Non Experimental (Qualitative) Research



Establishing the Precision and Accuracy of the Data in
(Predominantly) Experimental Research


(6)
Designing the Plan for the Statistical

Analysis of the Data



Me
asur ement Scal es and Test Sel ecti on



When You Can not Fol l ow the Pl an



Nonpar ametr i c Testi ng and Anal ysi s


(7)
Anal yzi ng Data from Si mpl e Experiments: Si ngl e Treatment
Anal yses



The Compl etel y Randomi zed Desi gn


Fi xed & Random
Effects



The Compl etel y Randomi z
ed Bl ock Desi gn (One and
Mor e Than One Bl ocked Effect)



The Compl etel y Randomi zed Desi gn
-

Repeated
Measur es

(8)
Maj or Measures of Rel ati onshi p


(Association and Correlation)


(9)
Reporting the Results of the Research Study



Reporting the Results of the

Study



The SDCA Process



The Final Checklist for the Planning and Execution of
Business & I ndustrial Research Studies

Pre
-
requisites

Probability and Statistics

[Stat 2101]

Semester


Status of Course

Compulsory

Teaching & Learning
Methods

Lectures on
basic topics;

Group and I ndividual projects work on specific researches in
MU


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



86

I ndividual assignments on the various topics every two weeks
period;

Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading System

Evaluation system

-

Mid term written examination=%

-

Final project work=
%

-

Continuous assessment with assignments=%


Grading system

I f the class size is more than 30 students, the method of grading
will be statistical based on three parameters such as sample
mean (μ), standard deviation (σ) and total mark obtained (μ
i
).
Otherwi
se, the students will be evaluated on absolute grade
scales. The grading system includes the letter grades from A to
F and the equations used to grade a student statistically are


A
+
>μ+1.5* σ


μ+σ<
A

μ+1.5*σ


μ+0.5*σ<
B
+
≤ μ+σ


μ<
B
≤ μ+0.5*σ


μ
-
0.5*σ <
C
+
≤ μ


μ
-

σ<
C
≤ μ
-
0.5*σ


μ
-
2*σ<D≤ μ
-
σ


F≤μ
-
2*σ

The letter grades have upper and lower limits
.

Attendance
Requirements

75% of all the course sessions (lectures, tutorials, and
experiments)

Literature

William Trochim and james P. Donnelly,
The Research Methods
Knowledge Base
, 3
rd

ed., Atomic Dog Publishing, 2007.





Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



87

Course
Code

MEng 3122

Course

Title

I ntroduction to FEM

Degree Program

B. Eng in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Finite Element Method

Module Coordinator

Mechanical Engineering Department

Lecturer

NN

Course load

2 Cr. Hrs or 3 ECTS

Contact Hours
(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

1
+
3
+
0
+3

Course Objectives &

Competences to be
Acquired

Course Objectives

This course is intended to lay the foundation for



Sufficient knowledge of mathematical foundation of the
Finite Element Methods



Skill development in computer programs for solving
engineering problems using FEM



Skill in using commercial FEM packages to model and
solve practical mechanical engineering problems


Competences (Learning Outcomes)


Upon completion of the course, students would have



Sufficient knowledge of mathematical fo
undation of
Finite Element Methods



Skill in developing FEM computer programs for
engineering problems



Skill in using commercial FEM packages to model and
solve practical mechanical engineering problems


Course
Description/Course
Contents

1.


Introduction

2.

Weighted Residual Methods:
I ntegral Form Galerkin
Method, Least square method, etc.; Weak form;
I nterpolation Function; Variational Method: Properties
of a functional; Stationary principle; Variational FEM
Formulation.

3.

Direct approach to solution of one d
imensional
problem: B
ar element; pipe flow element.

4.

Analysis of Truss Structure by FEM:
Element matrix in
local coordinates; Coordinate transformation; Element
matrix in global coordinates; Assembly of element
matrices; I mposition of force and displacement

boundary conduction; Solution of system equations.

5.

Analysis of Beam Structures by FEM:
Element matrix of
abeam element; Assembly procedure; I mposition of
boundary conduction;

6.

Shape Function and Isoperimetric Element:
1D Linear
and quadratic Element
. Rect
angular Linear and
quadratic elements; Linear and quadratic triangular
Element

7.

Numerical Integration:
Transformation of integral from

Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



88

global to local coordinates. Jacobian Matrix, Gaussian
quadrature.

8.

Dynamic Analysis of a Beam by FEM:
Element Mass,
stiffn
ess matrices and load vectors; Assembly of
element matrix; Modal analysis; I mposition of boundary
conditions. Central difference, Newark and Humboldt
time stepping schemes for transient analysis
.

Pre
-
requisites

Probability and Statistics

[Stat 2101]

Sem
ester


Status of Course

Compulsory

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lectures,



Computational Exercises



Project


Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading System

Evaluation system

-

Exercises 20%

-

Project 30%

-

Final Examination

50%


Grading system

I f the class size is more than 30 students, the method of grading
will be statistical based on three parameters such as sample
mean (μ), standard deviation (σ) and total mark obtained (μ
i
).
Otherwise, the students will be evaluated on absolute grade
scales. The grading system includes the letter grades from A to
F and the equations used to grade a student statistically are


A
+
>μ+1.5* σ


μ+σ
<
A
≤ μ+1.5*σ


μ+0.5*σ<
B
+
≤ μ+σ


μ<
B
≤ μ+0.5*σ


μ
-
0.5*σ <
C
+
≤ μ


μ
-

σ<
C
≤ μ
-
0.5*σ


μ
-
2*σ<D≤ μ
-
σ


F≤μ
-
2*σ

The letter grades have upper and lower li
mits.

Attendance
Requirements

75% of all the course sessions (lectures, tutorials, and
experiments)

Literature

1.

Daryl L. Logan,
A First Course in the Finite Element Method,

Jul 25, 2006.

2.

O. C. Zienkiewicz and R. L. Taylor,
The Finite Element
Method Set,
Sixth Edition,

Sep 19, 2005.

3.

J. N. Reddy,
An Introduction to the Finite Element Method
(Mcgraw Hill Series in Mechanical Engineering),

Jan 11,
2005.

4.

Darrell W. Pepper and Juan C. Heinrich,

The Finite Element
Method: Basic Concepts and Applications (Serie
s in
Computational and Physical Processes in Mechanics and
Thermal Sciences),

Oct 31, 2005.





Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



89

Course
Code

Econ

1011

Course Title

I ntroduction to Economics

Degree Program

B.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Assessment Semester

Module Coordinator

NREM

Lecturer

N.N

Course load

3 Cr. Hrs or 4 ECTS

Contact Hours
(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

3+0+0
+3

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Course Objectives



To introduce the discipline concerned with the
economic aspects of engineering; it involves the

systematic evolution of the costs and benefits of
proposed technical projects.



To introduce students the principles and methodology
of engineering economy which is the integral part of
the daily management and operation of private
-
sector companies and cor
porations, regulated public
utilities, and nonprofit organizations



I t presents mathematical techniques and practical
advice for evaluating decisions in the design and
operation of engineering systems. These procedures
support both selection and justificati
on of design
alternatives, operating policies, and capital
expenditure.

Student Learning Outcome



Students completing this course will be able to
understand:



The concepts of interest and time value of money;
product/project costs and financial statements



How to evaluate engineering projects with economic
decisions using present worth, annual worth and rate
of return analyses.




The impact of depreciation and taxation on project
decisions




How to make financially prudent decisions in
everyday life (car/hom
e loans or investments)










1.

I NTRODUCTI ON TO ENGI NEERI NG ECONOMY



I ntroduction



Origins of engineering economy



Relation ship between engineering &
Management



What are the principles of engineering
economy

2.

COST CONCEPT AND ANALYSI S



I ntroduction


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



90

















Course
Description/Course
Contents



Cost terminology



Application of cost concept



The general economic environment



Steps in an engineering economic analysis

3.

PRI NCI PLES OF MONEY
-
TI ME RELATI ON SHI P



I ntroduct
ion



Why consider return to capital



Origins of interest



Simple interest



Compound interest



The concept of equivalency

4.

APPLI CATI ON OF MONEY
-
TI ME RELATI ONSHIP



I ntroduction



The present worth method



The future worth method



The annual worth method



The internal
rate of return method



The external rate of return method



The pay back period method

5.

DEPRECI ATI ON & DEPLETI ON



I ntroduction



What is depreciation



Definition of value



Actual depreciation revealed by time



Types of depreciation



Depletion

6.

ESTI MATI NG CASH FLOW



I ntroduction



Components of an integrated approach



The work break down structure technique



The cost and revenue structure



Estimating techniques



Developing cash flows

7.

I NFLATI ON & PRI CE CHANGE



General price inflation



Terminology and basic concept



Differential

price inflation

8.

DEALI NG WI TH UNCERTAI NTY



I ntroduction



What are Rick, uncertainty, & sensitivity



Sources of uncertainty



Common methods for dealing with uncertainty



Breakeven sensitivity



Sensitivity method



Spread sheet method

Prerequisite

None

Semester

Year I, Semester I

Status of Course

Service

Teaching & Learning


Lectures


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



91

Methods



Tutorials on lectures,



Personal study and Assignments

Assessment/Evaluation &
Grading System

Assessment:

Written Examination



Mid
-
term examination



Final examination

Continues assessments



Class activity



Assignments



Seminar presentation


Reference:

1.

Engineering Economy, Tenth edition, E. Paul DeGarmo,
William G. Sullivan, James A. Bontadelli, Elin M. Wicks

2.

Richard E. Carmichael,

Economics for Ever
yone: An
Introduction to Economics,

Sep 11, 2006.

3.

William D. Rohlf,
Introduction to Economic Reasoning (7th
Edition) (Addison
-
Wesley Series in Economics),

Feb 20,
2007

4.

Marc Lieberman and Robert E. Hall,
Introduction to
Economics (with InfoTrac ),

Mar 31,
2004







Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



92

Course
Code

Phil 1011

Course Title

I ntroduction to philosophy and reasoning skills (Logic)

Degree Program

B. Sc. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Common Courses

Module Coordinator

NN

Lecturer

NN

Course load

3 Cr. Hrs or 4 ECTS

Contact Hours
(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

3+0+0+3

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

The objective of the course is to help students

to grasp

Appreciation and understanding of formal reasoning
and its connection to informal reasoning so as to make
good decision.

Course
Description/Course
Contents

The course develops basic techniques of analysis and
understanding of the principles of and concepts
involved in clear thinking. Emphasis will be given on
logical validity, deductive and inductive reasonin
g,
fallacious arguments, symbolic logic, and scientific
method as applied to criteria of reasonable evidence.

Pre
-
requisites

None

Semester

Year I, Semester I

Status of Course

Common Course

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lectures supported by tutorials;



Class and group discussions



Student seminars and workshops

Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading System



Assignment:



Mid
-
semester Examination



Final Examination

Attendance
Requirements



Lecture attendance (80%)



Presentation (all)

Literature








Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



93

Course
Code

Civic 1011

Course Title

Civ
ics and Ethical Education

Degree Program

B. Sc. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Common Courses

Module Coordinator

NN

Lecturer

NN

Course Credit

3 Cr. Hrs or 4 ECTS

Contact Hours
(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

3+0+0+3

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

The objective of the course is to help students grasp their
role in society as good and fruitful citizens. To this end,
they will be introduced to concepts in



governance



citizenship



constitutionalism



human rights and the rule of law

Course
Description/Course
Contents

1.

I ntroduction

1.1

Purpose and goals of civic and ethical
education

1.2

I nterdisciplinary nature of the course

2.

Government

3.

Citizenship

4.

Constitutions and constitutionalism

5.

Democracy

6.

Human rights and rule of law

6.1

Human rights

6.2

Rule of law

Pre
-
requisites

None

Semester

Year I, Semester I

Status of Course

Common Course

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lectures supported by tutorials;



Class and
group discussions



Student seminars and workshops

Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading System



Assignment:



Mid
-
semester Examination



Final Examination

Attendance
Requirements



Lecture attendance (80%)



Presentation (all)

Literature









Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



94

Course
Code

Eng 1011

Course Title

I ntroduction to Engineering Discipline

Degree Program

B. Sc. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Assessment Semester

Module Coordinator

Faculty of Science and Technology

Lecturer

NN

Course load

P/F

Contact Hours

(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

1+0
+0+
0

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Course Objectives



To teach students gain a basic understanding of
technology and problem solving skills.



To enable students have a sound understanding
of mechanical
engineering fundamentals, and
then will have a conducive state of mind to
easily grasp the advanced mathematics and
engineering sciences, and will acquire
engineering problem solving



To improve students comfort level with
technology.



To enable students gai
n the knowledge of basic
tools



To remove mystery surrounding the technology
faced every day.



To examine basic technologies in simple terms.

Student Learning Outcome



Students gain a basic understanding of
technology and problem solving skills.



Graduates
will have a sound understanding of
mechanical engineering fundamentals, and it
will be easier to be trained in mathematics and
sciences, and acquire engineering problem
solving skills.

Course
Description/Course
Contents

1)

I ntroduction to basic Mechanical Sy
stems

1.1.

Levers and inclined planes

1.2.

gears, belts, pulleys, cams, wheels & axles

1.3.

screws, springs, rotating wheels, friction

2)

Buoyancy

3)

Flying

4)

Hydraulic power,

5)

Exploiting heat, nuclear energy

6)

Light & optics

7)

Sound & music

8)

Telecommunications, waves,

9)

Electricity, magnetism

10)

Sensors & Detectors


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



95

11)

I C engines

Pre
-
requisites

None

Semester

Year I, Semester

Status of Course

Compulsory

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lectures



Tutorials



Laboratory exercises



Case studies



Assignments


Assessment/Evaluation
&
Grading System

o

Written Examination



Mid
-
term examination



Final examination

o

Case study reports

o

Presentations

Attendance
Requirements



Lecture and tutorial attendance (at least 80% of the
classes should be attended)



Laboratory exercise reports (all should be
submitted)



Case study reports (all should be submitted)



Presentation (all should be attended)

Literature

1.

The Way Things Work, D. Macaulay, 1998, Houghton
Mifflin Co., Boston.

2.

Technology: Today and Tomorrow


J.F. Fales, V.F.

Kuetemeyer S.A.

Brusic, Glencoe/McGraw Hill,
5
th

Edition, Feb 12, 2003




Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



96

Course
Code

MEng 1072

Course Title

Engineering Drawing

Degree Program

B. Eng in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Basic Engineering I

Module Coordinator

-
NN
-

Lecturer

-
NN
-

Course Load

3 Cr. Hrs
or 5 ECTS

Contact Hours
(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

2+
3
+
0+6

Course Objectives &

Competences to be
Acquired

Course Objectives

Will enable students:



To develop the understanding of drawings,



To improve the concept of orthographic projects
etc., at the end of the
course they should be in a
position to understand the language of Engineers,
i.e., drawing.



To develop idea of preparation of various types of
drawing industrial sectors,



To expose students to actual technical drawing
techniques for variety of components
, so that they
understand any type of technical drawing in
practice.

Competences (Learning Outcomes)



I mproved sketching skills



Easily understanding of geometrical drawing



Prepare various types of drawings industrial sectors



Understand the language of dra
wing and use drawing
as a means of communication ideas



Prepare different drawings



Easily understand technical drawings



Will have one big Engineering concept

Course
Description/Course

Contents

1.

I ntroduction

1.1

I mportance of Engineering Drawing

1.2

Standard Paper
layout

1.3

Drawing instruments and their uses

1.4

Alphabets of lines

1.5

Technical Lettering

2.

Geometrical Constructions**

2.1 Lines and angles

2.2 Construction of Regular polygons

2.3 Construction of curves used in engineering practices


2.3.1. Simple curves and arcs


2.3.2. Conic Sections: Ellipse, parabola, hyperbola


2.3.3. Cycloid curves: cycloid, epicycloids, and
hypocycloid



2.3.4. I nvolutes: Archimedean spiral

3. Orthographic projection


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



97


3.1.
I ntroduction


3.2. Principles of Orthographic projection


3.3. Projection of points and lines


3.4. Projection of planes



3.4.1 Point projections on a plane


3.4.2 Edge view, True shape and True slope of a
plane



3.4.
3 Finding shortest distances



3.4.4 Piercing points


3.5. Projection of solids

4. Multi
-
view Representation





4.1. I ntroduction




4.2. First angle method of projection



4.2 Third angle method of projection

5. Auxiliary and Revolved views



5.1 Primary auxiliary views



5.2 Secondary auxiliary views



5.3 Revolved views

6. Pictorial Drawings



6.1 I ntroduction


6.2 axonometric projections


6.3 I sometric drawing


6.3 Oblique drawing

7. Sectioning


7.1 I ntroduction


7.2 Types of sectional views


7.2.1 Full Section


7.2.2 Offset Section


7.2.3 Half Section


7.2.4 Broken out section


7.2.5 Revolved Secti
on


7.2.6 Removed Section


7.2.7 Phantom Section


7.2.8

Auxiliary section



7.3 Techniques in Sectioning


8. Basic Dimensioning


8.1 General concepts on size and location dimensioning


8.2
Basic dimensioning practice


8.2.1 Dimension line


8.2.2 Extension line


8.2.3 Arrow heads


8.2.4 Leaders and pointers


8.2.5 Finish marks


8.3 Method of dimensioning


8.3.1 Aligned method


8.3.2 Unidirectional method

9 I ntersections and Developments


9.1 I ntroduction


9.2 Methods for finding the line of intersection


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



98


9.2.1

Element method


9.2.2 cutting plane method


9.2.3 Common sphere method


9.3 Common intersections


9.3.1 Cone and cylinder intersection


9.3.2 Right cone


vertical cylinder intersection



9.4 Development of cylinders


9.5 Development of T
-
pieces


9.5 Development of Pyramids


9.6 Development of cones


**
-
Since this chapter is giving steps for construction are given,
better given as a reading assignment with han
douts and work
more in the tutorial time

Pre
-
requisites

None

Semester

Year I, Semester I I

Status of Course

Compulsory

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lecture on each topic



Tutorials in the class: representative exercises will be
given for students and
each student will discuss with his
instructor and/or technical assistant to increase the
depth of understanding



Home exercises will be given for each student: these
exercises are aimed to be done by individual student
as home assignment.

Assessment/Evalu
ation
& Grading System



Class attendance and Activity: 10%



Sudden quizzes: 5%



I ndividual Assignment: 30%



Mid term examination: 20%



Final examination: 35%

Attendance
Requirements

At least

75% of the lecture class and

90% of the tutorial class should be
attanded

Literature



Frederick E. Gieseck,
Technical Drawing
,
J
ul 18, 2005



Warren J. Luzzader and Jon M. Duff,
Fundamentals of
Engineering Drawing
,

Prentice Hall, New Jersy, 11
th

ed,
1983



Cecil Jensen and Jay D. Helsel,
Engineering Drawing and
Design
, Glencoe/McGraw
-
Hill, New York, 5
th

ed, 1996



R.R Nair and TVG Setty,
Descri pti ve Geometry
, AAU, 1981



Engineering Drawing and Graphic Technology
-

Thomas
French, Charles Vierck, and Robert Foster, Jan, 1993.
(better text Not Available)



Modern Engi neering G
raphics and Desi gn
-

Voland

G.S.,

Dec 1999




Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



99

Course
Code

Geol 1042

Course Title

Environmental Science

Degree Program

B. Eng. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Basic Science

Module Coordinator

N.N.

Lecturer

NN

Course load

3

Cr. Hrs or 4 ECTS

Contact Hours

(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

3
+0+0
+3

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Course Objectives



To enable students to know their natural resources, their
ecosystem, the biodiversity and its conservation, the
causes of environmental pollution,
social issues and its
relation with the environment

Student Learning Outcome

At the end of this course Mechanical Engineering students will
able to:



Know their natural resources (renewable and non
renewable)



Know structure of ecosystem and the energy flow
of
ecosystem



Know biodiversity and its conservation



The causes of environmental pollution



Know the social issues and its relation with the
environment

Course
Description/Course
Contents

Unit 1: The Multidisciplinary nature of environmental studies

Defini
tion, scope and importance


Need for public awareness.

(
2 Lectures)

Unit 2: Natural Resources :

Renewable and non
-
renewable resources :

Natural resources and associated problems.



Forest

resources: Use and over
-
exploitation,
deforestation, case studies. Timber extraction, mining,
dams and their effects on forests and tribal people.



Water resources: Use and over
-
Utilization of surface and
ground water, floods, drought, conflicts and water,

dams
-
benefits and problems.



Mineral resources: Use and exploitation, environmental
effects of extracting and using mineral resources, case
studies.



Food resources: World food problems, changes caused
by agriculture and overgrazing, effects of modern
agric
ulture, fertilizer
-
pesticide problems, water logging,

Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



100

salinity, case studies.



Energy resources: Growing energy needs, renewable
and non renewable energy sources, use of alternate
energy sources. Case studies.



Land resources: Land as a resource, land degrad
ation,
man induced landslides, soil erosion and desertification.

o

Role of an individual in conservation of natural
resources.

o

Equitable use of resources for sustainable
lifestyles.

(6 lectures)

Unit 3: Ecosystems



Concept of an ecosystem.



Structure and funct
ion of an ecosystem.



Producers, consumers and decomposers.



Energy flow in the ecosystem.



Ecological succession.



Food chains, food webs and ecological pyramids.



I ntroduction, types, characteristic features, structure
and function of the following
ecosystem:
-

o

Forest ecosystem

o

Grassland ecosystem

o

Desert ecosystem

o

Aquatic ecosystems (ponds, streams, lakes, rivers,
oceans, estuaries)

(6 lectures)

Unit 4: Biodiversity and its conservation



I ntroduction


Definition: genetic, species and
ecosystem diversi
ty.



Biogeographically classification of Ethiopia



Value of biodiversity : consumptive use, productive use,
social, ethical, aesthetic and option values



Biodiversity at global, National and local levels.



Ethiopia as a mega
-
diversity nation



Hot
-
spots of biod
iversity.



Threats to biodiversity: habitat loass, poaching of
wildlife, man
-
wildlife conflicts.



Endangered and endemic species of Ethiopia



Conservation of biodiversity: I n
-
situ conservation of
biodiversity.

(6 Lectures)

Unit 5: Environmental Pollution

Definition

Causes, effects and control measures of :
-



Air pollution



Water pollution



Soil pollution



Marine pollution



Noise pollution


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



101



Thermal pollution



Nuclear hazards

Solid waste Management: Causes, effects and control
measures of urban and industrial wast
es.

Role of an individual in prevention of pollution.

Pollution case studies.

Disaster management: floods, earthquake, cyclone and
landslides.

(8 lectures)

Unit 6: Social Issues and the Environment



From Unsustainable to Sustainable development



Urban
problems related to energy



Water conservation, rain water harvesting, watershed
management



Resettlement and rehabilitation of people; its problems
and concerns. Case studies.



Environmental ethics: Issues and possible solutions.



Climate change, global warm
ing, acid rain, ozone
layer depletion, nuclear accidents and holocaust. Case
studies.



Wasteland reclamation.



Consumerism and waste products.



Environment Protection Act.



Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act.



Water (Prevention and control of Polluti
on) Act



Wildlife Protection Act



Forest Conservation Act



I ssues involved in enforcement of environmental
legislation.



Public awareness.

(7 lectures)

Unit 7: Human Population and the Environment



Population growth, variation among nations.



Population
explosion


Family Welfare Programme.



Environment and human health.



Role of I nformation Technology in Environment and
human health.



Case Studies.

(3 Lectures)

Unit 8: Field work

Visit to a local area to document environmental and river
forest grassland hil
l mountain.

Pre
-
requisites

None

Semester

Year I, Semester I I

Status of Course

Service

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lectures



Tutorials on lectures



Project



Field Visit


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



102



Personal study and assignments

Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading System

Assessment:

Written Examination



Mid
-
term examination 25%



Final examination 50%

Continues assessments



Class activity 5%



Assignments 5%



Surprising quiz 5%

Seminar presentation 5%

Laboratory and flied visit report 5%

Grading system:

The method of grading will be
statistical based on three
parameters such as sample mean (μ), standard deviation (σ)
and total mark obtained (μ
i
). Otherwise, the students will be
evaluated on absolute grade scales. The grading system
includes the letter grades from A to F and the equati
ons used
to grade a student statistically are


A
+
>μ+1.5* σ


μ+σ<
A
≤ μ+1.5*σ


μ+0.5*σ<
B
+
≤ μ+σ


μ<
B
≤ μ+0.5*σ


μ
-
0.5*σ <
C
+
≤ μ


μ
-

σ<
C

μ
-
0.5*σ


μ
-
2*
σ
<D≤
μ
-
σ


F≤μ
-
2*σ

The letter grades have upper and lower limits.

Attendance
Requirements



Lecture attendance 80%



Assignment Submission 100%



Laboratory Practice 100%



Surprising quiz 100%

Literature

1.

I an Strangeways,
Measuring the Natural Environment
,
2nd
Edition, Cambridge university Press, October 2003.

2.

Jefferson W. Tester
,
Elisabeth M. Drake
,
Michael J. Driscoll
,
Michael W. Golay

and
William A. Peters
,
Sustainable Energy
,
MI T Press, July 2005
.

3.

Vaclav Smil
,
Energy in Nature and Society
, January 2008
.




Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



103

Course
Code

Math

1031

Course Title

Applied mathematics I

Degree Program

B. Sc. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Engineering
math

Module Coordinator

NN

Lecturer

NN

Course load

4 Cr. Hrs or 6 ECTS

Contact Hours

(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

3+3+0+6

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

The objective of this course is

to

equip students with
basic mathematical techniques of
calculus and
computational mathematics and help them develop skill
build
-
up in mathematical analysis for solving engineering
problems

Course
Description/Course
Contents

Vectors and Vector Spaces; Matrices, Determinants and
Systems of Linear Equations; Lim
it and Continuity;
Derivatives; I ntegration; Real Sequences; I ntroduction
Numerical Methods

Pre
-
requisites

None

Semester

Year I, Semester I

Status of Course

Compulsory

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lectures supported by tutorials;



Assignments

Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading System



Assignment:



Mid
-
semester Examination



Final Examination

Attendance
Requirements



Lecture and Lab attendance (80%)



Presentation (all)

Literature

1.

Robert Ellis and Denny Gulick,
Calculus: With
Analytic Geometry
, ,

Nov 19, 1995.

2.

Ron Larson, Robert P. Hostetler, and Bruce H.
Edwards,
Calculus With Analytic Geometry
,
Jan
12, 2005.

3.

Harvey P Greenspan, H.
P.
Greenspan, and D.J.
Benney,
CALCULUS: An intro
duction to Applied
Mathematics
,

Jun 1, 1997.

4.

David Poole,
Linear Algebra: A Modern
Introduction (with CD
-
ROM),

Jan 24, 2005.

5.

Richard E. Johnson,

Johnson and Kiokemeister's
Calculus With Analytic Geometry
,
Jan 1978.

6.

David C. Lay,
Linear Algebra and Its
Applications, Third Updated Edition,

Aug 22,
2005.

7.

J.L. Morris,
Computational Methods in
Elementary Numerical Analysis
,

Jan 26, 1983.





Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



104

Course
Code

Math

1032

Course Title

Applied mathematics I I

Degree Program

B. Sc. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Engineering math

Module Coordinator

NN

Lecturer

NN

Course load

4 Cr. Hrs or 6 ECTS

Contact Hours

(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

3+3+0+6

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

The objective of this course is

to

equip students with
basic mathematical
techniques of calculus and
computational mathematics and help them develop skill
build
-
up in mathematical analysis for solving engineering
problems

Course
Description/Course
Contents

Series and Sequences, Power Series, Fourier Series,
Differential
Calculus of Functions of Several variables,
Multiple I ntegrals

Pre
-
requisites

Math 1031

Semester

Year I, Semester I I

Status of Course

Compulsory

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lectures supported by tutorials;



Assignments

Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading
System



Assignment:



Mid
-
semester Examination



Final Examination

Attendance
Requirements



Lecture and Lab attendance (80%)



Presentation (all)

Literature

8.

Robert Ellis and Denny Gulick,
Calculus: With
Analytic
Geometry
, ,

Nov 19, 1995.

9.

Ron Larson, Robert P. Hostetler, and Bruce H.
Edwards,
Calculus With Analytic Geometry
,
Jan
12, 2005.

10.

Harvey P Greenspan, H.P
.

Greenspan, and D.J.
Benney,
CALCULUS: An introduction to Applied
Mathematics
,

Jun 1, 1997.

11.

David Poo
le,
Linear Algebra: A Modern
Introduction (with CD
-
ROM),

Jan 24, 2005.

12.

Richard E. Johnson,

Johnson and Kiokemeister's
Calculus With Analytic Geometry
,
Jan 1978.

13.

David C. Lay,
Linear Algebra and Its
Applications, Third Updated Edition,

Aug 22,
2005.

14.

J.L. Morris,
Computational Methods in
Elementary Numerical Analysis
,

Jan 26, 1983.




Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



105

Course Number

Math

2031

Course Title

Applied mathematics I II

Degree Program

B. Sc. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Engineering math

Module Coordinator

NN

Lecturer

NN

Course load

4 Cr. Hrs or 6 ECTS

Contact Hours

(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

3+3+0+6

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

The objective of this course is

to

equip students with
basic mathematical techniques of calculus and
computational mathematics
and help them develop skill
build
-
up in mathematical analysis for solving physical
engineering problems

Course
Description/Course
Contents

Differential equation of the first order; Ordinary linear
differential equation of the

second order; Vector
differential calculus; Line and surface integrals; Complex
analytic functions; Complex integrals; Taylor and Laurent
series; I ntegration by the method of residue.

Pre
-
requisites

Math 1032

Semester

Year I I, Semester I

Status of Course

Compulsory

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lectures supported by tutorials;



Assignments

Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading System



Assignment:



Mid
-
semester Examination



Final Examination

Attendance
Requirements



Lecture and Lab
attendance (80%)



Presentation (all)

Literature



Erwin Kreyzig, Advanced Engineering Mathematics



R. V. Churchil, Complex Variables and Applications



R. Ellis: Calculus with Analytic Geometry



Harevery and Greenspan: an I ntroduction to Applied
mathematics
,
1997.



Serge Lang: Linear Algebra



J. Morris: Computational Methods in Elementary
Numerical Analysis
, 1983.







Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



106

Course
Code

MEng 3111

Course Title

Computer Programming for Engineers

Degree Program

B.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Computer
Application for Mechanical Engineers

Module Coordinator

N.N.

Lecturer

NN

Course load

2 Cr. Hrs or
3
ECTS

Contact Hours

(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

1+
1+2
+3

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Course Objectives

o

To introduce students to the types of
high and low level
programming languages and their difference

o

To help students have the basics of high level
programming skills, such as input and output, algorithms
and flowcharts

o

To make students acquaint with different types of
structures in programming

o

To familiarize students with the concept of dividing a
large task to small sub
-
tasks by programming

o

To introduce students to object oriented programming

o

To make students have the skill of programming so that
they can apply their knowledge on other courses

whenever necessary.

o

To help students have the knowledge of programming
which enables them to solve problems, especially
related to the field of Mechanical Engineering.

o

To make students understand the basic principles of
programming so that they can easily

understand other
high level programming languages and use them
whenever necessary.

o

To help students solve tiresome and time
-
consuming
practical engineering problems in less time and effort
using the skill of programming.

o

To increase the habit of developin
g softwares to save
time and money.

Student Learning Outcome

o

Understanding of the principles of programming which is
useful to understand how various softwares work

o

Solving engineering problems with the help of a
programming skill

o

Understanding other cours
es better

o

Learning how to apply the knowledge of programming

Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



107

to practical problems relevant to the field of study

o

Being able to simplify a big and tiresome task within less
time and effort

o

Students will have the basics of object oriented
programming which
, by additional reference, helps
them to develop their own software for solving their
particular problem at hand which may be difficult to
solve by any of the softwares available

o

After taking the course, students are expected to
change their approach to so
lving problems, from the
programming point of view

Course
Description/Course
Contents

1.

I ntroduction

1.1

History

1.2

High and low level languages

1.3

Definitions of terms

1.4

Low and High level languages

1.5

Why Programming?

1.6

Flow charts and algorithms

1.7

Program errors (Syntax
and Logical errors)

1.8

Compiling and linking program codes

2.

Basics

2.1 Structures of a program

2.2 Variables, Data types and constants

2.3 Operators


2.3.1 Arithmetic operators


2.3.2 Assignment operator


2.3.3 Logic operators


2.3.4 R
elational operators


2.3.5 Compound operators

2.4 I nput and output

3.

Conditional Structures

3.1 if else structure

3.2 switch structures and enumerated constants

4.

Repetitive Structures

4.1 loop structures

5.

Functions

5.1 What is a function?

5.2 Declaring
and defining functions

5.3 Local and global variables

5.4 Passing by value and by reference

5.4 I nline and recursive functions

6.

Arrays and strings

6.1 I nitializing arrays

6.2 One dimensional arrays

6.3 Two dimensional arrays

6.4 Strings

7.

Structures


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



108

8.

Pointers,

Streams and files

9.

Objects and classes, introduction to object oriented
programming


C# is strongly recommended. However, the course can also be
given by C++ or another programming language, which is up
-
to
-
date and is better in many ways than the above two
.

Pre
-
requisites

None

Semester

Year I II, Semester I

Status of Course

Compulsory

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lectures (24 hrs)



Tutorials on lectures (8hrs)



lab exercises (48hrs)



Project (Different projects focusing on courses students have
already taken

or are taking will be given which help students
develop a program to apply their skill of programming)



Personal study and assignments

Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading System

Assessment:

Written Examination



Mid
-
term examination 20%



Final examination 40%

Continuous assessments



Attendance 5%



Assignments 15%

Project 20%



Grading system:

The method of grading will be statistical based on three
parameters such as sample mean (μ), standard deviation (σ)
and total mark obtained (μ
i
). Otherwise, the studen
ts will be
evaluated on absolute grade scales. The grading system
includes the letter grades from A to F and the equations used
to grade a student statistically are


A
+
>μ+1.5* σ


μ+σ<
A
≤ μ+1.5*σ



μ+0.5*σ<
B
+
≤ μ+σ


μ<
B
≤ μ+0.5*σ


μ
-
0.5*σ <
C
+
≤ μ


μ
-

σ<
C
≤ μ
-
0.5*σ


μ
-
2*
σ
<D≤
μ
-
σ


F≤
μ
-
2*
σ

The letter grades have upper and lower limits.

Attendance
Requirements



Lecture attendance 80%



Assignment Submission 100%



Laboratory Practice 100%

Literature

1.

Avinash Kak
,
Programming with Objects: A Comparative
Presentation of Object Oriented Programming with C++

Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



109

and Java
,

Mar 21, 2003
.

2.

Frank L. Friedman and
Elliot B. Koffman,

Problem Solving,
Abstraction and Design Using

C++, Visual C++.NET Edition
,

Aug 29, 2003.

3.

Lafore, R,
Object
-
Oriented Programming in C++,

3rd ed.,
2001

4.

Cohoon, J.P. and Davidson, J.W,
C++ Program Design: an
Introduction to Programming and

Object
-
Oriented Design
,
2nd ed., 1999






Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



110

Course
Code

MEng 3112

Course Title

Computational Methods
for
Engineers

Degree Program

B.Eng. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Computer Applications for Mechanical Engineers

Module Coordinator

N.N.

Lecturer

NN

Course load

3 Cr. Hrs or 4 ECTS

Contact Hours

(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

2+1
+
2+3

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Course Objectives

The purpose of this course

is

o

Give an insight of the MATLAB toolboxes

o

Understand how to deal with matrices in
Mat Lab

o

Know the means of plotting different types of graphs

o

Learn I nterpolation and curve fitting in Mat Lab

o

To make students work with MATLAB to solve engineering
problems

o

To teach students SI MULINK for modelling and simulation
of systems

o

To apply the k
nowledge of MATLAB and SI MULINK by
project assignments from relevant courses like control
engineering, etc.

o

To introduce students to numerical modeling and its role
in engineering problem solving



Student Learning Outcome


Upon completion of the course,
students will be able to:


o

understand how to solve equations with MATLAB


and show the solutions graphically

o

Students use calculus and differential equations
together with the concepts of basic engineering courses
to set up applied mechanical
engineering problems for
the solution by numerical methods.

o

Through assigned homework and projects, students
learn to formulate and solve numerical problems of
interest from various areas of mechanical engineering.

o

With the development of fast, efficient
computers, the
role of numerical methods in mechanical engineering
problem solving has been increased dramatically in
recent years. Students will then be able to solve
problems in vibration analysis, automobile design, solid
mechanics, and other applicatio
ns.

o

Students will be able to solve problems associated with
the field of mechanical engineering.

o

By the help of SI MULINK students will simulate the

Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



111

solutions of the problems.

Course
Description/Course
Contents


Part I: Computational Methods

1.

I ntroduction

2.

Arrays and Matrices

2.1

Transpose of a matrix

2.2

Operators and Variables

2.3

Functions and constants

2.4

Expressions

2.5

Generating matrices

2.6

Vector Multiplications

2.7

I nverse of a matrix

3.

M
-
File functions and Decision Making

4.

Graphics

4.1.1

Using the plot command

4.1.2

Line sty
les, Markers, and colours

4.1.3

Adding Grids and Labels

4.1.4

Customizing Axes

4.1.5

Printing figures

4.1.6

Manipulating plot

5.

Roots of equations

6.

System of Algebraic equations

7.

Curve Fitting and I nterpolation

8.

Numerical I ntegration and Differentiation

9.

Ordinary and Partial Differenti
al Equations

10.

SI MULINK



Note: I t is recommended that the students be made to work
the computational methods using MATLAB throughout the
course so that it will be able to develop the skill.


Pre
-
requisites

MEng 3111, Math 2031

Semester

Year I II, Semester

I

Status of Course

Compulsory

Teaching & Learning
Methods



Lectures



Tutorials on lectures



Lab exercises



Project



Personal study and assignments

Assessment/Evaluation
& Grading System

Assessment:

Written Examination



Mid
-
term examination



Final examination

Continuous assessments



Attendance



Assignments

Project


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



112



Grading system:

The method of grading will be statistical based on three
parameters such as sample mean (μ), standard deviation (σ)
and total mark obtained (μ
i
). Otherwise, t
he students will be
evaluated on absolute grade scales. The grading system
includes the letter grades from A to F and the equations used
to grade a student statistically are


A
+
>μ+1.5* σ


μ+σ<
A
≤ μ+1.5*σ


μ+0.5*σ<
B
+
≤ μ+σ


μ<
B
≤ μ+0.5*σ


μ
-
0.5*σ <
C
+
≤ μ


μ
-

σ<
C
≤ μ
-
0.5*σ


μ
-
2*σ<D≤ μ
-
σ


F≤μ
-
2*σ

The letter grades have upper and lower limits.

Attendance
Requirements



Lecture attendance



Assignment Submission




Laboratory Practice

Literature

1.

Steven C. Chapra and Raymond P. Canale,
Numerical
Methods for Engineers
,

Sep 1, 2005.

2.

Curtis F. Gerald and Patrick O. Wheatley,
Applied
Numerical Analysis
,
Jul 31, 2003.

3.

Ralston, Antony,
A first course in numerical analysis
(2
nd

Edition), Feb 6, 2001

4.

Yogesh Jaluria,
Computer Methods For Engineering
(Series in Computional and Physical Processes in
Mechanics and Thermal Sciences)
,

Dec 1, 1995.

5.

King J.T,
Introduction to Numerical Computation,

Jun
1984.






Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



113

Course
Code

MEng

3141

Course Title

Measurement and I nstrumentation Systems

Degree Program

B. Sc. in Mechanical Engineering

Module

Electro
-

Mechanical Module II

Module Coordinator

Mechanical
Engineering Department

Lecturer

NN

Course load

3 Cr. Hrs or
4

ECTS

Contact Hours

(Lec+Tut+lab+home)

2+
1+
2+
3

Course Objectives &
Competences to be
Acquired

Justification

Measurement procedure is an indispensable component
of engineering, from the inception of new ideas
(experiment), through the whole manufacturing process
(prototype testing, quality control) to the final product
delivery. Today's emphasis on low
-
fault and
low
-
maintenance production and products calls for better,
faster and more reliable measurements, while rapid
development in measurement and computer
technology provides numerous versatile and robust
devices that can meet the new precision demands.
Faced wi
th such a variety of items an engineer needs to
make judicious choices and to be able to balance
(often hyped
-
up) manufacturer info and the reality of
device limitations.

A course in Measurement Systems and instrumentation,
including coverage of performan
ce characteristics of
sensors, calibration standards, measuring devices, and
digital data logging and processing will be the remedy
for engineers to be in the rescue side of the research
institutes and I ndustrial demand on measurements.



At the end of th
is course, students will
:



Gain appreciation for measurement concepts and
principles.



Become familiar

with different types of
measurement systems /devices for engineering
measurements,



Understand the general context in which
measurement plays a role.



Gain hands
-
on skills in engineering measurements
and interpretation of results



Understand data acquisition systems, experiment
planning and sensor calibration



Understand general transducer/sensor design and
performance issues.



Learn different types of mea
suring instruments



Learn how to do a simple uncertainty analysis,



Understand dynamic properties of systems and
signals,


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



114



Learn how to use experimental methods for
engineering problem solving



Develop an understanding of the principles of
operation, calibrat
ion and use of different types of
instruments



Learn computerized experimental environment
based on Dasylab/Labview



Apply the conceptualization, planning, execution,
data acquisition, analysis, interpretation,
conclusion and reporting steps to obtain useful

insight into the engineering process at hand.



Describe the operation of measurement system of
physical quantities



Select and assemble the components of basic
analog and digital instrumentations



Know instrumentations design, selection,
calibration



Apply t
heoretical analysis of time
-
varying signals to
selection of signal conditioning components



Digital
-
Analog signal interfacing

Course
Description/Course
Contents

1.

I ntroduction and common measurement equipments

1.1.

Mechanical Measuring equipments

1.2.

Standards and
Measurement principles

1.3.

Techniques for measuring quantities

1.4.

I nstrument design and selection,

2.

Sensor and Transducers

2.1.

Displacement , position and proximity sensors

2.2.

Velocity and Motion Sensors

2.3.

Force and pressure Sensors

2.4.

flow Sensors

2.5.

Light Sensors

2.6.

Smart s
ensors and Mechatronics

2.7.

Sensor Calibration

2.8.

Measurement system design

3.

Signal conditioning Design

3.1.

Types of Amplifiers

3.2.

Op amps

3.3.

Filters and signal protection

3.4.

Data logging and Data acquisition

3.5.

Selection and specification of Signal
Conditioning

4.

Digital and

analog instrumentations processes

4.1

Digital Signals

4.2

Analogue to digital converters (ADC)

4.3

Digital to analog converters

5.

I nterfacing instrumentations

6.

Data Presentation systems (Analog and Digital)

7.

Measurement Data Analysis and Reporting

8.

Uncertainty
(Error) in Measurements


Curriculum for Regular Program for the Degree of Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Mechanical Engineering



115

8.1.

Standard Error Definitions

8.2.

Error Propagation

9.

Experimental Planning

10.

I nstallation and Diagnostic of Measurement
instrument

11.

Online and Offline Measurement Methods

12.

Computer
-
based measurement systems

12.1.

DasyLab / Labview Training

Pre
-
requisites

EEng 2131

Semester

Year I II, Semester I

Status of Course

Compulsory

Teaching & Learning