National Institute for Marine Research & Development “Grigore Antipa”

arghtalentData Management

Jan 31, 2013 (4 years and 9 months ago)

218 views


Romanian National Oceanographic and Environmental
Data Center



NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR

MARINE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
“GRIGORE ANTIPA”

Blvd. Mamaia 300, RO


900581

Constanta, ROMANIA

Tel: +40 241 543288, 540870

Fax: +40 241 831274

E
-
mail:
incdmct@datanet.ro

Viorel MALCIU

Third ODINBlackSea Steering Group Meeting

21
-
22 October 2010, IOC Project Office for IODE,
Oostende, Belgium

Romanian

National

Oceanographic

and

Environmental

Data

Center

(NOEDC)

is

designated

as

a

NODC

in

the

context

of

IOC
-
IODE

system
.

It

was

established

in

2007

as

a

Department

of

National

Institute

of

Marine

Research

and

Development

“Grigore

Antipa”
.


The

centre

is

officially

recognized

as

Romanian

Oceanographic

Data

Centre,

replacing

former

Designated

National

Agency

and

is

included

in

the

list

of

world

oceanographic

data

centers

of

IOC/IODE
.

COUNCIL OF ADMINISTRATION

GENERAL DIRECTOR

DIRECTORY
COMMITTEE

ECONOMIC DIRECTOR

TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

DEPARTAMENT

OCEANOGRAPHY

DEPARTAMENT ECOLOGY AND
ENVIONMENT PROTECTION

DEPARTAMENT MARINE LIVING
RESOURCES


COMPARTIMENT DISSEMINATION
OF INFORMATION



NATIONAL AND

INTERNATIONAL

CENTERS



DEPARTAMENT MARKETING
MANAGEMENT

Projects



JURIDIC COMPARTMENT


BIROU HUMAN RESOURCES


INTERNAL AUDIT COMPARTMENT


LMA


TECHNICAL
DEPARTMENT (nava, auto)

INFORMATIONAL SYSTEM
COMPARTMENT

COMPARTIMENT

INVENTI


COMPARTMENT WORK
PROTECTION


PROFESIONAL
FORMATION
COMPARTMENT

SCIENTIFIC COUNCIL

ECONOMIC
DEPARTMENT

DEPARTAMENT
INVESTITIONS

DEPARTAMENT
ADMINISTRTIV

SCIENTIFIC DIRECTOR

SECRETARIAT CNZC

SECRETARIAT CNRO

NATONAL
OCEANOGRAPHIC AND
ENVIRONMENTAL DATA
CENTER

Personnel:



1 manager


1 assistant manager


1 administrator IT


2 operators


Capacity building:

Available existing capacities, simultaneously with the NIMRD’s general services:

-

the external data lines (leased line, FO, bandwidth ~2Mbps, Internet granted;

-

the existing communication datacenter (routers, switches, infrastructure
servers,

C class IP address space PA in administration, Internet visibility services

(name, routing, etc.);

-

the existing internal (physical and logical) computer network;

-

the existing application servers and workstations;

-

for servers, the used hardware /software platform is Open Source based:
Linux (openSUSE or SLES) /Apache /PHP /PostgreSQL


MySQL, with time
demonstrated stability, installed on Intel architectures;

-

for workstations, the used hardware /software platform is Intel P4 class
/Microsoft Windows based (over 80%).

Being

the

technical

operator

of

the

marine

monitoring

network

(physical,

chemical

and

biological)

and

for

coastal

erosion

survey,

NIMRD

holds

a

comprehensive

volume

of

marine

data

and

information

(stored

in

National

Oceanographic

and

Environmental

Data

Center

-

NOEDC)
.


The

main

area

of

interest

is

Black

Sea

with

special

attention

to

the

western

part

of

Black

Sea
.


The

national

data

collection

of

the

NOEDC

consists

of
:

Physical and chemical
data


Air temperature

Sea water temperature,

Sea water salinity, density

Sea water transparency

Dissolved oxygen

Phosphorus

Nitrate

Nitrite

Ammonium

Silicate

Pesticides

Hydrocarbons

Heavy Metals

Biological
data


Plankton

Benthos

Chlorophyll
-
a

Ichthyology



Hydrodynamic
data


Sea waves

Sea level

Sea currents



Environmental
data


Functional zones

Protected areas




Socio
-

economic
data


Digitized maps




Presently Romanian NOEDC collates data and metadata from:




National Institute for Marine Research and Development “Grigore Antipa”



National Institute of Marine Geology and Geo
-
Ecology (GeoEcoMar)



Maritime Hydrographic Directorate (MHD)



Danube Delta Biosphere Reserve Authority (DDBRA)



At NIMRD site, the E2EDM Data Provider software is up and
running (installed and configured) since
Fri, April 24, 2009
.

Considering the ODIN objectives regarding increasing the
transnational data exchange capacity of the national NODC’s and

in order to contribute to
the Ocean Data Portal
system, NIMRD, as
NODC, have proceeded
to install (as we assumed
to) the required
infrastructure.

The E2EDM Data Provider
software is installed:


-

on an appropriate
dedicated physical
machine in the NIMRD’s
server room;


-

have assigned a FQDN
name in the NIMRD’s
name space and


-

benefits of a dedicated
private IP address from
the NIMRD’s PA IP address
space
.


The coordinates and the appropriate paths are
proper communicated since the end of the
installation, setup and configuration process.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR MARINE RESEARCH AND

DEVELOPMENT “GRIGORE ANTIPA” as Romanian
NODC

is partner in:


SEADATANET


Black Sea SCENE


EMODNET pilots _ Chemical lot


}

based on SeaDataNet network of NODC’s


Romanian
NOEDC
is adopting SeaDataNet data policy which

“is consistent with, and in the spirit of, national and international policies
and laws” and “is intended to be fully compatible with the Directive of the
European Parliament and of the Council on public access to
environmental information, the INSPIRE Directive, IOC, ICES, WMO,
GCOS, GEOSS and CLIVAR data principles.”


Scheme of metadata / data coordination for ROMANIA

Partners

NODC

Coordinators,
Developers

Services
(directories)

GeoEcoMar

EDMED

EDMERP,
EDMO,
CDI, DQC

EDIOS

CSR

Scientist, Bibliography,
SED

BODC

MARIS

BODC

BSH
-
DOD

RIHMI
-
WDC

NIMRD

DDBRA

Tools

CMS

CMS, MIKADO

CM
S

CMS

CMS

MHD

Concerning

the

Sea

Data

Net

and

Black

Sea

Scene

Download

Manager,

the

software

packages

will

take

the

same

profit

of

the

NIMRD’s

IT

existing

possibilities

as

the

E
2
EDM

Data

Provider

software

did
:

appropriate

dedicated

physical

machine

in

the

NIMRD’s

server

room,

assigned

FQDN

name

in

the

NIMRD’s

name

space

and

dedicated

private

IP

address

from

the

NIMRD’s

PA

IP

address

space
.


The

coordinates

and

the

appropriate

paths

will

also

be

proper

communicated

at

the

end

of

the

installation,

setup

and

configuration

process
.


The

process

is

ongoing

now,

these

days
.

The

expected

time

to

fulfill

the

task

(if

everything

will

run

all

right)

was

Thu,

October

01
,

2009
.


Present Database

Structure

Formats:


Present:


Data:


xls, text, ODV 4


Metadata:


adopted ISO 19115




In work:


All data




ODV format


Data till 1996: free


After 1996: on request

There was installed the SDN Download Manager, in order to
work in the respective oceanographic data exchange
environment and the adjacent projects (e.g. Upgrade Black
Sea Scene)

It is installed on a stand
-
alone machine, in the NIMRD’s
external DMZ. It will be soon moved on the new
infrastructure (enterprise
-
class servers, etc.). In the next
slide is shown a global network schematic.

Problems:

-

lack of redundant (backup) Internet line (in order to
increase data availability;

-

limited professional storage capacity;

-

limited data backup capacity (existing storage capacity
is assigned mainly to the working areas


see above &
previous slide);

-

delays in moving the systems to the new infrastructure.

-
Other problems:

At the First Session of the IODE Steering Group for the IODE Ocean Data Portal
(SG
-
ODP
-
I), 20
-
22 September 2010, was that a number of the current ODP data
providers are also providing data through SeaDataNet (non
-
IOC project) and
specific attention should be given to the interoperability between the two systems.

It was also noted that the data policy of SeaDataNet is quite different from the
policy used by ODP. The ODP data policy follows the IOC data policy aiming at free
and open access, whereas SeaDataNet requires user registration to download data
and allows restrictions on data access.

It was further noted that there are substantial differences in granularity
between SeaDataNet and ODP. SeaDataNet considers each profile as a
separate data set. ODP allows flexible setting of granularity (e.g. a
cruise, map, product, profile, etc, can all be a data set).

Participants involved in both SeaDataNet and ODP called for a single
software application that can be used to register data in either system.

If portals such as ODP and SeaDataNet are populated, the problem of
duplication will become a serious issue.

! Dr. Mikhaylov is in discussion with D. Schaap to provide a list of SDN
datasets; however no agreement has been reached. Dr Mikhaylov will
again raise this issue with D. Schaap.

As requirements for the future ODP working plan for 2010
-
2011 that the
Technical specifications on ODP V1


SeaDataNet interoperability to be
done till December 2010 and, more important, an agreement regarding
SeaDataNet data sets involvement (ODP ODINBlackSea countries) will
be reached in the beginning 2011.


Existing Infrastructure for the Integrated
Monitoring System


Operational oceanography: Tsunami Early Warning System, Sea level, Sea surface temperature (SST), Air
pressure


Constanta MedGLOSS station no 28

Intelligent Digiquartz Depth Sensor for sea level and water
temperature;

SETRA Atmospheric pressure sensor;

Garmin GPS II Plus Personal Navigator unit with serial output
and remote antenna for accurate time recording,

Computer (Pentium II 350MHz computer with Windows XP and 6
MB disk and US Robotics 32,000 baud rate modem),
connections and power supply unit.

Modem

Modem

Modem

NIMRD premises:
data QC and transfer

Local ISP

Data
acquisition,
storage and
transfer every
minute

FTP Data
transmission:

every minute


Existing

operational oceanography: sea currents and waves in the coastal area

For sea current and waves
monitoring in the coastal area,
three Acoustic Doppler Current
Profilers ADCP Workhorse
Sentinel 600 Hz are used in fixed,
underwater measurements
locations or in oceanographic
cruises. Data are used for
oceanographic forecast as well


Existing

operational oceanography: sea currents and waves in the coastal area

For sea current and waves
monitoring in the coastal area,
three Acoustic Doppler Current
Profilers ADCP Workhorse
Sentinel 600 Hz are used in fixed,
underwater measurements
locations or in oceanographic
cruises. Data are used for
oceanographic forecast as well

Existing operational oceanography: oceanographic
forecast

http://www.rmri.ro/RMRI/Forecasts/ForecastsRO.html

Prognoza

oceanografică

Cunoaşterea dinamicii

parametrilor fizico
-
chimici

Marea Neagră


(On the site of
Ministry of
Environment and
Forests)

Operational deep sea oceanography

Romanian operational oceanographic system is supposed to answer to:




Global Monitoring and Environment Security (GMES), having as a main component an
integrated system for ocean monitoring and crises management;




Marine Strategy Framework Directive



water quality monitoring, biodiversity protection,
marine living resources protection, environment information system;




INSPIRE (Infrastructure for Spatial Information in the European Community), the component
for waters
-

WISE (Water Information System for Europe)


coordination of data and information
exchange;




European Maritime Strategy


Green Book regarding Maritime Policies where one can find the
need for a European network for observation and data regarding marine environment.

Danube monitoring stations (Sulina,
Sf. Gheorghe)

Autonomous oceanographic buoys

NEW SEAWATCH SYSTEM FOR OCEANOGRAPHIC FORECAST
(draft project to be submitted to INNOVATION NORWAY)

The SEAWATCH system

has three main parts:


-
Real time observations from oceanographic and river buoys;


-
Data from other sources (e.g. coastal stations, research ships) and numerical models.

Data


management and forecasting services;


-
Data and information distribution.


Parameters

Group

Air

pressure


X

Air

temperature

X

Wind

speed

X

Wind

direction

Physical

Wave

height

Physical


Total

disposable

mass

Biologic

PAR

(
Photosynthetic

disposable

mass
)

Biologic

Humidity

Physical

Waves

period

Physical


Direction

and

speed

of

the

surface

current

Physical

Sea

surface

temperature

and

salinity

Physical


Ra
dioactivity

Chimic

Light

attenuation

Physical

and

biological


H
ydrocarbons

Chimic
al

O
xygen

Chimic
al

and

biologic
al

pH

Chimic
al

and

biologic
al

C
hlorophyll


Biologic
al

Nutri
ents

Chimic
al


and

biologic
al

List of the parameters provided by the oceanographic buoys

RIVERWATCH system


The RIVERWATCH system

is an integrated,
real
-
time, monitoring and information system
providing forecasting, warning and decision
support which can improve the
resource/emergency management capabilities
of river basin authorities, government
agencies, industry and others responsible for
water supply, power generation, agriculture,
waterway transport, waste disposal, public
health and water quality.


Main applications of RIVERWATCH include:

Boundary conditions for modeling, forecast

Pollution control

Flood early warning

Irrigation scheduling/operation

River navigation

Water allocation and drought management

Integrated river basin management


25

PRESENT STATE AND EVOLUTION TRENDS

OF THE ROMANIAN BLACK SEA COASTAL

ENVIRONMENT IN 2009

S. Nicolaev


Director General

A.S. Bologa


Scientific Director


V. Abaza, L. Alexandrov, L. Boicenco, V. Coatu, D. Diaconeasa,

C. Dumitrache, O. Dumitrescu, C. Ispas
-
Sava, L. Lazar,
V. Malciu,

R. Mateescu, V. Maximov, D. Micu, V. Nita, A. Oros, E. Stoica,

F. Timofte, D. Tiganus, D. Vasiliu, T. Zaharia


National Institute for Marine Research & Development

“Grigore Antipa”, Mamaia 300, RO
-
900581 Constanta 3,

Romania, E
-
mail: office@alpha.rmri.ro

Annex 1

COASTAL PROCESSES


In the sector Năvodari
-
Vama
Veche coastal geomorphological
processes presented the
following percentage in 2007
-

2009:




erosion 64%;



dynamic stability 18%;



accretion 18%.

Share of coastal processes (erosion / dynamic
-
stability / accretion) of coastal beaches in
Năvodari
-
Vama Veche area (2007
-

2009)

EP
28%
EM
15%
ES
21%
SR
18%
AS
6%
AM
6%
AP
6%
EP
EM
ES
SR
AS
AM
AP
Calculated erosion /accretion ratio was 3.24, as an indicator of
environmental state for the beaches along southern Romanian Black Sea
coast


SEA LEVEL

-30.0
-20.0
-10.0
0.0
10.0
20.0
30.0
40.0
50.0
Ian
Febr
Mart
Apr
Mai
Iun
Iul
Aug
Sept
Oct
Nov
Dec
cm
Medie 1933-2008
Medii lunare 2009
Medii lunare maxime (1933-2008)
Medii lunare minime (1933-2008)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
I -5 la 0
II 1 la 5
III 6 la 10
IV 11 la 15
V 16 la 20
VI 21 la 25
VII 26 la 30
VIII > 30
Clase statistice
Număr de cazuri
Sea level,

as one of the
indicators
of coastal zone state,
presented
during 2009 a constantly positive
deviation from the long term yearly
average.

Maximum deviation was

+ 19.1 cm in December, only 4.1
cm below the monthly maximum
mean for this month (+36.1 cm in
2002). Annual average was 7,2 cm
higher than long term annual
average (1933


2008).

Values of 2009 are included in frequency of
eleven years when sea level was between 21.0


25.0 cm (class six) if compared to longest
series of 24 years, class 16
-
20 cm.

General indicators


TRANSPARENCY



Significant differences between water
bodies

(transitional, coastal and
marine)



Range

of variation within
0
.
6
÷
10m


Transitional waters

-
min. 0.6m

Sulina 10m

Sep

-
max.4.0m Gura Buhaz


Sep


Coastal waters

-
min.0.7m Constanta Sud 5m


Sep

-
max.7.0m Vama Veche 20m


Sep


Marine waters

-
min. 1.8m Portita 30m


May

-
max. 10.0m

Est Constanta 5
-

Jul


PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL
INDICATORS

Minimum and maximum values of
water transparency in transitional,
coastal and marine waters

Transparency evolution influenced by river input and
anthropogenic activities


0
2
4
6
8
10
12
transitional waters
coastal waters
marine waters
2009
Transparency [m]
min.
max.
TEMPERATUR
E


Monthly average temperatures 2009 compared
with 19
59
-
200
8

multiannual averages,
Constanţa



Constanţa: 1
.
2
o
C
÷

26
o
C,
normal seasonal
variations



No negative values




Insignificant differences

between

water bodies
and
1959
-
2008
compared
with 2009




0.00
5.00
10.00
15.00
20.00
25.00
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
T [
o
C]
m+s
m-s
1959-2008
2009
Average seawater temperature recorded insignificant differences over
1959
-
200
8

range

SALINIT
Y


Significant differences

between transitional, coastal
and marine waters justifying
classification




Constanţa


monthly
average



11
.
40
÷
16
.
26g/l,
significant differences

(
t
test)
between

1959
-
2008
and
2009



Minimum value



A
pril,
correlated with Danube’s
maximum flow







Comparative analysis of salinity
multiannual monthly average (g/l),
Constanta, during 1959
-
2008 and 2009


11.00
12.00
13.00
14.00
15.00
16.00
17.00
18.00
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
Salinitate (g/l)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Debitul mediu lunar al Dunarii [km3/luna]
medie+s
medie-s
1959-2008
2009
Debitul mediu al Dunarii [km3/luna]
Salinity recorded deviations towards 1959
-
2008 multiannual

averages

due to Danube’s hydrological regime

DISSOLVED OXYGEN


Monthly averages, Constanţa:


2
1
5.
5


368
.
4µM


87
.
7%
-
107
.
4%



Significant seasonal variations
(saturability, t test) due to
thermic regime and biological
phenomena amplitude

Comparative analysis of multiannual monthly
averages of dissolved oxygen concentrations
(μM) of the seawater
,
Constanta

1959
-
2008 and 2009

0.0
50.0
100.0
150.0
200.0
250.0
300.0
350.0
400.0
450.0
500.0
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
O
2
[µM]
media+s
media-s
1959-2008
2009
85
90
95
100
105
110
115
120
125
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
Oxigen, %
medie+s
medie-s
1959-2008
2009
Good oxygenation of coastal
waters,
except
warm se
a
son
averages
which
slowly
decreased
as to

1959
-
2008

Eutrophication indicators

NUTRIENTS

Phosphates
concentrations
(
µM
)

Constanta

1960
-
2008 and
2009

Silicates
concentrations

(
µM)

Constanta

1960
-
2008 and
2009

Nitrates
concentrations
(µM)

Constanta

1976
-
2008 and
2009

Ammonium
concentrations
(µM)

Constanta

1980
-
2008 and
2009


Increased nitrates concentrations in Apri due to Danube

s input

without
significant di
f
ferences

(t

test
)
as to

1976
-
2008


S
ignificant decrease

(testul t)
of ammonium concentrations in 2009


P:
very low values
, comparable (t
-
test
)
with

1960
-
1970,
reference interval for
good water quality


Si:
significant differences

(t
-
test
)
as to

1960
-
2008
due to lower monthly
averages

Generally, nutrient concentrations (N, P, Si inorganic forms)

recorded
normal values
, slowly increased in transitional waters and anthropogenic
activitiy areas

-1.00
0.00
1.00
2.00
3.00
4.00
5.00
6.00
7.00
8.00
9.00
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
(PO
4
)
3-
[µM]
medie+s
medie-s
1960-2008
2009
1960-1970
0.0
10.0
20.0
30.0
40.0
50.0
60.0
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
(SiO
4
)
4-
[
µM
]
m+s
m-s
1959-2008
2009
0.00
5.00
10.00
15.00
20.00
25.00
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
(NO
3
)
-
[µM]
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
Debitul mediu lunar al Dunarii
[km3/luna]
medie+s
medie-s
1976-2008
2009
Debitul mediu al Dunarii [km3/luna]
0.00
2.00
4.00
6.00
8.00
10.00
12.00
14.00
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
(NH
4
)
+
[µM]
m+s
m-s
1980-2008
2009
CHLOROPHYLL a


Chlorophyll
-
a

concentrations

in

coastal

waters

(Constanta)

,

varied

between

0
.
87

and

50
.
63

μg/l

and

monthly

means

between

1
.
51

and

13
.
02

µg/l




Highest

value

in

April

as

a

result

of

intensive,

but

very

short,

algal

bloom




High

values

of

monthly

mean,

above

annual

average

(
5
.
56

µg/l),

in

February

(
8
.
61
µg/l)

and

May

(
9
.
13

µg/l)




In

2009

chlorophyll

a

annual

mean

in

coastal

waters,

although

slightly

higher

than

in

2008

(
4
.
55

µg/l
),

remains

below

the

average

value

for

the

period

2001



2009

(
5
.
92

µg/l)




Reduction

of

nutrients

input

from

Danube,

starting

early


90
s,

has

led

to

a

continuous

decrease

of

chlorophyll

a
,

confirming

the

recovery

trend

of

the

ecological

status

of

coastal

ecosystem

in

the

Romanian

Black

Sea

waters
.

C hlorophyll
a
- 2009
0.00
2.00
4.00
6.00
8.00
10.00
12.00
14.00
J an
F eb
Mar
Apr
May
J un
J ul
Aug
S ep
Oct
Nov
Dec
chl
a
, μg/l
C hlorophyll
a
2001 - 2009
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
chl
a
, μg/l
Indicator
s

of

contamina
tion

HEAVY METALS



Average concentrations in seawater
generally moderated (0.94


1.91 µg/L
Cu; 0.93


1.22 µg/L Cd; 1.58


3.35
µg/L Pb; 1.52


3.13 µg/L Ni; 3.08


6.04 µg/L Cr), and the distribution
showed reducing trends along with
increasing distance from the shore;



Increased accumulation was noticed in
sediments off Danube mouths and
inside Constanta harbor, in comparison
with the central and southern sectors;



Heavy metals values in marine
ecosystem components within the
variation ranges between 2002


2008,
in some cases sligthly decreasing
trends.

Plumb
0.00
2.00
4.00
6.00
8.00
10.00
12.00
14.00
16.00
18.00
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
µg/L
Plumb
0.00
10.00
20.00
30.00
40.00
50.00
60.00
70.00
80.00
90.00
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
µg/g
Evolution of annual average concentrations of heavy metals in
seawater (a) and sediments (b) during 2002
-
2009

a)

b)

TOTAL
P
ETROLEUM
H
YDROCARBONS


(TPHs)

TRANSITIONAL WATERS


High TPHs

content

in 2009


average of
601,6

g/
l compared with 2004
-
2008


mean value of 394,8

g/
l
;




Occasional extreme values of TPHs were
recorded at
Sf.Gheorghe
-

2,2 mg/l, Mila 9


1,2mg/l şi Gura Buhaz


1,4mg/l

stations



COASTAL WATERS


Average values were situated in the
specific range for the period 2004
-
2008



SEDIMENT
S


Highest content of TPHs was recorded in
northern area


average value of
330,2

g/g
;



TPHs mean values were situated in the
specific range for the period 2004
-
2008
for most stations.

399,6
635,6
1034,6
395,1
938,0
400,7
561,2
412,1
632,9
648,3
521,8
471,8
1,0
10,0
100,0
1000,0
10000,0
TPHs Concentration
µg/l
maximum µg/l
729,0
1299,0
2400,0
1559,0
1145,0
1104,0
2558,0
1407,0
3592,0
1171,0
1325,0
1430,0
av erage 2004-2008, µg/l
284,9
341,4
461,9
486,5
401,5
404,9
458,5
430,0
476,8
389,3
407,9
376,6
minimum µg/l
32,0
77,4
41,0
20,0
22,0
10,0
5,8
22,0
17,8
20,0
15,0
4,0
av erage 2009, µg/l
399,6
635,6
1034,6
395,1
938,0
400,7
561,2
412,1
632,9
648,3
521,8
471,8
Sulina
Mila 9
Sf.
Gheorghe
Portita
Gura Buhaz
Mamaia
Constanţa
Nord
Constanţa
Sud
Ef orie Sud
Costineşti
Mangalia
Vama
Veche
350,3
310,9
320,1
360,4
110,5
110,7
190,0
110,5
60,1
230,3
280,5
1,0
10,0
100,0
1000,0
10000,0
TPHs Concentration µg/g
maximum µg/g
686,0
672,0
476,9
719,0
468,0
1305,8
247,8
2619,0
1542,0
1075,8
1712,6
average, 2004-2008 µg/g
313,0
234,7
185,0
229,4
126,6
143,1
130,2
267,6
156,4
129,3
244,0
minimum µg/g
23,0
22,0
21,8
28,5
20,6
19,4
35,2
17,8
10,1
19,0
4,1
average, 2009 µg/g
350,3
310,9
320,1
360,4
110,5
110,7
190,0
110,5
60,1
230,3
280,5
Sulina
Mila 9
Sf.Gheorghe
Portiţa
Gura Buhaz
Cazino
Mamaia
Constanţa
Nord
Eforie Sud
Costineşti
Mangalia
Vama Veche
POLYNUCLEAR AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

(PAHs)


TRANSITIONAL

AND COASTAL
WATERS


Mean concentration of following PAHs
(µg/l)
: anthracene, fluorene, phenanthrene,
fluoranthene, naphthalene exceed
ed

limit
allowed by GD
N
o. 351 /2005 approving
program to phase out discharges,
emissions and losses of priority hazardous
substances.


SEDIMENT
S


Mean total PAHs concentrations in
sediments were situated in

specific range
for period 2004
-
2008

for most stations
;
highest was recorded in southern sector



Naphthalene and anthracene are dominant
organic pollutants in marine
sediments;concentrations of two
compounds exceeded level of 1

g/g
.

2,900
0,003
0,031
0,354
0,170
4,100
0,115
0,012
0,004
0,010
0,01
0,000
0,001
0,010
0,100
1,000
10,000
PAHs concentration
µg/l
maximum µg/l
4,700
0,005
0,060
0,600
0,300
7,200
0,220
0,020
0,006
0,020
0,02
2009,average µg/l
2,900
0,003
0,031
0,354
0,170
4,100
0,115
0,012
0,004
0,010
0,01
minimum µg/l
1,080
0,001
0,003
0,090
0,400
0,820
0,010
0,004
0,002
0,001
0,001
naphthalene
acenaphthylen
acenaphthene
fluorene
phenanthrene
anthracene
fluoranthene
pyrene
benz(a)anthra
cene
crysene
benz(k)fluoran
thene
1,80
7,60
1,40
0,85
0,55
0,75
1,10
8,50
2,80
0,45
4,20
4,10
0,00
0,01
0,10
1,00
10,00
100,00
Total PAHs concentration
µg/g
maximum µg/g
5,90
64,80
4,40
2,20
6,89
6,91
9,79
61,26
19,70
10,67
16,43
6,34
2004-2008,average µg/g
1,10
5,50
0,90
0,70
1,31
1,46
1,66
7,68
3,59
1,87
3,08
2,57
minimum µg/g
0,03
0,02
0,03
0,04
0,01
0,01
0,03
0,03
0,22
0,01
0,01
0,07
2009,average µg/g
1,80
7,60
1,40
0,85
0,55
0,75
1,10
8,50
2,80
0,45
4,20
4,10
Sulina
Mila 9
Sf.
Gheorgh
e
Portiţa
Gura
Buhaz
Mamaia
Constanţ
a Nord
Constanţ
a Sud
Eforie
Sud
Costineşt
i
Mangalia
Vama
Veche
23%
32%
21%
24%
35%
24%
21%
20%
49%
25%
20%
6%
39%
46%
11%
4%
61%
19%
16%
4%
38%
32%
24%
6%
40%
36%
19%
5%
58%
21%
15%
6%
70%
17%
9%
4%
61%
33%
5%
1%
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
70%
80%
90%
100%
Naphthalene
Anthracene
Phenanthrene
Pyrene
Benzo[a]anthracene
Fluorene
Fluoranthene
Acenaphthene
Chrysene
Acenaphthylene
<0.02 mg/kg
0.02-0.2 mg/kg
0.2-1.0 mg/kg
>1.0 mg/kg
ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES

(OCPs)


OCPs

(HCB,

lindane,

heptachlor,

aldrin,

dieldrin,

endrin,

DDE,

DDD,

DDT)

evinced

comparable

concentration

values

in

transitional

and

coastal

waters

between

detection

limit

and

0
.
2


g/L

in

sea

water

and

0
.
13


g/g

in

sediment,

respectively
.


In

bivalves

OCPs

concentration

varied

between

detection

limit

and

0
.
12


g/g

tissue
.

Downward

trend

of

organochlorinated

pesticide

concentrations

continued,

same

as

2004



2008
,

in

all

environmental

components

investigated

(water,

sediment,

biota)
.

0.0000
0.0200
0.0400
0.0600
0.0800
0.1000
0.1200
0.1400
ug/g
Scapharca Mila 9 18m
Mya Mila 9 18m
Rapana Mila 9 20m
Midii Mila 9 20m
Midii Portita 20m
Rapana Portita 20m
Scapharca Portita 20m
Midii Cazino 17m
Midii Cazino 28m
Midii Costinesti 5m
Midii Costinesti 17m
Midii Costinesti 28m
Rapana Costinesti 17 m
Scapharca Costinesti 20m
Midii Mangalia 3m
Midii Mangalia 5m
HCB
Lindan
Heptaclor
Aldrin
Dieldrin
Endrin
p,p'DDE
p,p'DDD
p,p'DDT
PHYTOPLANKTON



133

species

belonging

to

7

micro
-
algal

groups

have

been

identified

in

Romanian

waters



Diatoms

were

dominant

as

number

of

species

(
38
%
),

followed

by

dinoflagellates

(
25
%
)

and

chlorophytes

(
18
%
)
.

0
2
4
6
8
10
12
0
2
4
6
8
10
12
14
16
18
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
Density

(x10
6

cells / l)

Biomass ( g / m
3
)


Multi
-
yearly

averages

registered

for

phytoplankton

parameters

in

the

marine

waters

off

Constanta

between

1983

-

2009



The multi
-
annual
evolution trend of the
phytoplankton
abundance in the
Romanian coastal
waters is placed in the
overall decrease trend,
observed in the past few
years, as a result of a
continuous reducing
eutrophication process
since 1980




Species

Coastal waters

Cazino
-



February

May

July

Mamaia

BAC

Skeletonema costatum

1814





830

BAC

Chaetoceros socialis



4422

1200

BAC

Chaetoceros curvisetus



1216

470

BAC

Cerataulina pelagica



259

2100

BAC

Cyclotella caspia



417

380

BAC

Nitzschia delicatissima



15528

604

8690

BAC

Nitzschia pungens var. atlantica



720

BAC

Thallasiosira parva

544



DIN

Prorocentrum minimum



106

180

EUG

Eutreptia lanowii



4320

CRS

Apedinella spinifera



101

114

260

CYA

Aphanizomenon flos
-
aquae







490

Main phytoplankton species identified in the Romanian

Black Sea coastal waters with significant densities in 2009



100
-
1000 x 10
3

cells/l



1000
-
10000 x 10
3

cells/l



>10000 x 10
3

cells/l

PHYTOPLANKTON (cont’d)


Algal blooms, as impact indicator of eutrophication of
marine environment, showed a descendent tendency,
both numerically and as amplitude, which maintained
constant during last years.


Dominant species were diatoms
Nitzschia delicatissima,
Cerataulina pelagica,

Chaetoceros socialis,
Skeletonema costatum, Chaetoceros curvisetus,
Cyclotella caspia

and flagellate
Eutreptia lanowii.


Comparatively with previous
decade
, mean densities of
total phytoplankton (2,540∙10
3

cel
ls
∙l
-
1
) about 3.3 times
higher then in 2006

and

2008
,

a
s for mean biomass
(1,986.42 mg

m
-
3
), it has same order of magnitude
as
values recorded in 2007 and 2008,
namely
2,171.77
mg

m
-
3

and 1,384.24

mg

m
-
3
,
respectively.

ALGAL BLOOMS

PHYTOBENTHOS



During summer 2009, 12 macroalgal
species have been identified: 6 Chlorophyta, 1
Phaeophyta, 4 Rhodophyta and 1 Phanerogama.




From macroalgae recorded in Red List for the
Black Sea, 2 species identified: perennial species
Cystoseira barbata
(e
ncountered in southern part
of Romanian seashore
between

Mangalia
and

Vama Veche, well developed at Mangalia, with
high biomasses and
a high epiphyte degree
)
and
marine eelgrass
Zostera nana

(also at Mangalia).




High wet biomasses were reached by
opportunistic species
Ulva lactuca

(1,537.5 g/m
2
),
Enteromorpha flexuosa
(1,425 g/m
2
),
Ceramium
elegans
(2,027.5 g/m
2
).




Important macroalgal deposits formed along
seashore in 2009, as noticed in last few years.


V
ariation of mean wet biomass for

quantitatively
dominant species

in summer
2009

Cystoseira

barbata

maintains

its

regeneration

trend

in

the

southern

part

of

the

Romanian

seashore,

characterized

by

a

higher

specific

biodiversity,

compared

with

the

rest

of

the

seashore
.


0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
Cazino
Costinesti
Mangalia
Vama Veche
biomass (g/m
2
)
Ulva lactuca
Enteromorpha intestinalis
Ceramium elegans


Qualitative structure of zooplankton improves during all seasons, presenting an uniform abundance
distribution of 24 identified taxa.



Maximum values for total zooplankton (37,787 ind/m
-
3

and a biomass of 3,236.19 mg/m
-
3
) registered
on Est Constanta profile during June (station 4).



Fodder zooplankton registered maximum values in July (station 3) of the same profile (32.346 ind/m
-
3

and a biomass of 1,024.23 mg/m
-
3
).



Rare species during past decades like copepod
Centropages ponticus

and the cladocerans
Penilia
avirostris
,
Evadne spinifera

and
Pseudevadne tergestine

start to register more abundant populations
(maximum 19,156 ind/m
3

of
Penilia avirostris

in July).

Evolution of the total and fodder zooplankton abundance on the Est Constanta profile

ZOOPLANKTON

MACROZOOBENTHOS



51

identified

macrozoobenthic

species

comparable

with

50
-
52

species

between

2006

and

2008
;



Quantitative

increaments

of

densities

only

in

central

marine

sector

(Cazino
-
Mamaia),

13
,
950

ind/sq
.
m
.




Quantitative

reduction

more

evident

in

southern

marine

sector,

about

nine

times

lower

than

2007
-
2008

when

biomass

was

estimated

at

2
.
052

g/m
2
,

the

mollusks

contribution

to

biomass

increase

more

reduced

in

2009
.



Macrozoobenthos

evaluation

in

coastal

waters

evinced

an

improvement

in

terms

of

species

diversity
;

present

number

is

higher

than

in

the

'
90
s

when

benthic

fauna

was

represented

by

a

maximum

of

28

species
.

Evolution of number of macrozoobenthic species
in marine shallow waters between 2006 and
2008 compared with 1990

0
10
20
30
40
50
60
number of species
1990
2006
2007
2008
Contamination Indicators

MICROBIOLOGICAL CHARGE


concentrations of enteric bacteria [total coliforms (TC), fecal coliforms (FC), fecal
streptococci (FS) have been generally found within the limits of National
Regulations and EC Bathing Water Directive



areas under the influence of sewage discharge have shown
the maximum values
of bacterial indicators



compliance of coastal bathing waters with the mandatory and guide values for
the TC, FC and FS parameters was 100% in August while the percentage of
bathing areas failing to comply with the mandatory values for the enteric bacteria
(TC, FC and FS) have decreased at 0% compared with the same period in 2008

TC
0%
100%
% overtaking norms
% according to norms
CF
0%
100%
% overtaking norms
% according to norms
FS
0%
100%
% overtaking norms
% according to norms
BIODIVERSIT
Y INDICATORS


State

of biodiversity defined by occurrence of 300 species out of 200
-
270 yearly identified in last 15 years (750 sp. in entire period) and 26
threatened sp. from 48 in the Red List


Pressure

expressed by 28 non
-
indigenous sp., 8 commercially
exploited sp. (2 molluscs and 6 fish) and 12 anthropogenic activities


Impact

assessed by no. of threatened sp./no. of total sp. identified in
2009


26/300, by no. of disappeared sp./no. of total sp.


7/750 and
no. of self
-
acclimatized sp.
-

1 (
Mugil soiuyi
)


Response

has been estimated by no. of protected sp./no. of total sp.


16/750 (EGO 57/2007) and less than 50 experts in marine
biodiversity


Due to decreasing of marine research effort, only a small no. of
marine species is identified every year; pressure on marine
biodiversity and number of threatened species are still relevant

THREATENED SPECIES


Red List of marine species has been entirely updated in
2008 and just for fish in 2009


It includes 223 species categorized in 8 IUCN
categories: 19 macrophytes and angiosperms, 58
invertebrates, 142 fish and 4 mammals

Macrophytes

8%

Invertebrates

26%

Fish

64%

Mammals

2%

RE

4%

CR

7%

EN

9%

VU

7%

NT

14%

LC

13%

DD

45%

NA

1%

MARINE HABITATS




Diversity

was described using two classification systems:


EUNIS (European Nature Information System) classification system of the
EEA

(2 habitat types in the water column and 150 benthic habitat types)


Out of these, 5 habitat types in a critical state:



-

infralittoral

hard

clay

banks

with

Pholas

dactylus,



-

infralittoral

rock

with

Petricola

lithophaga,




-

midlittoral

sands

with

Donacilla

cornea,



-

Zostera

noltii

seagrass

meadows

,



-

Cystoseira

barbata

belts
.


MARINE HABITATS (cont’d)

NATURA

2000

(Habitats

Directive

92
/
43
/EC)

classification
:


8

general

habitat

types
:


-

1110

-

Sandbanks

which

are

slightly

covered

by

seawater

all

the

time,


-

1130

-

Estuaries,


-

1140

-

Mudflats

and

sandflats

not

covered

by

seawater

at

low

tide,


-

1150

-

Coastal

lagoons,


-

1160

-

Large

shallow

inlets

and

bays,



-

1170

-

Reefs,



-

1180

-

Submarine

structures

made

by

leaking

gases,


-

8330

-

Submerged

or

partially

submerged

sea

caves
.



with

28

de

subtypes,

out

of

which

10

with

high

or

very

high

conservation

value
.

In

2009
,

at

several

locations

with

habitat

type

1130



Estuar
i
e
s,

3

non
-
indigenous

species

new

for

the

Black

Sea

have

been

found
:

Asian

prawn

Palaemon

macrodactylus

Rathbun

1902
,

Say’s

mud

crab

Dyspanopeus

sayi

S
.

I
.

Smith

1869

and

Japanese

shore

crab

Hemigrapsus

sanguineus

de

Haan

1835
.

MARINE HABITATS (cont’d)


State

of

habitats
:

evaluated

through

inventorying

habitat

types

(
8

Natura

2000
,

152

EUNIS)

and

assessing

conservation

status
.



Pressure

on

habitats

expressed

by

10

human

activities


with

impact

on

conservation

state

(same

as

in

previous

years)
.



Evolution

trends

of

marine

habita
ts

according

with

general

rehabilitation

tendency
,

due

to

diminishing

anthropogenic

pressures
.



Response

at

environment

and

environmental

policies

level

quantified

as

number

of

MPAs

/

total

coast

length

(
2

/

245

km

for

national

MPAs

network

and

6

/

245

km

for

Natura

2000

ecological

network)
.



Marine

habita
ts

follow the general
rehabilitation tendency
,
due to diminishing
anthropogenic pressures;



Identification, description, classification
and mapping of marine habitate types
continued with respect to marine
biodiversity conservation and protection

MARINE HABITATS (cont’d)

ROSCI0066
Vama Veche


2 Mai marine


zone
:
(
overlapping on Marine


Reserve,
5.000 ha)


ROSCI0094
Mangalia Underwater Sulphurous


Springs
(360 ha)


ROSCI0197
Submerged Beach from Eforie


(140 ha)


ROSCI0273
Marine Zone from Cape Tuzla


(1
.
790 ha)

ROSCI0237
Methanogenic
Structures from
Sfantu Gheorghe

(cca
6.000 ha)

MARINE PROTECTED AREAS

1 SITE UNDER BIRDS DIRECTIVE

6 SITES UNDER HABITATS DIRECTIVE

ROSCI0269
Danube Delta


marine
zone

(
overlapping on the marine
zone of DDBR
-

103.000 ha)


STATE OF FISH STOCKS


Indicators for living resources


STATE


stock biomass



sprat 60,000 t



(2003
-
2004 / 45,000 t
;


2007
-
2009 / 60.000 t
)


turbot 1.500 t


(2006 /1.300 t,


2007 / 2300 t);


intensity of reproduction

estimated


relative

abundance

of sprat

eggs,


>2001


2008


population structure 25 species


(
5 small
-

sized

species
for



industrial fishing)

0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
%
2004
2,3
73,7
6,4
0,1
4
7,4
0,1
0,8
2,3
0,9
2
2005
1,8
73,4
4,5
1,2
4,6
7,6
0,2
0,6
1,5
1,6
3
2006
3
78,85
5,8
1
3,5
1,6
1
1,3
0,3
2,7
0,95
2007
12,19
62,29
2,86
0,75
4,38
10,42
2,08
1,73
0,22
0,71
1,82
0,55
2008
10,6
52,7
12,4
1,3
2,9
3,4
2,3
2,6
0,1
0,82
10,7
0,18
2009
14,74
27,72
12,6
4,15
5,13
6,46
1,31
5,07
0,46
2,16
19,18
1,01
turbot
sprat
whiting
mullet
goby
anchovy
shark
horse
makerel
red
mullet
caspian
shad
pontic
shad
other
Indicators for living resources

(cont’d)

PRESSURE



fishing effort (
decrease trend since
2000)



-

stationary/1,5
0
0

turbot gill nets




20

trap nets




16 beach seines




500

longlines




1,000

shad gill nets


250 gobies gill nets


-

active /
5

operational coastal



trawlers


3 pelagic trawls


1,950 turbot gill nets



total catch

(
decrease trend since


2000)


331

t

(
220

t +
111

t)



total admissible catch (TAC)


i
dentical 200
5
-
200
9



Spec
ies


TAC

(tons)

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Şpr
a
t


10
,
000


10
,
000


10
,
000


10,000

10,000

Whiting

1
,
000


1
,
000


500

500

500

Anchov
y

2
,
000


-

-

-

-

Gobies

100

100

200

100

-

Turbot

50

50

50

50

50

Dog fish

50

50

50

50

50

THE BLACK SEA AND ITS
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT


Strategic documents for sustainable development implementation:



National Strategy for Sustainable Development of Romania



20
09
-

2012

Governance Programme


Integrated coastal zone management
-

key tool of sustainable
development


European strategic documents for ICZM implementation:



-
ICZM Strategy Directive;

-
Water Framework Directive;

-
Mollusks Directive;

-
Birds and Habitats Directives and NATURA 2000 Network;

-
Integrated Maritime Strategy;

-
Directive
-

Framework Strategy on the marine environment;

-
INSPIRE Directive containing the water component of WISE;

-
Initiative Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES);

-
Common policies on fisheries;

-
European maritime policies, including maritime spatial planning;





AIM
:
The coastal and marine economical potential activation in unitary, continous and
sustainable way to avoid conflicts and to create maxim understanding and sinergy between
different groups of interest from maritime space in the aim of natural resources sustainable
conservation and use





Dissemination of Handbook for
Integrated Maritime


Spatial Planning
at national and Black Sea Basin level



Data base and maritime information up
-
dating,


GIS Thematical Maps and Integrated Maritime Plans
(Fig.No. A, B, C)

in
Maritime Zone (EEZ 12 MM),




Geographical issues


Coastal and marine integrated monitoring


Marine pollution from land sources


Spatial functional zonation


Natural resources


Black Sea energy resources and exploiting


Renewable energy


Built heritage
-

patrimony


Technical infrastructures


Black Sea and Danube
-
Black Sea Canal port infrastructure


Tourism activities


Sites of Community Importance (SCI)


Special Bird Protection Areas (SPA)


Social
-

demographic structure

A. Protected Areas

B. Coastal activities C. Industrial activities and maritime transport


Operational GIS system developing for MSP activities, offering mapping facilities designated to the

complex spatial analyses, to the spatial information automatical generation, geographical coordinate

processing and cartographical design/projection


Coastal vulnerability identifying as analytic instrument in establishing zones with specifical

kind of activities, developing knowledge on the cause
-
effect relation processing

MARITIME SPATIAL PLANNING

Accentuated devlopment of different socio
-
economic

activities within natural space of the coastal zone:


Tourism and recreation


Agriculture and food industry


Shipyards


Petrochemical Industry /Oil
-
refineries


Mining/Extractive Industry


Marin Fishing


Constructions/holiday houses


Aerial transport/Airports


Ports/Navigation


Touristic Ports


Manufacture Industry



Nuclear Industry


Military
and Defence Activities (inland/marine)

ANTHROPOGENIC
PRESSURES

Environmental problems induced by anthropogenic

factor, identified in the Romanian coastal zone, are the
following:


Coastal Erosion/Sediment’s dynamic to Danube's
Outlets


Natural risks persistence due to not ending of the
protective solution: underpass in Costinesti


Salt water intrusion in coastal aquifers in
Costinesti lake/area


Natural resources extraction/beach sand: North
Eforie, Mamaia, Mangalia areas


Water pollution /air (hydrocarbons, greenhouse
effect gases, s.a.)


Maritime and Road Transport in coastal area: not
protected technological access road in
Constanta North area


Over
-
Exploitation of fish stocks


Habitats losing/Endangered species in cliffs area
around Costinesti and Tuzla area


Population agglomeration within waterfront


Urban expansion in coastal natural and turistic
areas


Uncontrolled development of touristic and
recreation activities over the tourism carrying
capacity (inefficient solid waste management)

CONCLU
S
IONS



state and evolution trends of Romanian
marine and
coastal environment

continued to be monitored in
200
9

from physical, chemical and biological point of
view, usually compared with reference periods from
early '60ies or more recent years



state of marine and coastal environment in 2009
confirms a general trend of slight improvement of
above mentioned parameters and related
convalescence

of ecosystem status

CONCLU
S
IONS

(cont’d)


in order to protect and conserve marine biodiversity a
coherent marine protected areas network, of national
and European significane, was created in 2007



new versus historical reference data concerning
present state and evolution trends of Romanian
coastal environment are
national
contributions for

Report on the state of environmental factors in
Romania in 200
9
” (
National

Environmental Protection
Agency
) and

Report on the State of the Black Sea

(B
lack
S
ea
C
ommission
)