Base technologies Dorene

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Oct 29, 2013 (3 years and 11 months ago)

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Lighti
ng Controls Working Group


Page
1

Aug. 13,

2010

Draft
NZCBC
Lighting Controls
Report


Filename =
LC Subgroup Maniccia Draft_V3.doc


Zero Energy Commercial Buildings Consortium (CBC)

1

Technologies and Practices Task Area

2

Lighting/Daylighting and Controls Working Group

3

Lighting Controls Subgroup

Draft 1.0

4

August 13
, 2010

5


6

Introduction


Dorene

½ Page

7

L
ighting controls
can

play a major
role in reducing electrical lighting energy use

to
help reach
8

EISA’s
N
et
Z
ero

energy targets
.
Although recent advance
s

in energy codes and the accelerated
9

adoption of sustainable design practices for Federal buildings, have improved the penetration of
10

ligh
ting contro
ls, they are only mandated for new construction
, and their full energy
-
saving
11

potential has not bee
n realized
.
In today’s buildings, lighting accounts for 38% of the building

site

12

electrical use, and 20% of the site energy use (Energy Information Administration, CBECS 2003).
13

According to the EIA’s 2003 CBECS report, only 7% of the

commercial building floor

space

14

utilizes energy management and control systems for lighting, and only

4% of the floor

space
15

utilizes daylight

sensors. (Table b44)

16


17

Vision 2050

18

To reach NZ goals, we need to make major strides with penetrating the market using today’s
19

technologies that work and save energy, increase use of technologies that work today, bu
t are
20

limited in acceptance and application, and dedicate research and demonstration resources for
21

proving the effectiveness of new technologies that can have a major impact.

By 2050

we
22

envision that
the majority of the existing building stock will be retr
ofitted with new lighting
23

and control technologies, and all new construction will use the latest lighting and control
24

technologies and strategies.
Elements of the lighting system will be “smart” and energy use will
25

be monitored at the device, room, and bui
lding level. Control devices will consume li
ttle
-
to
-
no
26

power
.
All buildings will use automatic lighting controls for turning lighting off or reducing
27

lighting power when not needed

in all
interior and exterior
spaces
, will provide personal
28

controls for office and workstation occupants, and will have seamless capability for reducing
29

lighting system load upon demand.
Sensors will be embedded in the environment to learn
30

user’s preferences
, and the system

will

anticipa
te
user’s needs and personalize the

environment
31

by adapting light scenes for activity type, time of the day, room temperature, occupancy, day
32

l
ight, glare, eye sight, and mood.
Applied systems and technologies will vary, depending on
33

whether a building

has be
en

retrofitted, is

new
ly constructed
, or
is designed to optimize
34

daylight
.
Building energy performance will be evaluated based upon annual energy use per
35

square foot, rather than using prescriptive measures for specific building systems and envelope.

36


37

Tech
nology Assessment



Lighting Controls

1
-
2

Pages

38

Base technologies


Dorene

39

Base lighting
control technologies

are those

that are widely accepted into
today’s
market
, and

40

include programmable
lighting contr
ol relay panels, controllable circuit breakers

and contactor
41

panels
,
timer switches,
and manual switching

and dimming

strategies
.

T
hese technologies are
42

offered by many manufacturers, are proven to work,
and
have become commoditi
es. T
heir use
43

an
d

application is primarily driven by
a need for meeting
mandatory energy code

requirements

44

at the lowest cost
, rather than by
end
-
use
r

desire to maximize

energy

savings or provide
45

personal control for occupants
.

46

Lighti
ng Controls Working Group


Page
2

Aug. 13,

2010

Draft
NZCBC
Lighting Controls
Report


Filename =
LC Subgroup Maniccia Draft_V3.doc



47

Key Technologies

48

Key technologies are those that provide high value,
have proven energy
-
saving track record,
49

and
have a competitive market
. These include occupancy sensors, and
scene
-
based
50

programmable dimming systems
.

According to Frost & Sullivan’s 2008 market report,
51

occupancy and daylight sensors are the largest growing

lighting control category and are
52

projected to grow at 14% CAGR between 2008 and 2013. Their historical growth
can be
53

attributed to these technologies being required as part of energy codes, and encouraged as part
54

of sustainable building design practices.


55


56


57

Pacing technologies

58

Pacing technologies are those that have demonstrated their potential for changin
g the market
59

and saving energy
beyond the base technologies
, but aren’t widely used in practice
.
In other
60

words, they are
market
-
ready, but haven’t been widely received.
These

include

the following:

61



photosensors
,

62



dimming ballasts,

63



personal controls,

64



systems that combine

individual key and base technologies into one system that self
65

configures, and
is simple to install,

66



systems that

monitor, report,
and profile lighting energy use at the room and building
67

level, and

68



c
ontrollers for integrating lighting systems with other building systems


69

Aside from personal control, t
he reasons that these technologies haven’t been widely

accepted
70

include cost, technical complexity, applications complexity, and perceptions that the
71

technology is not reliable.
Personal controls are not widely used because they are viewed as a
72

superfluous expense, rather than as an energy saving tool. Althou
gh the energy saving b
enefits
73

of personal control has

been documented (
cite
NCAR, NRC, other….), their energy
-
saving
74

benefit and overall value has not been well und
erstood, or communicated to
owners and end
75

users
.

76


77

Emerging Technologies

78

Lighti
ng Controls Working Group


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Aug. 13,

2010

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NZCBC
Lighting Controls
Report


Filename =
LC Subgroup Maniccia Draft_V3.doc


Emerging technolo
gies are those that have not

fully
demonstrated their potential for saving
79

energy
, are not fully reliable,

and
not completely
accepted by the market.
These

include
net
80

zero energy devices, wirele
ss control, ubiquitous sensors,
demand management system
s,
81

in
telligent lighting control

systems, performance measurement systems, and
controlling
82

lighting plug loads.
The reasons that these technologies haven’t been widely accepted include
83

initial
cost

and lack of life cycle cost information
, technical complexity, a
pplications
84

complexity, and perceptions that the technology is not reliable.

85

Several technical, cultural and policy gaps, and market barriers have to be addressed to make
86

lighting controls an indispensable part of net zero energy commercial buildings
.
These are
87

discussed in the following

section.

Solutions for overcoming these gaps and
barriers will need
88

to be market, application, and demonstration
focused for key and pacing technologies, and
89

research and development
-
focused for emerging technologies.

90


91

Technical Gaps and Barriers

92

Net Zero Energy Devices

93

Many lighting control devices such as power packs, sensors,
LED drivers,
or any device using
94

an illuminated indicator light, draw power when operating, and when in stand
-
by mode. The
95

power draw can be between xx and xxx watts per device, when increases substantially when
96

considering the volume of products used in a project. Eli
minating, or minimizing, the power
97

consumption of these devices, is critical to the success of net zero buildings.
This requires a
98

combination of effective energy harvesting techniques
, such as micro fuel cells or
99

photovoltaics
,

coupled with storage techn
ologies

such as batteries
. These technologies need to
100

be developed further to address long lifetime and cost effectiveness aspects. Coupled with
101

these, power conversion circuits and systems with high efficiency and long lifetime will need to
102

be developed.

103


104

Intelligent,
Networked
Lighting Controls
and
Advanced

Sensors

105

Intelligent, networked
control

systems

that enhance the quality, reliability and efficiency of
106

lighting systems,

provide continuous feedback on system operat
ion,
and integrate with other
107

building systems
are

essential for
maximizing energy savings and
occupant comfort
, and
108

minimizing building operating and management costs.
These systems require a software
109

platform and communication backbone, together with

intellig
ent sensing and switching devices.
110

Lighting controls have yet to fully exploit the advances in
, and advantages of,

networking
111

technologies.

112


113

It is widely acknowledged that maximum value for building owners, operators and occupants
114

can be extracted if all

of the building components and subsystems (e.g. lighting, HVAC,
115

shading, climate control, audiovisual subsystem, access control, security, onsite power
116

generation
, plug
-
in hybrid electric vehic
l
e
s, and emergency response) are fully integrated and
117

jointly
optimized. This whole
-
buildings integrated approach involves radically new
118

interdisciplinary activities across planning, design, equipment and material selection,
119

construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance to make optimal use of natural (e.g.
120

daylight) and human made systems. The benefits of user comfort, enhanced productivity,
121

energy efficiency, sustainable resource utilization, cost
-
effectiveness, return
-
on
-
investment and
122

Lighti
ng Controls Working Group


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2010

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NZCBC
Lighting Controls
Report


Filename =
LC Subgroup Maniccia Draft_V3.doc


lifecycle value offered by integrated controls of all the subsystems n
eeds to be fully explored
123

and quantified.

124


125

The progress on software development, which is vital for designing sophisticated systems that
126

can be re
liably installed in buildings and

achieve significant energy savings, has been very slow
127

due to

i
ndustry fra
gmentation

and lack of agreement on one or more industry
-
accepted
128

communication platform
s
.
Legacy 0
-
10v analog and DALI dimmers haven’t been able to make
129

a dent in the commercial building market mainly due to higher costs and commissioning
130

complexity. Penetration of DALI as a lighting control protocol has also been inhibited by the
131

fact that it

is designed primarily for dimming ballasts, not for sensors and it requires additional
132

wiring which increases the cost.
Sophisticated control systems tend to be complex and require
133

highly skilled installers, commissioning engineers and labor intensive pr
ocesses which add to
134

the overall cost and slow down adoption. Developing self
-
configuring standardized protocols
135

and advance
d

tools would make the process of installation and commissioning friendly to non
-
136

experts, and easy for electricians
.

137


138

Wireless

139

Desp
ite many virtues of wireless technologies (e.g. cost
-
effective deployment in legacy
140

building where rewiring could be cost prohibitive), the lighting c
ontrol industry has been slow
141

with

embracing it due to reliability and interference concerns. Availabilit
y of open standards,
142

software protocol stacks and chipsets haven’t been able to accelerate the market uptake.
143

Advances in opportunistic spectrum access technologies and progressive regulatory policies
144

could mitigate spectrum crowding and interference issu
es. Breakthroughs in high performance
145

low
-
power radios and scalable network architecture could expand the coverage of wireless
146

lighting controls networks to the entire building. Large scale wireless lighting control
147

demonstration projects would help alle
viate scalability and integrity concerns and establish
148

wireless technology as a reliable solution for connectivity.
P
roven cost
-
effective wireless
149

technology, improvements in energy harvesting sensors and advances in battery technology
are
150

needed to

make
wireless a preferred choice for lighting controls.

151

Performance monitoring, tracking, reporting and profiling

152

Determining the standardized methods for measuring the performance of lighting control
153

technologies over time is critical for auditing, benchmarki
ng, performance comparisons,
154

reporting and documentation. In the near term, the focus should be on development of
155

continuous performance monitoring tools, sensors, algorithms, and metrics that would enable
156

detailed metering, performance analysis and optim
ization. In addition to that decision support
157

tools need to be developed for load prediction, strategy optimization and demand response
158

planning purposes.

159


160

In future, automated continuous commissioning tools would be designed to track real
-
time
161

performan
ce of lighting system, detect anomalies causing energy wastage, identify any faults
162

and diagnose any system level problems. To further improve overall system control and
163

operations, the optimal operational parameters, strategies and schedules would be dec
ided
164

based on actual facility needs, current occupancy requirements, weather conditions, onsite
165

power generation and demand management policies. Maintenance crews would be
166

automatically alerted by the system to reduce system downtime. Lamp runtime tracki
ng and
167

battery level monitoring would facilitate scheduled maintenance. Thus, the paradigm will shift
168

from reactive maintenance to cost
-
effective proactive maintenance.

169

Lighti
ng Controls Working Group


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2010

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NZCBC
Lighting Controls
Report


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170

A n
ational repository should be created for storing life cycle performance and cost assessments
171

of representative lighting and energy management technologies operating in a range of building
172

types and climate zones. Public and private sector initiatives for
on
-
going benchmarking,
173

verification of savings and validation of control strategies would boost the adoption of latest
174

lighting control technologies.

175


176

Demand management

177

Development of novel demand management strategies and simulation tools focusing on
178

li
ghting controls and pilot programs quantifying their performance would strengthen the role of
179

lighting controls. In parallel, the sensitivity of demand management strategies to changes in
180

weather, daylight and occupancy dynamics should be investigated.
Re
search and cooperation
181

among sta
k
e
holders are needed to define the information models for real
-
time information
182

exchange between lighting systems, utilities, and smart grid. .

183

DC micro
-
grid

184

Today the power is supplied to lights and control equipments
in the form of AC. Given the
185

proliferation of laptops, computers, servers and networking equipments, emergence of SSL,
186

rise of solar power and the expected growth in electric vehicles, all of which are inherently DC
187

driven, it would be beneficial to devel
op DC micro
-
grids for commercial buildings. DC micro
-
188

grids would fundamentally change the way power is supplied in commercial buildings,
189

eliminate DC
-
AC
-
DC conversions, simplify equipment designs and layouts, and save energy.
190

Technical assessment of the
requirements is needed to derive the specification of DC micro
191

grid. The micro
-
grid architecture needs to address emerging lighting (SSL) as well as internet
192

connected appliances while clearly pointing out the benefits in terms of energy savings,
193

lifecycl
e cost savings and flexibility.

194

Standards

195

Lack of
universal standards for in
tegrated lighting controls will

lead to a fragmented market
196

full of high cost, proprietary and incompatible solutions, and the shortage of skilled
197

professionals. The vision of ful
ly integrated commercial building would not be realized
198

without scientifically sound standards that support ‘plug and play’ interoperability. It is
199

unlikely that one standard would address all the requirements hence, a suite of standardized
200

protocols, data

structures, control parameters, interfaces and interoperability profiles for
201

communications and information exchange between individual components and subsystem
s

202

throughout
a building needs to be developed
. Strategic partnerships, collabora
tion and
203

coope
ration cutting ac
ross industry domains, academic and governme
n
tal institutions,
204

regulato
rs and policy makers are essent
i
a
l to
undertake this endeavor
.

205

Simulation tools

206

Because field measurements and demonstrations are ex
pensive and time consuming,
207

simulati
ons will play key role in studying energy, economic, environmental impact of
208

integrated lighting control systems. Existing simulation tools are inadequate to handle the
209

complexities of the advanced lighting control technologies and interdependencies among

210

integrated systems. More R&D is needed to fill these gaps and to develop a comprehensive
211

simulation tool that can perform the complete life cycle impact assessment of not only lighting
212

control systems but also include the broader impact on other building

subsystems (e.g. HVAC).

213

When used in a real building, such a tool can utilize the real
-
time information about the
214

building subsystems, occupancy and weather condition to produce necessary visual feedback to
215

Lighti
ng Controls Working Group


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2010

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NZCBC
Lighting Controls
Report


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the facilities manager and send control signal
s to actuators to further optimize the overall
216

system performance.

217

Plug Load Control

218

Minimizing energy used by plug loads is crucial for meeting net zero energy goals. For
219

lighting, this means controlling task lights and other plug
-
in portable lamps. Few t
echnologies
220

exist on the market today that elegantly turn plug loads off when not in use, or needed. NEEDS
221

ELABORATION

222

Controls for SSL

223

Widely anticipated penetration of SSL requires development of novel digital control
224

methodologies which can not only ena
ble dimming but also scene setting, color temperature
225

control and desired distribution within the space while maintaining energy efficiency and lamp
226

life. Longevity of SSL brings about the need for long lasting drivers and control gear. New
227

technologies a
re needed for designing reconfigurable systems that can be easily adapted to
228

changes in layouts and usage patterns over its lifetime. In the long run, penetration of S
SL in
229

commercial buildings will

permanently change the lighting control landscape.

230


231

Cult
ural Gaps and Barriers
-

Richard

232

There are many cultural gaps and barriers that need to be overcome for improving the
233

penetration of key and pacing lighting control technologies.
These occur at all stages of the
234

project design, specification, and delivery p
rocess.

235


236

Owner issues

(cost)

237



Building owners
want a ‘reasonable’ return on any investment, including improvements in
238

energy efficiency.

Despite encouragement and recommendations to make decisions based
239

upon life cycle costing, owners remain committed to making decisions based upon first cost
240

and simple payback. Building owners also are hesitant to hire specially trained personnel to
241

ensur
e that lighting control systems continue to operate effectively. Therefore, control
242

technologies must be easy to install, operate, and maintain.

243



Next is the differential between who pays these first costs and who benefits from the energy
244

savings. This dif
ferential typically results in even shorter payback requirements.
[Richard,
245

not sure of what you meant here]

246



Typically owners are unaware of how energy is used by various components of their
247

buildings or what energy is being wasted due to a condition that
might be easily remedied.

248


249

Design
/Specification issues

250



Lack of consistency between states leads to confu
s
ion about what is required by code, and
251

what is not. Designers spend valuable “billable” hours researching and understanding
252

energy codes for their projects. Currently, there are
four different versions of 90.1 and
253

IECC.

254



Uncertainty exists between the us
e of automatic controls and manual overrides. Principles
255

have not been firmly established regarding occupant acceptance regarding the level and rate
256

of dimming; this issue is then in conflict with the concern that manual controls will be used
257

too often, e
liminating the energy savings.

258

Lighti
ng Controls Working Group


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2010

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NZCBC
Lighting Controls
Report


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Zoning logistics can be an issue. Depending on the type of ballast, zoning can be a labor
259

intensive process; this can be especially true for a renovation where the use of the space has
260

changed.

261



Changes in color appearance du
ring dimming of some source types.

262



Concern over reductions in lamp life due to more frequent on/off cycles.
Program start
263

ballasts were developed to overcome this issue, however, they must be specifically
264

specified on the project for them to show up on the
job. Low cost instant start ballasts are
265

shipped as standard with most fluorescent luminaires.

266



Concern over a
loss of efficacy during dimming, and increased energy use at full power
267

when dimming ballasts are used. Additional power is needed to heat the cat
hodes for
268

fluorescent dimming ballasts. This results in higher energy use, relative to non dimming
269

ballasts, when lamps are operated at full power.

270



In an attempt to keep control of costs, too few sensors may be specified in open office
271

areas.

272


273

Distributio
n/Commissioning Model

274

User issues

275



When not applied, installed, or commissioned correctly, l
ighting controls are frequently
276

short
-
circuited by building occupants or the maintenance people that have to field their
277

complaints; e.g. photocells are taped
-
over,
blinds are left permanently closed, sensitivities
278

maxed out and sensors are disabled or even removed.

279



Sensor location can become a problem as furniture is moved around after installation.

280


281

Installation Training
/Commissioning issues

282



Commissioning is viewed
as prohibitively expensive and frequently not performed; this
283

results in legitimate user issues and owner disappointment.

284



Installation of lighting controls in a retrofit is limited due to perceived hassles and added
285

costs.

286



Sensor placement is a bit of an a
rtform.

287



There is, at least, a perceived lack of guidelines regarding the proper cabling or wiring
288

installation of some components.

289



As
-
built drawings are rarely accurate and then frequently not modified when changes are
290

made to the building.

291



Night time
installations of

retrofits means the manufacturer is probably not available for
292

consultation when problems arise.

293


294

Maintenance/Operations
/Recommissioning

issues

295


296

Policy Gaps


RE lighting controls concerning:

297

1.

Building codes/standards

-

Michael

298

a.

C
ontent


require control of emergency lighting


off at night and when not in
299

emergency state

300

b.

adoption of these codes

301

c.

enforcement of these codes

302

d.

Expanding codes to apply to tenant renovation and fit
-
up

303

e.

Energy monitoring, reporting, and profiling

304

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2.

Legislation

305

3.

Environ
mental Policies

-

Dorene

306

a.

Building/system
Labeling?

307

b.

Carbon footprint assessment/Cradle
-
to
-
Cradle/LCA

308

4.

Market
-
based Programs

309

a.

Energy Star

310

b.

Energy Star Buildings

311

c.

Utility
Incentive programs



Michael/Dorene

312

Recommendations

-

1 Page

313


314

TEAM, PLEASE LOOK AT THE
RECOMMENDATIONS SPREADSHEET AND GIVE
315

FEEDBACK ON THE IDEA TO MAKE A TABLE SIMILAR TO THE ONE SHOWN. I AM
316

OPEN TO MODIFICATIONS/REFORMATTING.

317


318

5.

Technology improvements



Gert

319

a.

On
-
going b
enchmarking performance/measurement/verification of
320

savings/performance


321

b.

Lighting information model for monitoring

322

c.


RD&D priorities and other focused innovation mechanisms

323

i.

Put as much money into lighting control technology development as SSL
324

program

325

1.

Team industry with government

326


327

Recommendation for intelligent lighting contro
ls


pulled from Philips write up

328

In the short term, incremental advances in self
-
contained, sensors along with development of
329

intelligent algorithms to extract mea
ningful information from sensor

data would significantly
330

improve the overall light managemen
t system performance. In the longer term, innovative self
-
331

calibrating, self powered (energy harvesting) an
d fully integrated tiny

sensors would become
332

ubiquitous throughout the com
mercial building enabling distributed

intelligence. For example,
333

nonintrusi
ve, automated and reliable glare sensing technology can dramatically improve the
334

level of performance and acceptance of daylight harvesting lighting and shading systems by

335

automatically adjusting window glazing to mitigate glare, and adjusting electric lig
hting to
336

maintain visual comfort.


337


338

Building
-
wide networked lighting control systems are starting to emerge on the horizon but yet
339

to find a foothold in the market. Leveraging commercial of the shelf technologies (e.g. LAN
340

and IP) to address the
connectivity challenges would entail economics of scale, availability of
341

skilled manpower and compatibility with existing IT infrastructure thereby fostering the market
342

adoption. Obtaining buy
-
in from the building IT management is crucial for having LAN a
nd
343

IP
-
based control solutions accepted.

344


345

Extending the networked control paradigm beyond one building would facilitate enterprise
-
346

wide lighting management systems and services deployed over the internet. Enterprise
-
wide
347

lighting controls spanning across t
he geographical boundaries would fundamentally alter the
348

way lighting controls are designed, developed, operated and managed in the future. However,
349

Lighti
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Lighting Controls
Report


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further investment in research and development is needed to exploit these value propositions in
350

commercial

building landscape.


351


352

Initial efforts can be directed towards development of tools, strategies, framework and pilot
353

projects for integrated closed
-
loop lighting, HVAC and shading systems compatible with the
354

smart grid. In parallel, the implementation of
demand response and load shedding strategies
355

over integrated building management systems should be undertaken to be followed later by
356

larger scale integration of other subsystems, demonstrations and market transformation
357

strategies.

358


359


360

6.

Culture/Market
Acceptance

-

Richard

361

a.

Accelerated adoption and propagation of the technologies through enhanced
362

institutional policies and programs i.e. do we have any suggestions about
363

bridging the gaps identified in 2.b and 2.c above

364

Cultural

365



Case Studies


customers wan
t proof of economic claims and technological acceptability.
366

Case studies showing the economic and visual benefits of lighting controls must be
367

developed, well publicized and made readily available to owners, specifiers, DSM program
368

developers, code develop
ment organizations, government procurement groups and ESCOs.
369

These case studies must show (i) economic benefits, (ii) technological maturity, (iii)
370

previous market success and (iv) user acceptance and do so in a robust, statistically
371

significant manner.

372



B
est Practices

373



Specifiers and installers need consensus based, best practice documents explaining which
374

technologies are most appropriate given (i) the application, (ii) where they are to be
375

installed and (iii) the desired features. These documents must in
clude guidelines on
376

installation and commissioning and must differentiate between market segments and space
377

type.

378



Likewise, best practice documentation should be generated for the manufacturers detailing
379

the installation, wiring and maintenance requirement
s of their products.

380



Training


building occupants need to be trained on how to use their lighting controls and
381

the costs involved with short
-
circuiting them. But this must be joined with an effort to
382

solicit and act on feedback from those occupants with
legitimate problems with their
383

lighting controls.

384



Documentation


manufacturers should include labeled circuit schmatics on the devices or
385

in the packaging identifying the signals and/or function of all electrical connections.

386

i.


387


388

b.

Policy/Programs
-

What poli
cies/programs are recommended for reaching NZ
389

goals?
Richard/Dorene

390

i.

Building codes/standards

-


391

1.

Recommendations for code/standards improvements

392

a.

National adoption of a EE code with HPB standards
393

employed, so that there’s consistency and optimized EE
394

performance

395

o

Measuring the use of electricity broken down by load type (e.g. internal lighting
396

vs. HVAC, etc.) should be mandated by energy code.

397

Lighti
ng Controls Working Group


Page
10

Aug. 13,

2010

Draft
NZCBC
Lighting Controls
Report


Filename =
LC Subgroup Maniccia Draft_V3.doc


o

Commissioning (pre
-

and post
-
) should be mandated by energy code.

398

o

Minimum documentation requirements should be
mandated by energy code.

399

o


400

2.

Which is better from a technology perspective? Performance
-
based
401

policies or prescriptive? [
kWh/SF]

402

3.

National code vs. State Codes..???

403

ii.

Program to build a national database of information on energy savings from
404

lighting controls. B
uildings monitor performance and feed into a national
405

buildings performance database.

406


407


408

TIMELINE

409

July 27

Finalized outline with writing assignments distributed to team

410

Aug 4

Progress check


Conference call to review writing progress

411

Aug 11

Section drafts

due to Dorene

for co
llation into complete draft report

412

Aug. 18

Co
llated draft report distributed to team for final review

413

Aug 25

Receive team comments on comprehensive draft, review/revise accordingly

414

Aug 27

Send finalized draft to team for final review

415

Aug 30

All final comments due to Dorene

416

Aug 31

Completed w
orking group report

send to
ASE

417

End of Sept


Final report to DOE

418


419


420

Take the one that gets you 20% and get it into the market more.

421

Don’t spend research money on getting small % improvement

422