Early Childhood Training Course 2008

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Nov 26, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

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Week 4


Early Childhood Training Course 2008

Playground / Large Muscle (sensory/motor)


1.

Welcome

A.

Collection and discussion of Health/Safety Checklists for Infant[
Toddler classroom and for Preschool
classroom.

B.
Overview of today/s class; Use class content block prop

2.

Playground, varies from center to center

A.

What it includes (State Licensing)
Booklet on playgrounds

5 foot fence encloses open space for playing and pretend play Track for
wheeled toys/ wheeled toys

Playground structures
l

various

Room for indoor materials brought outside
Water table / easel

Sand play / sand toys

Shaded area

.Living things / nature (
grass, trees, shrubs, flowers, bird feeders) Storage
area for wheel toys/sand toys/ balls

Guest:
Kim Watts, playgrounds, Cathy Carter, Early Head Start

B.

Location

Locked, fenced in area

Easy accessibility to all US~lg it

C.

Set up

Safe equipment, suitable for age group served (meets licensing) Well
-
defined areas

Safe surfaces, pea gravel, wood mulch, "mat" surface
6
11

Storage for toys/equipment/wheel toys

Easy to follow traffic pattern

Enough space if swings

Water containers, cu
ps and trash can

D.

Playground maintenance

Monitor pea gravel! wood mulch, replace as needed (center managers)

Daily health/safety inspection of playground
Monthly inspection of play equipment

Remove and/or report items needing repair

Keep tree branches
trimmed, shrubs trimmed! and grass cut

D. Group Activities



Parachute play, Red Rover, Boa constrictor, to an activity record or teacher's idea



Bean bag games, maybe with carpet square to an activity record or teacher's idea



Motions
-

moving across the room many different ways



Exercise videos
-
watch and do, add materials from classroom
-

props, music, scarves,
etc. to enhance activities

E.

Combinations



Sometimes gym times is split between
1/2
time for a game or organized activ
ity and
V2
time for 'choice"



Sometimes teachers may put down a tapeline, to play ball on one side and have individual
choice or game on the other side

F.

Books



Some centers have books in gym so when children get tired or want to be quiet they can
look at the books

G.

Clean Up



Encourage children to put:



Sand toys and balls where they go



Wheel toys
-

designated by teachers where to go



Help them
-

may suggest one
child take buckets, another take shovels

Activity:
Visit Bigelow playground. As a class, take a listening walk around the playground. Write down
or draw what you hear. Divide up into groups. Each group will look at something different and then report
back to large group. Form provided.

Groups will look at
:

1) Playground structure; 2) Track/wheel toys; 3) Shelter; 4) Nature

Answer the following about your area:



What does it include?



How can it be used?



~What equipment/materials/toys could you use with it?



What can we do to promote safety in that area?



What surprised you about the area?



What skills can a child learn in this area?

Page 3

.3. Large muscle
-

what it includes

A.

Indoor Materials



mats, variety of balls, hoops{ bowling set{ walk
er stompers, rocking boat,
parachute, hoops and other large muscle equipment

B. Outdoor Materials



Playground equipment, variety of balls, trikes{ child size, shovels and rakes, and other
large muscle equipment

C.

Classroom Materials



3 items per room (state licensing)



Songs with movement



Movement, self

D.

Indoor Gym Location



Away from traffic



Preferably not near outside doors



Square footage determined by number/age of children (state licensing)

E.

Indoor Gym Set up

Nice to have a CD
player

Storage carts for balls, beanbags{ parachutes, etc. Daily
health safety checklist

Make sure outlets are covered{ balls inflated, remove broken items

F.

Indoor Gym Maintenance



Put materials away after use or when large muscle time is over



Gym floor clean



Materials in good order, good shape

4.

What to Do in Gym
A. Organized games:

• Mr. Fox{ Mother May I{ Grey Duck{ Sally Go Round the Sun

B. Obstacle Course



Set up materials that children would use to follow a path{ crawl through a tunnel{
roll on matt hopscotch, throw a ball{ climb through a hoop

C. Child's Choice



Teacher tells child what is available{ could include hopscotch{ bowling{ basket ball{
balance
beam{ ring toss{ bean bag toss{ mats
-

rolling

Page 2

5.

How children explore the outdoors/ Large Muscle

A.

Functional play



Feel, smell, look, sound, maybe taste



Ask themselves, "what can I do with this?"



Leads to experimenting



Water to sa
nd, in pail
-
dump out, build towers

B.

Constructive Play



They know about materials available and begin to use to create something new, (i.e. sand;
makes a castle with a moat or tunnel)

. C. Dramatic play



Pretend play
-

role playing (firefighter), parametric, garbage hauler, truck driver, bus driver,
etc.



With or without props

D. Games with Rules



Organized games (Red Light/Green Light)



Ball games (catch, basketball)

E. InfantjToddlers and 2's



Outdoors different environment



Fresh air



More open space to stretch/run



Need natural spaces that encourage sensory, physical and social exploration

6.

Indoor Materials that can be Brought Outside
A.
Music and movement



Cassette players, c.d. players, boom

box and music



Instruments

B. Art



Easel and paint



Sidewalk chalk
-

Drawing

C. Dramatic play props



Picnic materials



Hats



Nothing so loose or big it could get caught on equipment.

D. Books



Related to nature, animals



Portable storage

Page 4

E. Tools for Investigation



Magnifying glasses



Plastic jars for bugs



Nets for bugs



Binoculars



Science experiments
-

wind, snow, rain, volcanoes

F. Sensory



Water table for water play



Bubbles



Wash chairs, toys, etc.

1.

Outdoor Play! Gym Large Motor! Promotes Development

A.

Social emotional



Accomplish as skills are learned



Social skills, sharing



Creativity
-

sand/movement

B.

Physical



Gross motor skills
-

run, leap, hop, climb, pedal, slide



Find motor
-

sand play

C.

Cognitive



Study nature
-

bugs, squirrels, birds, rabbits



Watching seasonal changes



Weather



Problem solving

D.

Language



Vocabulary



Descriptive words



Expressing themselves



Conversations



Asks, responds to questions



Environmental print awareness

8.

What
Children Learn Outdoors! Large Motor

A.

Literacy



Vocabulary



Listening
-

take a listening walk



Environmental print



Understanding of books, find books that relate to what they see, do outside



Phonological awareness
-

sounds of the neighborhood, comparing sounds, nature sounds



Print
-

letters and words


Signs in playground, environmental print

Page 5

B.

Math



Problem solving
-

guiding children to find solutions for problems



Numb
er concepts
-

written numbers
f

what a set of
-

looks like



Count aloud when lining up to go in and out



Counting what you see and do



Pattern and relationships
-

note those on flowers
f

leaves
f

pinecones
f

and
caterpillars;



Geometry and spatial relationship
s



Shapes on playground and in natureflocations of items

C.

Data collection/ organization/ representation



Sort/classify items they find



Record science experiment data



Make graphs

D.

Measurement/graphing



Rulers
f

yardsticks



Record sizes of things they find

E.

Science



Process skills



"What would happen if
_ff
questions



Encourage children to observe



Physical science

F.

Sand/Water Play



explore properties and enhancements



Water wheels, funnels, ramps, balls

G. Life Science



Bird feeders/birds



Insects



Squirrels / rabbits



Stethoscope to hear their heart when they play

H.

Earth/Environment



Gardening



Shadows
-

how they move


Rocks, pinecones compare •
Puddles

.• Collect litter (wear gloves)

• Seasons and changes

I.

Social Studies



Spaces/ geography



Distances walked



Drawing playgrounds


Page 6

J.

People and how they live/work



Who walks by playground



Who rides bus



What type of trucks/cars go by



What jobs do they do (mail, police, fire, etc.)



Do you see airplanes or helicopters

K.

Arts



Dance and music



Moving bodies freely



Move the animals



Visual Arts



Bring art materials outside



Draw what you see

L.

Technology



Awareness of people and technology



Tools and machines, trash trucks, walker talkies



Cameras, construction vehicles

M.

Technology tools



Binoculars



Microscopes



Magnifying glasses



Cameras

9.

Teacher's Role Outside

A.

Safety



Going outside and coming inside, after toileting, clean up



Check that

shoes are tied, outerwear as needed



Count children, make sure you have everyone



Teachers take attendance clipboard and emergency contact folder, and first aid kit



Adult at front and back of line

B.

Preventing injuries



Before going outside, adults and children need to apply sunscreen to face, arms, legs (if
exposed) and area where most injuries occur



No strings onjackets/sweatshirts



Adults need to spread out/ be where the children are playing, not 'magnet' together



Be

aware of multi layers of a piece of equipment and where children are



Encourage/remind children to use equipment correctly in school, ("in school we go up the
ladder and down the slide, we slide on our bottom, we climb down ladders").

Page 7



Most classrooms have safety rules for playground, review daily.



Children sometimes dont judge distance correctly and could hurt themselves

jumping down



Children may not be aware of their surroundings and walk into something.



If you see that, say something



Close supervision is the key.

C.

Allergies



Teachers know who is allergic to something and will follow the child's



Health Care Plan.



When child isn't on health plan and has an emergency, teachers will follow
emergency pOlicy
/procedure.

D.

Adaptations

• Teachers will respond to assure child's safety and participation

E.

What to say



When a child seeks reinforcement "Look at me!", describe what they did:



You slid down the slide on your bottom; You

climbed to the top. How do you feel?

What do you see 7"



Ask questions about what they are doing and how/where they are going, what will they see,
what did they find, how is it moving.



Encourage children to explore
-

may not have opportunity to play out
side
-

Let's check out



What this is and how to use it
-

go with them, guide them
-

"climb, 1 step at a time" to go
down or if you want to come down, use this slide.

F.

What to do



Interact with children



Be familiar with playground rules so you follow them
(some sites have no monster

play, etc.)



Some sits have no monster play, etc.



Play ball or a game



Look for changes of leaves/flowers



Look for bugs



Pump gas for bikes, Sand play



Climb/ Slide, Walk/Run



Bring classroom items outside (check with teaches first)

Page 8

10.

Teacher's Role Inside Gym! Large Muscle

A.

Safety



Going to gym and coming back



After toileting, line up



Check shoes tied



Count children aloud, make sure you have
everyone



Teachers take attendance, clipboard and emergency contact folder, first aid kit



Teachers front and back of line



Count children aloud upon return from gym

B.

Preventing injuries



Adults need to spread out, if there's a doorway/entrance one needs to be there
,

other in room



Close supervision is key



Adults spread out, do not 'magnet' together



Most classrooms have gym safety rules that are reviewed before they go



Teachers tell children ahead what gym will be that day



Encourage children/remind them to use m
aterials correctly



Demonstrate if item is new to a child



Children sometimes don't judge distance correctly, may walk into something



If you see it
-

say something

C.

What to say in Gym/Large Muscle



When child seeks reinforcement
--
"Look at me"u

describe what they did, i.e. "you walked a
long way on those walker stompers," "you bounced the ball 8
times.'f



Ask questions about what they are doing and how: Where did you start hopping?

How many feet do you use next?



Encourage children to explore:
can you roll slowly? Fast? With your hand up above
your head?



Guide them: shoot one basket, then go to the end of the line
if
you want another turn



Use words that are descriptive: fast, slow, high, low

D.

What To Do



Interact with child/children, one
-
on
-
on
e or in a group: roll balls, bounce balls, toss beanbags,
bowl



I will bounce the ball two times and pass it to you

E.

Gym Clean Up



Encourage children to put items away where they go, help them



Delegate clean up, have some put sand toys, others bikes and balls

Page 9

Activity:
Set up gym stations



Ball



Parachute



Bean bag



Demonstrate each activity and have them divide into 3 groups and do one.

Song.'
Clean Up

Assignment:
Complete Playground Safety Checklist
-

teacher will sign off on the checklist

Page 10





EARLY CHILDHOOD TRAINING COURSE FALL 2010

WEEK 2 DEVELOPMENTAL PRINCIPLES/THEORIES AND PLAYGROUND

PART 1

(LARGE MOTOR)

PREP
: sign
-
in sheet on clipboard on back tabl
e, song sheets and note cards on back table, copies of songs,
visit site manager and classrooms next week (arrange visit), copies of assignment 1, cut out are you aware
squares (for next week), copies of Developmental MIlestones sheet

NAME PLATES:
Teach ho
w to write a name plate neatly.

SONGS
Body Play; Jack in the Box, 5 Little Ducks, Head, S
houlders, Knees and Toes, Johnny Works with
One Hammer


Distribute music bags
, design and collect until volunteering starts. Put name on bags with Sharpie

Assignme
nt 1 Introduction
:
Predict what you will see in the centers and why they are arranged in the
way observed. Have students write predictions in groups. Write predictions to each of the questions in
their notebooks in two columns. Column 1: Predicted answer
to the question Column 2: Why? Write a
predicted reason for the classroom arrangement (Save this assignment to be completed the first week of
volunteering.)

INTRODUCTION TO DEVELOPMENT:

DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES
:

Intro: Children develop differently at d
ifferent stages as they grow. They develop socially (interpersonal
relationships), physically (movement to self or with environment), cognitively (learning and interpreting),
and linguistically (language acquisition and social use of language).

ACTIVITY

St
udents read Developmental Milestones handout. Pass out large paper per group.



Each group is assigned a different age range



Determine which category of development each characteristic belongs to.



Include a picture that depicts a child at their given mile stone.



Each group presents their age range and summaries the development of a child in that age range to
the group.

INTRODUCTION TO PLAYGROUND

Introduction: When we talk about the playground, we
will cover:


-
The environment


-
Safety on the Playground and in the Gym


-
Playground / Gym activities


-
Large Motor development


-
What children learn

ACTIVITY

Observe playground and fill in the note
-
taking sheet. Review answers in class.

SAFTEY

Intro the safety handout:


-
The playground is important for development


-
An excellent place for child/parent interaction and child
-
child interaction


-
Playground equipment has improved


-
Regular safety inspections both formally and informally are importa
nt

ACTIVITY

Use the handout to identify safety hazards and protective measures to keep children safe
according to each hazard. Fill out note
-
taking chart on safety.

Continue with points D
-
G if time.

Clean up



2.


100 Empire Drive, Suite 100 • Saint Pau
l, MN 55103
Ph: 651.209.6400 /866.574.6516 • Fax: 651.209.6495 •
www.mcit.org


Playground Safety is Not "Child's Play"

Date/Source:
June 2007 Bulletin (Reviewed August 2008)

Play is essential for a child's development. Playgrounds provide an excellent environment for a child to physically
challenge himsel£'herself as well as engage in social interaction. Children and parents regularly take advantage of public
playgrounds expec
ting they are safe.

Improvements in playground equipment have increased significantly during the past twenty five years driven largely by
the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM)
establishmen
t and updating of safety standards for playground equipment.:Even the best designed playground can
present hazards if the equipment is improperly installed, broken, worn or vandalized. Regular safety audits and
maintenance inspections are essential tools t
o reduce the risk of playground accidents.

Safety Audit vs. Maintenance Inspection

A safety audit is a formal assessment of a playground's design, layout and surface materials conducted by trained
personnel. A maintenance inspection is a regularly scheduled inspection that concentrates on hazards caused by aged or
damaged equipment and i
s typically conducted by maintenance employees. This difference is important to note because
a well designed playground could pass a safety audit but fail a maintenance inspection. Likewise, a well maintained
playground could fail a safety audit because of

inherent design flaws.

Public entities have several resources when considering a safety audit. Often companies that sell playground equipment
will perform a complementary or reduced fee playground safety audit of existing play structures to ensure curren
t
national standards are being met. Inspections are performed by Certified Playground Safety Inspectors (CPSI) who are
trained professionals that have the knowledge, skills and tools necessary to complete playground audits and inspections.

Inspection chec
klists assist maintenance personnel to identity and track the correction of hazards. Checklists should be
customized for the specific piece of equipment being inspected. The original equipment manufacturer and playground
safety standard organizations, such

as the CPSC, are the best source for inspection checklists.

The Dirty Dozen


The National Playground Safety Institute (NPSI) has identified twelve of the leading causes of injuries on playgrounds.
The "Dirty Dozen" include:

1.

Improper Protective Surfacing

Acceptable surfaces are hardwood fiber/mulch, sand and pea gravel. Surfaces must be maintained at a depth of
twelve inches, be free of standing water and debris and not be allowed to become compacted. There are also
synthetic

or rubber tiles and mats that are appropriate for use under play equipment.

3.

Inadequate Fall Zone

A fall zone or use zone is the area under and around the playground equipment where a child might fall.

3.

Protrusion
&
Entanglement Hazards

A protrusion haz
ard is a component or piece of hardware that might be capable of impaling or cutting a

Minnesota Counties Insurance Trust Resources
-


The information contained in this document is intended for general information
purposes only and does not constitute legal or coverage advice on any specific matter.

Page 1 of2



child or capable of catching strings or items of clothing

which might be worn around a child's neck. Ropes
should be anchored securely at both ends and not be capable of forming a loop or a noose.

4.

Entrapment in Openings

Children often enter openings feet first and attempt to slide through an opening. If the op
ening is not large
enough it may allow the body to pass through the opening and entrap the head.

5.

Insufficient Equipment Spacing

Equipment should provide room for children to circulate and prevent the possibility of a child falling off of one
structure and striking another structure. Swings and other pieces of moving equipment should be located in an
area away from other structures.


6.

Trip Hazards

Exposed concrete footings, abrupt changes in surface elevations, containment borders, tree roots, tree stumps
and rocks are common trip hazards.

7.

Lack of Supervision

A play area should be designed so that it is easy for a parent or caregiv
er to observe children at play.

8.

Age
-
Inappropriate Activities

Areas for pre
-
school age children should be separate from areas intended for school age children.

9.

Lack of Maintenance

A program of systematic, preventive maintenance must be present.

10.

Pinch,
Crush, Shearing and Sharp Edge Hazards

Components in the play environment should not have sharp edges or points that could cut skin. Moving
components should be checked to make sure that there are no parts or mechanisms that might crush or pinch a
child's

finger.

11.

Platforms with No Guardrails

Elevated surfaces such as platforms, ramps, and bridgeways should have guardrails that prevent accidental falls.

12.

Equipment Not Recommended for Public Playgrounds

Accidents associated with the following types of equipment have resulted in the Consumer Product Safety
Commission recommending that they not be used on public playgrounds:

./' Heavy swings such as animal figure swings and multiple occupancy!
glider type
swings .

./' Free swinging ropes that may fray or form a loop .

./' Swinging exercise rings and trapeze bars are considered athletic equipment and not recommended for
public playgrounds.

liabilities

Minnesota's park and recreation immunities reduce a p
ublic entity's liability for playground injuries by providing a
defense for a claim; however, they do not prevent a lawsuit from being filed. The defense of a lawsuit can be expensive
and consume a great deal of time and energy of the public entity. A succ
essful defense is most likely when safety audits
and maintenance inspections are performed on a regular basis and are well documented.

Additional Information Sources

MCIT Loss Control Consultants are available to assist members review overall playground
safety including on
site visits.
A 35 minute DVD titled Inspecting Playgrounds for Hazards is available for checkout from MCIT. For either of these
services contact Loss Control Manager Kevin Balfanz at 651
-
209
-
6446 or
kbalfanz@mcit.org


The Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) Handbook for Public Playground Safety presents safety
information for public playground equipment in the form of
guidelines
-
www.cpsc.gov.


The National Playground Safety Institute (NPSI) promotes the latest public playground industry standards and
guidelines as the most desirable standard of care for public
-
use
playgrounds
-
www.playgroundsafety.org.


Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



14

Minnesota Counties Insurance Trust Resou~

The information contained in this document is
-
intended for general information

purposes only and does not constitute legal or coverage advice on any specific matter.
Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



15


Playground
Environment

Location

Set
-
up

Playground
Maintenance



5
-
foot fence encloses
open space for playing
and pretend play




Accessibility



Safe equipment
suitable for all ages of
children



Monitor gravel/wood
mulch,



Daily health/safety
inspection


Playground Safety

Safety hazards

Ways to Protect Children

Improper Protective Surfacing

(The surface on the playground: wood, mulch,
cement
etc…)




Inadequate Fall Zones

(The area where a child may fall)




Protrusion and Entanglement Hazard

(Objects can scratch, poke or catch strings from
child’s clothing)




Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



16

Entrapment in Openings

(Openings for children to pass through such as
tunnels)




Insufficient Equipment Spacing

(The space between each piece of equipment
)




Trip Hazards

(Objects could cause a child to trip)






Lack of Supervision

(The design that enables parents and caregivers to
watch children)




Age
-
Inappropriate
Activities

(Age
-
appropriate designations)




Lack of Maintenance

(Systems for maintenance)




Pinch, Crush, Shearing and Sharp Edge Hazards

(Areas that may pinch, crush or cut
-

especially
fingers)




Platforms with No Guardrails

(Railings to prevent
falling)




Equipment Not Recommended for Public
Playgrounds

(unsafe equipment)





Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



17




Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



18


Playground Safety Article “Playground Safety is not “Child’s Play” Vocabulary Cloze Activity

Name_______________________________________ Date
_____________________________

Directions: From the list of words at the bottom of the page, please select the matching word for each sentence.

1.

Playgrounds provide an excellent ______________ for a child to physically challenge himself or herself as well as

socially interact with
other children.

2.

Even the best designed playgrounds can present ________________ if the equipment is improperly installed, broken, worn or
vandalized.

3.

Regular safety audits and ________________ ___________________ are essential tool
s to reduce the risk of playground accidents.

4.

Improper protective _________________ includes concrete and dirt, for example.

5.

A fall _____________ is the area under and around the playground equipment where a child might fall.

6.

A _____________ hazard is a
component or piece of hardware that might be capable of impaling or cutting a child.

7.

An _______________hazard is a component or piece of hardware that might be capable of catching strings or items of clothing w
hich
might be worn around a child’s neck.

8.

An _
___________hazard occurs when a child attempts to enter an opening and becomes entrapped.

9.

When playground equipment is placed too close together, _____________equipment ___________ has occurred.

10.

Uneven surfaces, including tree roots, tree stumps and change
s in surface heights present a _______ hazard for children.

11.

Playground equipment should not have parts or mechanisms that could cut, crush, pinch or

present a
_______
hazard to
a child’s finger.




Trip

Insufficient

Hazard

Protrusion

Environment

Maintenan
ce

Inspections

Entrapment Surfacing

Zone

Entanglement

Spacing


Shearing

Entrapment

Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



19


Introduction to Child Development


Large Motor Questions

ACTIVITY: Work together in a group to answer these questions.

1. How do you think children explore the outdoor
s?



2. What do children learn from outdoor and gym actives in each of the following areas?



What materials
can be brought outside to develop the each of the following areas?

A
. Music and M
ovement


B. Art


C. Dramatic Play:


D. Literacy


F. Science:


G. Sensory Skills:


H. Math


I. Earth/Environment


J. Social Studies


K. Technology


3. How do outdoor play and gym large motor games promote development in the following areas? (An example is provided
for each area. You and your group list more ideas.)

A. Social emotional:
sharing


B. Physical:
gross motor skills through running.



C. Cognitive :
study nature outside like bugs and plants
.

Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



20


D. Language:
Ask and respond to questions


4. What is the teacher’s role outside?






5. What are some sentences
and phrases to say to children to encourage their development outside?





6. What is the teacher’s role inside the gym
?



Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



21

EARLY CHILDHOOD TRAINING COURSE FALL 2010

WEEK 3
PLAYGROUND

PART 2

(LARGE MOTOR)


PREP
: sign
-
in sheet on clip
board on back table, son
g sheet and construction paper on back table,

visit site manager and classrooms
next week (arrange visit), copies of assignment 1 and assignment 2 (playground), copies of large motor, note sheet and group
question
activity, copies of volunteer time cards,
copies of consent sheet for video.

ANNOUNCEMENTS
:

Filming next week, sign
-
up for materials team or tables and chairs team

OVERVIEW OF THE CLASS USE CLASS BLOCK PROPS

NAME PLATES:
pass out

VOLUNTEERING
: Head Start staff

(placements and badges)

-
volunteer time card (collected at the end of each month Oct. 29th), homework assignments to complete at center (1&2), review
of
classroom community poster for review of volunteer expectations,

1:45 CONSENT FORM and POSITION SIGN
-
UP:
filming from the Hubb
s Center next week.

SONGS
: Stop, Drop and Roll

2:00
PLAYGROUND

Introduction: When we talk about the playground, we will cover:


-
The environment


-
Safety on the Playground and in the Gym


-
Playground / Gym activities


-
Large Motor development


-
What ch
ildren learn

ACTIVITY

Fill in the note
-
taking sheet. Review answers in class.

3:00
SAFTEY

Intro the safety handout:


-
The playground is important for development


-
An excellent place for child/parent interaction and child
-
child interaction


-
Playground e
quipment has improved


-
Regular safety inspections both formally and informally are important

ACTIVITY

Use the handout to identify safety hazards and protective measures to keep children safe according to each hazard. Fill out
note
-
taking chart on safety.


ACTIVITY
: Visit the playground. Take a listening walk around the playground. Divide into groups. Each group looks at something
different and records observations on their sheet. Playground sheet (if not time, take home)

ACTIVITY
:
Look over Large Motor
Activity Sheet. Try the Tortoise game and discuss together what is happening with development in
subject areas and areas of child development. Complete question sheet in groups

C
lean up


Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



22



Games for Developing Large Motor Skills

MATERIALS

Indoor:
mats, v
ariety of balls, hoops, bowling set, walkers stompers, rocking boat, parachute, hoops and other large muscle equipment, stora
ge
carts, daily health safety checklist. (Make sure outlets are covered, balls inflated and remove broken items)


Outdoor:
Playgrou
nd equipment, variety of balls, tricycles, child
-
size shovels and rakes, and other large muscle equipment.


Group Activities:

Parachute play, River Rover, Boa Constrictor


Motions:
Moving around the room in many different ways.


Exercise Video:

Watch and do, ad materials from the classroom
-

Props, music, scarves, etc. to enhance activities.

Gym

Choice Time:
Sometimes the gym time is divided into two parts. ½ of the time can be for a game or organized activity and ½ the time
can be for ‘choice’
time. Some centers have books in the gym so when children get tired or want to be quiet, they can look at the books.

BEAN BAG GAMES


Heads or Tails: Toss two
-
color bean bag in the air and

have child guess which color will land facing up.

Bean Bag Crawl
: Put bean bag on child's back and see how far he/she can crawl before it falls off.

Bean Bag Walk: Child balances bean bag on head as he/she walks, sits in a chair, sits on the floor, walks backward, etc.

BEAN BAG FUN


Toss bean bags into a hoop or ser
ies of hoops on the ground, assigning point values for each hoop.


Or have them toss the bean bags through
hoops like a lion jumping through a hoop.

Use the bean bags for body part identification, asking them to walk around with the bean bags on shoulders
, elbows, etc. or just have them
touch the bean bags to their limbs.

Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



23

Have the kids shake the bean bags, then toss them up in the air and catch them.


Have them see how many times they can clap while the
beanbag is up in the air before catching it or have
them spin in a circle before catching it.

Have them play catch, taking a step back every time they catch it and a step forward when they miss.

BIG BLOCKS

Liven up your blocks center with these attractive, lightweight building blocks. Collect a supply of
concentrated detergent boxes. Tape over the
opening of each box with packaging tape. Cover each box with colored Cont
-
Tact® paper. Youngsters will demonstrate new heights of
creativity when they're building with these larger
-
than
-
life blocks!

THE TORTOISE



Ages: 2
-

5

Goal: Team work and coordination

To create a giant tortoise several children get on their hands and knees while you cover them with a shell made from a blanke
t or large sheet of
cardboard. Suggest that the tortoise take a little walk. Do n
ot be surprised if it loses it's shell the first few tries. The children will need to
practice and use team work to move as one and keep their "home" on their backs. Once they start operating as a team set up a
simple obstacle
path, put a chair in path tha
t they have to turn to avoid, blocks that must be climbed over.


TOSS IN THE CAN


Assemble a sock ball, a bean bag or a yarn ball and an empty trash can or tub. Place the can or tub close to the child. Show
the child how to
toss the ball or bean bag into
the trash can or tub.

Encourage the child to use one hand, but accept either under
-

or overhand tosses. The object is to aim for the target with the ball or bean bag.

When the child has gained confidence in tossing the ball a short distance, the trash ca
n or tub can be moved farther away from the child. This
will offer more of a challenge to the child and will increase his skill and confidence.

OBSTACLE COURSE:

Set up materials that children would use to follow a path, crawl through a tunnel, roll on m
at, hopscotch, throw a
ball, climb through a hoop.

CLEAN UP:

Whether on the playground or in the gym, always encourage children to clean up the activities.

-
Put sand toys and balls where they go.

-
Wheel toys
-

designated by teachers where to go.

-
Help t
hem
-
You may suggest one child takes buckets, another takes shovels.


Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



24






Bridge I Intro to
Child Development_
Playground_Large Motor
Unit Materials

Carlynn Miller
-
Gore and Holly Andrews Intro to Child Development
11/26/2013



25


Learning Goals

Student
Evaluation


Name: ________________________

Class:

Intro to Child Development




Unit:


Playground/Large Motor



Completion Date:





Circle the word that shows how you feel about
your skill in
each
learning
goal.



Goals

Before Unit

After Unit

1. Scan for key information

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-
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