SEDL 441(Newman) - University of South Carolina Upstate

attackkaboomInternet and Web Development

Feb 2, 2013 (4 years and 7 months ago)

124 views


1

SEDL 441 Elementary School Curriculum and Organization

USC
-
Upstate

Sumter Campus

I.
Instructor Information

Instructor: Dr. Judy Newman

Telephone: 803
-
840
-
0259

Fax: 803
-
774
-
2410

E
-
mail:
edvantage@ftc
-
i.net

Av
ailable: Monday
-
Friday (by appointment)


II.
Course Information

Spring

Semester, 200
9

Time:
Wednesday
s,
4:30 p.m.
-

7
:
2
0
p
.m.

Location: Anderson 254


III. Readings
:

Required:

Marzano, Robert J. 2003.
What Works in Schools: Translating Research into
Action
.

Alexandria VA: ASCD
. ISBN: 0
-
87120
-
717
-
6

Recommended readings:


Marzano, Robert J., Pickering, Debra, and Pollock, Jane E. 2001.
Classroom



Instruction that Works: Research
-
based Strategies for Increasing Student


Achieveme
nt.

Alexandria VA: ASCD. ISBN: 0
-
87120
-
504
-
1



Marzano, Robert J., Marzano, Jana S., and Debra J. Pickering.
2003.
Classroom



Management that Works: Research
-
Based Strategies for Every Teacher
. Alexandria


VA: ASCD. ISBN: 0
-
87120
-
793
-
1




Reeves, Douglas.
Making Standards Work
, 3
rd

edition
. 2003.

Denver, CO:


Advanced Learning Press. ISBN: 0
-
9709455
-
0
-
7


IV. Course Description

SEDL 441
:
The entire school program, including grouping, grading, placement, and
organi
zation of both the children and the school for optimal learning.

Intended Audience:

SEDL 441

is required for students seeking certification in elementary
education.

Course Credit:

Three (3) semester hours

Prerequisite:

Admission to professional progra
m for all Elementary education majors.

Co
-
requisites: SEDF 487, SEDL447, SEDL 450, SEDL 455, SEDR 442








2

V. USC Upstate Conceptual Framework

The USC Upstate School of Education aims to be recognized nationally for its outstanding
teacher preparation pr
ograms whose graduates are excellent, learner centered practitioners and
professionals.

a.
Core Dispositions

The faculty and candidates of the USCS School of Education:



Value reflective teaching practice.



Value learner
-
centered pedagogy.



Value performance
-
based assessment.



Are committed to and affirm diversity.



Are committed to professional responsibility.

b. Undergraduate Program Organizing Theme:
Teachers prepared at USC Upstate possess a
broad knowledge of the liberal arts

and applicable content areas,
the latest developments in
curriculum and instruction, and the foundations of education. They understand and respect
cultural diversity and place the welfare and educational needs of their students first. As
reflective practitioners, they are committed t
o a service ideal which is built upon professional
standards and ethics.

c. Philosophy
:
The faculty members and administrators of the SOE have developed a set of
consistent principles and values that serves as the foundation of the school’s approach to
cu
rriculum, pedagogy and program development.



A general exposure to and an appreciation of the traditional liberal arts and sciences
of both western and non
-
western traditions.



A specific exposure to the most up
-
to
-
date pedagogical theories and practices.



A
set of ethical principles, values, and dispositions.



A commitment to the principle of equality of educational opportunity for all students
regardless of group or individual differences.



A commitment to knowledge of both theory and practice and an understan
ding of
how one informs and strengthens the other.

d.
Theoretical Underpinnings:
The theoretical underpinnings of the SOE are consistent with
the tenants of progressivism and constructivism. Practices and behaviors consistent with these
approaches include:



Application of problem
-
solving and scientific inquiry



Use of cooperative learning experiences and self
-
discipline



Emphasis on how to think not what to think with the teacher serving as a guide



Appreciation of the interdisciplinary nature of learning



Prepa
ration of all students for full participation in a democracy


VI.
Rationale

Elementary students vary in learning styles, background, interests and motivation. Even so, all
of these children can and will experience success in school when appropriate instru
ctional
opportunities are provided. Emphasizing the role of the teacher as a facilitator of learning for all
students in the classroom, this course will examine how planning, using varied instructional
strategies, assessing individual student needs, and
reflecting on classroom experiences enables
the classroom teacher to modify student

behavior and support student academic growth.
Through this study, elementary candidates will develop basic knowledge, skills and attitude

3

which are consistent with the con
ceptual framework of USC Upstate, the South Carolina ADEPT
system, and the National SPA standards.


VII.
Course Goals

Through review of current research, discussion of material read, and completion of activities in
this course, the student will be able to:

1. Identify
,

explain
, and model

the characteristics of effective and successful teachers.

2. Develop an awareness of the national and state standards.

3. Develop the skill of long range (unit) planning and short range (lesson) planning.

4. Explore th
e array of possible diversities among students and implement a study of
instructional

approaches to address these diversities in the classroom setting.

5. Reflect on their experiences and learning about elementary curriculum and teaching to
escalate their

personal growth as individuals.

Course Objectives

The student will be to:

1.

Develop a unit of instruction based on SC Standards which includes standards, skills and
knowledge, essential questions, pre and post assessment, concept map and timeline. (APS
1
; ACEI 1.0, 3.1, 4.0, 5.1
)

2.

From the unit plan, develop two lesson plans to include opening activity, teacher steps,
student activities, pre and post assessment, closure activity, materials needed, and teacher
pre
-
class procedures. (One plan must integrate

standards from two core content areas.)
(APS 2
,

APS 5
; ACEI 1.0, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 4.0, 5.1
)

3.

Present a demo lesson to the class. (APS 5
; ACEI 1.0, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 4.0, 5.1)

4.

Develop an instructional strategies/classroom management toolkit identifyin
g
instructional strategies that research has shown to positively engage students in learning.
(APS 8
; ACEI 1.0, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 4.0, 5.1)

5.

Summarize the content of assigned readings and discuss the application of the
information in planning and implemen
ting classroom instruction. (APS 10
; ACEI 1.0,
3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 4.0, 5.1)

6.

Reflect on their level of understanding of course goals. (APS 10
; ACEI 5.1
)

7.

Organize a portfolio according to
the ADEPT Performance Standards. Write rationales
for selection of ar
tifacts for the five identified performance standards.
(APS 10
; ACEI 5.1
)


VIII. Course Requirements

(All work is to be typewritten unless otherwise specified in the assignment.)

1.

Unit Plan

(
DOMAIN 1
-

APS
1
;

ACEI 1.0, 3.1, 4.0, 5.1
)


Develop a unit plan whi
ch includes SC standards addressed, skills and knowledge identified,
essential questions, pre and post assessment,
and
5
-
15 day

timeline with concepts to be
covered specified.

(
35

POINTS)

rubric
provide
d


2.

Lesson Plans

(
DOMAIN 1


APS2

and APS5
;

ACEI 1.0
, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4, 4.0, 5.1
)

Develop two lesson plans which include the opening activity (set), teacher procedures (direct

teaching steps), student activities (guided instruction), pre and post assessment activities, and
closing activity. One of th
e lesson plans must include the
integration

of t
wo core content
areas in t
he lesson, either by the teacher or the students (or both).

(
45

points
total
)
rubric
provide
d


4

3.

Demonstration lesson

(
DOMAIN 2
-
APS
5
;

ACEI 1.0, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4, 4.0, 5.1
)

Teach
a lesson to the class using one
of the developed lesson plans.
(
2
0

POINTS)

Rubric
provide
d

4.

Report on readings

(DOMAIN 4
-

APS10
;

ACEI 1.0, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4, 4.0, 5.1
)

Select
1 book
from the assigned reading list and write a one to two page report wh
ich
summarizes the
book

and which identifies how the information can be used by the reader.
Prepare a 10 minute presentation for the class highlighting the major points that you learned
and how you will use the information.
(
2
0

POINTS)
rubric
provided

5.

Exit

slips
/Journal*

(DOMAIN 4


APS10
;

ACEI 5.1
)

Report weekly on understanding of information and growth as a future educator.

(
6

POINTS)

6

Lesson critiques

(DOMAIN 4


APS10
;

ACEI 5.1
)

Using the demonstration lesson rubric, assess each lesson presented and mak
e comments as
to strengths noted and strategie
s for possible improvement.
(
9

POINTS)

7.
I
nstructional Strategies
/Classroom Management

Toolkit

*

(DOMAIN 3


APS
8
;

ACEI
1.0, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, and 3.4, 4.0, 5.1
)

Compile a listing of
5

research
-
based instructi
onal
strategies

and
5

classroom management strategies
. Identify what parts of the lesson they best
fit and give 2 examples of use.
A total of

10

strategies must be listed.

(
25

POINTS)

Rubric
provide
d

8.

E
-
PORTFOLIO
*


(DOMAIN

4


APS10; ACEI 5.1
)


Develop pe
rsonal portfolio based on ADEPT Performance Standards

Add to the Portfolio

an artifact in f
ive

Performance Standards area
s
:

a.
Performance Standard One
and

Performance Standard Two

b.
Performance Standard Five

c. Performance Standard Eight

d. Performa
nce Standard Ten

USC Upstate rubric will be used for feedback.

(2 points for each artifact report and rationale)

9
.
Exam

(
25

POINTS)

Must be taken on assigned date.


IX.
Although n
o field experiences will be required with this course
,
they are encoura
ged.


X. Course policies:

Professional behavior is required of all educators. Students in SEDL 441 are expected to
model this behavior at all times.

(APS 10)


1.

Attitude
: A major key to being an effective teacher is being open to the ideas of


othe
rs, showing respect to those around us, and looking for the best in each


person and each moment. Students will be expected to model this behavior.

2.

Attendance
: Students are expected to attend each class, to be on time, and to stay the
entire

class period. Any combination of three (tardies or early departures) will constitute
an unexcused absence. Any absence without valid reason (medical, death in immediate
family, prior approval of instructor, etc.) will be considered unexcused. An unexc
used
absence will result in a final grade reduction of 20 points. Students are responsible for
obtaining any information (written or oral) presented in any class session missed.

3.

Assignments
: All assignments must be handed in by the specified date and ti
me.


5

Assignments and projects from other courses will not be accepted for credit in this
course. Points will be deducted when assignments are turned in late (one week
-
40%, 2
weeks


60%).
Students
will

be
given the opportunity to re
-
work

completed assi
gnments
when learning can be enhanced.

Reworked assignments must be turned in by the
deadline given. If the work corrects all errors identified by teacher feedback, fifty
percent of the points missed can be made up.

4.

Tests
:

Test must be taken on the assi
gned date. In the event of an emergency, students
must contact the instructor via both email and voice mail before class meets if they will
be missing a test. Make
-
up tests will be given at the discretion of the instructor. Each
student will receive a le
tter grade for overall performance in this course based on the
assignments, tests, and reflections. Work will be assessed based on the rubric for each
assignment. Students are encouraged to use the rubric as a tool in completing their
assignments.

5.

The in
structor reserves the right to modify assignments, add or delete
requirements, adjust rubrics, and adjust the assigned points as needed
.

Students
will be notified if adjustments are made.


Grading

A total of 185 points may be accrued. The grade/point sc
ale listed below will be used to assign
letter grades.
Students
will

be
given the opportunity to

re
-
work completed assignments when
learning can be enhanced.

Reworked assignments must be turned in by the deadline given. If the
work corrects all errors id
entified by teacher feedback, fifty percent of the points missed can be
made up.


Grade Points

A 93
-
100%

181
-
1
9
5

B+ 87
-
92%

16
9
-
1
80

B 80
-
86%

156
-
1
79

C+ 77
-
79%

150
-
1
55

C 70
-
76%

136
-
14
9

D+ 67
-
69%

1
30
-
1
35

D 60
-
66%

11
7
-
12
9

F 0
-
59%
0
-
110















6

XI. Assessments

SEDL 441
Spring
, 200
9

Unit Plan Rubric


CRITERIA


5 POINTS

3 POINTS

2 POINTS

1 POINT


0
PT
S
.

STAN
-
DARDS
CLUS
-
TERED
AND

FOCUS
STAN
-
DARDS
IDENTI
-
FIED



Uses a graphic organizer
and identifi
es all of the
following components
concisely and correctly:

1. concepts/skills of each
standard/indicator

2. relationship of each
clustered indicator to each
other

3. major points of each
standard/indicator identified

5. focus standards identified

-
Uses

graphic
organizer to identify
all of the 5 points.


-
Four of the five

com
ponents are
identified

correctly.


-
Uses graphic
organizer to
identify all of the
5 points.


-
Three of the
five components
are

identified

correctly.


-
Uses
graphic
organizer to
iden
tify all
of the 5
points.

-
Two of the
five
components
are

identified

correctly.

No
compo
-
nents are
identified
correctly.

STAN
-
DARDS
UN
-
WRAPPED



Uses a graphic organizer to
present information clearly
and concisely.

-
Identifies correct concepts
to be t
aught (from the
standard)

-
Organizes
the
correct
concepts in a logical
sequence for teaching.

-
Identifies the specific skills

or sub skills
needed to
develop the concepts.

-
Identifies at least 4
techniques to assess the
concepts and skills.

-
Identifies at
least 4
strategies and materials to
use in teaching the standard.

-
Uses a graphic
organizer to present
information clearly
and concisely.

-
Four

of the f
ive

components are
identified correctly.

-
Uses a graphic
organizer to
present
information
clearly and
concisely.

-
T
hree

of the
four components
are identified
correctly.

-
Uses a
graphic
organizer to
present
information
clearly and
concisely.

-
One

of the
four com
-

ponents
is

identified
correctly.

No
compo
-
nents are
identified
correctly.

TIME
PRO
-
JECTED



-
Projects total number of
days to cover the unit.

-
Projects number of days to
cover each concept on the
Unwrapping Graphic
Organizer.


-
Projects total
number of days
to cover the unit.


No
projection

of time.

CRITERIA


3 POIN
TS

2 POINTS

1 POINTS

.5 POINTS


0 PTS.

ESSEN
-
TIAL
QUES
-
TIONS


-
Clearly relate to the major
concepts of the Unwrapping
Standards Organizer.

-
Clearly reflect the
objectives of the unit.

-
Clearly worded in “child
friendly” language

Two of the three
compone
nts are
correct.


One of the
three
components
is correct.

No
compo
-
nents are
correct.

RELE
-
VANCE


-
Makes relevance
statements for each
identified focus standard
s
.

-
Words statements in kid
-
friendly language.

-
Shows the importance of
these concepts/skills
to the
-
Makes relevance
statements for each
identified focus
standard.

-
Words statements in
kid
-
friendly
terms
.

-
Shows the
Two of the three
components are
correct
.

One of the
three
components
is correct.

No
componen
ts are
correct.


7

child’s life
today
.

importance of these
concepts or skills to
the child’s life in the
future.

ASSESS
-

MENT


The description of the
proposed culminating
assessment:

-
Describes how the focus
indicators will be assessed.


-
Requires student
performance at skills levels
required by st
andard

and indicators

-
Indicates how the identified
vocabulary must be used in
the assessment

-
Two of the
components are
completed correctly.

-
One of the
components is
completed
correctly.


-
None of
the com
-
ponents
are com
-
pleted
correctly.

CRITERIA


15

POINTS

10

POINTS

5 POINTS

3 POINTS


0 PTS.

DAILY
OULTINE

-
Topic content for each day
of the unit has been
identified.

-
standard indicator
identified

-
daily objective written

-
instructional strategies
to
be used described

-
materials identified

-
key vocabul
ary has been
identified

Four of the
components are
completed correctly.

Three of the
components are
completed
correctly.

Two of the
components
are
completed
correctly.

None of
the com
-
ponents
are com
-
pleted
correctly.

CRITERIA


1 POINT


.50 POINTS



0 P
TS.

SPELLING
AND
GRAM
-
MAR

High quality writing
techniques are used.

-
no grammatical or spelling
errors are made


-
well
-
written sentences
have smooth transition


Writing is
marginal.

-
Less than 4
grammatical
errors are made.

-
One to two
spelling errors
a
re made.


Writing is
unaccepta
ble

-
More
than 4
grammatic
al errors
are made.

Revised 12
-
30
-
08


Exit Slip Checklist

Criteria

Points

All questions answered in complete sentences with answers indicating thoughtful connections or
questions seeking further und
erstanding.

.5

Some questions are not answered at all or are answered incompletely.

0


EXAM RUBRIC

(possible 25 points for exam)

CRITERIA

5

3

1

0

INFOR
-
MATION

-
The major points of the topic are
covered correctly and effectively.

-
The information is dis
cussed in a
concise, coherent manner.

-
Explanations are well
-
thought out,
and details are given.

-
A graphic organizer is used to
organize thoughts.

-

The

major points of the topic
are covered correctly, but they
are not tied together effectively.

-

The information is discussed in
a rambling manner.

-
A graphic organizer is used.

-
The responses are written in
complete sentences with less
-

The major
points of the
topic are not
covered
correctly, and
they are not
tied together
effectively.

-
no attempt to
answer question


8

-
The responses are written in
complete sentences with less than 3
grammatical and/or spelling errors.

than 10 grammatical
and/or
spelling errors.


Updated 12
-
30
-
08


SEDL 441 (
Spring 2009
) Lesson Plan Rubric


4

3

2

0

Introduces
the lesson


-
Gains student attention

-
Points out what they will be
learning through the use of
essential questions

-
Points out

the relevance of the
information to the student

-
Assesses students current
knowledge of topic before
beginning instru
ction

-
3 of 4 criteria are
met

-
1 of 4 criteria is met

-
No introduction

Teaches the
Standards

-
Explains the major concepts
in detail(definition, examples,
modeling, process, content)

-
Sequences information in a
logical, organized manner

-
Chunks informatio
n in small
pieces

-
Draws attention to similarities
and differences

-
Uses graphic organizers

-
Models the instruction when
appropriate

-
Assesses student learning
through questioning and/or
observation

-
Explains the major
concepts in
detail(definition,
exampl
es, modeling,
process, content)

-
Sequences
information in a
logical, organized
manner

-
Chunks
information in small
pieces

-
1 or 2 of 4 criteria
are met. (Must
include the criteria
listed below:)

-

Explains the major
concepts in
detail(definition,
example
s, modeling,
process, content)


-

Teaching does
not address the
standards

Involves the
Students

-
Provides an activity where
students use the information
with teacher assistance

-
Provides an activity where
students use the information
independently

-
Provid
es an opportunity for
students to discuss the
information with each other

-
Provides an opportunity for
students to use the information
in a different way

-
Provides an opportunity for
students to ask and answer
questions

-
Provides an opportunity for
student
s to move

-
Attempts to predict possible
ways to monitor and adjust if
student understanding is not
evident

4 to 5 of the criteria
are met. (Must
include the criteria
listed below:)

-
Provides an activity
where students use
the information

-
Provides an
oppor
tunity for
students to discuss
the information with
each other

-
Provides an
opportunity for
students to ask and
answer questions


-
2 or 3 of the criteria
are met. (Must
include the criteria
listed below:)

-

Provides an activity
where students use
the info
rmation

-
Provides an
opportunity for
students to discuss the
information with each
other


-
Students are not
involved

Reaches
higher level
thinking

-
Questions focus on higher
level of Bloom’s taxonomy
(how, why, what if, what’s
-
Questions focus on
higher level of
Bloom’s taxonomy
-

Questions focus on
higher level of
Bloom’s taxonomy
-
No higher level
thinking is
required


9

next)

-
Asks for predictions

-
Asks for comparisons

(how, why, what if,
what’s next)

-
Asks for
predictions

(how, why, what if,
what’s next)


Closes the
lesson

-
Involves the learner

-
Summarizes what has been
covered

-
“Frames” what is to come

-
Involves the learner

-
Summarizes what
has been covered

-
Summarizes what
has been covered

-
No closure


Lesson Two (integrating content areas) uses rubric
above plus:


Criteria

5

4

2

0

Integration

-
Identifies standards
from more than one
core content area to
be covered

-
Uses an activity
which addresses both
core content area
s

-
Assesses both core
content areas through
questioning and/or
observation

-

Identif
ies
standards from more
than one core
content area to be
covered

-
Uses an activity
which addresses
both core content
area
s


-
Uses an activity
which addresses
both core content
area
s





-

No integration of
content areas



Points:

Lesson 1 Lesson 2

Introduction (4) ______ ______

Teaches the Standards (4) ______ ______

Involves the Students (4) __
____ ______

Higher Level Thinking(4) ______ ______

Closes the Lesson(4) ______ ______

Integration (5) na ___
___


Notes:



Total _______ _______



Updated 12
-
30
-
08



Readings Report/Presentation Rubric
Spring
, 200
9

CRIT
ERIA


6 points

4 points

2 points

1 point

0

Concept
Descrip
-
tion

-
li
sts 3
-
4 major points or
procedures of the book in detail

-
defines purpose of the book as it
relates to classroom instruction

-
identifies audience for whom this
book is best suited

-
lists 3
-
4 major points or
procedures of the book in
detail

-
defines purpo
se of book but
does not relate it to classroom
instruction

-
lists 1
-
2

Major points or
procedures of
the book in
detail


-
Rambling
description

-
No
description

Useful
-
ness

-
clear statement of why/why not
the information will be useful to
them as they plan

and/or as they
are implement instruction

-
identifies a new topic/concept
that this information makes them
wonder about

-

statement of why/why not
the information is useful to
them specifies exactly how it
can be used

-
statement of
why/why not
the informat
ion
is useful is
vague





-
No
reference to
usefulness
of
information


10

Format




-
MLA style is
used correctly



-
MLA style
is not used
correctly

Presen
-
tat
ion

-
uses visual in presentation

-
clearly de
scribes major points of
the book

-
clearly describes the usefulness
of the information to the
classroom teacher

-
clearly describes major
points of the book

-
clearly describes the
usefulness of the information
to the classroom teacher



-
does not
present
information

(20 points) Updated 12
-
30
-
08


SEDL 441
Spring 2009

Lesson Critique Checklist

Criteria

1

0

Notes strong points
about presentation


Lesson 1


Lesson 2


Lesson
3

Lesson
4

Lesson 5

Lesson 6

Lesson 1


Lesson 2


Lesson 3

Lesson
4

Lesson 5

Lesson 6

Makes suggestions for
improvement


Lesson 1


Lesson 2


Lesson 3

Lesson
4

Lesson 5

Lesson 6

Lesson 1


Lesson 2


Lesson 3

Lesson
4

Lesson 5

Lesson 6

Tot
al points



(9 points) Updated 12
-
30
-
08


SEDL 441
Spring 2009

Instructional Strategies/Classroom Management Toolkit


Criteria

1

.75

.5

0

Strategy

-
identified

-
short description given

-
use of strategy as discipline or
instructional strategy is identifi
ed

-
Source of proven success record of
strategy
IS
identified

-
identified

-
use of strategy as
discipline or instructional
strategy is identified
-

-----


-

no strategies
identified

Lesson
placemen
t

-
2 or more places in the lesson are
identified

where the
strategy would
be appropriate
for use

-
reason for recommended placement
is explained


-

1 place in the lesson for
possible use is identified

where the strategy would
be appropriate
for use

-
reason for recommended
placement is explained

-

1 place in the
les
son for possible
use is identified

where the strategy
would be
appropriate
for use


-
no
recommendation
for placement

Research
based



-

-
Source of proven
success record of
strategy
IS
identified


--
Source of proven
success record of
strategy
IS NOT

identi
fied


Points
:
(possible 2.5 points for each strategy)


Updated 1
-
25
-
09



11

Classroom Management Instructional strategies


Techniques

1
st

strategy ____

6
th

strategy____

2
nd

st
rategy____ 7
th

strategy____

3
rd

st
rategy____ 8
th

strategy____ TOTAL________

4
th

s
trategy____ 9
th

strategy____

5
th

strategy_
___

10
th

strategy____


XII. ADA compliance statement:

In keeping with University policy, any student with a disability who requests academic
accommodations should contact Disability Services at 503
-
5195 to arrange a
confidential
appointment with the Disability Services Coordinator.


Students are encouraged to seek an
appointment as early in the semester as possible, as accommodations are not provided
retroactively.

Letters of accommodation must be signed and printed
on letterhead from the
Disability Services office.


It is the student’s responsibility to provide these letters to professors
in a timely manner so that accommodations may be put in place.


XIII. Education Economic Development Act (EEDA) Compliance Stat
ement:


On May

2
7, 2005, Governor Mark Sanford signed the Education and Economic

Development Act (EEDA), new legislation designed to give South Carolina

students the educational tools they need to build prosperous, successful futures.

The EEDA
Standar
ds for Teacher Education Programs in SC require that teacher candidates be proficient in
the following: (
1)
the career guidance process, (2)career clusters and Individual Graduation
Plans, (3) SC career guidance standards and competencies, (4) character e
ducation, (5)
contextual teaching, (6)cooperative learning, and (7) diverse learning styles.
Depending on
your

p
rogram,

some of these standards may be addressed in this course. You can obtain
additional information about the EEDA at the SOE website.












SEDL 441

SPRING

SEMESTER, 200
9

SUMTER CAMPUS, Anderson 254

Wednesdays
,
4
:30

P
.M.


7:20

P
.M.



12

The instructor reserves the right to modify assignments, add or delete requirements, adjust
rubrics, and adjust the assigned points as needed
.
Students

will be notified if adjustments are
made.

DATE

ESSENTIAL
QUESTIONS

Materials

Assignment Due

Session 1
January 14

Why are we here?

What do we hope to
accomplish in this class?

Why do we need “reflective”
瑥tc桥牳r

How do we “set the tone” for
瑨攠t污獳l
潯洠敮癩o潮浥湴?

䡯e⁤漠睥⁤ ve汯瀠
“withitness?”

C潵牳o⁳y汬a扵猠
a湤⁲n扲楣s

䕢y⁨ 湤潵o

䕸楴⁳汩p

pe獳s潮′o

ga湵nry′

䡯e⁤漠睥⁰污渠景f潮朠
牡nge?

䡯e⁤漠睥⁤ te牭楮r⁷桡琠t桥
獴慮摡牤猠rea汬yea渿

Handout

Ainsworth

Exit slip

Session 3

January
28

How do we plan for long
range?

How do we determine what the
standards really mean?

How do we determine time
needed to cover material?

Marzano,

Chapters 1 & 2

Reading report due

Exit slip

Session 4

February 4

How do we develop a lesson
plan?

How do we d
etermine time
needed to cover material?

How do we select strategies to
use?

Eby, chapter 6
handout

Rutherford
handout 184
-
186

CITW
1
handout

Exit slip


Instructional/management
toolkit due


Session 5

February 11

How do we develop portfolios
to meet USC
-
Upst
ate
requirements?

How does identifying
similarities and differences
affect student learning?

How does the use of graphic
organizers affect retention?



Dr. Izzard



CITW
, 2
&
6

handout

Marzano, chapters
9 &
11


Exit slip

Unit plan due

Readings presentation d
ue




Session 6

February 18

How does summarizing and
note
-
taking affect retention?

How does setting the objective
and goal setting assist the
learner?

CITW
3

&
8
(pp.92
-
96)

Marzano, chapter

4

Exit slip

APS artifact report and
rationale 8 due



13

Session 7
F
ebruary 25

How does the teacher influence
motivation

of the student
?

How do reinforcing effort and
providing recognition and
feedback affect student
engagement and retention?

How do I plan for authentic
learning?

CITW 4 & 8

Eby , p 118
-
121

Marzano, chapt
er
15

Exit slip

APS
artifact report and
rationale 1 due


Session 8

March 4

How do I manage a classroom?

How can giving directions
affect learning?

How does learning collabora
-
tively affect retention?

CITW
, 7

handout

Chapter 10

Exit slip

Lesson plan 1


Session 9

March 18

How does the use of question
-
ing, cues, framing,
generating
and testing hypotheses
,

and ad
-
vanced organizers affect
learning?

CITW
, 9
&

10

handout

Marzano, chapters

5, 6, and 10

Exit slip

APS
10 artifact report and
rationale due


Sessi
on 10

March 25

How do we accommodate for
diverse needs when planning
lessons?

How do we stimulate thinking
through questioning?

CITW
,
11 &

12

h
andout

Marzano, chapters

12, 13, & 14


Exit slip

Lesson plan 2


Session 1
1

April 8

NO class



Session 12

April

15

What are the characteristics of
effective teachers?

How do I develop these
characteristics?

How do I address both
standards and student needs at
one time?

Marzano, chapter 7

Exit slip

APS 2 artifact report and
rationale due

Session 13

April 22

How do
I develop the

traits of
an effective teacher?


How can I improve my
delivery of instruction?


Demo lessons due

Critique of the

demo

lessons


Session 14

April 29

How do we mesh “work
sampling” with student
瑥tc桩hg?

䡯e⁤漠睥⁣潭灬y⁷楴栠
䕅b䄠Ae煵楲e浥湴猿

䡯e⁩猠 桡牡cte爠r摵da瑩潮⁡
灡牴r⁡ca摥浩c⁩湳 牵c瑩潮?


APS

5 artifact report and

rationale due


Session 15

May 6

How well do we understand
the concepts covered?


Exam




14

Course Bibliography


Barr, Robert D., and William H. Parrett.
The Kids Left B
ehind
. Bloomington, IN:


Solution Tree, 2007.


Blackburn, Barbara R.
Classroom Motivation from A to Z: How to Engage Your



Students in Learning
. Larchmo
nt, NY: Eye on Education, 2005.


Clark, Ron.
The Essential 55
. New York: Hyperion, 2003
.


Cummings, Carol.
Winning Strategies for Classroom Management
. Alexandria,


VA: ASCD, 2000.


Divinyi, Joyce.
Discipline that Works: Five Simple Steps
. Peachtree City, GA: The


Wellness Connection,

2003.


Du
f
our, Richard, Rebecca Dufour, R
obert Eaker and Gayle Karhanek.


Whatever It Takes
.

Bloomington, IN: National Educational Service,

2004.


Eby, Judy W., and Adrienne L. Herrell.
Teaching in the Elementary School: A


Reflective Action Approach
. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pe
arson Prentice Hall, 2005.


Glasgow, Neal A., and Cathy D. Hicks.
What Successful Teachers Do
. Thousand


Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, 2003.



Harmin, Merill.
Inspiring Active Learning: A Handbook for Teachers
. Alexandria,


VA: ASCD, 1994.


Hunter, Robin.
Madeline Hunter’s Mastery Teaching: Increasing Instructional


Effectiveness in Elementary and Secondary Schools
. Thousand Oaks, CA:


Corwin Press, 2004.


Jensen, Eric.
Music with the Brain in Mind
. San Diego: The Brain Store
, 2002.


Jensen, Eric.
Teaching with the Brain in Mind
.
2
nd

edition.

Alexandria, VA: ASCD,


2005.


Payne, Ruby.
A Framework for Understanding Poverty
. Highlands, TX: Aha


Process, 1996.


Rutherford, Paula.
Why Didn’t I Learn This in Co
llege
? Alexandria, VA
: Just ASK


Publications, 2002.


Schoenfeldt, Melinda K. and Denise E. Salsbury.
Lesson Planning: A Research
-
based



Model for K
-
12 Classroom
. Upper

Saddle River, NJ: Pearson, 2009.



15

Silver, Harvey F., Richard W. St
rong, and Matthew J. Perini.
The Strategic Teacher: Selecting


the Right Research
-
Based Strategy for Every Lesson.

Alexandria, VA: ASCD,


2007
.


Slocumb, Paul D.
Hear Our Cry: Boys in Crisis
. Highlands, Texas: Aha Process, 2004.


Smith,
Rick.
Conscious Classroom Management
. San Rafael, CA:


Conscious Teaching Publications, 2004.


Sprenger, Marilee.
How to Teach so Student Remember
. Alexandria, VA: ASCD, 2005.


Tate, Marcia.
Worksheets Don’t Grow Dendrites: Instructional Strate
gies that Engage


the Brain
. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin, 2003.


Tileson, Donna Walker.
What Every Teacher Should Know about Instructional Planning
.


Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin, 2004.