JEFFERSON COLLEGE COURSE SYLLABUS ETC103 DC ...

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JEFFERSON COLLEGE

COURSE SYLLABUS








ETC103

DC CIRCUITS

5 Credit Hours









Prepared by:
Ronald C. Boyer








Revised Date: August, 2007
By
Dennis Eimer




Division of Technology
Dr. John Keck, Dean
Ms. Brenda Russell, Associate Dean


I. Catalog Description

DC Circuits is a study of electrical units of measure, direct current theory,
circuit theorems and analysis techniques, and equipment and procedures
common to the analysis of DC circuits.

Prerequisite:

COMPASS algebra score of at least 42, ASSET elementary algebra score of
40 or higher, ACT math score of 18 or higher or MTH002 with a grade of C
or better.

Credit Hours: 5


II. Expected Learning Outcomes with Assessment Measures
Upon Completion of this course, the student will be able to:

A. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the concepts and laws
related the study of voltage, current, resistance, and power in DC .
(Evaluate by written exams, quizzes and observation of lab
performance)
B. Demonstrate ability to identify and schematically represent common
components used in DC circuits. (Evaluate by written exams, quizzes
and observation of lab performance)
C. Demonstrate skill in constructing series, parallel, and complex
series/parallel circuits from a schematic diagram. (Evaluate by
observation of lab performance)
D. Demonstrate knowledge and skill in the use of test equipment
commonly associated with DC circuit analysis. (Evaluate by written
exams, quizzes and observation of lab performance)
E. Demonstrate ability to successfully analyze and troubleshoot DC
components and circuits. (Evaluate by written exams, quizzes and
observation of lab performance)


III. Course Outline

A. Electricity
B. DC Components and Symbols
C. Ohms Law
D. Series Circuits
E. Parallel Circuits
F. Series-Parallel Circuits and Measuring Instruments
G. Network Simplification




Unit 1 Objectives

A. Electricity:

1. State the definition of the terms:
a. element
b. atom
c. molecule
d. compound
2. Describe the location within the structure of the atom of the:
a. nucleus
b. proton
c. neutron
d. electron
3. State the charge of the:
a. proton
b. neutron
c. electron
4. State the definition of the terms:
a. atomic number
b. shell
c. valence electrons
d. positive ion
e. negative ion
f. conductor
g. semiconductor
h. insulator
i. coulomb
j. law of charges
k. voltage
l. current
m. resistance
n. conductance
5. State the unit of measurement of:
a. voltage
b. current
c. resistance
d. conductance
6. State the direction of current flow for:
a. electron current flow
b. conventional current flow
7. State and give at least one example of each of six sources of
EMF
8. Contrast conduction and induction as methods for delivering a
static charge
9. Draw the electrical symbol for:
a. volt
b. ampere
c. resistance
d. ohm
e. conductance
f. Siemans

Reading Assignment: Meade, Foundations of Electronics, 5
h
Edition pp. 3 –31

Review Questions: pp 25 – 26 Questions Numbers 1 – 14 & 16 -25



Integrated Mathematics Objectives

Basic Arithmetic, Decimals, Powers of Numbers, and Systems of
Measurement

1. State the four basic operations in arithmetic
2. Define the following Laws of Arithmetic
a. Commutative Law
b. Associative Law
c. Distributive Law
3. State the order of Operations in arithmetic.
4. Define fractions
5. Be able to add, subtract, multiply and divide fractions
6. Be able to reduce fractions to the lowest terms
7. Be able to use the calculator and its memory to perform basic
Arithmetic operations.
8. Define a decimal fraction.
9. Be able to add, subtract, multiply and divide decimals.
10. Be able to convert between fractions, decimal fractions, and
Percentages
11. Be able to calculate a percent change.
12. Define significant digits
13. State the rules for rounding off numbers.
14. Define Accuracy
15. Define Precision
16. Define exponent
17. Be able to raise a number to a power.
18. State the order of operations.
19. Be able to add, subtract, multiply and divide powers of ten.
20. Define absolute value
21. Be able to find the square root and the cube root of a number
22. Be able to raise powers of ten to a positive power
23. Be able to find roots of powers of ten
24. Be able to simplify expressions with radical signs.
25. Be able to do powers and roots on the calculator
26. Express numbers in scientific notation and engineering notation
27. Perform the following operations on numbers expressed in
Scientific notation and engineering notation
a. Addition
b. Subtraction
c. Multiplication
d. Division
e. Root of a power
f. Power of a power
28. Express numbers using common electrical unit prefix
29. Define S I Units
30. Be able to use the calculator for engineering and scientific notation
operations.




Reading Assignment: Kramer, Mathematics for Electricity and Electronics
3rd edition
pp. 1 - 104

Problem Assignment: Problems will be assigned in class as the material is covered




















Unit 2 Objectives

B. DC Components and Symbols

1. State the minimum requirements for a practical DC circuit
2. Draw the following basic electronic symbols:
a. single cell
b. multiple cell
c. conductors crossing but not electrically connected
d. electrically connected conductors
e. single pole single throw switch (normally open
normally closed)
f. single pole double throw switch
g. double pole double throw switch
h. rotary switch (single pole n position)
i. push button switch (normally open normally closed
momentary contact)
j. fixed resistor
k. rheostat
l. potentiometer
m. fuse
n. lamp
3. State the definition of the following terms:
a. cell
b. battery
4. Describe the method for connecting cells for a:
a. higher voltage
b. higher capacity
c. higher voltage and capacity
5. Describe the following batteries (primary/secondary, terminal
voltage, discharge characteristics, capacity, shelf life):
a. Carbon-Zinc (Leclanch and zinc chloride)
b. Alkaline-Manganese Dioxide
c. Mercury
d. Silver
e. Nickel-Cadmium
f. Lithium
g. Lead-Acid
6. State the physical factors that contribute to the resistance of a
conductor
7. State the unit of measurement of the resistivity (specific
resistance) of a conductor material
8. State the definition of the term temperature coefficient of
resistance (positive, zero, negative)

9. Given the American Wire Gage chart, determine the resistance
of a given length of a given gage wire at the reference
temperature
10. State the definition of the following terms:
a. fuse voltage rating
b. fuse fault-condition current
c. fuse short circuit rating
d. fuse response time
11. State the general response time characteristic of the circuit
breaker
12. Determine the value and tolerance of a color-coded resistor
using the EIA standard color code
13. Determine the minimum and maximum acceptable measured
value given the color-coded value of a resistor
14. Distinguish between a potentiometer and a rheostat in terms of
purpose of use
15. State the definition of the term potentiometer taper
16. Describe and draw the schematic symbol for the:
a. thermistor
b. photo resistor (photo conductive cell)

Reading Assignment: Meade, Foundations of Electronics, 5
th
Edition pp. 27 –55

Review Questions: pp 56 – 57 Questions Numbers 1 – 25

Computer Support: DC Challenge “Color Code”

Lab Assignment: Determine Resistor values by color code and be able to prove the value
using an Ohm Meter.

Integrated Mathematics Objectives:
Basic Algebra

Upon completion of this Unit the student will be able to:

a. State the meaning of signed numbers
b. Add, subtract, multiply and divide signed numbers.
c. Identify an algebraic expression
d. Combine algebraic terms
e. State the five basic rules for working with exponents
f. Define the meaning of negative and zero exponents.

Reading Assignment: Kramer, Mathematics for Electricity and Electronics
3rd
edition pp. 105 - 132

Problem Assignment: Problems will be assigned in class as the material is covered

Unit 3 Objectives

C. Ohms Law:

1. State the three forms of Ohm's Law
2. Calculate a value of voltage, current, or resistance given any
other two circuit values
3. Express a value of voltage, current, or resistance using the
appropriate prefix
4. State the definition for work
5. State the definition for power
6. State the unit for expressing mechanical power
7. State the unit for expressing electrical power
8. State the relationship between electrical and mechanical power
9. Calculate the kilowatthour (kWh) power consumption given
power used and the time the power is used
10. State the three forms for calculating electrical power
11. Calculate power given any two other circuit values (current,
voltage, or resistance)
12. Calculate the remaining two of the four circuit values (current,
voltage, resistance, or power) given any two circuit values
13. Describe the procedures and precautions for connecting a
VOM when measuring a:
a. voltage
b. current
c. resistance.

D. Series Circuits

1. State the definition of the term series circuit
2. Apply the laws of a series circuit for the purpose of circuit
computations for unknown values of voltage, current,
resistance, and power:
a. current in a series circuit
b. Kirchhoff's Voltage Law
c. total resistance of series connected resistors
d. voltage divider rule
e. total power dissipation
3. Correctly assign the polarity of an IR voltage drop
4. State the value and polarity of a voltage with respect to a
reference (standard subscript notation for voltages with respect
to circuit common and reference points other than circuit
common)
5. Calculate the effective voltage of multiple source series circuits

6. Calculate the value of a series current limiting resistor or
excess voltage dropping resistor
7. State the symptoms of an open or shorted component in a
series circuit
8. Draw electronic symbols for:
a. common chassis or circuit ground
b. earth ground or circuit ground

Reading Assignment: Meade, Foundations of Electronics, 5th Edition pp. 61 –117

Review Questions: p. 81 Questions Numbers 1 – 10
pp. 118 1 – 10

Problems: p. 82 Numbers 1 – 25
pp. 119 - 120 1 - 28

Computer Support: DC Challenge “Series Circuits”

Lab Assignment: Build series circuits on the trainer and be able to measure the
voltage, current, and resistance of that circuit.

Integrated Mathematics Objectives:

Linear Equations & Math for DC Circuits

Upon completion of this Unit the student will be able to:

a. State the meaning of a first-degree or linear equation
b. Use the step-step process for solving linear equations
c. Transpose terms in an equation.
d. Solve first degree equations with fractions, decimals, and percents.
e. State the basic concepts of DC circuits.
f. Apply Ohm’s Law to DC circuits.
g. State the meaning of direct proportion and inverse proportion.
h. Explain the concepts of energy, work, and electric power.
I. Derive and use power formulas.


Reading Assignment: Mathematics for Electricity and Electronics
3rd edition
By: Arthur Kramer pp. 133 - 163

Problem Assignment: Problems will be assigned in class as the material is covered






Unit 4 Objectives


E. Parallel Circuits:

1. State the relationship between:
a. applied voltage and branch voltage
b. circuit current and branch current (Kirchhoff's
Current Law)
c. total resistance and the smallest branch resistance
2. Calculate the total resistance given the individual branch
resistances
3. Calculate conductance given resistance and vice versa
4. Calculate total conductance given the individual branch
conductances
5. Calculate branch resistance given the branch voltage and
branch current
6. Calculate total current given the applied voltage and branch
resistances
7. Apply the current divider rule for the solution of a branch
current
8. Calculate power in a parallel circuit
9. State the symptoms of an open and shorted branch.


Reading Assignment: Meade, Foundations of Electronics, 5
th
Edition pp. 129 –152

Review Questions: p. 154 Question Numbers 1 – 12

Problems: pp. 145 – 157 Numbers 1 – 30


Computer Support: DC Challenge “Parallel Circuits”

Lab Assignment: Build parallel circuits on the trainer and be able to measure the
voltage, current, and resistance of that circuit.









Integrated Mathematics Objectives:

Multiplying and Factoring Polynomials
Upon completion of this unit the student will be able to :

a. State the meaning of a monomial, binomial, trinomial, and polynomial
b. Multiply two binomials.
c. Multiply a trinomial by a binomial.
d. Separate a monomial factor from a polynomial.
e. Factor a polynomial into two binomials.
f. State the meaning of a second degree or quadratic equation.
g. Solve a second degree equation by factoring and taking roots.
h. solve a second degree equation by the quadratic formula

Reading Assignment: Mathematics for Electricity and Electronics
3rd edition
By: Arthur Kramer pp. 165 - 183

Problem Assignment: Problems will be assigned in class as the material is covered




























Unit 5 Objectives


F. Series Parallel Circuits and Measuring Instruments

1. Reduce series circuits connected in parallel and parallel circuits
connected in series to a single equivalent resistance
2. Apply the concept of equivalency for the solution of unknown
values in a single source complex series-parallel circuit
3. Analyze a series-parallel circuit for conditions resulting from
an open or shorted component
4. Given the applied voltage, required "bleeder current", and the
load specifications, design the necessary circuit to supply the
specified voltages
5. Analyze the loaded voltage divider for the conditions resulting
from an open or shorted component
6. State the indications of a Wheatstone Bridge in balance
7. Calculate the conditions necessary to balance a Wheatstone
Bridge
8. Describe the basic construction and characteristics of the
following meter movements:
a. D'Arsonval/Weston
b. Electrodynamometer
9. Calculate the simple shunt required to extend the range of a
basic meter movement
10. Given the meter movement sensitivity, internal resistance, and
current ranges, calculate the resistances necessary for the
Ayrton shunt
11. State the method for connecting the ammeter for current
measurements
12. Analyze a circuit for the effects of ammeter loading
13. Given the meter movement sensitivity and internal resistance
calculate the required multiplier resistance to construct a
voltmeter of a given range
14. Given the ohms/volt sensitivity of a voltmeter, calculate the
internal resistance of the voltmeter for a given range
15. Analyze a circuit for the effects of voltmeter loading
16. State the method for connecting a voltmeter for voltage
measurements
17. Describe the construction and characteristics of a series
ohmmeter






Reading Assignment: Meade, Foundations of Electronics, 5th Edition pp. 165 –196

pp. 331 -346

Review Questions: pp. 197 - 198 Question Numbers 1 – 10

Problems: pp. 198 – 200 Numbers 1 – 31


Computer Support: DC Challenge “Series - Parallel Circuits”

Lab Assignment: Build series -parallel circuits on the trainer and be able to measure the
voltage, current, and resistance of that circuit. Demonstrate Analog volt meter loading
effects.



Integrated Mathematics Objectives:

Algebraic Fractions

Upon completion of this unit the student will be able to:

a. Reduce algebraic fractions to lowest terms.
b. Multiply and divide algebraic fractions.
c. Find the lowest common denominator.
d. State the meaning of equivalent algebraic fractions.
e. Add algebraic fractions
f. Simplify and solve equations with fractions


Reading Assignment: Mathematics for Electricity and Electronics
3rd edition
By: Arthur Kramer pp. 185 - 202

Problem Assignment: Problems will be assigned in class as the material is covered





Unit 6

Objectives

G. Network Simplification

1. Apply Kirchhoff'sVoltage and Current Law for the solution of
a multi-source DC network for values of voltage, current, or
power using:
a. superposition theorem
b. node voltage analysis
c. mesh current analysis
2. Solve for the Thevenin equivalent circuit for a DC network
3. Solve for the Norton equivalent circuit for a DC network
4. Convert the Thevenin equivalent circuit to a Norton equivalent
circuit and vice versa
5 simplify a DC bridge circuit using delta to wye
transformations
6. Convert a DC wye network to an equivalent delta network
7. State the Maximum Power Transfer Theorem




Reading Assignment: Meade, Foundations of Electronics, 5th Edition pp. 209 –249

Mathematics for Electricity and Electronics 3rd edition
By: Arthur Kramer pp. 274 - 317

Review Questions: Meade. p. 230 Numbers 1 – 12
p. 251 Numbers 1 - 12

Problems: Meade. pp. 230 – 231 Numbers 1 – 15
pp. 251 – 252 Numbers 1 - 18

Computer Support: None

Lab Assignment: Prove The Superposition Theorem by building a multisource circuit
and do the voltage and current measurements.

Build a Series – Parallel circuit and solve for unknown load values


IV. Methods of Instruction
:
Lecture, Demonstration, Labs, Discussion, Computer
software usage




V. Required Textbook

1. Meade, Foundations of Electronics, 5th edition
2. Reeder, Using MultiSIM : Troubleshooting DC/AC Circuits, 4
th
edition
3. Kramer, Mathematics for Electricity & Electronics 3rd edition

VI. Required Materials

1. Electronic Scientific Notation Calculator

VII. Supplemental References

MiacSoft Computer tutorial software

VIII. Methods of Evaluation

A. Distribution of the Final Grade

70% Theory (tests, quizzes, homework)
20% Lab (observing work habits, safety habits, follow verbal instructions
and perform the exercises assigned)
10% Instructor Evaluation (Student participation, attendance, homework)

B. Assignment of Final Letter Grade:

A = 90 – 100%
B = 80 -- 89%
C = 70 -- 79%
D = 64 -- 69%
F = Below 64%

IX. ADA Statement


Any student requiring special accommodations should inform the
instructor and the Coordinator of Disability Support Services (Library;
phone 636-797-3000, ext. 169).

X. Academic Honesty Statement


As a student in the Electronics Department, you are advised of the Statement
of Academic Honesty published in the Jefferson College Student Handbook
.
Plagiarism, Cheating, and Computer misuse violate the College’s standards
of academic honesty, and the expectations for conduct in the Electronics
Department. Conduct related to assignments, examinations, or computer
usage during the completion of assignments or examinations in violation of
the standards of academic honesty may result in a failing (F) grade given for
the assignment or examination, and potentially, the course.