ChemQuest 53 - Walton High

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Oct 27, 2013 (4 years and 2 months ago)

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ChemQuest 53


Name: ____________________________

Date: _______________

Hour: _____



Information
: Internal Energy


Thermodynamics involves the study of the energy and disorder of a system. Every system has
“internal energy”.
Internal energy

is the total amount of all the potential and kinetic energy that
a system has. For an example of a “system” let’s take a car. A car has kinetic energy (the
energy of motion)
if

it is moving and it has potential energy (chemical energy of the gasoline)
i
f

it has gas in the tank. A car always has a certain amount of energy associated with it. A car has
more total energy (chemical potential energy) with a full tank of gas than with a half full tank.
Therefore, after driving a car for a while the total am
ount of energy (called the
internal energy
)
that the car has decreases.


Critical Thinking Questions


1.

If we use KE to symbolize kinetic energy and PE to symbolize potential energy, and U to
symbolize internal energy, then write an equation for internal e
nergy.


2.

Consider a car as described in the table below. Fill in the blanks in the table with the
hypothetical values for kinetic energy, potential energy, and internal energy. (Assume that
the overall mass of the car stays the same even though the amount

of gasoline in the tank
decreases.)



A car is setting in
the driveway
before a long road
trip. The gas tank
is full.

The car has set out on
the trip and has been
driving for a while.
Cruise control is set
for a constant speed.

The car is still
driving
at the
same speed.

The car ran out
of gas and is
parked along
the highway.

Kinetic
Energy


20



Potential
Energy

100


30


Internal
Energy


90




3.

The Law of the Conservation of Energy states that energy isn’t created or destroyed. The car
in question
2, lost energy. If the energy was not destroyed, hypothesize what happened to it.



4.

What would be the internal energy of the car in question 2 if someone brought enough gas to
fill the tank back up completely while the car was stranded at the side of the
highway?



Information
: First Law of Thermodynamics


As you saw in question 2 above, the internal energy of a system can change. What happens to
the energy? The energy merely changes form. In the car example, the internal energy was
changed into heat en
ergy as the gasoline burned. Also, some of the internal energy was used to
do work by moving the car. The
First Law of Thermodynamics

states that the change in internal
energy of a system equals the sum of the heat and the work. Internal energy of a sys
tem can
increase or decrease. If a system is heated, it gains internal energy, but if the system loses heat
then it decreases in internal energy. If a system does work it loses internal energy, but if work is
done on the system then it gains internal ene
rgy.


Critical Thinking Questions


5.

For each of the following, state what the “system” is and also state whether the internal
energy of the system would increase or decrease in each situation.

a)

Lifting a ball from the ground and holding it six feet off the
ground.


b)

Heating up a piece of pizza in the microwave.


c)

The logs in the fireplace are burning.


d)

An ice cube is melting while it sets on the kitchen counter.


e)

Two molecules bond together and heat energy is released (
exothermic
).


Information
: Enthalpy


Heat

energy is a large factor in how much the internal energy of a system changes. We
will now turn our attention to chemical reactions. In your answer to question 5e above you
should have identified the two molecules as the “system” and you should have note
d that their
overall internal energy decreased since they lost heat. Verify that this is correct. The heat
energy involved in a chemical reaction is given the name “
enthalpy
”. The change in heat energy
for a reaction is called the
change in enthalpy

and

it is given the symbol

H and it has units of
kilojoules (kJ). An example of 5e taking place is when one mole of hydrogen molecules reacts
with ½ mole of oxygen molecules:




Example Reaction 1: H
2

(g) + ½ O
2

(g)


H
2
O (g) ;

H
f

=
-
241.8 kJ

In the
following reaction, energy is absorbed by the system (
endothermic
) instead of being
released.



Example Reaction 2: C (s) + 2 S (s)


CS
2

(g) ;

H
f

= 117 kJ


Critical Thinking Questions


6.

Give the definition for the following terms.

a)

endothermic:


b)

exothermic:




7.

In the above examples, Example Reaction 1

H is negative and in Example Reaction 2

H is
positive. What does the sign on

H tell you?




8.

In Example Reaction 1, compare the amount of energy that the product has compared to the
reactants.



9.

I
n Example Reaction 2, compare the amount of energy that the product has compared to the
reactants.



Information
: Enthalpy of Formation


In Example Reaction 1 and 2, one substance was formed out of two. Whenever one substance is
made from elements in the
ir standard states, the accompanying enthalpy change is called the
enthalpy of formation
, given the symbol

H
f
. Note the following two example reactions:




Example Reaction 3: H
2

(g) + S (s)


H
2
S (g);

H
f

=
-
20 kJ




Example Reaction 4: C (s) +
O
2

(g)


CO
2

(g);

H
f

=
-
393.5 kJ

Notice that in the previous 4 example reactions, each substance formed is involved in the
following reaction:




Example Reaction 5: 2 H
2
O (g) + CS
2

(g)


2 H
2
S (g) + CO
2

(g);

H
= ?

The

H for Example Reaction 5
can be calculated from the data for Example Reactions 1
-
4 as
follows:





H = [2(
-
20 kJ) + (
-
393.5 kJ)]


[2(
-
241.8 kJ) + (117 kJ)] =
-
66.9 kJ


Critical Thinking Questions


10.

In Example Reactions 1
-
4, the enthalpy value was given the symbol

H
f
, but in Example
Reaction 5, the enthalpy value was given the symbol

H. Why the difference?




11.

In calculating the

H for Example Reaction 5, why was

20kJ multiplied by 2? Why was the

241.8kJ multiplied by 2?




12.

Using a table for standard enthalpies of

formation (

H
f
), verify that

H for the following
reaction is approximately

91.4 kJ.

2 NaF + CaCl
2



CaF
2

+ 2 NaCl






13.

Again using a table of standard enthalpy values calculate

H for each of the following
reactions.


a)

LiCl + NaBr


NaCl + LiBr




b)

MgCO
3

+ 2 NaCl


Na
2
CO
3

+ MgCl
2




c)

CH
4

+ Cl
2



HCl (g) + CH
3
Cl




14.

In 13c, you should have noted that

H
f

for Cl
2

is zero.

H
f

is also zero for O
2
, Na (s), Mg (s),
and other substances. Why do you think

H
f

is zero for these substances?




15.

Compare the

H
f

for O
2

(g) and for O (g). Why is

H
f

equal to zero for O
2
, but not for O?




16.

Calculate

H for the following reaction using a table for standard enthalpy values:

2 CO + O
2



2 CO
2
.




17.

Consider the following reactions and

H values




C +

O
2



CO
2

;

H
f

=
-
393.5 kJ




2 CO


CO
2

+ C ;

H =
-
172.5

a)

Using only the above two

H values, how can you calculate

H for the reaction in
question 16?



b)

What is the relationship between the two reactions above and the reaction in question
16?



18.

In question 17a, you used
Hess’s Law

to find the

H for a reaction even though you didn’t
know what Hess’s Law is. In your own words, state what you believe is Hess’s Law.








19.

Consider the following reaction: N
2

+ 2 O
2

+ 2 NO


2 NO + 2 NO
2
. Use
Hess’s Law
along with the following information to find the

H for this reaction.

reaction #1 N
2

+ O
2



2 NO ;

H = 181 kJ

reaction #2 2 NO + O
2



2 NO
2

;

H =
-
113 kJ






20.

Consider the following reaction: 2 NO


N
2

+ O
2

;

H =
-
181 kJ. What relationsh
ip exists
determined?






21.

Using only the information presented in question 12, find the

H for the following reaction.

CaF
2

+ 2 NaCl


2 NaF + CaCl
2