Puzzling Over the Dead Burying Their Dead

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Nov 10, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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Puzzling Over the Dead Burying Their Dead

Kristina M. DeNeve, Ph.D.
Adult Faith Formation Coordinator
Diocese of Honolulu
Today’s Gospel contains sayings by Jesus I don’t understand, especially
“Let the dead bury their dead.” What does this mean?

If I lived as a Catholic a mere 100 years ago, I probably would not spend
much time puzzling over today’s Gospel. Why? Scripture was too
important to risk being misunderstood by the untrained ear. Instead of
praying with a passage ourselves, we laity relied on trained priests to
understand the meaning of divine revelation.

This changed dramatically with Dei Verbum (Dogmatic Constitution on
Divine Revelation) from Vatican Council II. Absolutely, the
magisterium still offers us a definitive understanding of Scripture.
However, and this is a big
however, the laity are now encouraged
to read,
study and pray the Bible.

(We) “forcefully and specifically exhort all the Christian faithful to learn
the surpassing knowledge of Jesus Christ by frequent reading of the
divine Scriptures. Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ.” (Dei
Verbum, paragraph 25).

Let the dead bury their dead? Guess I will pray with this passage awhile
longer…..

Inserts for Bulletins, Newsletters & Websites
13
th
Sunday Ordinary Time, June 29-30, 2013


Readings can be found at:
http://usccb.org/bible/readings/063013.cfml



Questions, Comments Suggestions?
Contact Kristina
kdeneve@rcchawaii.org
or
808-230-6767

































Our Job Regarding the Harvest

Kristina M. DeNeve, Ph.D.
Adult Faith Formation Coordinator
Diocese of Honolulu
“[T]he laity, by their very vocation, seek the kingdom of God by
engaging in temporal affairs and by ordering them according to the plan
of God. They are called there by God that by exercising their proper
function and led by the spirit of the Gospel they may work for the
sanctification of the world from within as a leaven” (Lumen Gentium,
The Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, 31).

This quote may not send shivers down your back, but the kernel idea
should. We are to be yeast in the world – transforming it from within.
St. Teresa of Avila had it right when she said “Christ has no body but
yours, no hands, no feet on earth but yours….”

Today’s Gospel says the harvest is plenty, but laborers are few. This is
not because too few of us give up everything to go door to door. It is
because too few of us have really taken up the challenge to be leaven in
our everyday, ordinary life.

100% of the time. Always. All ways.
Inserts for Bulletins, Newsletters & Websites
14
th
Sunday of Ordinary Time, July 6-7, 2013


Readings can be found at:
http://usccb.org/bible/readings/070713.cfml



Questions, Comments Suggestions?
Contact Kristina
kdeneve@rcchawaii.org
or
808-230-6767

































My Other Self is “Inferior”

Kristina M. DeNeve, Ph.D.
Adult Faith Formation Coordinator
Diocese of Honolulu
In many ways, society gets the message of today’s Gospel of the Good
Samaritan. We come to the aid of people following disaster. We
deplore human trafficking and celebrate freedom. We even value
education for all, health care for all, homes for all.

That said, I think that I personally, that each of us personally, has a ways
to go. “Wishing to come down to topics that are practical and of some
urgency, the Council lays stress on respect for the human person:
everyone should look upon his neighbor (without any exception) as
another self” (Gaudium et Spes, Church in the Modern World, #27).

Another self. Having exactly the same value and worth.

Honestly, too often I see others as inferior to me, esp. when they
“differ” from me. Whether they smell bad or drive a luxurious gas-
guzzler, I see differences with a critical eye. I even do this with other
Catholics - too conservative, too liberal, etc….

Lord, help me see the person I would rather not be(come) as literally

being me. Open my eyes today to my other self.
Inserts for Bulletins, Newsletters & Websites
15
th
Sunday Ordinary Time, July 13-14, 2013


Readings can be found at:
http://usccb.org/bible/readings/071413.cfml



Questions, Comments Suggestions?
Contact Kristina
kdeneve@rcchawaii.org
or
808-230-6767


































Vatican II on Martha and Mary

Kristina M. DeNeve, Ph.D.
Adult Faith Formation Coordinator
Diocese of Honolulu
Are we laity called to be Martha or Mary? Lumen Gentium (LG,
Dogmatic Constition on the Church), approaches this question when it
devotes an entire section to the role of the laity in the church.

“The laity, however, are given this special vocation: to make the Church
present and fruitful in those places and circumstances where it is only
through them that she can become the salt of the earth. Thus, every lay
person, through those gifts given to him, is at once the witness and the
living instrument of the mission of the Church itself ‘according to the
measure of Christ’s bestowal’ (Eph 4:7) (LG, No. 33)

In other words, virtually all laity are called to be Martha.

So, what do we do with Jesus telling us that Mary chose the better part?
Two things. First, the laity, us “Marthas,” must still take time to sit with
Jesus, to be “Mary” now and then. Second, know that none of us is
ever fully “Martha” or “Mary.” Throughout our lives, we will each be
called to general times of action or times of contemplation.
Inserts for Bulletins, Newsletters & Websites
12
th
Sunday Ordinary Time, July 20-21, 2013


Readings can be found at:
http://usccb.org/bible/readings/072113.cfml



Questions, Comments Suggestions?
Contact Kristina kdeneve@rcchawaii.org or
808-230-6767


































Praying as Individuals and

as the Body of Christ
Kristina M. DeNeve, Ph.D.
Adult Faith Formation Coordinator
Diocese of Honolulu
We tend to think of Jesus’ teachings on prayer as addressing our
personal, individual prayer. While true, Jesus today also tells us what
happens during our communal prayer, especially the liturgical prayers of
the Mass and the Liturgy of the Hours.

Jesus tells us that we as individuals will be given what we ask for, what
we seek, and he’ll open what is blocked in our lives. Now, imagine
what happens when 1.2 billion people join together to ask, to seek, to
beg for openness?

“From this it follows that every liturgical celebration, because it is the
action of Christ the Priest and of his Body, which is the Church, is a
sacred action surpassing all others. No other action of the Church can
equal its efficacy by the same title and to the same degree.”
(Sacrosanctum Concilium, The Constitution on the Divine Liturgy, No.
7).

So, if Mass (or the Divine Office) feels dry or boring, try to recall that
this is our
chance, as part of the Body, to collectively ask
. WE
are
seeking. And how much does the Holy Spirit give?!
Inserts for Bulletins, Newsletters & Websites
12
th
Sunday Ordinary Time, July 27-28, 2013


Readings can be found at:
http://usccb.org/bible/readings/072813.cfml



Questions, Comments Suggestions?
Contact Kristina kdeneve@rcchawaii.org or
808-230-6767