BIOLOGY 409: GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY - Winona State University

bewilderedvoyageBiotechnology

Dec 12, 2012 (4 years and 10 months ago)

234 views

Copyright to Dr. N. Aulik


BIOLOGY 409: GENERAL MICROBIOLOGY

Fall 2010



Instructor
:


Dr. Nicole A. Aulik (Lecture and Laboratory)


Office Hours
:

Mon. 1
-
4, Weds. 8
-
12
, and Fri. 9
-
12
-

Please sign up for a time!




248 Pasteur Hall; 507
-
457
-
5277




E
-
mail: naulik@winona.edu


Lectures
:


T & Th 9:30 AM
-

10:50 AM, PA229


Labs
:



Section 01 T & Th 12:00 PM
-

1:50 PM, SLC 268




Section 02 T & Th 2:00 PM
-

3:50 PM, SLC 268


Text
:



Alcamo’s Fundamentals of Microbiology
by Jeffrey C. Pommerville,


9
th

Edition, 2011.


Online

Inform
ation:
Can be found on D2L.winona.edu


E
-
mail:


Emails will be sent to your winona.edu email only.


Lab Manual
:


Benson’s
Microbiological Applications
by Harold J.

Benson, 11
th

Edition, 2011.






Prerequisites
:

Biology 308, 310 and Chemistry 340 (or Chemistry 350 & 351) or




permission from instructor.


Course Description
:

The major objective of this course is to introduce the student to world of microorganisms including
bacteria, viruses,

protozoans, and fungi. This course is designed to broadly cover several different
microorganisms that are not only cause disease in humans, but are also found in other niches or are
beneficial to the host. Several subjects will be covered included: the d
evelopment of microbiology as
a science, the biochemical and physiological processes of microorganisms, microbial genetics,
microbial ecology, food and industrial microbiology, microbial taxonomy, and pathogenic
microbiology, and an introduction to immunol
ogy. There is an emphasis on microorganisms that are
pathogenic to humans or other mammals. However, the major focus of this course is the biology of
microorganisms, not the biology of humans, therefore the causative agents of disease will be
stressed, n
ot the organ systems that these agents affect.


The laboratory section will cover several different microbiology techniques that are used in practice.
Standard microbiology microscopic evaluations, staining, and culture methods will be examined.
Differen
t growth conditions will be examined for their effects on microbe proliferation. Students will
also be asked to isolate and identify an unknown bacterium.



Instructor’s expectations
:

Prior to each lecture, it is preferred that the student reads the requ
ired text for that lecture. Adequate
preparation for both lecture and laboratory cannot be overstressed. Details discussed in lectures can
neither be appreciated nor remembered if a student has not first studied the topic. The laboratory
Copyright to Dr. N. Aulik


exercises canno
t be completed or understood without diligent preparation. For some laboratories, it
will be expected that the student has reviewed the material. Quizzes in the lecture and laboratory
sections will be used to assess students’ understanding of the materia
l.


Student Learning Outcomes:



At the end of this course, a student should be able to
identify several pathogens

and be able
to classify them as bacterial, viral, fungal, or protozoan.



Student should
understand basic culture techniques

and be able to ident
ify simple
biochemical tests used in this course.



Students should be able to
work easily in a microbiology laboratory

using aseptic
techniques and without contamination.



Students should be able to
identify disease states caused by the pathogens

described i
n
class.



Students should be able to
communicate with others in the field of microbiology

using
terminology related to the field.



Students are required to
present microbiological findings using PowerPoint
. Similarly,
students should be at easy with PowerPo
int presentations.



Students should be able to
critic microbiological presentations and publications
.



Students should be able to
identify bacteria using simple biochemical tests

described
during class.


Attendance Policy
:

a.

Attendance at is not mandatory, but

is expected and highly recommended. Participating in
lecture gives the student an opportunity to ask questions or discuss relevant, interesting topics.

b.

Attendance of the laboratory is required, makeup laboratories will not be available!

c.

POP LAB QUIZZES

WILL BE GIVEN AT THE BEGINNING OF
LECTURE

SESSION, SO BE
ON TIME. IF YOU ARE LATE YOU WILL HAVE AS LONG AS THE OTHER STUDENTS TO
FINISH YOUR QUIZ.

A quiz will be given at the beginning of 10 laboratories (indicated on the
syllabus), and will focus on material covered during the previous lab session with emphasis on
the pre
-
lab lecture and reading material from the laboratory manual. The student is

allowed to
drop the lowest two quizzes.

d.

QUIZZES IN
LEBORATORY

WILL BE GIVEN AS SCHEDULED.

As described above, 10
quizzes will be given and the lowest two will be dropped.


Examinations
:

Exams will be given as scheduled. Exams will be rescheduled only due to major impediments.
There will be four hourly exams and a comprehensive final (100 points each). The exam format
will be short answer, essay, fill
-
in
-
the
-
blank, and matching. In add
ition to the correct concept and
organization of ideas, grammar and spelling will be important in answering the essay, short
answer, and fill
-
in
-
the
-
blank questions. Spelling of microorganisms is key and the correct spelling
is required within one letter
change.



Oral flag requirement for University Studies


University Studies oral flag has 6 goals. These goals are encompassed in requirements or learning
activities that promote students’ abilities to:


1.

earn significant course credit through extemporan
eous presentations.

Copyright to Dr. N. Aulik


2.

understand the features and types of speaking in their disciplines.

3.

adapt their speaking to field
-
specific audiences.

4.

receive appropriate feedback from teachers and peers, including suggestions for
improvement.

5.

make use of the tec
hnologies used for research and speaking in their fields.

6.

learn the conventions of evidence, format, usage and documentation in their fields.


These goals will be fulfilled the following ways:


1.

Each student will be required to present a detailed descriptio
n of a microorganism of medical
importance. The student will be required to use Power Point, and will cover all the current
information that is known about that pathogen. This presentation will be worth 100 points and
will be evaluated by the instructor.

a.

Similarly, during presentations, students are required to attend lectures and critic a
peer’s presentation. A discussion on the topic presented by the student also factors into
these points. Evaluations of the presentations are worth 50 points.

Critics

from peers
will not be counted toward the presenter’s grade, but rather the points are
awarded for critical comments both written and verbal.

2.

Each student will do a textbook chapter group presentation with 2
-
3 other students. This
presentation will be wh
ere the group will teach other students in the course some of the
material from one of the text chapter specifically dealing with microbial diseases. This
presentation will be worth 100 points.


Grading System
:

The final grade will reflect an assessment o
f performance and accomplishment in both lecture and
laboratory portions of the course as follows:


Participation







100 points

Lecture Exam #1 (September 16
th
)




100 points

Lecture Exam #2 (October 14
th
)




100 points

Lecture Exam #3 (November 11
th
)




100 points

Lecture
Final
Exam #4 (December 2
nd
)



100 points

Chapter Presentation






100 points

Powerpoint Presentation





100 points

Discussion of student presentation




50 points

Lecture
Quizzes

(8 x 10 points each)




80 points

Laboratory Repo
rts






100 points

Lab Quizzes (8 X 10 points)






80 points

Lab Final Practical







50 points

Written Laboratory Final






50 points










1110 points


LATE LABORATORY REPORTS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED!


In general, grades will be given as 1110


999 p
oints (90


100%) =
A,
998


888 points (80


90%) =
B,
887


777 points (70


80%) =
C,
776


666 points (60

70%) =
D,
and 665


0 points
(


60%) =
F.



Copyright to Dr. N. Aulik


Academic integrity:
Cheating of any form or seeking or assisting cheating will not be tolerated. An
“F” will be given to those students caught cheating and WSU will be informed of the misconduct. If
you feel that you are behind, please see the instructor. However, collabor
ation on assignments both
inside and outside of the class/laboratory is encouraged.


Outline of the major topics to be covered in lecture
:

I.

Foundations of Microbiology

A.

The Development of Microbiology

B.

Basic Concepts of Microbiology

II.

The Bacteria

A.

Bacterial
Structure & Growth

B.

Bacterial Genetics

III.

Control of Microorganisms

A.

Physical Control of Microorganisms

B.

Chemical Control of Microorganisms

C.

Chemotherapeutic Agents & Antibiotics

IV.

Bacterial Diseases of Humans

A.

Airborne Bacterial Diseases

B.

Foodborne & Waterborne Bact
erial Diseases

C.

Soilborne & Arthropodborne Bacterial Diseases

D.

Sexually Transmitted, Contact, & Miscellaneous Bacterial Diseases

V.

Viruses

A.

Characteristics of Viruses

B.

Pneumonotropic & Dermotropic Viral Diseases

C.

Viscerotropic & Neurotropic Viral Diseases

VI.

The Fun
gi

VII.

The Protozoa

VIII.

The Multicellular Parasites


Readings:


Week


Date

Title









Pages

#1



8
-
24

Introduction








Professor




8
-
26

Foundations of Microbiology

(Ch1)




1
-
31

#2



8
-
31

Concepts & Tools for Studying Microorganisms


(Ch3)


64
-
96




9
-
2

Cell Structure and Function

(Ch4)





104
-
120

#3



9
-
7

Microbial Growth and Nutrition

(Ch5)




131
-
154




9
-
9

Metabolism of Microorganisms

(Ch6)




189
-
217

#4



9
-
14

Review for Exam 1




9
-
16

EXAM 1


#5



9
-
21

Control of Microbes: Phys and Chem
M
ethods

(Ch7)


189
-
214




9
-
23

Gene Trans
f
er, Geneti
c Engineering, and Genomics

(Ch8
-
9)

251
-
273

#6



9
-
28

Bacterial Disease in Humans

(Ch10)




298
-
328




9
-
30

Foodborne and
Waterborne

Bacterial Diseases

(Ch11)

334
-
363

#7



10
-
5

Soilborne & Arthropodbo
rne
Bacterial Diseases

(Ch12)

371
-
389




10
-
7

Sexually and Contact Transmitted Bacterial Disease

(Ch13)

396
-
432

#8



10
-
12

Review for Exam 2




10
-
14

EXAM 2

#9



10
-
19

Viruses and Virus
-
like Agents

(Ch14)




440
-
470

Copyright to Dr. N. Aulik





10
-
21

NO CLASS

#10


10
-
26

Viral
Infections of the Resp. Tract and

Skin

(Ch15)


474
-
504




10
-
28

Viral Infe
ctions of the
Blood, Lymph., GI, Nerv. (Ch16)


508
-
530

#11


11
-
2

Eukary
otic Microorganisms: The Fungi

(Ch17)


535
-
562




11
-
4

Eukaryotic Microorganisms: The
Parasites

(Ch18)


567
-
601

#12


11
-
9

Exam 3




11
-
11

NO CLASS

#13


11
-
16

Student Presentations




11
-
18

Student Presentations

#14


11
-
23

Student Presentations




11
-
25

Student Presentations

#15


11
-
30

Review for comprehensive final exam




12
-
2

FINAL EXAM







Copyright to Dr. N. Aulik


RULES FOR WORKING IN

THE MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY


ALL OF YOU HAVE TAKEN OTHER LABORATORY COURSES BEFORE. HOWEVER, UNLIKE
OTHER LABORATORIES, IN MICROBIOLOGY, YOU WILL BE WORKING (PROBABLY FOR THE
FIRST TIME) WITH POTENTIALLY INFECTIOUS ORGANISMS. THEREFORE, THERE ARE
SOME R
ULES/PRECAUTIONS WHICH
MUST

BE FOLLOWED FOR YOUR OWN AND EVERYONE
ELSE'S SAFETY. MOST OF THESE ARE BASED ON COMMON SENSE; OTHERS ARE NOT.
HOWEVER,
ALL

MUST BE STRICTLY FOLLOWED.


1.

Bring into the laboratory only the materials that you need (e.g., lab manu
al, textbook, and
notebook). Leave everything else (e.g., coats, other books, backpacks, etc.) in the proper
storage area.

2.

Wash your hands thoroughly before
AND

after each laboratory period, and anytime during lab
when/if you come in contact with a live c
ulture.

3.

Before lab, thoroughly clean off your work area with disinfectant.

4.

Although not required, it is
HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

that you wear a clean lab coat at all
times during lab. Not only will it protect your clothing, but it will provide an additional pr
otective
barrier between you and the bacteria with which you will work.

5.

Similarly, although not required, it is RECOMMENDED that wear closed toed shoes and long
pants in case of spills.

6.

It is fine to wear latex or nitrile gloves when in lab. However, I rec
ommend that students use
gloves sparingly and rather, I prefer that the student can feel if any liquids come in contact with
the skin. Wash hands immediately if this occurs!

7.

Eating or drinking is
NOT

allowed in the laboratory!

8.

In every lab, you will be us
ing Bunsen or Fischer burners for making sterile transfers.
Therefore, be careful of loose clothing. If you have long hair, keep it tied behind your head, out
of the way. Be careful where you place the burner, and light it only when necessary.

9.

Keep your

drawer or storage area neat and clean.

10.

Never put any objects (e.g. pencils & pens) into your mouth.

11.

If an accident occurs, consult the instructor immediately! Even if it is a small spill, contact the
instructor immediately.

12.

If you cut yourself or susta
in any injury, tell the instructor immediately!

13.

NEVER

pour
ANY

cultures down the drain. Also,
NEVER

pour molten agar down the drain.

14.

Be considerate of other students. When lab is over, thoroughly clean off your work area with
disinfectant. Return microsc
opes to the cabinets (with the lowest power objectives in place).
Return other equipment to its proper storage area. Discard all trash in proper containers.
Remove tape labels from glassware, this includes petri plates. Place all dirty glassware (e.g.
test tubes, pipets, etc.) into the proper receptacles for sterilization.