UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT MONTICELLO SCHOOL OF MATH ...

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UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS AT MONTICELLO

SCHOOL OF MATH AND NATURAL SCIENCES

COURSE SYLLABUS

Spring 2012, MWF 9:10 a.m.


Instructor Name:

Dr. Morris Bramlett


Instructor Office:
Science Center A
-
7


Instructor Phone:

870
-
460
-
1116


Instructor Email Address:

bramlett@uamont.edu


Office Hours:

MWF 10
-
11 M
-
F or by appointment


Course Title and Cred
it Hours:

CHEM 1113,

General Chemistry II, 3 credit hours)


Course Description
:

The study of kinetics, equilibrium, the
rmodynamics, electrochemistry, oxidation
-
reduction, acid
-
base chemistry, nuclear chemistry and selected descriptive chemistry. An ACS standardized exam will be given as the
final exam.


Prerequisites:


CHEM 1103 and CHEM 1121

Corequisite:

Chem 1131


Req
uired Text and Materials:


General Chemistry, The Essential Concepts
,
Chang and Overby, McGraw Hill, 6
th

Edition





ISBN:

978
-
0
-
07
-
337563
-
2


Student Learning Outcomes:

By the end of the course the successful student should be able to explain, describe,

discuss, recognize, perform
related calculations and apply knowledge of the following:



Molecular Geometry



Intermolecular Forces



Properties of Solutions



Thermodynamics



Chemical Kinetics



Mechanisms of Chemical Reactions



Acid/Base Theory



Equilibrium of
chemical reactions, including solubility



Equilibrium of acid/base reactions, including titration



Oxidation
-
Reduction



Electrochemistry



Nuclear Chemistry


Specific Course Policies:

Attendance:

Regular attendance is expected. You are responsible for any m
issed class notes, homework
assignments made before the next class period.

Quizzes and Exams may be made up if the
absence is University approved and correct procedures are followed; otherwise, missed quizzes
will be considered as zero and can be one of t
he drop quizzes. If more quizzes are missed than
the allowable number dropped, the extra missed quizzes will be counted as a zero. An
unexcused missed exam will be counted as the lowest exam for the term, and replaced by the
percentage scored on the fina
l exam. Only one exam can be replaced with the final.



Cell Phones:

Cell phones are to be turned off and put away during class. They may not be used as calculator.
Do not have the cell phone on desk during class. Anyone caught using a cell phone durin
g class
will be asked to leave immediately.


Academic Honesty:

Cheating, helping others cheat, disruptive behavior or other improper conduct will not
be tolerated, and could lead to dismissal from the course with a failing grade. The minimum
penalty for
cheating will be a score of zero on the assignment or exam, which cannot be
dropped as the low score for the semester. The second cheating offense results in removal from
the course.


Content Outline:


Chapter 10

Chemical Bonding II: Molecular Geometry
and Hybridization of Atomic Orbitals



Molecular Geometry



Dipole Moments



Valence Bond Theory



Hybridization of Atomic Orbitals



Hybridization in Molecules Containing Double and Triple Bonds



Molecular Orbital Theory

Chapter 12

Intermolecular Forces and Liquids
and Solids



Kinetic Molecular Theory of Liquids and Solids



Intermolecular Forces



Properties of Liquids



Crystal Structure



Bonding in Solids



Phase Changes



Phase Diagrams

Chapter 13

Physical Properties of Solutions



Types of Solutions



A Molecular View of the So
lution Process



Concentration Units



Effect of Temperature on Solubility



Effect of Pressure on Solubility of Gases



Colligative Properties

Chapter 14

Chemical Kinetics



The Rate of Reaction



The Rate Laws



Relation Between Reactant Concentrations and Time



Activ
ation Energy and Temperature Dependence of Rate Constants



Reaction Mechanisms



Catalysis

Chapter 15

Chemical Equilibrium



The Concept of Equilibrium



Ways of Expressing Equilibrium Constants



What Does the Equilibrium Constant Tell Us?



Factors that Affect
Chemical Equilibrium








Chapter 16

Acids and Bases



Bronsted Acids and Bases



Acid
-
Base Properties of Water



pH
-
A Measure of Acidity



Strengths of Acids and Bases



Weak Acids and Acid Ionization Constants



Weak Bases and Base Ionization Constants



The Relatio
nship Between Conjugate Acid
-
Base Ionization Constants



Molecular Structure and the Strength of Acids



Acid
-
Base Properties of Salts



Acidic, Basic, and Amphoteric Oxides



Lewis Acids and Bases

Chapter 17

Acid
-
Base Equilbria and Solubility Equilibria



Homogeneo
us Versus Heterogeneous Solution Equilibria



Buffer Solutions



A Closer Look at Acid
-
Base Titrations



Acid Base Indicators



Solubility Equilibria



The Common Ion Effect and Solubility



Complex Ion Equilibria and Solubility



Application of Solubility Product
Principle to Qualitative Analysis

Chapter 18

Thermodynamics



The Laws of Thermodynamics



Spontaneous Processes



Entropy



Second Law of Thermodynamics



Gibbs Free Energy



Free Energy and Chemical Equilbrium



Thermodynamics in Living Systems

Chapter 19

Redox Reacti
ns and Electrochemistry



Redox Reactions



Galvanic Cells



Standard Reduction Potentials



Thermodynamics of Redox Reactions



Effect of Concentration on Cell EMF



Batteries



Corrosion



Electrolysis



Electrometallurgy

Special Topics in Chemistry (as time permits)



Nuc
lear Chemistry



Organic Chemistry



Coordination Chemistry








Special Projects and Assignments:

None


Provisions for Exams and Evaluations:

Exams will be given during class time and will

be announced approximately one
week prior to the exam. If you have
a University excused absence, and proper
procedures are followed, you will be allowed to make
-
up the exam. Calculators
will be required for quizzes and exams. If you use a graphing calculator, it will
be cleared. If you do not want your calculator clear
ed, please bring a different
calculator.



Grading:

Four tests of equal value (100 pts each) will be given. The fifth exam is a comprehensive final exam written by

the American Chemical Society. This exam is comprehensive and includes questions from
Chem I. If the final exam

score is higher than the lowest regular exam score, the regular exam score will be replaced with the percentage scored

on the final exam.. This also applies to a missed exam; however, only one exam score can be replaced. Quiz
zes will be

given almost daily at the beginning of class over previously covered material. The five lowest (or missed) quizzes will be

dropped. Homework will occasionally be turned in for a grade and counted in the overall quiz score. No homework

scor
es will be dropped. The homework and quiz grades will be converted to a percentage of 100 points (equivalent to

one exam).














Special Dates of Concern
:


January 11 (Wednesday)


First Day of Classes



January 16 (Monday)



Martin Luther King Holiday. All
offices and classes closed.


January 18 (Wednesday)


Last Day to Add Classes


March 19
-
23 (Monday
-
Friday)


Spring Break for faculty and students. All offices closed on March 23.



April 2 (Monday):



Preregistration for summer and fall begins.



April 4
(Wednesday)




Last day to drop with W in regular classes



April 26 (Thursday)




Last day to withdraw from class


May 1 (Tuesday)



Last day of classes

May 2
-
8 (Wednesday
-
Tuesday)


Final exams

May 11 (Friday)



Commencement


May 7

(Monday)

Final Examina
tion

All sections Chem 1023, 1103, & 1113.. 10:30
-

12:30











Point Values

Test 1



100 points

Test 2



100 points

Test 3



100 points

Test 4



100 points

Final Exam


100 points

HW and Quizzes

100 points

Total



600 points


Grading Scale

88


100

A

76


87


B

64


75


C

50


63


D

0
-
49


F

Students with disabilities
:


It is the policy of the University of Arkansas at Monticello to accommodate individuals with disabilities pursuant
to federal law and the University’s
commitment to equal educational opportunities. It is the responsibility of the student
to inform the instructor of any necessary accommodations at the beginning of the course. Any student requiring
accommodations should contact the Office of Special Stude
nt Services located in Harris Hall Room 120; phone 870 460
-
1026; TDD 870 460
-
1626; Fax 870 460
-
1926; email: whitingm@uamont.edu.

For assistance on a College of Technology campus contact:

McGehee: Office of Special Student Services representative on campus
; phone 870 222
-
5360; fax 870 222
-
1105.

Crossett: Office of Special Student Services representative on campus; phone 870 364
-
6414; fax 870 364
-
5707.









Student conduct statement
:


Students at the University of Arkansas at Monticello are expected to
conduct themselves appropriately, keeping
in mind that they are subject to the laws of the community and standards of society. The student must not conduct
him/herself in a manner that disrupts the academic community or breaches the freedom of other stude
nts to progress
academically.


Academic dishonesty:

1.

Cheating: Students shall not give, receive, offer, or solicit information on examinations, quizzes, etc. This
includes but is not limited to the following classes of dishonesty:

a.

Copying from another stud
ent’s paper;

b.

Use during the examination of prepared materials, notes, or texts other than those specifically
permitted by the instructor;

c.

Collaboration with another student during the examination;

d.

Buying, selling, stealing, soliciting, or transmitting an
examination or any material purported to be the
unreleased contents of coming examinations or the use of any such material;

e.

Substituting for another person during an examination or allowing such substitutions for oneself.

2.

Collusion: Collusion is defined as

obtaining from another party, without specific approval in advance by the
instructor, assistance in the production of work offered for credit to the extent that the work reflects the ideas
of the party consulted rather than those of the person whose name
in on the work submitted.

3.

Duplicity: Duplicity is defined as offering for credit identical or substantially unchanged work in two or more
courses, without specific advanced approval of the instructors involved.

4.

Plagiarism: Plagiarism is defined as adoptin
g and reproducing as one’s own, to appropriate to one’s use, and to
incorporate in one’s own work without acknowledgement the ideas or passages from the writings or works of
others.


For any instance of academic dishonesty that is discovered by the instruc
tor, whether the dishonesty is found to be
cheating, collusion, duplicity, or plagiarism, the result for the student(s) involved as a first offense will be minimum
of a grade of zero for the assignment, quiz or exam, and that grade is not a droppable grade

in the grade calculation.
Second offenses will result in automatic expulsion from the course.