Champlain Reading for Inclusion - SOCIAL JUSTICE Curriculum ...

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Feb 2, 2013 (4 years and 8 months ago)

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Introduction

Grade 1 Social Studies Unit

J
ustice: Community and Diversity,

Peace

and Conflict Resolution,

and Social Action

Setting: Champlain Elementary School, Burlington, Vermont

Duration: October 2011
-
March 2012

Resources and Materials: Please see
Appendices, Bibliography, and Individual Lesson Plans

Procedures: Outlined in the Following Lessons

Assessments: See Appendices

Overview:

This

unit
is focused

on 3 main areas:

Community and Diversity,

Peace

and Conflict Resolution,

and
Social Action.


Eac
h of these 3 areas has its own
essential questions,
set of vocabulary words, texts,
lessons, group and individual activities, and opportunities to incorporate the arts.

Following is a
summary of each section.

Community and Diversity



In first grade, each
school year begins with focused instruction around b
uilding our classroom
community, establishing a safe, respectful climate, and practicing daily habits that help
set the stage for
a year of learning
.

By roughly the 4
th

week of school, students are typically ready to turn this

solid
foundational understanding into a more specific investigation of what it means to be a member of a
community, identifying attributes of communities, practicing inclusion, honoring our differe
nces, and
recognizing what makes us all united and unique.

In connection with our Readers' Workshop lessons on
synthesis, we've been identifying the "so what," or the main idea, of several books

and other literary
sources

with a focus on justice issues
.
This section of our unit

includes biographies of civil rights leaders,
an examination of our diverse families and holiday traditions, identifying our different strengths, talents,
and interests, and lessons about including everyone regardless of disabiliti
es, different races,
origins,
languages, personal style, homes,
talents, and families.

We explore
concepts such as
inclusion,

perspective taking, active listening, and respectful communication through various art forms.

This kind
of explicit teaching and

learning is invaluable to children's civic development.

It helps us establish a
climate in which we all feel comfortable with who we are, and learn to practice empathy and respect for
others in all aspects of our lives.

These crucial life skills enable
us to be "available" for the
rich

academic

learning that happens in a climate where everyone feels free to take academic risks and
express ourselves effectively. This section is the most heavily weighted in the overall unit as it is directly
connected to o
ur school wide practices and policies such as Responsive Classroom and PBIS, is
particularly accessible and familiar in content to our young children, and is the foundation for deeper
learning moving forward.

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Peace

and Conflict Resolution

-

This section w
ill emphasize peace, and how we can all be peacemakers
in our own communities.

Students will learn and practice specific conflict resolution skills, such as
talking calmly, listening, compr
omise, asking for help, and making a different choice
. We will al
so
explore communication skills such as using “I statements,” self
-
advocacy, awareness of emotions, self
-
control, and perspective taking.
Again, we'll be using texts, drama, visual art, writing, discussion, and
other m
edia to explore these concepts. Many

of these skills will be taught through the use of role play
using scenarios relevant to students in their daily social interactions.


This section will build on and draw
from the previous, reinforcing
concepts of

empathy, respect, and differences.



Soci
al Action


I hope to empower our first graders to be critical thinkers, develop their own analysis of
justice and injustice, and find ways to improve their own communities, however significant or
small.

Students will learn about the process by which chang
e happens.
We'll scratch the surface of
some global issues such as climate change, poverty, and labor issues through texts and the
arts;

however the focus of each lesson in this section will be based on our goals of developing empathy,
exploring perspecti
ves, and empowering students to make positive choices that can lead to changes that
benefit

our own community.


I am a firm believer in the principal of "no doom and gloom" when
introducing justice issues to young children.

This means that students will
not simply be burdened by
the ills of the world, but rather, learn about some ways that inequity and unjust situations affect
communities, and then have a vehicle to be an agent of change to make them better in our own
community.



This unit was designed
as part of m
y thesis to obtain my M.Ed. and was
used to conduct qualitative
research from October 2011
-
March 2012.
Throughout the implementation of this unit, I
engaged in
ongoing analysis of the effectiveness of such instruction, allowing student interes
t, interaction, and
questions to guide my choices along the way. This study
has enabled me

to practice constant reflection
about my teaching choices, including content, delivery, and follow through, as well as enhance my
overall practice as a
socially res
ponsible teacher. In designing this study, my hope wa
s that my findin
gs
will show that children
have a deeper understanding of justice issues after unit impl
ementation, and

inform me about
effective ways to apply
my own teaching strategies to implement a
curriculum for
social justice. With guidance from my students, through data collection, and analysis, I will also be
working to determine what is age appropriate for first graders, to what extent this unit might be
effective, and how accessible I can make

the content for my young learners. My goals include increased
student capacity for discussion, conflict resolution, empathy, perspective taking, inclusive behavior, and
respect for differences, self
-
awareness, advocacy, and action.

Part of the Burlingt
on School District’s mission is to “encourage students to be independent, motivated,
and socially responsible citizens,” which I examine
d

in practice. Grounded in the principles of the
Responsive Classroom model and as we as a district embrace PBIS,
I am

committed to the belief that the
social curriculum is as important as the academic curriculum and that the best learning takes place when
the school environment is kind, safe, respectful, and predictable. I believe my research focus is a very
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appropriate
match with our district’s mission, as I will be striving to raise students’ social awareness,
critical thinking skills, empathy, and creative expression through a justice
-
based social studies unit.


Overall Unit Plan


St. Michael’s College Format

FOCUS:

Social Studies
-

Justice

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

How do communities work together? Why is it important to respect diversity? How can we
practice peace in our lives? How
do people effectively resolve conflicts
? How do inequity and
unjust situations affect communities? How can we all help to make our community a better
place for everyone?
How do people work for change?

RATIONALE:

The purpose of this study is to explore how social justice education with young

students
might enable
students

to more deeply understand concepts of justice, have meaningful conversations about issues of
societal justice and equity, exhibit more empathy for others, and inspire them to take action. Social
justice curriculum can be de
fined as one that integrates an analysis of the social, political, and cultural
structures that create and perpetuate inequity across the globe (McDonald, 2008). My focus is on social
justice education through the arts. This includes

language arts,

visua
l art, music, drama, storytelling and
other creative forms of artistic expression.

Young children are exposed to issues of inequity every day, such as economic, racial, and social
discrimination, poverty, and exclusion; yet, most lack the awareness needed
to address these

issues as
responsible cit
izens
. Many children feel disempowered in their role as children facing global issues that
seem too big to tackle, or too systematic to envision viable change. In order to help empower young
people to be active,
engaged citizens, they need to be armed with critical thinking skills necessary to
understand and confront these situations. The arts provide personally engaging, creative, expressive
means through which to access these skills. The use of dramatic role
-
p
lay, visual artistic expression,
language arts, and music can enable students to communicate with others in honest, safe ways, express
their perspectives,
and learn to appreciate others’.


If any reader is interested in the related qualitative study that c
orresponds with this unit, please email
me at
rhaslam@bsdvt.org
.

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FOCUSING QUESTIONS:

Section 1: Community and Diversity

What is a community? What are some communities we belong to? What are the
responsibilities of community members? What are the
rights of community members?


What
does it mean to respect diversity? How are we alike and different?

Why is it important to
practice inclusion?

Section 2: Peace

and Conflict Resolution

What is peace? What does peace look, sound, and feel like? What is

conflict? What does
conflict look, sound, and feel like? What are some ways people handle conflict? What is
empathy? What is the relationship between our actions, choices, and words, and their
consequences?

Section 3: Social Action

What are some things we
might

improve in our community? Who do we need to talk to? How
do we make meaningful change happen? How can we help encourage others to help improve
our community?

GRADE EXPECTATIONS FOR VERMONT’S FRAMEWORK OF STANDARDS AND LEAR
NING
OPPORTUNITIES: HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES


Inquiry, Social and Historical Questioning

2:1 Students initiate an inquiry by asking questions based on what they have seen, what they have read,
and what they have listened to, and/or what they have resear
ched as a class


History

2:9 Students show understanding of how humans interpret history by differentiating among fact,
opinion, and interpretation of classroom situations, stories, and other media.


Physical and Cultural Geography

2:12 Students show und
erstanding of human interaction with the environment over time by:



identifying ways in which they

and people in the community take care of or hurt the
environment



participating in taking care of the environment


2:13 Students analyze how and why cultures
continue and change over time by:



identifying ways culture is expressed in their communities, such as celebrations,
legends, and traditions


2:14 Students act as citizens by:



describing what it means to be a responsible member of a group



describing what
his/her role is as a member of various groups



demonstrating positive interaction with group members

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explaining their own point of view on issues that affect themselves



participating in setting and following the rules of the group, school, community


Civics
, Government, and Society

2:15 Students show understanding of various forms of government by describing characteristics of good
leadership and fair decision
-
making and how that affects others


2:16 Students examine how different societies address issues
of human interdependence by:



explaining that people have rights and needs



identifying how the groups to which a person belongs influence how she or he
thinks and acts



defining their own rights and needs, and the rights and needs of others, in the
classroom
, school, and playground



giving examples of ways that she or he is similar to and different from others



identifying examples of interdependence among individuals and groups



practicing communication skills with individuals and groups



describing feelings and

situations that might lead to conflict



describing ways that people solve problems


2:17 Students examine how access to various institutions affects justice, reward, and power by
identifying ways in which local institutions promote the common good


VERMON
T’S FRAMEWORK OF STANDARDS AND LEARNING OPPORTUNITIES

Fields of Knowledge: History and Social Studies

Citizenship

6.9 Meaning of Citizenship: Students examine and debate the meaning of citizenship and act as citizens
in a democratic society. This is
evident when students:

a.

debate and define the rights, principles, and responsibilities of citizenship in a
school, community, and country

6.10 Types of Government: Students will be introduced to principles of leadership, rights and
responsibilities by exami
ning the structure of their home and school.

6.11 Institutional Access: Students will be introduced to issues of justice by considering fair treatment of
people within their neighborhood and school

6.12 Human Rights: Students will begin to identify the con
cept of human rights


Diversity and Unity

6.13 Concepts of Culture: Students will be introduced to the concepts of culture in their local
community.

6.14 Forces of Unity and Disunity: Students will be introduced to issues that cause tensions between and
am
ong people within their community.


Economics

6.16
Impact of Economic Systems:

Students will be introduced to issues of needs and wants of people
and on the environment in their local community.


Conflict and Conflict Resolution

6.18 Nature of Conflict: St
udents will be introduced to issues of conflicts and how they can be resolved.

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Identity and Interdependence

6.19 Students will be introduced to some of the influences and impact of the construction, preservation,
and change of identity with their families

and the community.


Vermont Standards of Education: Vital Results: Communication Standards

1.13 Listening


Clarification and Restatement

Students listen actively and respond to communication by asking clarifying questions, restating
information and respo
nding through discussion, writing, and using art forms.

1.15 Expression
-

Speaking

Students use verbal and nonverbal skills to express themselves effectively by sharing information,
constructively expressing preferences, feelings, and needs.

1.16 Expression
-

Artistic Dimensions

Students use a variety of forms, such as dance, music, theater, and visual arts to create projects that are
appropriate in terms of the following dimensions: skill development, reflection and critique, making
connect
ions, and approach to work.

1.23 Poetry

In writing poetry, students use a variety of forms.


Vermont Standards of Education: Vital Results: Personal Development Standards

3.3 Respect

Students demonstrate respect for themselves and others.

3.9 Sustainabilit
y

Students make decisions that demonstrate understanding of natural and human communities, the
ecological, economic, political, or social systems within them, and awareness of how their personal and
collective actions affect the sustainability of these int
errelated systems.

3.10 Teamwork

Students perform effectively on teams that set and achieve goals, conduct investigations, solve
problems, and create solutions.

3.11 Interactions

Students interact respectfully with others, including those with whom they ha
ve differences.

3.12 Conflict Resolution

Students use systematic and collaborative problem solving processes, including mediation, to negotiate
and resolve conflicts.

3.13 Roles and Responsibilities

Students analyze their roles and responsibilities in the
ir family, their school, and their community.

4.1 Service

Students take an active role in their community by planning, implementing, and reflecting on activities
that respond to community needs, and by using academic skills and knowledge in real
-
life commu
nity
situations.

4.3 Cultural Expression

Students demonstrate understanding of the cultural expressions that are characteristic of particular
groups.

4.4 Effects of Prejudice

Students demonstrate understanding of the concept of prejudice, and of its effect
s on various groups.




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VERMONT COMMON CORE STATE STANDARDS FOR
ENGLISH
LANGUAGE ARTS ADDRESSED

Reading: Literature: Grade 1



RL.1.1.

Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.



RL.1.2.

Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate
understanding of their central message or
lesson.



RL.1.3.

Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details.


Reading: Informational Text: Grade 1



RI.1.1.

Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.



RI.1.2.

Identify th
e main topic and retell key details of a text.



RI.1.3.

Describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.



RI.1.4.

Ask and answer questions to help determine or clarify the meaning of words and phrases in a t
ext.



RI.1.5.

Know and use various text features (e.g., headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic
menus, icons) to locate key facts or information in a text.



RI.1.6.

Distinguish between information provided by pictures or other illustrations and
information
provided by the words in a text.



RI.1.7.

Use the illustrations and details in a text to describe its key ideas.



RI.1.8.

Identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.



RI.1.9.

Identify basic similarities in and differences
between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in
illustrations, descriptions, or procedures).


Reading: Foundational Skills: Grade 1



RF.1.4.

Read with sufficient accuracy and f
luency to support comprehension;
Read

grade
-
level text with
purpose and understanding.


Writing: Text Types and Purposes: Grade 1



W.1.1.
. Write opinion pieces in which they introduce the topic or name the book they are writing about,
state an opinion, supply a reason for the opinion, and prov
ide some sense of closure.



W.1.2.

Write informative/explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic,
and provide some sense of closure.



W.1.3.

Write narratives in which they recount two or more appropriately sequenced events
, include some
details regarding what happened, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide some sense of
closure.

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Writing: Production and Distribution of Writing: Grade 1



W.1.5.

With guidance and support from adults, focus on a topic, respond to

questions and suggestions
from peers, and add details to strengthen writing as needed.



W.1.6.

With guidance and support from adults, use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing,
including in collaboration with peers.

Writing: Research to

Build and Present Knowledge: Grade 1



W.1.7.

Participate in shared research and writing projects (e.g., explore a number of “how
-
to” books on a
given topic and use them to write a sequence of instructions).



W.1.8.

With guidance and support from adults, rec
all information from experiences or gather information
from provided sources to answer a question.




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SECTION 1: COMMUNITY AND DIVERSITY

Community and Diversity
:
Lesson 1


We Are a Learning Community

Estimated Time



1 hour total, may be spread over 2 sessions

Essential Question


What is a community? Who are our community members and what are our rights?
What are our responsibilities? Why do we need rules in our classroom community?

Vocabulary


community, team,

cooperation, communicate, responsibility, expression, rights, rules

Activities :

1.

We start with the word “community” on chart. What do we know about this word? What is a
community? What do community members do? Students help generate a list of ideas.
We
establish that a community is a group of people who work together, help each other, and share
an interest, and that communities are made up of lots of different people.

2.

We go on to list the different communities we and those we know, belong to. We come

up with
examples like King Street Center, the YMCA, Soccer, Art Club, Scouts, PTO, Yoga, and even
extend our thinking to examples like our class, our school, our family, church, Vermont, and the
world. Of course, each of these examples spur valuable disc
ussion about the shared goals
specific to each community, the roles of members, and the agreement that t
hese different
communities are

important parts of our lives.

3.

We orally share about some of the rules at
each of our community settings and make
conn
ections to our own school and classroom
rules. Why do we need rules? What would
these different community settings be like
without rules?
Key concept:
Following the
rules is our responsibility as part of a
community.


4.

Students choose a community they b
elong to.
They illustrate the setting, include some
community members and their roles, and
write about their chosen community. They
identify some of the rules of their community,
perhaps sharing what might happen without
rules.

Expectations


Through gro
up discussion, sharing,
and concrete examples in our own and our
classmates’ lives, students gain an understanding of communities, their roles in society, and the roles of
their members. Students are able to understand the connection between the rights an
d responsibilities
of community members and our school rules and protocols. Students will demonstrate this
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understanding through their exploration of a community they cho
ose to illustrate and describe

in
discussion, by listening to peers, by generating hy
pothetical situations wherein rules were not in place,
talking about what unjust situations look or feel like using examples from their own lives, and exploring
what our own examples of communities in our lives would look and feel like with no rules in pla
ce.

Students directly or indirectly make connections to our classroom and school
-
wide practices and
protocols such as Responsive Classroom and Positive Behavior Intervention Systems (PBIS). We make
connections to our lessons about “reading with a wide awake m
ind” as we explore active listening and
“listening with a wide awake mind.”
Students understand that w
hen others are talking, our job is to
think about what is being said, make connections, visualize, ask questions, make inferences, and find
other ways to

respond and contribute.

Accommodations


Whole group lessons and discussions allow for students to learn from each other in
a low pressure setting. Students who may be less familiar with the content or less comfortable
volunteering their ideas are able

to access the content through active listening. This lesson is designed
to allow all students to make a personal connection to belonging to several communities. Students are
all stakeholders in our classroom community.

Closure


We review our rules and
talk about how they are all important to our classroom community.
Students who wish to may share their illustrations, descriptions, rules, and connections with the group.


Community and Diversity: Lesson 2


Swimmy
, by Leo Lionni


Estimated Time



15
-
20 minutes (Read Aloud Mini
-
Lesson)

Essential Question


Why is it important for community members to work together?

Vocabulary


community, team, cooperation, communicate, leadership

Activities:

1.

Gather students for an interactive read aloud of Leo L
ionni’s
Swimmy
.

2.

While reading, encourage students to identify Swimmy’s group of fish as a community. What do
they like to do? What is the problem in this story? How do these community members work
together

for a common purpose? Why is it important fo
r community members to work
together?

3.

During Readers’ Workshop, we’ve been working on synthesis. We describe this concept using
the term “so what?” with our first graders. Students are familiar with identifying the point, or
the “so what” of various te
xts we read, and also with including a “so what” in the conclusion
paragraphs of our writing. For each Read Aloud lesson in this unit, students will be identifying
the “so what.”

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4.

How does this story relate to other communities we’re part of? Can anyon
e think of a time
when members of a community had to work together to keep everyone safe, or to solve a
problem? How do members of our school community work together to keep everyone safe?

Expectations


Students will be
able to synthesize the “big idea”
in
this story


that community
members need to work together
to keep everyone safe and to solve
their problems. Students should
also be able to make a personal
connection to their own lives, our
class community, or our school
community.

Accommodations


T
his lesson
builds on the previous, and again
invites all students to access the
content through familiar, inclusive means using our own school and classroom communities as
examples. All students are familiar with our school rules and how they help to keep

us all safe, as we’ve
been teaching into our PBIS matrix for several weeks at this point.

Closure


Students will share their connections and talk about how working together was important in
this story. We will generate their ideas for the “so what” t
ogether, then we’ll choose one to post.


Community and Diversity: Lesson 3



Introduction to Justice and Pre
-
Assessment
, “Pass the Mask”

Estimated Time


30
-
45 minutes

Essential Question


What is justice? What does it look and feel like if something i
s fair? What does it
look and feel like if something is unfair? How can we all help to make our community a more just place?

Vocabulary


justice, empathy, respect, fair, unfair, perspective, point of view,
considerate


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Activities



Building on Lesson 1
’s learning about what we need as a community in order to meet
everyone’s needs and learn effectively, we need to further explore what it looks and feels like when
something is fair and unfair.

1.

Students generate their own definitions of the words “fair”
and “unfair.”

2.

Students generate examples of situations they describe as “fair” and “unfair.”

3.

We play a game called “Pass the Mask” where students sit in a circle. One person starts by
showing a certain emotion or word on their face, and “passes” it to the

next person in the circle.
As each child “passes the mask,” we see everyone’s interpretation of the named emotion or
word. Try the following words: happy, sad, surprised, fair, unfair, lonely, included

4.

We make a t
-
chart together of what “fair” and
“unfair” look like and sound like.

5.

Administer Pre
-
Assessment (
Appendix A
).

I will read each statement aloud to students, who will
mark it with the appropriate symbol indicating “fair,” “unfair,” or “not sure” to describe each
statement. Students are also asked to write their own definition for “fair” and “unfair.”






Lonely

(E
xcluded
)





Included




Surprised







U
nfair

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Expectations


Students participate and generate definitions and examples for our discussion, and ideas
for our t
-
chart. Students participate i
n the “pass the mask” activity and are thoughtful about how their
expression communicates the named emotion or word. Students complete the pre assessment.

Accommodations


First grade students are at the developmental age where the concepts of what is
“fa
ir” or “unfair” are relatively intuitive. Most first graders are eager to share their opinions on this
topic. Those that are not ready to share can listen to their peers, make connections to what they hear,
and share some general examples others give tha
t may be familiar to them.

Closure


We’ll post our t
-
chart and focus our attention on the information about fairness. We can then
synthesize this learning into action steps. What can we all do to make our community a more fair, just
place for everyone?


Community and Diversity: Lesson 4


Introduction to Inclusion
, K
-
5 Burlington School District

Estimated Time


30 minutes

Essential Question


What does it mean for people to be inclusive? What does it look and feel like
when people are being inclusive?

What does it look and feel like when people are being exclusive? How
can we be inclusive at school and in our other settings?

Vocabulary


inclusion, exclusion
, include, exclude

Activities



See
Appendix B

for complete lesson written by Matthew Hajdun,

2010.

Build on our work from yesterday with another round of “Pass the Mask.” Today, try these words:
inclusion, exclusion.

Expectations


Students gain an initial understanding of inclusion and develop a working definition.
Students identify feelings
and emotions associated with being excluded or included. Students
brainstorm ways to include others. Students make a connection between being inclusive and being fair.

Accommodations


Most students at this age/grade level can think of a personal example

where they or
a friend have felt left out. We model and provide many opportunities each day where all students are
included. Students will also be using pictures as prompts during this lesson to help them identify
situations that are inclusive and exclu
sive, the feelings and emotions associated with each, and can learn
from each other as they volunteer words the children in the pictures might be saying to each other.

Closure


This lesson is intended to prepare students for a visit from our guest reader
coming for the
Reading for Inclusion program. We’ll connect this learning about inclusion to our previous work about
being a community and being fair. This is also the first of many lessons about respecting differences.
Students will reflect on how they

can be more inclusive of others in their own lives, for example, in the
lunchroom, on the playground, during group work times, and after school. Some may share an idea for
a way they plan to be inclusive.

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Community and Diversity: Lesson 5


Inclusion P
re
-
Lesson, Grade 1:
And Tango Makes Three
(Richardson and Parnell)

Estimated Time


45 minutes


Essential Question


What makes
a family a family? How are our
families diverse?

Vocabulary


differences,
similarities, diverse

Activities



See
Appendix C

fo
r
complete lesson written by
Rebecca Haslam, 2011

Expectations


Students identify
some attributes of their own
families. During the read aloud of
And Tango Makes Three
, students
identify some attributes of Tango’s family. Students help compile informati
on into a class t
-
chart
comparing our families and Tango’s family. Students recognize that families are all different. With
guidance, students discuss how families are all similar: there are people who care for each other, and
love makes a family.

Acc
ommodations


Each child can start with what they know


their own family. Each student gets the
validation of knowing that their family is a great example of how we’re all different, but how we all have
something in common when we talk about our families
. This text includes content that may make some
uncomfortable, however it is presented in a fictional, low
-
risk way that students can easily be guided to
treat respectfully. Many of our students have personal connections to the content in this book that
they
may find particularly validating.

Closure


Engage students in a guided discussion
after the book. Connect this lesson with previous
learning about inclusion and fairness.

Ideas for discussion:

We are all different. We have different families,
we come from different places, we have different
color skin, eyes, and hair, we like different things,
we live in different kinds of homes, we dress and
speak differently than each other, etc. Sometimes
p
eople treat each other unfairly because of these differences. We have a job to do: now that we know
what makes a family, we need to help teach other people that our differences aren’t as important as our
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similarities. We’re all people with feelings, ou
r feelings matter, and we all have families that love us.
How might it feel if someone said, “I don’t want to be your friend because you don’t have green eyes,” or
“You can’t play with us because you don’t have a brother or sister,” or “You aren’t invited

because you
have two moms” ? Would this be fair? No. Let’s make sure people know that our differences aren’t
reasons to treat each other differently. In order to be inclusive, we must respect our differences.


Support students as they identify a “s
o what” for this read aloud. Post their words along with a copy of
the book cover on our bulletin board. Students are beginning to see how the concepts we’ve covered so
far: community, inclusion, and diversity, are all components of justice.


Community a
nd Diversity: Lesson 6


Reading f
or Inclusion Guest Reader Visit:

Don’t Call Me Special, a
First Look at Disability (Thomas and Harker)

Estimated Time


30 minutes

Essential Question


How do our bodies affect the way we do things? How
can we be
inclusive of everyone regardless of their abilities/disabilities?

Vocabulary


differences, similarities, diverse, disability, ability, disables,
differently abled, handicapped

Activities



See
Appendix D

for complete lesson by Matthew Hajdun, 2010

Expecta
tions


Students are respectful audience members for our guest
reader. If they have questions for our guest about his/her disability, they ask
them in a respectful way. Students demonstrate their understanding of
empathy, inclusion, and respect for diffe
rences by listening to the story
attentively, asking questions, making connections, sharing inferences, and generating a “so what” at the
end of the story.

Accommodations


Students have been well
-
prepped for this visit. As with any other guest that comes

to our school, students know to be respectful audience members. Because we’ve had so much practice
with synthesizing the “big ideas” in texts, students should all be able to focus on the enduring
understanding included in this lesson, even though it invo
lves some sophisticated perspective taking and
empathy.

Closure


We’ll thank our guest reader and share our work thus far on Justice. We’ll add this book to
our display wall and continue to discuss and practice inclusion in our own community.



[
16
]


Extension



One of my particularly bright students did some independent research at home about Helen
Keller. He made a poster and shared it with the class.




Community and Diversity: Lesson 7


Reading for Inclusion Post
-
Lesson: Love Makes a Family

Estimated T
ime


45

minutes

Essential Question


What makes a family a family?

Vocabulary


differences, similarities, diverse
, relatives

Activities :

1.

Read the text,
Families are Different, (
Pellegrini )

2.

See
Appendix E

for complete lesson written by Rebecca
Hasla
m, 2011

3.

Teachers may choose to use the family context to bring
the focus back to diversity, or follow
Appendix E

for a
focus on inclusion.

Expectations


Students will be able to identify how families are all different, and how they are all made
up of
people who care for each other and love each other. Students will be able to include details,
attributes, and nonfiction conventions in their artistic representations of their families.


[
17
]


Accommodations


Students are using their own families as context,
so each student can be an expert.
The read aloud in this lesson will provide many jumping off points for discussion about how families are
alike and different.

Closure


Students will be invited to share their artwork and talk about their piece. We’ll le
arn more
about each other’s’ diverse families. We will also add a “so what” about this book to our bulletin board.



Community and Diversity: Lesson 8


We’re All Unique! Honoring our Differences

Estimated Time


20 minute mini
-
lesson on valuing our dif
ferences

Essential Question


How are we all unique? Why is this important? How can we honor, respect, and
celebrate our differences?

Vocabulary


unique, diversity, differences
, talents

Activities :

1.

Play “Touch Someone Who.” Seat students in a circle.

Choose 4
-
5 helpers to stand on the
outside of the circle while the rest hide their eyes. Explain to students that helpers would be
gently tapping friends on the head, and that it’s not important to know who chooses whom.

2.

Read the following statements,
or any of your own depending on your students, and have
helpers walk around the (outside of) the circle to choose a student or two to acknowledge with
a gentle tap on the head.

Touch someone who is a caring friend.

Touch someone who is a talented athlete
.

Touch someone who is a hard worker at reading time.

Touch someone who is helpful to others.

Touch someone who you’d like to get to know better.

Touch someone who you think it would be fun to have a play date with.

Touch someone who you think is a smart s
cientist.

Touch someone who is good at math.

Touch someone who is a talented artist.

Touch someone who is inclusive.

Touch someone who is funny.

Touch someone who is a great writer.

Touch someone who is a talented musician.

3.

You may consider switching your
group of helpers after 4 or 5 statements so everyone gets a
chance to experience being chosen.

[
18
]


Expectations


Students remain quiet throughout this activity and are thoughtful about their choices if
they’re a helper.

Accommodations


Of course, you’ll have

your teacher eye out for who’s getting chosen or not chosen
and you can also circulate and select kids. You can model for your helpers how to select kids who may
not necessarily shine in other ways. You can adjust the list of statements to include attri
butes for
certain students you may want to draw attention to.

Closure


The point of this activity is to offer validation to all students for their individual strengths,
talents, and other attributes. Ask children to share how they felt when they were
selected by a student.
Ask children why it might be important to let people know the things we like about them. Ask children if
it bothered them to not get picked for every single thing. Is it important to be really good at everything,
or is it okay to
have our own unique talents and attributes that make us who we are? We can even find
a “so what” in this simple activity: We are all diverse in many ways, and our differences make us special.


Community and Diversity: Lesson 9


Honoring Diversity
-

The

Colors of Us

Estimated Time


45 minutes

Essential Question


How are we all unique? Why is this important? How can we honor, respect, and
celebrate our differences?

Vocabulary


unique, diversity,
differences, similarities, race, color, ethnicity

Activ
ities :

1.


Read the text,
The Colors of Us
, by Karen Katz. This book follows a child through her
neighborhood as she compares each person’s skin color to a yummy food or other
pleasant item, then goes home to paint a portrait of everyone’s face with a compa
rison
to a food or object.

2.

Brainstorm a list of food/items we remember from the book, and add our own ideas to
it. If students are comfortable, call up a volunteer or two and have children come up
with some good words to use for their skin tones. Choose
children with different skin
colors as examples.

3.

Do a simple demonstration of drawing a portrait, starting with the shape of a face the
right size for the page, where eyes, nose, and mouth should go, where the hair falls, and
to include things like ears, n
eck and shoulders.

4.

Show students how to fold over the bottom 3 inches or so of their paper, held
lengthwise, to leave room for their sentence that follows the pattern of the book: “My
skin is the color of ___________.”


[
19
]



Expectations


All words childr
en use to compare to our skin tone are respectful words with positive
connotations. Students use the multicultural crayons and pencils to match their true skin tone to the
best of their ability.



Accommodations


Give students the opportunity to

play with the skin tone colored pencils and
multicultural crayons on the back of their papers before they begin. Some students may need a mirror
to see their own face. Some students have overgeneralized words like “black” or “white” to their literal
mea
nings and need to see their skin tone is somewhere in between. Others will default to the peach,
orange, yellow, or brown just by habit. Encourage kids to mix colors together to create a unique color.
Encourage kids to hold their arm next to a color to
see if it’s really a match. Many students will need
guidance choosing a food word that is a good comparison for their unique skin color. A common
roadblock is having several (Caucasian) students choose the word “peach.” Encourage students to really
stre
tch their creative minds and visualize thinking more in terms of simile.




[
20
]


Closure


Invite each child to share their portrait and sentence. Take a group photo of students with
their portraits, or have them look around and engage in a discu
ssion about the wonderful, different
“colors of us!”


Community and Diversity: Lesson 10



Stand on the Line

Estimated Time


15
-
20 minute mini
-
activity


Essential Question


How much or how little do you agree with the following statements? What can we
learn about our community members by watching where they stand?

Vocabulary


perspective, point of view, empathy, uni
que, similarities, differences

Activities :

1.


Set up an imaginary linear spectrum in your classroom, for example, from one end of
the carpet

to the other. Designate one end as “Strongly Agree,” and the other end as “I
Don’t Agree At All!” Ask kids to help decide what other points on the line might mean,
like the middle, slightly to one side of the middle, etc.

2.

Tell students you’ll be making
statements and they need to silently stand on the line to
show how much they agree or not. What can we tell about our friends by looking
around? What happens when we all try to stand in one spot? Do we all feel the same
way about things, or are there t
hings we feel differently about?

Expectations


Students remain quiet and move safely. The goal of this kinesthetic activity is to give
students a chance to physically show where they “stand” in relation to certain statements. Statements
can be as simple

as, “I like ice cream,” or more in depth, “I think we should compost in our classroom.”
Certain statements will beg discussion. The overall expectation is that students see how diverse our
opinions, preferences, and feelings are about various topics, an
d handle these differences respectfully.

Accommodations


Students who are feeling confused about any given statement may choose to float
somewhere near the middle. Be sure to include statements that all students will have an opinion about,
and mix in
simple statements as well as more profound ones. If a student is finding herself or himself
standing alone at one end, talk about how our unique qualities are valuable, just as our similarities are.

Closure


Pull together in a circle and discuss the acti
vity. What did students notice? Were there any
statements they wanted to comment on? Use this lesson’s vocabulary words to discuss the following:

How did it feel when you were standing with a large group of people?

How did it feel to be standing alone
?



[
21
]



Community and Diversity: Lesson 11

Only One Club

by
Jane Naliboff and Jeff Hopkins

Estimated Time


45 minutes

Essential Question


How are our family traditions and holidays different?

Vocabulary


unique, diverse, Hanukkah
, tradition, culture
, holiday, celebration

Activities :

1.


Read students the text,
The Only One
Club
, by Naliboff and Hopkins.

2.

Invite students to brainstorm different
ways they might be unique.

3.

Have students cut out a large orange
circle with a tracer, or have these ready
in
advance, (recommended.)

4.

Students create their own “Only One
Club” button to wear and proudly
celebrate what makes them unique.

Expectations


Students think of something that makes
them unique and create a button to wear like the
children in the story. Ch
ildren learn a lot about each
other by sharing their buttons.

Accommodations


It may be helpful to help students
rehearse a reply for when others ask what the buttons
are all about.

Some students will need help finding something about themselves that is
unique and
appropriate to celebrate.

I was lucky enough to have a parent volunteer come in with this book and lesson all ready to go. Her
child and family celebrate Hanukkah and she shared a personal connection about feeling the same way
as the charact
er in this book. Consider having guest readers from your school community come in to
share some of the instructional read alouds as well as their own perspectives.




[
22
]


Closure


Invite students to share their buttons with the class and wear them for
the remainder of the
day. Be sure to make one yourself, too! Students like to see that you, too, are proud of what makes you
unique.



Community and Diversity: Lesson 12


Our Holidays are Diverse

Estimated Time


20
-
40 minutes

Essential Question


How are our holiday traditions diverse?

Vocabulary


diversity, difference, similarities,

holidays, traditions,
relatives, celebrate, ritual, culture

Activities :

1.

Students will make a poster illustrating the December
holiday(s) they celebrate at home.
Note: we chose
December holidays because it happened to be
December when we were studying this topic. You may
want to adjust so the content is relevant.

2.

Students will incorporate non
-
fiction text conventions
like a title, captions, labels, arrows, close u
ps, and
other graphic tools to organize their content.

3.

This lesson can be supplemented by any of the books
on the instructional read aloud list that pertain to
diverse holidays. (Recommended:
Light the Lights,
My Two Holidays.)

It can also be used as a

follow
up from the previous lesson.






[
23
]


Expectations


Students visually communicate which holiday(s) they celebrate during December at their
home. Students include non
-
fiction text features that share specific information about their traditions,
ritual
s, and culture.

Accommodations


Show students how they might organize their poster to show two different homes,
two or more holidays, or two families they spend time with.

Closure


Invite students to share their poster and talk about their holiday tradit
ions.


Community and Diversity: Lesson 13


Exploring Vocabulary with

Facial Expressions and

Sound

Estimated Time


20
-
30 minutes

Essential Question

What might different emotions sound like? What might different words look like
when acted out?

Vocabulary



excluded, included, fair, unfair, cooperation, diverse

Activities :

1.


Start students in a circle and tell them this is similar to “Pass the Mask.” In this game,
students will be sharing a sound. They do not have to pass the same sound around
, but
can make up their own sound on their turn if they want to.

2.

Start by modeling. Tell students the first word is “included.” Next, tell them that we’re
going to make a sound that goes with that word. This ends up being more intuitive than
interpretiv
e, but works surprisingly well with first grade imaginations!

3.

I make a happy sound that communicates satisfaction. I motion to the child next to me,
who chooses to make a similar sound. The next child makes his own unique sound that
sounds very excited
. The next child comes up with yet another new sound that reminds
us of a deep, relaxed sigh. I guide the reaction and brief discussion, but keep the pace
moving. I encourage kids who are apprehensive, validate those who mimic another’s
sound, and give
positive feedback to those who come up with an effective new way to
communicate our chosen word. Some sounds are accompanied by a simple hand or
body motion. We talk about this too, and reinforce the ones that make sense.

4.

We try sounds for other words su
ch as: excluded, fair, unfair, cooperation, diverse

5.

Students are given the opportunity to generate the word and start by being the model.

Expectations


Students stay appropriately calm and don’t get too silly during this game. Students are
being thoughtf
ul about which kinds of sounds effectively communicate specific feelings or meaning.

Accommodations


It’s natural for some kids to be apprehensive about taking this kind of social risk.
This is a creative, open
-
ended activity that some students will be

uncomfortable with at first. This is why
it is so important to invite students to copy a sound another person, perhaps the model, has made.
[
24
]


You’ll be your own gauge for what’s an appropriate body movement to accompany a sound, and what’s
excessive or un
safe. (For example, some of my students made hand gestures, others dove into the
center of the circle.)

Closure


Give students some feedback about their sounds for today and tell them the next lesson is
even more fun, and maybe more challenging. We’ll
be moving through our space to communicate
similar words! How might our artistic choices be different? How might the rules be the same or
different?


Community and Diversity: Lesson 14


Exploring Vocabulary with Movement

Estimated Time


20 minutes

Ess
ential Question


How can we communicate by moving our bodies?

How do we move our bodies
safely indoors? What does it mean to maintain personal space?

Vocabulary


See Activities, # 4, immediately below

Activities :

1.

Start by reminding students of our l
ast activity and tell them that today we’re
going to use movement to communicate certain words. Remind students of
rules for moving safely and to maintain personal space.

2.

Tell students not to move yet, but to think about how they might communicate
the wor
d “heavy” through movement. Start with something concrete like this
to warm up. Ask for a volunteer to demonstrate how they move safely and
communicate this word.

3.

Ring a chime and tell students that is their “freeze” signal. When they hear it,
they have

to freeze and be ready for the next word. Tell everyone to stand up
and find a spot in the room to start with enough personal space to move safely.

4.


Try out other words such as: sleepy, excited, nervous, surprised, tiny,
frightened. Move on to more abst
ract concepts such as included, excluded,
respectful, safe, responsible, justice, empathy, diverse.

5.


Students are given the opportunity to generate the word and start by being the
model.

6.

Optional: gather students on the carpet and make a space for a “stag
e.” Write
4 or 5 words on a chart and ask for a volunteer to secretly choose one to act
out. Have others guess which word it is and discuss.

Expectations


Students move their bodies safely and maintain personal space. Students are thoughtful
about usin
g movements that communicate our vocabulary words.

[
25
]


Accommodations


It’s natural for some kids to be apprehensive about taking this kind of social risk.
This is a creative, open
-
ended activity that some students will be uncomfortable with at first. Thi
s is why
it is so important to invite students to copy a movement from another person. You’ll be your own
gauge for what’s an appropriate movement and what’s excessive or unsafe.

Closure


Gather back in our circle and ask students to share about what t
hey noticed. What words
were easier to communicate through movement? Were any hard to do? You’ll likely notice that
students come up with a lot of noises, facial expressions, and dialogue to accompany their movement.
Talk about what students saw, heard
, and did.

Have students self
-
assess their ability to move safely and respect the space of others. I have them hold
up 5 fingers if they were extremely safe, followed all our rules, and stayed in control of their bodies; 4 if
they needed to remind themsel
ves to stay calm and safe, 3 if they needed a reminder from me or felt
they should have been safer than they were, 2 if they needed more than a reminder from me or lost
control of their bodies, and a 1 if they were asked to sit out or if they were unsafe.


Community and Diversity: Interactive Read Aloud Mini
-
Lessons to Supplement Section 1

Estimated Time


15
-
20 minute read aloud mini
-
lessons

Essential Question


What is the big idea, or “so what” of this book? In other words, what did the
author want us
to learn?

Vocabulary


synthesis
; text
-
specific vocabulary will also apply

Activities :

1.


Fit these in during any read aloud time, transition time, or any other time that works
for an instructional read aloud during the first section of this unit.

2.


Referen
ce the following table for the general message in the book and help students
synthesize the text and find the “so what.” See bibliography for details about each text.


Book Title



See Bibliography for more info

Topic / Justice Theme

Whoever You Are

Diversity

Amelia’s Road

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䍨慲⁓au⁂慯 䉯X

M楶敲獩瑹ⰠP敲獰e捴楶攬e慮T 剥獰散琠景爠
M楦i敲敮e敳

䅬氠瑨攠Co汯r猠sf⁴Ue⁅慲瑨

M楶敲獩瑹

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䥮捬c獩sn⁡湤⁒ 獰散e⁦o爠M楦i敲敮捥e

MommXH⁍am愬⁡湤⁍e

M楶敲獥⁆ m楬i


P物r捥cs⁂ X

M楶敲獩瑹Ⱐ䝥nTe爠䥤敮瑩eXⰠ剥獰散琠景爠
M楦i敲敮e敳

[
26
]


The Recess Queen

Inclusion

Families are Different

Inclusion, Diversity, Respect for Differences

Thank You, Mr. Falker

Diversity, Respect for Differences, Inclusion

We Wanted You

Diversity and Family

The Sneetches

Inclusion

If America Were A Village

Perspective, Point of View, Diversity

If The World Were A Village

Perspective, Point of View, Diversity

This Child, Every Child

Perspective, Point of View, Diversity

The Other Side

Equity and Segregation

Let’s Read About Ruby Bridges

䕱N楴i⁡湤⁓敧 敧慴楯n

副獡

䕱N楴i⁡湤⁓敧 敧慴楯n

M慲捨⁏n!†周T⁄aX MX⁂ o瑨敲WM慲瑩W⁃桡 g敤⁴桥
坯牬r

䕱N楴i⁡湤⁓敧 敧慴楯n

Martin’s Big Words

䕱N楴i⁡湤⁓敧 敧慴楯n

MX 䉲B瑨敲WM慲瑩a

䕱N楴i⁡
nT⁓敧 敧慴楯n

䍲Cw⁂ X

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L楧U琠瑨攠L楧U瑳

M楶敲獥⁈o汩T慹a

周攠䉥B琠䕩N 䕶敲

M楶敲獥⁈o汩T慹a

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M楶敲獥⁈o汩T慹a

MX 呷o⁈o汩T慹a

M楶敲獥⁈o汩T慹a

卮o眠楮⁊敲 獡sem

M楶敲獥⁈o汩T慹a


Expectations


Students are actively engaged in each instructional read aloud making connections,
asking questions, making inferences, and thinking about the “big
idea” or “so what.”

Accommodations


This procedure will become routine and comfortable over time. At this point, the
content is familiar and students have a solid understanding of how to synthesize information in a text to
find the “big idea,” “point,” o
r “so what.”

Closure


At the end of each read aloud, add a copy of the book cover as well as the students’ words
synthesizing the “so what” for each story to our bulletin board. Encourage students to do this kind of
thinking (synthesis) with song lyrics,

poetry, and other texts.







[
27
]


Section 1: Community and Diversity Post Assessment

Estimated Time


20
-
25 minutes

Procedures:

1.

See
Appendix F

for Community and Diversity Post Assessment.
Note: I used my own
narrative baseline as a pre
-
assessment
tool. This document,
Appendix F
, can
alternatively be used as a pre
-
assessment for Section 1.

2.

Read the prompts and questions aloud to students and instruct them to write as much
as they can. It will be necessary and helpful to re
-
read the prompts and que
stions
several times and remind students to answer all parts of the questions.

Prompt/Questions read:
We are all different. What are 3 ways we are all different? Our class is a
community. What does this mean?

3.

Use the following rubric to assess for stud
ent understanding:



[
28
]



Student Name ________________________________ Date ___________________


Section 1: Community and Diversity

: Post Assessment

Assessment Rubric for Conceptual Understanding



Little Evidence of
Understanding
(1)

Some Evidence of
Understanding (2)

Sufficient Evidence
of Understanding (3)

Evidence of Deep
Understanding (4)

What are 3
ways we are all
different?

Student attempts to
answer the question
with little success.
Student names one
way we are all
differe
nt.

Student names 2
ways we are all
different.

Student names 3
ways we are all
different.

Student names 3 or
more ways we are all
different and
extends thinking to
include examples or
analysis, or makes
other connections.

Our class is a
community!
What d
oes this
mean?

Student provides an
incorrect
explanation, or no
explanation of the
meaning of
community. An
ineffective or no
attempt is made to
connect the concept
of community to our
class.

Student’s
數p污l慴楯n映瑨攠
m敡湩ng o映
捯mmun楴X⁩ ⁶慧ue


汩m楴敤i瑯⁡
g敮敲慬e
unT敲獴慮T楮g⸠⁁.
楮敦晥e瑩v攠o爠ro
慴aemp琠楳慤攠Wo
捯nn散e⁴Ue⁣on捥灴c
o映fommun楴X⁴o ou爠
捬慳献

却ST敮琠e硰x慩a猠瑨攠
m敡湩ng o映
捯mmun楴X 睩瑨w
牥汥r慮捥cWo ou爠
捬慳献

却ST敮琠e硰x慩a猠瑨攠
m敡湩ng o映
捯mmun楴X 睩瑨w
牥汥r慮捥cWo
ou爠
捬慳猠慮c⁥硴敮e猠
瑨Wn歩kg⁴o⁩湣 uTe
數amp汥猠o爠慮rlX獩猬s
o爠m慫敳eo瑨敲W
捯nn散eion献

Section 1
Vocabulary

Student does not use
any Section 1
vocabulary.


Student attempts to
use Section 1
vocabulary but does
so incorrectly with
regards to meaning.

Student attempts to
use Section 1
vocabulary but does
so incorrectly with
regards to usage or
grammar.

Student uses one
vocabulary
word/new concept
from Section 1 in a
meaningful,
grammatically
correct way.

Student uses more
than two vocabulary
words/new c
oncepts
from Section 1 in a
meaningful,
grammatically
correct way.


Range

Overall
Understanding

0
-
4

Limited

5
-
7

Basic

8
-
10

Proficient *

11
-
12

Advanced

*This is the goal for first graders when used as a post
-
assessment.

If used as a pre/post
assessment, teachers may consider a growth model instead.

[
29
]


SECTION 2: PEACE AND CONFLICT RESOLUTION

Peace and Conflict Resolution: Section 2
Pre Assessment


Estimated Time
-

20
-
25 minutes

Procedures:

1.


See
Appendix G

for Peace and Conflict Resolution Pre
-
Assessment.
Note: This
document,
Appendix
G
, can also be used as a post
-
assessment in addition to, or in place
of
Appendix
J
, Peace
and Conflict Post
-
Assessment.

2.

Read the prompt and questions aloud to students and ins
truct them to write as much as
they can. It will be necessary and helpful to re
-
read the prompt and questions several
times and remind students to answer all parts of the questions.

Prompt/Questions Read:
Jill and Kate were arguing over who got to use th
e computer first. Their friend,
Petra, tried to help. What do you think Petra is saying? Why is it important that she is trying to help?

3.

Use the following rubric to assess for student understanding:
















[
30
]


Unit 2: Peace and Conflict Resolution


Pre Assessment

Assessment Rubric for Conceptual Understanding

Student Name __________________________________ Date __________________________


Little Evidence of
Understanding (1)

Some Evidence of
Understanding (2)

Sufficient Evidence
of Understandi
ng (3)

Evidence of Deep
Understanding (4)

What
do you
think Petra is
saying?

Student attempts to
answer the question
with little success.
Student ‘s example
睯u汤o琠Uav攠be敮e
慮⁥晦散瑩Wer
牥汥r慮琠comm敮琮

却ST敮琠灲ev楤敳eone
數amp汥lo映
獯m整U楮g
P整牡
捯u汤⁳ X⁴U慴⁷ou汤
b攠敦晥捴楶攮

却ST敮琠灲ev楤敳e
mor攠瑨慮 one
數amp汥lo映
獯m整U楮g P整牡
捯u汤⁳ X⁴U慴⁷ou汤
b攠敦晥捴楶攮

却ST敮琠灲ev楤敳e
mor攠瑨慮 one
數amp汥lo映
獯m整U楮g P整牡
捯u汤⁳ X⁴U慴⁷ou汤
b攠敦晥捴楶攮†却ST敮琠
數瑥nT猠瑨Wn歩kg⁴o
楮捬cT攠愠獰散楦楣
捯n晬f捴c牥ro汵瑩Wn
獴牡瑥gX.

Why is it
important that
she is trying to
help?

Student attempts to
answer the question
with little success.
Student’s
explanation doesn’t
m慫攠獥湳攮

却ST敮琠灲ev楤敳eone
牥慳rn⁩琠楳⁩mpo牴慮琠
獨攠楳⁴rX
楮g⁴o⁨敬 ⸠.
剥慳onaX⁢
v慧u攠楮慴 r攬ebu琠
牥汥r慮琠Wo⁣on捥c瑳W
o映灥f捥c慮T⁣on晬f捴
牥獯汵瑩on.

却ST敮琠灲ev楤敳eone
捬敡爬⁲敬敶慮琠
牥慳rn⁩琠楳⁩mpo牴慮琠
瑯⁨敬 ⸠⁓瑵 敮琠楳
慢汥⁴o⁥污lo牡r攠
獯m敷Ua琠on⁴U敩爠
牥慳rn.

却ST敮琠灲ev楤敳e
mor攠瑨慮
one
reason it’s important
獨攠楳⁴rX楮g⁴o⁨敬 .


却ST敮琠灲ev楤敳eone
牥汥r慮琠牥r獯n⁡湤
數瑥nT猠瑨Wn歩kg⁴o
楮捬cT攠慮慬祳楳⁡湤
o瑨敲W捯nne捴con献

Section 2

Vocabulary

Student does not use
any Section 2
vocabulary.


Student attempts to
use Section 2
v
ocabulary but does
so ineffectively.

Student uses one
vocabulary
word/new concept
from Section 2 in a
meaningful,
grammatically
correct way.

Student uses more
than two vocabulary
words/new concepts
from Section 2 in a
meaningful,
grammatically
correct way.


Range

Overall
Understanding

0
-
4

Limited

5
-
7

Basic

8
-
10

Proficient *

11
-
12

Advanced

*This is the goal for first graders when used as a post
-
assessment.

If used as a pre/post assessment, teachers may consider a growth model instead.



[
31
]


Peace and
Conflict Resolution
: Lesson 1



Wangari’s Trees of Peace
, by Jeanette Winter

Estimated Time
-

15
-
20 minutes (Read Aloud Mini
-
Lesson
)

Essential Question


How can ordinary people be
peacemakers in our communities?

Vocabulary



peace, peacemaker, environment, community,
change, inspire, share

Activities:

1.

Gather students for an interactive read aloud of
Jeanette Winter’s
Wangari’s Trees of Peace.


Inform
students that this is a true story from Africa.

2.

While reading,

encoura
ge students to think about
how Wangari is being a peacemaker in her
community.
What is the problem in this story?
How
is
Wangari able to create meaningful change in her
community? How did community members work
together to make their community a better
place?

3.

During Readers’ Workshop, we’ve been working on synthesis. We describe this concept using
the term “so what?” with our first graders. Students are familiar with identifying the point, or
the “so what” of various texts we read, and also with includ
ing a “so what” in the conclusion
paragraphs of our writing. For each Read Aloud lesson in this unit, students will be identifying
the “so what.” Students will work together to identify the “so what” of this text.

Expectations


Students will be able to
synthesize the “big idea” in this story


that we can all help to
create peace in our communities, and that caring for our environment is one way we can be
peacemakers. Students should also be able to make a personal connection to their own lives, our cla
ss
community, or our school community.

Accommodations


This lesson gives children a real example of how one person without a lot of means,
money, and power, can make a meaningful difference in her community by doing something simple.
Students will hopefu
lly feel empowered by this story. Because of the nature of this lesson, all students
will be introduced to the concept of peace through environmentalism in a low risk setting. Those who
are comfortable contributing to our discussions can help encourage o
thers to extend their thinking and
practice the skills of synthesis. As students share examples of ways they could improve our community
through environmentalism, others will surely be able to make connections and build on what they hear.

Closure


Studen
ts will share their ideas for how we could apply the lessons in this text to our own lives.
We’ll discuss the question, “How can we be peacemakers in our community?” We will generate their
ideas for the “so what” together, then we’ll choose one to post.




[
32
]


Peace and Conflict Resolution
: Lesson 2



Somewhere Today,
by Shelley Moore Thomas

Estimated Time
-

15
-
20 minutes (Read Aloud Mini
-
Lesson
)

Essential Question


How can ordinary people be peacemakers in
our communities?

Vocabulary



peace, peacemaker, environment, community,
change, inspire, share

Activities:

1.

Gather students for an interactive read aloud of
Shelley
Moore Thomas’s
Somewhere Today.

2.

While reading,

encourage students to think about how the
examples in the book each h
elp make the world a more
peaceful place. How are these people making their
communities better? What would our page in this book
sound like?

3.

For each Read Aloud lesson in this unit, students will be
identifying the “so what.” Students will work toget
her

to
identify the “so what,”
or big idea, of this text.

Expectations


Students will be able to synthesize the “big idea” in this book


that we can all help to
create peace in our communities, even in small ways. Students should also be able to make a per
sonal
connection to their own lives, our class community, or our school community.

Accommodations


This story gives concrete examples of small ways to make meaningful change for
peace. Students will hopefully feel empowered by this story. Because of the

nature of this lesson, all
students will be introduced to the concept of peace in a low risk setting. Those who are comfortable
contributing to our discussions can help encourage others to extend their thinking and practice the skills
of synthesis. As s
tudents share examples of ways they could improve our community through small acts
of peacemaking, others will surely be able to make connections and build on what they hear.

Closure


Students will share their ideas for how we could apply the lessons in t
his text to our own lives.
We’ll discuss the question, “How can we be peacemakers in our community?” We will generate their
ideas for the “so what” together, then we’ll choose one to post.



[
33
]


Peace and Conflict Resolution: Lesson 3


Peace Poems

Estim
ated Time


1
-
2 hours, recommended to spread out over 2
-
3 lessons/days

Essential Question


How can we use sensory poetry to communicate our visions of peace?

Vocabulary


peace, community, peacemakers,
sensory, senses

Activities :

1.

We’ve been studying poetry in
Writers’ Workshop.
Note: This
lesson will still work without
extensive background teaching about
poetry. It may be helpful to make
prompt cards for sensory language
and other poetic elements such as
those in the picture. It

will also be
helpful to share many different
examples of poems with students
and talk about how poets
communicate their message.

We use prompt cards to generate our ideas for a peace poem,
then work together to put the ideas on an
order that makes sense
and flows as a
poem.

2.

We construct and read our class poem
together.

3.

We review additional prompt cards and
generate some more ideas for peace poetry.

4.

Students have independent writing time to
work on a rough draft of their own original
peace poem.

5.

After

sharing it with me, students are asked
to make a final copy of their peace poem,
illustrate it, and think about what their “so
what” is.


Expectations
-

Students will contribute to the
construction of our class poem and brainstorm.
Students will each gen
erate their own original peace poem using sensory language and other poetic
elements. Students will complete a finished product and identify their own “so what” that they wish to
communicate to readers.

[
34
]



Accommodations


Students are still working on d
eveloping their
own concept of what peace means to them. The previous lessons and
discussions will have provided context for this activity. Students are
welcome to borrow ideas from our class brainstorm and class poem
as they construct their own poem.

P
oetry prompts are familiar
images and should provide a clear structure to guide students to
include sensory language and other poetic elements.

Closure
-

Students will be invited to share their poems with the
group, talk about their process, and share their “so what.”




Peace and Conflict Resolution: Lesson 4


What a Wonderful World

Estimated Time


30
-
45 minutes

Essential Questions


When we visualize
peace, what does it look like? How might we communicate a
message of peace using images only? How are song lyrics and poetry similar? How does the song writer
communicate a message of peace?

Vocabulary


visualize, imagery, lyrics, peace

Music includ
ed in Appendix M

Activities :

1.

Have a few students share their peace poems from last
lesson t
o set the context for today.

2.

Tell students they are going to hear a famous song all
about peace. First, post and read the lyrics together,
talking about how the so
ngwriter communicates a
message of peace.

3.

Engage in a discussion about what we visualize when we
think about the lyrics. Visualization is a familiar skill for students at this time of the year.

4.

Play the song for students. Ask them how the song made them
feel and what they
visualized in their heads.

5.

Tell students they will be creating watercolor paintings to this song, and that their images
should communicate messages of peace.

6.

Make directions for using watercolors, water, brushes, drying rack, etc. expl
icit.

[
35
]


7.

Play the song on repeat as students engage in quiet, reflective, peaceful painting.

Expectations


Students will

paint quietly, letting the whole atmosphere in
the room feel peaceful. They will work independently on their peace
paintings, listening

to the lyrics and thinking about what kinds of images
and colors communicate a message of peace.

Accommodations


This activity is accessible for all students regardless of
ability. Both literal and abstract paintings will be celebrated, and students
w
ill be encouraged to express themselves freely and artistically.

Closure


As paintings dry, gather kids back on the carpet for closing. Ask
students how it felt to paint to the song, what they chose to represent, and
how their painting communicates a m
essage of peace. Come up with a “so
what” for the song lyrics. When paintings are dry (about 30
-
60 minutes)
invite students to share. Celebrate everyone’s efforts!





[
36
]



Peace and Conflict Resolution: Lesson 5



Can You Say Peace?
By Karen Katz

Estimated Time


15
-
20 minutes (Read Aloud Mini
-
Lesson
)

Essential Question


How do people all over the world feel about peace?

Vocabulary


countries, languages, peace, map, globe, diverse

Activities :

1.

Gather students for an interactive read aloud of
K
aren Katz’s
Can
You Say Peace?

2.

While reading,

encourage students to think about how people in
different parts of the world feel about peace. Have students echo
the word in different languages as you read. Reinforce concepts of
respect for diversity as st
udents learn the different ways to say “peace.”

3.

For each Read Aloud lesson in this unit, students will be identifying the “so what.” Students will
work together to identify the “so what,” or big idea, of this text.

4.

Make a Morning Meeting greeting out of
this activity. Put each greeting on a card (in advance.)
Choose 2 students, have them take a card, and greet each other by saying “peace” in a different
language. Variation: each student greets the whole group and the whole group greets them
back.

Exp
ectations


Students will respectfully practice saying the word
“peace” in various languages from the book. Students will help identify
the “so what” in the book. Students will each participate in the
greeting activity. Suggestion: Do the greeting the
following morning.

Accommodations


I’ll be reading the book and asking students to
echo the word “peace” in each language. The “so what” is articulated
on the last page of the book, so it will be easy for children to find and
put in their own words. The
re is also a page at the end of the book
with a list of more ways to say “peace” in other languages. Consider
including some of these that may be relevant to your class. For
example, we included the Hebrew, “Shalom” because we have two students who know
and speak some
Hebrew. Consider further supplementing this lesson with other languages that are relevant to your
students that may not be in the book. (I found the Kirundi translation, “ama
-
horo.”)

Closure
-

Work

together to identity the “so what” of this book. “No matter how we say it, people all
over the world want peace.” We also used the practice greeting as a closure and planned to try it out in
the morning.



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37
]


Peace and Conflict Resolution: Lesson 6


And to Think That We Thought We’d Never Be Friends,
by
Mary Ann Hoberman

Estimated Time


15
-
20 minutes (Read Aloud mini
-
lesson)

Essential Question


Why do some people have conflicts? How can people work together to solve their
conflicts?

Vocabulary


pe
ace, conflict, conflict resolution, strategies, argument, celebration

Activities :

1.

Gather students for an interactive read aloud of
Mary Ann Hoberman’s
And to Think That We
Thought We’d Never Be Friends.

2.

While reading,

encourage students to think about why

conflicts arise and how people work
together to solve them. In this book, students identify the conflicts, the peacemakers, and how
the problems get solved.

3.

For each Read Aloud lesson in this unit, students will be identifying the “so what.” Students wi
ll
work together to identify the “so what,” or big idea, of this text.

Expectations


Students will engage in discussion about the conflict(s) in this text, what caused them,
how people were feeling, and how they got resolved. Students will make
connections by identifying
conflicts in their own lives, the feelings that
accompany them, and possible ways to resolve them.

Accommodations


This is our first exposure to conflict
and conflict resolution. Students will be given context
through the read
aloud and discussion, and will learn
from peers as they share their connections and “so
what.”

Closure
-

Students will work together to identify the
“so what” in this book: There are many different ways
to solve conflicts, and we can all be peacemakers.
S
tudents will be asked to try resolving small conflicts
during their school day.






[
38
]


Peace and Conflict Resolution: Lesson 7



Conflict Resolution: Role Play #1

Estimated Time


30 minutes

Essential Question


How do we keep respectful disagreements from
turning into conflicts? How can
we solve our disagreements and conflicts in peaceful ways?

Vocabulary


role play, disagreement, argument, conflict, conflict resolution, solution, scenario,
situation, communicate, talking calmly, listening

Activities :

1.

G
ather students together to read the first few parts of Lisa Adams’s
Dealing With
Arguments.

Tell students we’ll be learning about conflict, which is like an argument, and
ways to solve them. Activate students’ prior knowledge


Has anyone ever had a conflict?
How did it feel? How did it get solved?

2.

Interactive Read Aloud

a.

Part 1


What is an
Argument? Read this section to students, stopping to discuss
along the way. Make explicit the difference between a respectful disagreement and
an argument. Arguments involve angry feelings, and often hurt others’ feelings.

b.

Part 2


How Do Arguments Start? Read this section to students, stopping to discuss
along the way.

c.

Part 3


Talking Calmly, Part 4


Listening; Read these sections to students,
stopping to discuss along the way. Provide students with a real life exa
mple of a
disagreement, modeling the difference between a respectful disagreement and an