What do I know? What can we share? How can we make it better?

amountdollElectronics - Devices

Nov 2, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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What do I know?

What can we share?

How can we make it better?

Jane Chu Prey, PhD

jprey@microsoft.com

Microsoft Research

Senior Research Program Manager


Who What Why


Who am I?


What are we going to be talking about?


What do I know: a perspective from someone who
is unfamiliar with the Latam gender/pipeline


What can YOU teach me?


Why is this important?


Balance in the pipeline is a competitive advantage


Did you know?

10,000,000,000,000,000,000
grains of rice


Ten
quintillion: 10*10
18


The number of grains of
rice harvested in 2004

Compare this to
--


10,000,000,000,000,000,000 transistors



Ten
quintillion: 10*10
18


The number of grains of rice
harvested in 2004


The number of transistors
fabricated in 2004

When I first started …
hardware was king

And now …

So what about software?

Deep Blue, 1997

Deep Fritz, 2002

Today: Roughly 1 billion PCs …

Representing less than 2% of all
processors!

Computing truly has changed the
world


Advances in computing change the way we
live, work, learn, and communicate


Advances in computing drive advances in
nearly all other
fields such as medicine


Advances in computing power our economy


Not just through the growth of the IT industry


through productivity growth across the entire
economy

What I know…

The Importance of IT to the Nation

and the World


IT is pervasive



IT drives the U.S. and global economy



IT is a critical tool of national security



IT drives science and technology



IT is changing the economic and social foundations of our society

IT Is Shaping Our Future


So why is this so disturbing?



In the United States




Girls comprise fewer than 15 percent of all AP computer science exam
-
takers


the lowest representation of any AP discipline.



Between 1984 and 2006, the share of computer science bachelor’s
degrees awarded to women dropped from 36 to 21 percent.



Women hold more than half of professional positions overall, but fewer
than 22 percent of software
engineering
positions.



Within the top Fortune 500 IT companies, fewer

than five percent of Chief Technical Officers are

women.


What scares me …

What else scares
me …

Bias is very damaging



Stereotypes impact task performance and the standard we use to evaluate
performance information.



Stereotypes also impact the standard we use to decide whether our own
performance indicates that we have sufficient ability. Central idea is that
when you know that others do not expect “people like you” to be good at
a given type of task, you judge your own performance by a harsher
standard. This impacts aspirations as well.
Shelley J.
Correll

Cornell
University


Why Should We Care?

More Women in IT Means…

»
Global competitiveness.
Research has found that companies with the highest
representation of women in their senior management teams had a 35% higher
return on equity and a 34% higher return to shareholders.


»
A stronger workforce.
IT jobs are projected to grow by 24 percent over the next
eight years, which is TWICE the projected growth rate of the overall workforce. Total
IT jobs estimated to be added to our workforce between 2006 and 2016 is nearly 1.6
million.


»
Better products and services.
Women
purchase 66 percent of all home computers
and spend more on consumer electronics than men.


»
Increased innovation.
Patent citation rates
--

one measure of a patent’s usefulness
--

are up to
42% higher
for IT patents created by teams of both men and women.



Sources: Catalyst, 2006; Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2006; WOW!
QuickFacts
, 2006; NCWIT, 2007.

The Bottom Line: Innovation Suffers Without Diversity

But the
future is
FULL of
opportunity


Designing a next Internet


GENI/FIND


Driving advances in all fields of science
and engineering


Wreckless

driving


Personalized education


Predictive, preventive, personalized
medicine


Quantum computing


Transforming the developing world


Personalized health monitoring =>
quality of life


Data
-
intensive supercomputing


Neurobotics


Synthetic biology


The algorithmic lens => Cyber
-
enabled
Discovery and Innovation

The U.S. BIG question:

So why don’t women find
computing compelling?


Is this the same here in Brazil?


What I heard at the
Latam

Faculty Summit


Attendees


Claudia
Bauzer
, UNICAMP


Karin Breitman, PUC
-
Rio


Jacques
Wainer
, UNICAMP


Flavio

Soares
, IME
-
USP


Overview of conversation


Unlike the US, there is an increase in the number of students in
computing.


The percentage of women choosing computing in Brazilian
universities is decreasing


The percentage of women graduating in computing is dropping
rapidly


The percentage of women participating in the entrance exams
decreases at every phase [vestibular]


The persistence rate is significantly higher for women than men.


Now your turn …


My questions to you


Do you think there is a gender issue in your
school?


Why?


What kinds of bias do you believe hinders the
progress of women in computing in Brazil?


What kinds of evidence do you need to be
credible with the people who can help
facilitate change? How can we get this
evidence?


Who are the people you need to partner with
to have change happen in your school?



If there is ONE thing you could change to
improve YOUR school, what would that be?


Thank you for the privilege of
speaking to you.