Introduction to Biomechanics

baconossifiedMechanics

Oct 29, 2013 (4 years and 10 days ago)

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Introduction to
Biomechanics

Biomechanics


What is it?


The mechanical bases of biological
systems.


The application of mechanical laws to
living structures.

Biomechanics


What is it?
(cont.)


The study of the structure and function
of biological systems by means of the
methods of mechanics.


The science concerned with the internal
and external forces acting on the human
body and the effects produced by these
forces.

Kinesiology


Is it the same as
biomechanics?


Kinesis

(motion)

+
-
logy

(science, study of)


Applied anatomy and mechanics


Rasch & Burke (1978).
Kinesiology

=
anatomy

(science of structure)

+
physiology

(science of body function)

+
mechanics

(science of movement)

=
science of movement of the human body.

Kinesiology (cont.)


Old (pre
-
1980) usage


Title of a functional (applied) anatomy +
biomechanics course (“Kinesiology”).


Continue to see that use


many programs now put extra descriptors
in the title for clarification (e.g., “Anatomical
Kinesiology”, “Functional Anatomy and
Kinesiology”).

Kinesiology (cont.)


Current (post
-
1980) usage


One of several terms used to characterize
the discipline or field (e.g., “Department of
Kinesiology”).


Other terms include “Exercise Science and
Physical Education”, “Exercise and Sport
Sciences”, “Human Movement Studies”, or
“Movement Science”.


Potentially an umbrella term for any form of
anatomical, physiological, psychological, or
mechanical analysis of human movement.

Biomechanics: Does it exist in
more than one field?


Exercise and sport biomechanics


Orthopedic biomechanics


Occupational biomechanics


Biomechanics of other biological
systems

Biomechanics


Does it exist
in more than one field? (cont.)


Exercise and sport biomechanics


improving athletic performance, reduction
of athletic injuries


Biomechanics


Does it exist
in more than one field? (cont.)


Orthopedic biomechanics


artificial limbs, joints, and orthoses to
improve functional movement capacity


study of natural and artificial biological
tissues


Occupational Biomechanics


Ergonomics and Human Factors


reduction of workplace injuries

Biomechanics


Does it exist
in more than one field? (cont.)


Biomechanics of other biological systems


Comparative biomechanics (e.g., swimming
in fish, locomotion in apes)


Equine (horse) and canine (dog) racing
performance

Biomechanics


Does it exist
in more than one field? (cont.)

What do we have in common?


Application of fundamental mechanical
principles to the study of structure and
function of living systems.


Common measurement and analysis
tools.

Divisions of Mechanics

(Bio)mechanics

Statics

Dynamics

Fluids

Kinematics

Kinetics

Linear

Angular

Deformable
Solids

Stress

Strain

Why Study Biomechanics?


From a mechanical perspective…


How do we generate and control our
movements?


What mechanical and/or anatomical factors
determine or limit movement outcomes?


How can we make our movements
“better”?