Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics

bankercordMechanics

Oct 27, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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Physics
410
-
01




Spring 20
1
2

Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics

MWF
8
:
1
5
A
M



9
:
2
0

PM

Room O
WS

1
65A


Instructor:


Dr. Richard A.
Thomas




Office: OWS 162




Phone: 2
-
5212







email: rathomas1@stthomas.edu




Office Hours:

I have scheduled office hours MW
12
30
-
0
1
30
. You can also schedule an appointment with me
, or
simply stop by my office unannounced
.

I
will never be in on
Tuesdays, but I will usually be here

Thursdays.

When
I am here, though, my door is always open, so please feel free to stop by whenever.


Text:


Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics

by Ashley H. Carter


I will cover some things in class not contained
in our textbook

which you will be responsible for on tests. There will
also be things in the text not covered in this course.


Tests (
70
%):

There will be f
our

exams during the

semester (including the final)
. Consider each exam to be cumulative,
becaus
e newer material builds on material covered previously.
Tests
must

be taken at the scheduled time.

Requests to reschedule or make up exams or labs for non
-
emergency personal reasons will be declined. Do not
make advance travel commitments with the exp
ectation that such requests will be granted.

Pe
rmission to take an
exam
at other than the scheduled time to accommodate college activities will be at the di
scretion of the instructor
,
and must be taken earlier than the scheduled date/time
.



Qualified stu
dents with documented disabilities who may need classroom accommodations should make an
appointment with the Enhancement Program


Disability Services office. Appointments can be made by calling
651
-
962
-
6315.You may also make an appointment in person in O’
Shaughnessy Educational Center, room 119.
For further information, you can locate the Enhancement Program on the web at
http://www.stthomas.edu/enhancementprog/
.

Homework

(30
%):
Homework assignments will be given at the beginning of nearly every class period. Doing the
homework is
crucial

to learning the material. I encourage you to ask many questions about homework


both to me
and to your classmates


and I encourage you to work in groups. Solutions will be posted on the course web site

after they are due
. Homework assignments are due

two class periods after they are assigned.
You will get 10 points
per assignment, with half of the points going towards effort. So in order to insure you get partial credit, turn in ALL
of your work on a problem even if you don’t get the answer. If you

turn in no work on a particular problem, you
will get a zero for it.

Assignments turned in up to one class period late can get no better than ½ credit.


Course Web site:
http://
courseweb.stthomas.edu/physics/academics/410/spr%202012/hw410s12thomas.htm


This contains our syllabus, a list of topics covered in class, homework solutions (posted after it is due), future
homework assignments, and course schedule. Please bookmark this and check it often, as I will put class
announcements there as well.


Honor
Code:

In the process of conducting scientific work it is essential that an attitude of trust and honesty is common
to all participants.
In the Physics Department we have an honor code. This means that we trust you. For example,
you are free to leave th
e room during exams without asking me first. We take our honor code very seriously, so a
breach of this trust has severe consequences. Cheating

in any form

will be dealt with according to the University’s
Academic Integrity Policy. More significantly, c
heating would damage the trust I have in you. Don’t jeopardize
this trust. Keep in mind that I respect you as individuals, and I respect the effort you put into the class

regardless of
your grade.


Approximate

Grading Guidelines:

Technically, I do not
have a fixed grading scale. At the end of the semester, I list
everyone’s course score out of 100 fro
m top to bottom and draw the A/A
-
, A
-
/B+
,

B+/B,

etc., lines in big gaps
between adjacent scores. This way, there are no borderline cases. I never put the border between an A
-

and a B
+

higher than 90%,
and so far I have never found it necessary to put it any lower than 87.5%. So if you want to assure

yourself of at least an A
-
, aim for a course total above 90%. On the other end of things,
I have never given a passing
grade for a
course

point total less than 50% of the maximum. Midterm grades, however, are assigned according to a
strict 90
-
100 = A, 8
0
-
90 = B, 70
-
80 = C, etc., scale. With each test you get back, you will be given two scores: one
for that test, and one that indicates your current course score out of 100.

Disclaimer:

This syllabus and the following class schedule are subject to change

as the semester progresses.



TENTATIVE

Course Schedule

DATE

CLASS TOPIC

JAN

30

M

Course Intro

FEB

1

W

Ch. 11: Kinetic Theory of Gases (skip section 11.2)

3

F

Ch. 11: more kinetic theory
--
equipartition theorem, specific heat

6

M

Ch. 11: derive
Maxwell
-
Boltzmann distribution function, averages of v and v
2

8

W

Ch. 11: mean free path, collision frequency,

1
0

F

Ch.
3: first law, work for ideal gas processes

1
3

M

Ch
1 (very quickly); Ch. 2: van der Waals eqn of state

1
5

W

Ch 2: finish;
Ch 3:
expansion/compression of solids,
exact vs. inexact differentials

1
7

F

Ch 3:
“configurational” vs. dissipative work; Ch 4: enthalpy

2
0

M

Ch 4: Enthalpy; Ch 5: 1
st

Law and Cycles

2
2

W

EXAM #1

2
4

F

Ch 5: More on cycles Ch 6: 2
nd

Law and
Carnot cycle

27

M

Ch 6: Entropy
, etc.

29

W

Ch 6:
Clausius inequality, calculating
Δ
S


MAR

2

F

Ch 6:
more on calculating
Δ
S, formal definition of temperature

5

M

Ch 7:
TdS

equations; Ch 8: begin thermodynamic potentials

7

W

Ch 8:
t
hermodynamic
p
otentials

9

F

Ch 8:
t
hermodynamic
p
otentials
; Ch 9: chemical potential

1
2

M

Ch 9:
phase mixtures, mixtures of ideal gases

EXAM 2?????

1
4

W

Ch 10:

Th e 3
rd

Law and Its Consequences

1
6

F

Ch 12: macrostates vs. microstates, flipping coins, Stirling’s approximation

19

M

NO CLASS


SPRING BREAK

2
1

W

NO CLASS


SPRING BREAK

2
3

F

NO CLASS


SPRING BREAK

2
6

M

Ch 12:
more on macrostates

and entropy

28

W

Ch 12:
entropy, indistinguishable particles, degenerate states

30

F

Ch 13:
m
ethod of Lagrange multipliers, Boltzmann distribution.

APR

2

M

Ch 13:
finish Lagrange multipliers, Boltzmann distribution

4

W

Ch 12: density of states

6

F

NO CLASS


EASTER BREAK

9

M

NO CLASS


EASTER BREAK

1
1

W

Ch 13:
Fermi
-
Dirac and Bose
-
Einstein statistics

1
3

F

Ch 13:
more FD and BE stats, examples

1
6

M

Ch 1
3
:
minor review, spin system example

18

W

Ch 14
: stat mech and the ideal gas

2
0

F

Ch 15: the diatomic ideal gas
EXAM #3
???

2
3

M

Ch 1
6
:
phonons in solids, Einstein model

2
5

W

Ch 1
6
:
phonons in solids, DeBye model

27

F

Ch
17: intro to thermodynamics of magnetism

3
0

M

Ch 1
7
:
more magnetism thermodynamics,
some review

MAY

2

W

The Ising model and criticality

(not covered in book)

4

F

TBA

7

M

Ch 18: blackbody radiation

9

W

Ch 19: Fermi gases

1
1

F

Ch 19: Fermi gases, white dwarfs and neutron stars, course evals.

1
4

M

NO CLASS

study day before
finals

1
5

T

EXAM #4

(
080
0
-
100
0 pm)