Genetic Engineering: Common ground Impossible

alarmduckBiotechnology

Dec 12, 2012 (4 years and 9 months ago)

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Billy Rogers

Biology 1010

Issue Paper


Genetic Engineering: Common ground Impossible



There is one topic that has been lingering around politics and news stands for the last
decade and that is genetic engineering or cloning.

Genetic engineering involves the artificial
transfer of genetic material, or DNA, usually between unrelated species of plants, animals,
bacteria, viruses, and humans. The two most common methods for gene transfer are biological
and electromechanical. Ear
ly experiments all involved changing DNA using bacterial vectors.
Many bacteria have part of their genome located on

plasmids,


which are small loops of DNA
outside their main chromosomes. These plasmids were first used as means of transferring DNA
(Oshin
ski). In addition to the moral argument of genetic engineering

there are many scientific,
social, economic and political issues connected with the cloning technology that make it
impossible to make everyone agree on this topic.


In genetic engineer
ing the
re are many people that are for and
against it. There is
genetic engineering that is going on today is in the food
industry. The food crops that are
genetically e
ngineered right now consist of c
orn, soybeans, cotton, and canola and others.
Scientists ha
ve cloned

organs and human stem cells for medical purposes. These genetic
engineering practices have caused huge debates.


The people that are pro genetic engineering look at the social and economic benefits
that will come from these advancements. In t
he agricultural industry they are cloning corn,
soybeans and other crops to be able to mass produce these products in unnatural ways. The
economic benefits of this would be seen by consumers in their pocketbooks.

In the medical
field,
cloning o
f

human
or
gans would eliminate a waiting list for organ transplants
.

Also, the
testing that doctors and researchers would be able to do would be revolutionary.

These
arguments from those that are for cloning seem logical and beneficial at face value.


On the other

hand, there are many people that are extremely against genetic
engineering. They see cloning as taking a higher power

s actions into their own hands. Genetic
engineering
side steps

any natural or organic creation of living things. There is scientific
evidence that the farm crops that are synthetically engineered do not have the nutrients and
health benefits of naturally grown crops. In fact, they a seeing signs of major problems t
hat
these engineered products are causing.
H
uman organ cloning is the most controversial as it
should

be
. Taking life into your own hands is
an

ethical dilemma that has
muffled the
conversation about
this topic for years.

According to Lori B
. A
ndrews,
a
uthor
of
is there a

right
to clone? Constitutional challenges to bans on human cloning
. The essential difference with
human
cloning is the risk of hubris, of abuse of power. Cloning represents the potential for
“[a]buses of the power to control another per
son's destiny
-

both psychological and physical
-

of an unprecedented order” (Andrews
)
.




My opinion on this topic falls with those that are against

genetic engineering. There
is

a
lot of

scientific evidence that show
s

when cells are created or organs
are created t
hey have
major problems and do

not survive without constant help

(
Jaenisch)
.

I als
o have religious views
that take a firm stance against taking G
ods work into your own hands. In the agriculture
industry, I have a hard time handling all the chemicals and
hormones

they have to use in order
to grow these crops because it is bad for us and the environment that use them.

Works Cited:

Andrews
, L
. IS THE
RE A RIGHT TO CLONE? CONSTITUTIONAL CHALLENGES TO BANS ON HUMAN
CLONING
.
Retrieved June 9, 2010.


http://scholar.google.com/schola
r?q=human+cloning&hl=en&btnG=Search&as_sdt=200
000000 00001&as_sdtp=on


Oshinskie
, M
.
The Rest Of The Story Behind Genetic Engineering. Retrieved June 9, 2010.


http://online.sfsu.ed
u/~rone/GEessays/tokarinterview.htm


Jaenisch,

Rudolf M.D.
Human Cloning


The Science and Ethics


of Nuclear Transplantation. Retrieved June 9, 2010


http://www.endo.gr/cgi/reprint/351/27/2787.pdf