AP Physics B /ECE

bistredingdongMechanics

Oct 31, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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AP Physics B
/ECE





School code: 070756


Course Overview



The AP class has run since it was first offered in 1994 and has evolved to include covering AP C topics
and as of the fall of 2005 part of the University of Connecticut Early College Experience.

Classes meet
for forty two minutes, eight times a week for the entire school year. Students who elect to register for
the UCONN ECE program can receive credit from the University of Connecticut

for Physics
12
0
1
Q
and
12
0
2
Q
. The AP/UCONN ECE course is desig
ned as a second year course and virtually all the
students enrolled have already taken Honors Physics. The UCONN syllabus and the AP B syllabus are
very similar. Topics that are UCONN ECE specific are covered after the AP exam. Although this
course is offi
cially considered a non

calculus course many of the concepts are presented using calculus.
In Mechanics almost all of the AP C topics are covered. Each year a few students elect to take the AP
Physics C exam instead of the B exam. Students that elect to ta
ke either or both AP C exams must have

taken AP Calculus AB, and most concurrently take Calculus BC. The Calculus teacher includes the
solution of differential equations and other Physics C specific math in Calculus class. Students interested
in taking the

E&M exam are given independent assignments to fill in the few gaps in the curriculum.
Students have been very successful with this arrangement with everyone having received a 3 or better
on the AP C Mechanics and or E&M exam.


The syllabus that we use for

the course is based on the 38 page course objectives from The Teacher’s
Guide to Advanced Placement Courses in Physics by Naomi Martin which was issued by the College
Board in the 1980’s. The syllabus has been modified to reflect the most recent course de
scription
including a new unit on Fluids and changes in Special Relativity.


Homework is assigned almost every night. Homework problems are taken from the text book along
with past AP Physics B and C released exam questions. Test questions are normally pas
t AP C and B
released free response questions. Released AP multiple choice questions ( B&C ) are included as part
of review assignments prior to the AP exams.


The objective of the course is to have students develop skills and intuition to be able to under
stand
physics problems, and along with mathematical reasoning, to be able to solve college level physics
problems. The lab experiments parallel and support the core concepts of the course curriculum. The lab
component is intended to provide students with t
he analytical skills required for the analysis of physical
phenomenon.



The course is focused on developing conceptual understanding and intuition about the physical world.
As the course progresses through the year multi
-
conceptual problems are the norm.



All homework is reviewed the next day. Labs are done at a time to best reinforce the relationships and
concepts currently being studied. Informal assessment of understanding is done on a daily basis.
Throughout the course, emphasis is placed on the conc
epts and method of solution or analysis, and less
on the actual final product or answer.



Textbook



Primary textbook:

Serway/Faughn (2006). College Physics, 7th ed. 10 Davis Drive, Belmont, CA.: Thomson
Brooks/Cole. ISBN 0
-
534
-
99723
-
6


Reference

textbook:

Serway/Jewett (2004). College Physics, 6th ed. 10 Davis Drive, Belmont, CA.: Thomson
Brooks/Cole. ISBN 0
-
534
-
40842
-
7



Course Outline

* Indicates AP C topic which is included in the course but requires additional
independent study if the s
tudent is to take the AP C exam.


I
NTRODUCTION


week
)






A. Data collection and analysis





I. NEWTONIAN MECHANICS


Kinematics







(2 weeks)



A. Motion in One Dimension




1. Position
-
time, velocity
-
time, and acceleration
-
time graphs




2. Equations of motion under constant acceleration



3. Free fall



B. Motion in Two Dimensions

1. Projectiles



2. Vector addition





a. Graphical methods





b. Algebraic methods


Newton’s Laws






(1.5 weeks)



A. Static Equilibrium (First La
w)




1. First Condition


translational equilibrium




2. Second Condition


rotational equilibrium (torque)



B. Dynamics of a Single Body (Second Law)



C. Systems of Two or More Bodies (Third Law)



D. Applications




1. Inclined planes




2
. Atwood’s machines and their modifications




3. Static and kinetic friction





Work, and Energy





(1.5 weeks)



A. Work and Work
-
Kinetic Energy Theorem

B Conservative Forces and Potential Energy




1. Gravity




2. Springs



C. Conservation o
f Mechanical Energy

D. Power




Systems of particles, Linear momentum



(1.5 weeks)



A. Impulse = change in momentum


B. Center of mass



C. Conservation of Linear Momentum and Collisions





1. Inelastic and perfectly elastic collisions





2. T
wo
-
dimensional collisions



D. Conservation of Angular Momentum (for a point mass)


Circular Motion and Gravity




( 1.5 weeks )

A.

Centripetal acceleration



B. Gravitation

C.

Applications

1.

Keplers Laws

2. Horizontal and vertical circles

3.

Planetary motion

Rotation







( 2 weeks )

A.

Rotational Kinematics

1. Angular and linear quantities

B. Rotational Dynamics



1. Torque and angular acceleration



2. Moment of inertia



3. Conservation of energy with rotational motion



4. Conservation of angular momentum

Waves







( 1 week )

A. Description and characteristics of waves



B. Standing waves and harmonics





1. Waves on a string





2. Waves in a tube (open and closed)




3. The Doppler Effect (in one dimension)




4. Sound intensity, power and relati
ve sound intensity

Simple Harmonic Motion





( 1.5 weeks )



A. Period of Springs and Pendulums



B. Energy and SHM


C. Acceleration and velocity as function of displacement


D. Position, velocity, and acceleration as function of time


Fluid Mechanic
s






(2 weeks)



A. Density and pressure




1. Density and specific gravity




2. Pressure as a function of depth




3. Pascal’s Law




B. Buoyancy


Archimedes’ Principle




C. Fluid flow continuity




D. Bernoulli's equat
ion




E. Applications in fluid mechanics



Thermal Physics






(3 weeks)

A. Temperature and Thermal Effects




1. Mechanical equivalent of heat




2. Heat transfer and thermal expansion






a. linear expansion of solids





b. volume
expansion of solids and liquids




3. Calorimetry


B. Kinetic Theory, Ideal Gases & Gas Laws


C. Thermodynamics




1. Processes and PV diagrams





a. isothermal





b. isobaric





c. isometric





d. adiabatic





e. cyclic




2
. First Law of Thermodynamics





a. Internal energy






b. Energy conservation





c. Molar heat capacity of a gas




3. Second Law of Thermodynamics





a. Directions of processes





b. Entropy




4. Heat Engines and Refrigerators


Semester II




E
LECTRICITY
&

M
AGNETISM

Electrostatics






(3 weeks)

A. Coulomb’s Law



B. Electric Fields and Gauss’ Law*



C. Electric Potential Energy and Electric Potential


E. Capacitance




1. Graphical description of capacitance





a. area


charge stored




2. Capacitors in series and parallel


D. Applications




1. Point charge distributions




2. Parallel plates




3. Cathode ray tubes




4. Millikan Oil Drop Experiment


Current Electricity





(2.5 weeks)



A
.

Electric Circuits




1. Emf sources, Current, Resistance and Power





2. DC circuits





a. Series and parallel circuits





b. Batteries and internal resistance





c. Ohm’s Law and Kirchhoff’s rules






d. Voltmeters and ammeters






e.

Capacitors in circuits (RC circuits)





3. Applications


Electromagnetism






( 3.5 weeks)


A. Magnetostatics

1.

Force of a magnetic field on a moving charge

2.

Force of a magnetic field on a current carrying wire

3.

Torque on a current carrying loop

4.

Mag
netic fields due to straight and coiled wires

5.

Ampere’s Law

*

B. Electromagnetic Induction

1.

Magnetic flux

2.

Faraday’s Law

3.

Lenz’s Law

4.

Inductance

*

C. Applications

1.

Mass spectrometers

2.

Motors

3.

Generators



OPTICS







( 2.5 weeks )



A. Geometric Opt
ics




1. Reflection, Refraction and Snell’s Law





a. Reflection and refraction at a plane surface





b. Total internal reflection




2. Images formed by mirrors




3. Images formed by lenses




4. Ray Diagrams and the thin lens/mirror equa
tion




B. Physical Optics




1. The electromagnetic spectrum




2. Interference and path difference




3. Interference effects





a. Single slit





b. Double slit





c. Diffraction grating





d. Thin film



Modern Physics






(2.5

weeks)



A. Atomic Physics and Quantum Effects




1. Photons and the Photoelectric effect




2. X
-
ray production




3. Electron energy levels




4. Compton scattering




5. Wave nature of matter



B. Nuclear Physics




1. Atomic mass, mass
number, atomic number




2. Mass defect and nuclear binding energy




3. Nuclear processes






a. modes of radioactive decay (
α
,
β
,
γ
)






b. fission






c. fusion




4. Mass
-
Energy Equivalence and Conservation of Mass and Energy



Labs



Because virtually all of the students in the AP course have taken Honors Physics, a point is made to not
repeat lab experiments that

students have already completed and understand. Labs are generally open
-
ended. Students are given an objective or task, and they work as a group to complete the task or goal.
The use of the scientific method is often incorporated in the lab design. Ultima
tely most of the lab
experimental designs lead to the collection of data

which is analyzed through graphical methods. Many
labs include the use of Pasco hardware and software or Calculator Based Lab modules with TI graphing
calculators to collect and analy
ze data. Most labs use more traditional methods of collecting and analyzing
data. Students work in groups during labs, but each student must submit their own lab report. Group
projects require only one lab report submission per group, but require a presen
tation to the class. Students
keep their lab reports in case the college of their choice requires evidence prior to awarding college credit
for physics.



Lab List




Study area

Specific Topic

Lab Title

Type

Time(min

1


Measurement

Measurement and Analy
sis

Hands on

60

2

Mechanics

Kinematics

The Great Graphing Race

Hands on

90

3

Mechanics

Dynamics

The Atwood Machine

Hands on

90

4

Mechanics

Circular motion

Centripetal Force

Hands on

60

5

Mechanics

Energy

Changes in Potential Energy

Hands on

60

6

Mecha
nics

Energy

Conservation of energy with a projectile

Hands on

60

7

Mechanics

Momentum

Impulse = change in momentum

Hands on

60

8

Mechanics

Momentum

Conservation of momentum in two dimensions

Hands on

60

9

Mechanics

Rotation

Moment of Inertia

Hands on

90

10

Fluids

Fluid static’s

Archimedes’ Principle

ean摳





jechanics

Static’s

b煵ili扲ium ⁡⁲igi搠扯摹

ean摳





jechanics

pej

pim灬e⁈arm潮ic⁍潴i潮

ean摳





jechanics


mr潪ectile⁌auncher⁐r潪ect

ean摳

ㄲN



bCj

blectr潳tatics

The⁅lectric⁆ield

ean摳





bCj

Ca灡citance

Ca灡citance

ean摳





bCj

aC⁣ircuits

blectric⁣ircuits

ean摳





bCj

aC⁣ircuits

The⁗heatst潮e⁂ri摧e⁡n搠d灥cific⁒esistance

ean摳





bCj

aC⁃ircuits

s潬tmeter⁡n搠dmmeter⁤ sign

eand
s





bCj

jagnetism

jagnetic⁆iel搠dr潵n搠d⁃潩l

ean摳





bCj

jagnetism

jass ⁡n⁅lectr潮
Tuning⁅yeF

ean摳





l灴ics

ienses

C潭扩nati潮 ⁌enses

ean摳





taves

fnterference

a潵扬e
-
slit⁉nterference

ean摳





j潤orn

bne
rgyevels

p灥ctral

ean摳





clui摳

clui搠dynamics

iaminar⁆lui搠dl潷⁡n搠摲ag⁦潲ce

ean摳



25

Fluids

Fluid Dynamics

Turbulent Fluid Flow and drag force

Hands on

45