EDCI_350 - College of Education - Purdue University

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College of Education


Department of Curriculum and Instruction

EDCI 350:

Community Issues and Applications for Educators
-

Fall 200
7

Tuesday & Thursday
8
:30
-
9
:20 a.m.

Steven C. Beering Hall of Liberal Arts and Education (BRNG) 2275


Course Instructor
s

Dr. Wanda S. Fox, Ph.D., Associate Professor

Office
:


Beering Hall, Room 3148

Office hours
:

By appointment; arrange with our secretary, Kim Deardorff

Phone:


765
-
494
-
7291 (office); 765
-
427
-
0829 (home/cell, before 8:00 p.m.)

E
-
Mail:


wfox@purdue.edu

Fax:

765
-
496
-
1622


Joy Dugan, B.S., Teaching Assistant, Dept. of Curriculum and Instruction

Office
:


Beering Hall, Room 3146

Office hours
:

Tuesday 3:00
-
4:00 Thursday 9:30
-
10:30

Phone:


765
-
494
-
7292 (office)

E
-
Mail:


jv
anest@purdue.edu



Secretary:


Kim Deardorff, 494
-
7290, Beering Hall Room 3134

(M
-
F, 7:30
-
12:00, 12:30
-
4:00)

Mailing Address
:


Department of Curriculum & Instruction


100 N. University Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907
-
2098


Course Description

Examination
of diverse family and community characteristics and issues and potential impacts on
teaching and learning processes. Includes interactions with human service agencies and personnel in
the school and community.

Pre
-

or co
-
requisite:

EDCI 205 & 285.


Credit
2
-

3.


Course Goals

1.

Become a more effective teacher by developing greater awareness about, caring and respect for,
and ability to relate with people (particularly students and their families) whose backgrounds, life
experiences, perspectives, and values a
re different from one’s own.

2.

Examine community human service agencies in terms of (1) ways to contribute as a community
volunteer, either individually or with students; (2) ways to interact with agencies on behalf of
students; and (3) future career opportu
nities.


Course Objectives

1.0

D
EMONSTRATE RESPONSIV
ENESS TO STUDENTS


DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS
,

LIFE EXPERIENCES
,

PERSPECTIVES
,

AND VALUES THROUGH
WHAT

YOU TEACH

(curriculum topics, content, and
processes)

1.1.

Determine and justify curriculum choices based on relevanc
e for students’ current and
future life experiences, perspectives, values, and goals.

1.2.

Focus on processes that will enable students to consider and build the kind of life they
would like to have.

1.3.

Value and shape course content in ways that recognize and int
egrate diverse socio
-
cultural, economic, and family values and perspectives.

EDCI 350, Community Issues and Applications for Educators

Fall 2007, page
2


2.0

D
EMONSTRATE RESPONSIV
ENESS TO STUDENTS


DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS
,

LIFE EXPERIENCES
,

PERSPECTIVES
,

AND VALUES THROUGH
HOW

YOU TEACH

(formal and informal interactions with
students, in
side and outside of classroom)

2.1.

Emphasize learning experiences that develop students’ knowledge and skills in FACS
process areas:

thinking, communication, leadership and

management.

2.2.

Develop a classroom environment and approaches to teaching and learning th
at foster
success for students with a variety of backgrounds, learning styles, and intelligences.

2.3.

Select student
-
centered learning experiences that enable students to reflect and examine
various viewpoints and that incorporate FCCLA and service learning.

2.4.

D
evelop classroom procedures, assessment processes, and other actions that foster
equitable, respectful treatment of students by you and by each other.

2.5.

Design purposeful, appropriate strategies for interacting with and getting to know students,
especially t
hose whose life experiences differ from your own.



3.0

D
EVELOP AND DEMONSTRA
TE RESPONSIVENESS TO

STUDENTS


DIVERSE BACKGROUNDS
,

LIFE
EXPERIENCES
,

PERSPECTIVES
,

AND VALUES THROUGH
WHO

YOU ARE

(personal/professional values
& commitments)

3.1.

Demonstrate respectful,

caring attitudes and interactions with students and their families,
in and outside the classroom.

3.2.

Demonstrate community involvement.

3.3.

On behalf of students, establish connections with guidance, counseling, and health
personnel in the school and/or human se
rvice agencies in the community.

3.4.

Cultivate personal mindfulness and “critical friends” who help one to recognize and
counteract narrow, biased curriculum and inequitable treatment of students (e.g. having
“favorites”, using learning experiences that consis
tently favor specific types of learners,
using teaching examples that are not relevant for many students).



Indiana Standards for Teachers of Family and Consumer Sciences

Focus standards for this course are listed below.

The complete texts
of these and ot
her teacher standards are available at

http://www.doe.state.in.us/dps/standards/famcon.html


Standard #1: Creating a Productive Learning Environment
-

Knowledge of Students.

The Family

and Consumer Sciences teacher demonstrates knowledge of learners in the
instructional process.

1.

The teacher identifies and utilizes a variety of resources to engage learners in the learning
process.

2.

The teacher identifies learning styles.

3.

The teacher ide
ntifies the culture and diversity of his/her students.

4.

The teacher designs a learning process utilizing learning styles, learner interests, and aptitude
assessment data.

Standard #4: Advancing Student Learning
-

Knowledge of Subject Matter.

The Family an
d Consumer Sciences teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies that
engage students in active learning and promote students' development of critical thinking,
problem solving, and performance capabilities
.

1.

The competent teacher is grounded in re
search
-
based family and consumer sciences subject
matter; findings of educational research; established academic standards for family and
consumer sciences content and process areas; and needs of students, the local community,
careers, and workplaces.

EDCI 350, Community Issues and Applications for Educators

Fall 2007, page
3

4.

The competent teacher incorporates family and consumer sciences content that supports the
developmental characteristics (early adolescents, late adolescents and young adults) of
students with a diverse range of needs and capabilities.

10.

The competent te
acher integrates programs and projects of the Family, Career and
Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) student organization in order to foster students'
academic growth, leadership development, application of curriculum knowledge and skills,
community servi
ce, and career development.

11.

The competent teacher provides opportunities for students to probe multiple viewpoints about
real
-
life family, community, and workplace issues that often are controversial. Such learning
experiences:

a.

Develop students' c
apabilities to select and use reliable, research
-
based sources of
information; consider diverse societal and personal values and perspectives; examine
possible goals; assess available resources; analyze short and long
-
term consequences of
possible actions;

select and take action; and evaluate outcomes

b.

Incorporate teacher and student questions that support, guide, and probe thinking and
reasoning

c.

Are facilitated by a supportive teaching/learning environment that fosters positive critique
and respectf
ul interactions among participants

12.

The competent teacher features authentic, student
-
centered learning experiences related to
family, workplace, and community issues. Such learning experiences:

a.

Are relevant to students' current and future lives

b
.

Address established academic standards for family and consumer sciences

c.

Integrate purposeful use of the family and consumer sciences process areas (thinking,
communication, leadership, and management)

d.

Promote application of math, science, and lan
guage arts in real
-
life contexts

e.

Incorporate and connect learning activities in the classroom, the workplace, and the
community

f.

Provide students with opportunities to make choices, take action, and experience
consequences

g.

Include a large and cr
eative repertoire of instructional strategies and methods in which
students:

i.

Examine family, community, and workplace issues through analogies, case studies,
classroom meetings, debates, drama, family history, FCCLA activities, laboratories,
literature
, role
-
playing, workplace learning, and other teaching/learning strategies that
promote active student involvement

ii.

Create products to meet human needs (e.g. food, clothing, shelter, nurturing)

iii.

Conduct inquiry and make recommendations for action

iv.

Take action in families, communities, and workplaces (i.e., service learning; career
preparation; advocating for public policies and legislation that support individuals,
families, and communities)

Standard #9: Professional Development & Outreach
-

F
amily and Community Partnerships.

The career and technical education teacher fosters relationships with families and the local
community to achieve common goals for all learners.

1.

The teacher works with family and community to improve learning opportuniti
es for all
learners.

2.

The teacher promotes the school within the community.

3.

The teacher actively involves community representatives in learning activities.

4.

The teacher is involved in a variety of community activities.

5.

The teacher organizes an active voc
ational student organization.


EDCI 350, Community Issues and Applications for Educators

Fall 2007, page
4

Standard #12: Life Skill Preparation
-

Life Skills.

The career and technical education teacher assists learners in developing self
-
awareness and
confidence as well as sound personal and social values.

1.

The teacher identifies

specific cultural needs within the community.

2.

The teacher uses a variety of instructional strategies which address cultural diversity.

3.

The teacher uses strategies which improve the learners' self
-
esteem and self
-
awareness.


Course Readings and Referenc
e Materials

Required

Payne, Ruby K.

(200
5
).

A framework for understanding poverty

(
fourth
revised edition).

Highlands,
TX:

aha! Process, Inc.


Recommended for Purchase

Jackson, Tom.
Conducting group discussions with kids (2002).

One or more of the followi
ng
:
Activities that teach, More activities that teach, Still more activities that teach, Activities that
teach family values
,.

Cedar City, UT:

Active Learning Center (
http://www.activelearning.org
)


Assigned R
eadings and Reference Materials
.

Assigned readings and reference materials will be available on reserve in the Technology Resource
Center (TRC), BRNG 3287 and/or on the course website.

NOTE:

TRC duplication is limited to 100
pages of resource materials per

student per course.



Course Assignments and Grades

See page
6
for itemization of assignments and point values

Two

Credits

Readings and Participation:

25
% =
250

points

Study Guides
and summaries
for
a
ssigned readings

and guest speakers, student observatio
n
assignment,
and
c
lass attendance and participation.


Service Learning

Project
:

6
5
% =
6
5
0

points

Groups of students will investigate individual, family, and community issues related to a particular
area of family and consumer sciences (e.g. child developm
ent, nutrition and wellness, resource
management, and others). They will identify community agencies that address these issues and work
with personnel
and clients
from
one of these agencies
to develop and implement a service learning
project
.

(
directly rel
ated to
academic standards for middle or high school family and consumer
sciences.
Students are expected to
invest a

minimum of 1
5

hours of
direct and indirect
service
participation

as part of this project
.

The project will include group proposal and final

presentations and
individual reflective journals and final report.


Curriculum
A
pplications
Assignment
:

1
0
% =
1
0
0

points

In conjunction with the service learning project, individual students will identify curriculum materials
other than textbooks that pro
vide information about the issues they are addressing in the project..
They will select and justify specific items from these materials that they could use in corresponding
family and consumer sciences classes with middle or high school students.

Curriculu
m examples
include:
Taking Charge
,
Don’t Laugh at Me, The Art of Loving Well, CARe Curriculum
, etc.


EDCI 350, Community Issues and Applications for Educators

Fall 2007, page
5


Third (optional) credit



Choose one or combine among the following options.

Develop specific
experiences, expectations, and report format collaborative
ly with Dr. Fox and Mrs.
Dugan
.

The
expected time investment is approximately 40 additional hours, total, with 500 possible points.

(1)

Complete additional 25
-
30 hours of service with a community agency.

Maintain time/activity log.

Complete additional related
reading.

Write reflective summary.

(2)

Complete additional reading
s

and
an
in
-
depth review of
supplemental
curriculum materials, as
outlined in the “Responsive Teaching Project” guidelines (available on Blackboard/Vista and in
the TRC).

(3)

Using the FCCLA “Commun
ity Service” guidelines, p
rovide leadership for a
service learning
project

and submit a follow
-
up report.
This can be completed with other student(s) from the
class and/or with middle or high school students (in collaboration with a family and consumer
sci
ences teacher). Contribute to visibility of effort in school and community.

(4)

Provide leadership for writing, implementing, and reporting a grant proposal for service learning,
in conjunction with EDCI 350 and/or with middle or high school teacher and studen
ts.

(5)

Examine a controversial or sensitive topic from the Indiana Family and Consumer Sciences
Academic Standards. Identify teacher and student resources and develop a plan for instruction
for this topic. Related teacher interviews and observations or intera
ctions in a middle or high
school family and consumer sciences classroom recommended but optional.

(6)

Other


submit written proposal and develop details with Dr. Fox and Mrs.
Dugan
.





EDCI 350


Fall 2007

LATE ASSIGNMENT COUPON

One late assignment is allo
wed, without penalty, per semester.


This
must be arranged by 8:00 a.m. the day they are due by e
-
mailing Mrs. Dugan
jvanest@purdue.edu

Attach a copy of her e
-
mail response and this coupon to the assignment when i
t is submitted.

Turn in within one week of original due date.



EDCI 350

Fall 2007

REVISE
-
AND
-
RESUBMIT ASSIGNMENT COUPON

One revise
-
and resubmit assignment is allowed, without penalty, per semester.

Deadlines:

One week after graded assignment is return
ed:

Submit request by e
-
mail to Mrs. Dugan (
jvanest@purdue.edu
)

Two weeks after graded assignment is returned:

Submit revised assignment

Include
all

five

of the following items with the revised assignment:

1.

Copy
of e
-
mail exchange showing request & permission to revise
-
and
-
resubmit

2.

This coupon

3.

A separate, 8½” X 11” cover sheet that lists each section that was revised with a brief (1
-
2
sentence) explanation of the shortcoming(s)
for each section
and how these are

addressed in
your revision.

4.

The original, graded assignment with post
-
it notes marking the section(s) to be re
-
graded

5.

The original score sheet

EDCI 350, Community Issues and Applications for Educators

Fall 2007, page
6


Course Assignments and Grades


Readings, Topical Summaries, and Related Assignments

P
OINTS

P
OSSIBLE

E
ARN
ED



Payne Readings & Study Guides (
9

items @ 15 points)

o

Introduction
and
C1, “Definitions & Resources”

o

C2, “The Role of Language and Story”

o

C3, “Hidden Rules Among Classes”

o

C4, “Characteristics of Generational Poverty

o

C5, “Role Models and Emotional Resou
rces”

o

C6, “Support Systems”

o

C9, Creating Relationships

o

Appendix, Additive Model

o

Related readings, as assigned

1
3
5




Topical summaries (5 items @ 15 points)

o

Service Learning

o

Student Support Services

o

Social and Emotional Learning

o

Community Agencies

o

FACS Tea
ching: Sensitive and Controversial Topics

6
5




School/Community Analysis and Student Observation

5
0


Total

250



Service Learning (SL) Assignments

P
OINTS

P
OSSIBLE

E
ARNED

SL
Proposal

200


SL
Journal Entries (5 @ 25 points)

125


SL Final Report


Individual

225


SL Demonstration


Group

100


SL Total

650



Curriculum Applications Assignment

100



Task Stream

Entr
y
:

Service Learning and Curriculum Applications Individual Reports

(see Course Policy #8)

P/NP



Totals


2 credits

P
OINTS

P
OSSIBLE

E
ARNED

Readings & Participation

250


Service Learning

65
0


Curriculum Applications

100


Course Total

1000


Grades
:



1000
-
900 = A


899
-

800 = B


799
-

700 = C


699
-

600 = D


Below 600 = F


T
hird Credit

(Optional)

Individually selected, implemented, and reported

See guidelines provided on syllabus, page 5
.


500



EDCI 350, Community Issues and Applications for Educators

Fall 2007, page
7


P
URDUE
U
NIVERSITY

-

EDCI

350

F
ALL
2005

-

C
OURSE
S
CHEDULE

* Schedule is subject to revision.

Any changes will be announced in cla
ss *

Week

Tuesday

Thursday

1.

8/2
1 &
8/23

Course Overview and Introductions

Service Learning

2.

8/
2
8 &
8/30

Prepare:

Standards for assigned FACS content
courses

Service Learning

P
r
epare
: Ideas for SL goals and evidence

Service Learning

3.

9/
4

&
9/
6

Prepare:

P
roject research: B
ackground
readings
, websites, interviews, etc


Service Learning

Prepare:

Draft SL Proposal

Service Learning

4.

9/1
1 &
9/13

Due:
SL Proposal Presentation

Service Learning

Due
: SL Journal #1

Service Learning

5.

9/1
8 &
9/20



Payne, Intro, C1


De
finitions & Resources




Payne, Intro, C1


Definitions &
Resources

6.

9/2
5 &
9/27



Payne, C2


Language & Story

Due
: SL Journal #2

No Class
-

SL Release Time

(INAFCS State Conference)

7.

10/
2 &
10/4



SL updates




Payne, C2


Language & Story

8.

10/
9 &
10/11

No Clas
s

October Break

Due
: SL Journal #3



SL updates

9.

10/16
&
10/18

Due
: School/community and student observation
assignment




Payne, C3


Hidden Rules among Classes



Payne, C3


Hidden Rules among Classes

10.

10/2
3 &
10/25



Payne, C3


Hidden Rules among Classes

Due
:
SL Journal #4



Payne, C4


Generational Poverty

11.

10/
30
& 11/1



Payne, C4


Generational Poverty



Payne, C5
-

Role Models and Emotional
Resources

12.

11/
6 &
11/8



Payne, C5
-

Role Models and Emotional
Resources

Due
: SL Journal #4


Due

Curriculum Applications Assig
nment



SL updates

13.

11/1
3
&
11/15



Payne, C6


Support Systems

Due

SL Demonstration


Group



Student Support Services

14.

11/
20

Due
: SL Journal #5

(final entry)



SL
reflections

No Class: Thanksgiving Break

15.

11/2
7
&
11/29



SL wrap
-
up & demonstration planning



SL
Cele
bration & Reception

16.

12/
4 &
12/6



Payne, C9


Relationships

Due
: Final Individual Report



Payne, Appendix


Additive Model

17.

12/1
1
&
12/13



FACS Teaching: Social
-
Emotional Learning



FACS Teaching: Sensitive and
Controversial topics

18.

TBA

(Final’s
week



Course w
rap
-
up


EDCI 350, Community Issues and Applications for Educators

Fall 2007, page
8

Course Policies

1.

Student
inquiries,
feedback
,

and suggestions related to course topics, assignments, and schedules are
welcome. If you have ideas or questions about anything related to this course, please contact
Dr. Fox or
Mrs.
Dugan
.

2.

Students a
re expected to sign and abide by the “Professionalism Agreement” provided in class.

3.

Purdue University policy states that all students are expected to be present for every meeting of classes
in which they are enrolled.
On
-
time class attendance and active cl
ass participation are expected. Inform
Mrs.
Dugan
before

class begins if you will not be able to attend the entire class session. More than one
late arrival or early departure will deduct 5 points per occurrence from your course total.


4.

If you will be abse
nt for
more than five days
, have not been able to reach Dr. Fox or Mrs. Dugan in
person or by telephone or through leaving notification of your circumstances with their secretary, Kim
Deardorff, you or your representative should notify the Office of the De
an of Students (765
-
494
-
1254) as
soon as possible after becoming aware that the absence is necessary. Be advised, you may be asked to
provide documentation from an authorized professional or agency which supports an explanation for your
absence. All matter
s relative to attendance, including the make
-
up of missed work, are to be arranged
between you and Dr. Fox. Only Dr. Fox can excuse you from classes or course responsibilities.


5.

You are responsible for recording the instructors’ and Dean of Students’ conta
ct information so they are
available to you if you are away from campus.

6.

If assignments are turned in late, 5% of possible points will be deducted for
each

day

late.

One exception
per semester (see coupon below).

7.

All assignments are to be individual work,
unless specified as “group”. Evidence of academic dishonesty
of any type can lead to a failing grade in the course.
Purdue prohibits "dishonesty in connection with any
University activity. Cheating, plagiarism, or knowingly furnishing false information to
the University are
examples of dishonesty." [Part 5, Section III
-
B
-
2
-
a,
University Regulations
] Furthermore, the University
Senate has stipulated that "the commitment of acts of cheating, lying, and deceit in

any of their diverse
forms (such as the use of substitutes for taking examinations, the use of illegal cribs, plagiarism, and
copying during examinations) is dishonest and must not be tolerated. Moreover, knowingly to aid and
abet, directly or indirectly,

other parties in committing dishonest acts is in itself dishonest." [University
Senate Document 72
-
18, December 15, 1972]

8.

The
individual Service Learning

and Curriculum Applications

Final
Report
s

must be posted on Task
Stream.
If th
e
s
e

assignment
s

are

not

completed
and posted
satisfactorily, it will result in a failing grade in
EDCI 350.

9.

Students with disabilities should be registered with Adaptive Programs in the Office of the Dean of
Students
before
classroom accommodations can be provided.
If you are el
igible for academic
accommodations because you have a documented disability that will impact your work in this class
,
make an appointment with
Dr. Fox
as soon as possible
to discuss your needs.

10.

Books, articles, videos, middle and high school textbooks, cur
riculum guides, and other resource
materials in addition to those specifically listed on the syllabus will be available on loan or reserve in the
TRC, on loan from
Dr. Fox or
Mrs.
Dugan
, and available in some cases from school
-
based colleagues.
Students ar
e expected to take initiative to identify and obtain needed reference items and resources.

Materials borrowed from
Dr. Fox,
Mrs.
Dugan,
the TRC, and school
-
based colleagues must be returned
before final grade will be submitted.

11.

In the event of a major camp
us emergency, course requirements, deadlines and grading percentages
are subject to changes that may be necessitated by a revised semester calendar or other circumstances.
Here are ways to get information about changes in
this

course. Vista web page, my em
ail address:
wfox@purdue.edu
, and my office phone:
765
-
494
-
7291.