SECOORA Geo Tools Presentation

bawltherapistSoftware and s/w Development

Dec 13, 2013 (3 years and 3 months ago)

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SECOORA
Geo Tools Presentation
Dan Ramage, University of South Carolina
dan@inlet.geol.sc.edu
Outline

Aggregation

Storage

Discovery

Distribution
• Near Future Development
Project Context
SECOORA
Southeast Coastal Ocean Observing Regional Association
“SECOORA is to be designed and operated to provide
data, information and products on marine and estuarine
systems. Information will be provided to users in a
common manner and according to sound scientific
practice. SECOORA will include the infrastructure and
expertise required for this system. “
Data Aggregation
•In-situ observations are collected from a variety of
sources, such as buoys, water level stations, pier
based meteorological stations, etc. in a near-real
time manner. This data is then converted into
multiple formats such as netCDF and/or obsKML for
insertion into a relational database(RDB).
•From this database of recent observations a variety
of file formats, web services and applications can be
driven. By suggesting a minimally common
observation oriented XML and RDB schema,
developed scripts and products can benefit from and
build around these shared schema.
Data Aggregation
Data Flow
Data Aggregation
Data Providers
6. Relational Database
(Postgres or SQLite)
1. In-situ observations
(buoy, water level
station, etc)
2. Model output
(elevation, currents,
particle trajectories, etc)
3. Screen-scraping
(NDBC, NWS,USGS,etc)
or file translation
4. netCDF files
(Regional convention
format and data
dictionary)
5. Data Scout:Polls
data providers for new
in-situ, model data.
Implements region
specific output formats
for importation by
database.
A fully relational schema, Xenia.
Data Aggregation
• Who are some of the providers?
– National Backbone
• NWS
• USGS
• NDBC
• NOS
• NERRS
– Regional Providers
• University of South Carolina
• University of North Carolina
• University of South Florida

Skidaway Institute of Oceanography
Technologies Employed
• Base environment
– Linux
– Apache
– Plone
– Perl & PHP
– Python
• Mapping & imaging
– MapServer(gdal,ogr)
– OpenLayers
– TileCache

Gnuplot
• Data storage
– PostgreSQL
– PostGIS
– SQLite
– SpatiaLite,
spatial
enablement for SQLite
– obsKML
, Google KML
based
– Filesystem
Why Open Source?
• Pros
– Most software either free or quite inexpensive
– Common data sharing standards
• OGC, WMS, WFS, SOS
• Google KML
– Large developer community
• Wikis, Bulletin Boards, Listservs
• Cons
– Documentation and packaging can be lacking
– Large developer community working on array of
different operating systems
Data Parsing
– Data Scout
• Discovers and processes the netCDF files and outputs
either SQL statements or obsKML to be read into the
database.
– Screen Scraping
• Pull the data directly from columnar data from a
providers website.
Data Storage, the How’s
– The Xenia Schema
• Recent near real-time in-situ observations are
aggregated to a ‘Xenia’ schema relational
database(RDB)
• The schema was developed to provide a good general
purpose relational database, focused on in-situ
observation data.
– SQLite Database Engine
• SQLite is a software library that implements a self-
contained, serverless, zero-configuration, transactional
SQL database engine.
• SpatiaLite is a library that allows processing of
GIS and spatial data in SQLite databases.
Xenia Relational Database Schema
Hierarchy = organization->platform->sensor->multi_obs(observation data)
– The focus of the database is on individual measurements, not
platforms. Previous schemas were platform centric, Xenia
addresses most of the shortcomings of that design, such as slow
multi-platform queries since the design called for a table per
platform schema.
– Bridging the gap between raw data collection and the
organization and sharing of data using previously developed
products, services and standards(leveraging earlier work against
new data providers)
– Fostering a standardization of products and services via a
common openly shared technical infrastructure(common
database schema and product support scripts)
– The SQLite implementation of Xenia is designed for low-volume
data(< 100,000 records per hour) in-situ observational platforms
or system arrays (e.g. 1 to 1000 platforms collecting 10-20
observations per hour) collecting data at any geographic scale
(local,regional,national,etc)

SQLite implements the database as a single file. This makes it
simple to distribute the database for users who want to
implement their own data mining.
Data Storage, the Why’s
Data, you can have it your way

Data is available in a number of different file
formats as well as web-services. In addition to
having all the in-situ data available, per
observation access is provided also.
File formats:
•CSV
•Shapefile
•obsKML
•Styled KML
•SQLite
database
Web Services:
•WMS
•WFS
•SOS
•GeoRSS
Aggregated Data
Data Products
Data
*CSV files
*Query&Download
*KML
Graphs
*Time series
*Depth profile
Maps
*GIS
*Animations
QC&Notification
*Missing data
*Range
Data Access/Web Services
Data Sharing
*OGC SWE/SOS
services (SensorML,
O&M)
Graphs
*Time series
*Depth profile
*TBD by users
Maps
*OGC Web
Mapping Service
(WMS)
QC&Notification
*Missing data
*Range
*Continuity
6. Relational Database
(Postgres or SQLite)
Products and Services from Aggregated Data
Applications - SECOORA interactive map
Latest regional observation maps are accessed via WMS(Web Mapping
Service) and merged into an OpenLayers(browser javascript) map
interface. Observation database requests are supported via WMS
GFI(Get Feature Info)
http://secoora.org/maps/dynamic
Applications - CarolinasRCOOS
Map image layers supported via MapServer WMS with increased map
response time via TileCache which tiles and caches image requests for
repeated reference. Site feature info supported via Xenia database
instance styled output html table accessed via WMS GFI.
http://carolinasrcoos.org
Applications – National Weather Service
Latest regional platform observations from Xenia database are styled to
html tables and presented in fixed map interface alongside NWS
forecast warnings/advisories and other map layers of interest
http://forecast.weather.gov/mwp/
Data Distribution – ObsKML
ObsKML (Observations KML)
A simple XML encoding of
observation metadata
associated with a KML
Placemark.
Default XML import/export
format for Xenia database
Instances.
Postgres or Sqlite database paths
ObsKML XML schema for import/export
KML/KMZ – Latest obs by platform
KML (Keyhole Markup Language) which is the XML format used to visualize data in
Google Earth/Maps and potentially other globes/maps with KML support such as
NASA WorldWind and ESRI ArcExplorer. OGC Standard. Can be imported by other
GIS platforms, such as OpenLayers.
Latest observation data organized by all observations per platform
http://tinyurl.com/664wtx
KML/KMZ – latest obs by obsType
http://tinyurl.com/664wtx
All observations carry:
•Observation type(obsType)
•Unit of measure(uom)
•Measurement value
Color Styled low to high value blue/green/red
GeoRSS
•GeoRSS allows users to subscribe and have the data they are interested
in “pushed” to them via an RSS reader.
•Simple, lightweight XML format.
Near Future Steps
• Virtualization
– What is it?
• In general terms, it is the abstraction of computer resources.
• For our purposes, it is the separation of the operating system from
the underlying computer resources.
– What does that mean to me?
• This type of architecture is (ideally) more reproducible, scalable,
redundant, and portable
• Instead of owning and maintaining server hardware, images can
be hosted in the “Cloud” while requiring less internal system
maintenance or housing costs
– What do I need?
• We’re using free software from VMWare, called the VMPlayer,
that “plays” the image. http://www.vmware.com/
Near Future Steps
• QA/QC
– Implementation of more comprehensive quality
checks.
• Application Development
– Implement user-defined services or data delivery
methods
• Documentation

Process documentation to make it easier for
others to clone what we’ve done.
Credits
2
C.Calloway,
2
J.Cleary,
1
J.Cothran,
4
J.Donovan,
3
J.Dorton,
1
M.Fletcher,C.Galvarino,
1
S.King,
2
S.Haines,
3
L.Leonard,
1
D.Porter,
3
X.Qi,
1
D.Ramage,
2
H.Seim,
4
V.Subramanian,
1
S.Walker,
4
R.Weisberg
1
University of South Carolina,
2
University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill,
3
University of North Carolina at
Wilmington,
4
University of South Florida
SECOORA
Geo Tools Presentation
Dan Ramage, University of South Carolina
dan@inlet.geol.sc.edu