Waste Management Plan

advertisementhumphManagement

Nov 9, 2013 (3 years and 8 months ago)

237 views

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

1





Date:


November

2011

Version number:

2
.0

Owner:


Craig Grabham

Dept.

Office of Procurement and
Sustainability

Approval route:

Carbon Advisory Board

Approval status:

Approved by PU Governors
and the Carbon Trust

Waste Management
Plan

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

2


Executive Summary

A report into the waste strategies and policies currently in place at
Plymouth
University (PU)
,

identifying

how

efficiency

improvement
s

can be made

via changes
in strategy and
providing

recommendations for investment with related costs an
d pay
back periods
.

D
rivers for i
mprovement

in
clude

financial benefits through reducing the amount
spent on collection and disposal (including associated
taxes
), environmental
benefits
,

enhanced

corporate image
as well as linking into PU’s

sustainability
agenda
.

Further drivers for improvement include reducing the risk of
legislative
non
-
compliance regarding
ISO
14001(

Environmental Management S
ystem
)
, aidin
g PU
carbon reduction commitment
and helping external league tables such as
the
People
and Planet Gr
een League Tables.

PU produce
in excess of 480

tonnes of waste a year (2010/11) with 53% of this
being recycled
(
257

tonnes)
.






Recommendations for improvement have been made and highlighted,
with other
leading university’s
achieving

recycling efficiencies of 70%

it is recommended
PU
adopt
a similar
target

of 70% of total waste recycled
. In addition
a target of 20kg of
waste

per st
udent per year

should be implemented

which will

monitor total waste.
This will be achieved by;

Aim

Action

Cost

Improving awareness and
knowledge

Matrix & e
-
Learning package

Within existing budget

Consistent bin signage

Change signs to all exterior
and
interior bins

£9,250

Recycling ‘hub’ on campus

Designated area for users to
recycle all streams

Minimal monetary value.
Small amount of space
required

Implementing new strategy

Communicate to all campus
users, especially those
responsible for certain
streams

Within existing budget

Record data

and costs more
effectively

Communication of waste
management plan to related
persons

Within existing budget



484

Tonnes of waste a year



53% of which is recycled




26 kg of waste per student per year





Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

3


This report
analyses’

data collected over the last four years, highlight
s

all

of the
University’s w
aste

streams and how they are managed, identifies inefficiencies and
areas of

improve
ment
, make
s

recommendations on
further reductions
including a
proposal for investment
. KPI’s have also been identified

and

included within the

management

p
lan
.

There will be
a

waste

services tender following this waste management plan.




Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

4


Contents

Executive Summary

................................
................................
................................
...

2

1.0 Introduction

................................
................................
................................
..........

6

1.1 Scope an
d Boundaries

................................
................................
.....................

6

1.2 History

................................
................................
................................
..............

7

2.0 Waste Streams

................................
................................
................................
.....

8

2.1 Waste Matrix

................................
................................
................................
.

9

3.0 Strategy

................................
................................
................................
..............

14

4.0 Waste Figures (Tonnes)

................................
................................
.....................

17

5.
0 Targets (Tonnes)

................................
................................
................................

19

6.0 Waste Plan
-

Financing

................................
................................
......................

20

6.1 Assumptions

................................
................................
................................
...

22

6.2 Unquantifiable Benefits/Savings

................................
................................
.....

23

6.3 Additional Resources

................................
................................
......................

23

6.4 Financial Costs and Sources of Funding

................................
........................

23

7.0 Recommendations

................................
................................
.............................

23

7.1 Immediate Action Required

................................
................................
............

23

7.2 Short Term

................................
................................
................................
......

24

7.3

Medium
-
Long Term

................................
................................
.....................

24

8.0 Legislation and Regulations

................................
................................
...............

26

9.0 Current Waste Streams

................................
................................
......................

28

................................
................................
................................
..............................

28

9.1 Non
-
Hazardous Waste

................................
................................
...................

28

9.1.1 General Waste

................................
................................
.........................

28

9.1.2 Recyclable Waste

................................
................................
....................

28

9.2 Hazardous Waste

................................
................................
...........................

30

9.2.1 Recyclable Hazardous Waste

................................
................................
..

30

9.2.2 Non
-
Recyclable
Hazardous Waste

................................
..........................

31

9.3 Department/Faculty Streams

................................
................................
..............

32

9.3.1 Science waste

................................
................................
..............................

32

9.3.2 Non
-
Hazardous

................................
................................
........................

32

9.3.3 Hazardous Waste

................................
................................
.....................

32

9.4 Arts
Waste

................................
................................
................................
......

35

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

5


9.5 Catering Waste

................................
................................
...............................

36

9.6 University of Plymouth Students Union (SU)

................................
..................

36

9.7 Halls of Residence
-

University Partnerships Pro
gramme (UPP)
....................

36

9.8 Other Waste Streams

................................
................................
.....................

36

9.8.1 Nursery
................................
................................
................................
.....

36

9.8.2 Planscape

................................
................................
................................

37

9.8.3 Contra
ctors

................................
................................
...............................

37

9.8.4 Estates

................................
................................
................................
.....

37

9.9 Improvements to Waste Streams without a Procedure in Place

.....................

37

10.0 Glossary of Terms

................................
................................
........................

38

11.0 Current Bin Signage

................................
................................
.....................

39

11.1 Suggested Bin Signage

................................
................................
................

41




Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

6


1.0
Introduction

Waste

and waste management
ha
ve

become ever more imp
ortant in recent years
with

emphasis coming from central
government on the importance of increasing
recycling rates and decreasing

the amount sent to

landfill.
PU has made
considerable improvements with regards to waste and also reduct
ion
s

in carbon
dioxide (CO
²)

emissions

but reductions in waste have begun to
plateau
.
B
iodegradable waste going to landfill have associated CO
²

e
missions

attached to
them

as biodegradable waste em
its methane

and CO
²

during its degrading process

both

of whi
ch

contribute to the greenhouse gas effect
.

Further to this, with ever limited landfill space
and
increasing
landfill tax

(s
ee right)

plus

the

rising costs of
disposal, waste management is

at the forefront of UK
agendas.

O
rganisations

seek to develop new and
innovative ways of reducin
g, re
-
using and recycling waste
according to the waste hierarchy.



1.1

Scope and
Boundaries

Throughout

this report waste is classified
and recorded from academic years (Aug
-
Jul)
.


For what areas of PU are included within the
report please see
table adjacent.

When percentage recycled is discussed this
represents how much as a percentage of the
total waste is recycled and not sent to
landfill.


The
Waste Transfer
Centre (WTC
)

is situated in Babba
ge Building Car Park
,
operated by Estates and Faci
lity Management (E&FM).

Figures for weights of waste are represented in tonnes.

Year

Landfill tax
per tonne

2011

£56

2012

£64

2013

£72

2014

£80

Included

Not included

Main Campus

Veysey

Royal William Yard

John Bull

DMC

PAHC

Building

Cookworthy Building


PU areas of Robbins
and Pilgrims



Skardon Place




Waste is ‘any substance or object the holder discards, intends to

discard or is required to discard’. Waste management is the collection,

processing and monitoring of waste products. (WRAP, 2011)

Lan
dfill tax is set to rise by 43
% by 2014

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

7


0.00%
10.00%
20.00%
30.00%
40.00%
50.00%
60.00%
70.00%
80.00%
0.00
100.00
200.00
300.00
400.00
500.00
600.00
700.00
2007/08
2008/09
2009/10
2010/11
Percentage of Waste Recycled of the Total
wste produced

Quantity of Waste
--

Tonnes

Year

RECYCLED
LANDFILL
Percentage Recycled
1.2

History

PU

is one of the UK's most prominent and dynamic

universities with an educational
history dating back to 1862. Consistently ranked as one of the top three modern
universities, Plymouth has
over 30,000 students, almost 3,000 staff and an annual
income of around £200 million
.
In addition to this PU is eve
r improving, this can be
recognised
in the

‘The Times


University Guide 2012: University league Tables’

where PU has
improved again
during the last academic year.

The university has a
major role in developing the local economy and its activities make a ma
jor
contribution to the South West Region.



Below the table and graph represent the waste figures and percentage
of
recycled
since 2007/2008.

Total Waste

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

573.77

476.49

332.14

484.32





-
16.95%

-
30.29%

-
45.82%


% of Total
Recycled

2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

67.24%

54.35%

47.59%

53.39%





-
19.17%

-
12.44%

12.19%


PU accepts it has a responsibility to deal with waste in a responsible manner

adhering to current legislation.


Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

8


Historically there has been some inconsistency with waste figures and

spikes have
been caused due to gaps in the collection of data
.

D
uring the last academic year
(2010
-
11) systems
have been put
in place and staff resp
onsible have improved the
way PU record its

waste data
,

which is the foundation for improvement as

you
cannot manage what you cannot measure
’ (Lord Kelvin)
.

The new strategy
assumes

waste is to be
record
ed

at one centralised point.

With
this improvement it is expected that waste data will be more consistent than in
previous years

making the task of improv
ement easier to monitor and achieve
.


The table below show a comparison of percent
age waste recycled against

other

top
performing
universities in this sector
. This information is from the People and Planet
Green League
, since

2008 PU
has improved its recyc
ling percentage by 0.6
%

whilst
others have improved by 40%
-
60%
.
This evidence suggests that
improvements to
the current strategy are

required

for

PU
to

continue being a top performing ‘green’
university as well as a top performer in the waste sector.



2
.0
Waste Streams



Waste is

classifie
d

into two main categories
,

hazardous and non
-
hazardous

waste
.
Most n
on
-
hazardous waste is
managed by the

Head of Security/Campus Services
of
E&FM
whilst hazardous waste is
managed by the
Health and Safety Officer
.

Both
hazardous and non
-
hazardous waste streams have some materials that can and
cannot be recycled and it should be the aim of PU to recycle

as much as possible.

Position in
waste
sector
,
2011

University

(
Overall
P&P
Position
, 2011
)

2011
% Waste
Recycled


2008 %
Waste
Recycled

Improvement
since 2008 as a
%

1

Huddersfield (14)

85.18

44

+41
%

2

Aston (12)

79.7

18

+62%

3

Nottingham Trent
(1)

78

34

+44%

4

University

of Wales
(68=)

77.14

No data

N/A

5

Kings College,
London (50=)

61.12

No data

N/A

6

Bath Spa (7)

60.27

12

+48%

7

Plymouth (4)

53.6

53

+0.6%

All waste is the responsibility of the producer

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

9


All

waste streams should follow the WRAP
waste hierarc
hy
. Previously the waste
hierarc
hy wa
s simply the 3 R’s


Reduce
, Re
-
use

and Recycle but wrap guidelines have
expanded this
somewhat.

Prevention



This can come in many different
forms from increasing the life span of products

or

avoidance i.e. buying fewer items, selling
and buying used item
s that are no longer
required but still usab
le.

Preparing for re
-
use



Through checking,
cleaning or repairing items or subcomponents
of items so that they can be re
-
used with
out

any further processing. E.g. wood waste
could be offered to faculty of arts
for students to use in their projects

Recycling



Reprocessing of items, products, materials or substances.

Other recovery



E
nergy recovery techniques such as combustion, an
aerobic
digestion, gasification or

pyrolysis. E.g.
PU
is

looking into the feasib
ility of sending
biodegradable waste to a
l
ocal anaerobic digestion plant
.

Disposal



Waste that cannot be re
-
used o
r recycled should be disposed o
f in the
correct manor. If this disposal is contracted then the company used should have the
correct legal
requirements and paperwork. Weights of

all
waste collected should also
be
kept and recorded

and is a legislative requirement
.




For
the use of staff and student awareness a
nd to motivate
campus users to follow the waste hierarchy it is
recommended that the more s
implistic 3 R hierarchy is used
.



2.1

Waste Matrix

All streams
are highlighted in the waste streams
matrix
,

it
also highlights key
information such as
management
responsibility
, collection details and contractors.

Further details of PU waste streams and current procedure are detailed in the
Appendix under section 9
.0
.

For simplicity the following hierarchy should be used.

Reduce, Re
-
use, Recycle

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

10


Non
-
Hazardous

Materials/
Stream

Sub
Category

Source

Mid
-
Term
Storage

End use

Contractor

Collection
details

University
Responsibility

Data
Responsibility

Comments

General Waste

Waste Bins

Compactor
(WTC)

Landfill

Viridor

Ad
-
Hoc
(Estimate once
a week)

Head of
Security/Campus
Services

Waste
Administrative
Assistant

Target to reduce this
to 30% of total waste

Paper &
Car
d

Non
-
Confidential

Desk top
recyclers/
recycling bins/
Document
Production
Centre

Paper
container
(WTC)

Recycling Plant
-

Recycled paper and card

Viridor

Once a week

Head of
Security/Campus
Services

Waste
Administrative
Assistant

PU generate income
from
this waste
stream. Cardboard
boxes should be flat
packed

Confidential

CSO's collect
on request
from user

Locked
confidential
paper
container
(WTC)

Shredding and Recycling
Plant
-

Recycled paper
and card

Viridor

Ad
-
Hoc (Once a
week)

Head of
Security/Campus
Services

Waste
Administrative
Assistant

Must be placed into a
BLUE bag. Contact
Campus Services
Supervisor for internal
collection. Campus users
must not leave bags for
collection in unsecure
areas

Plastics/ Tin

Recycling bins

Container
(WTC)

Recycling Plant
-

Recycled into plastic
products

Viridor

Typically once a
week

Head of
Security/Campus
Services

Waste
Administrative
Assistant



Glass

SU/ Catering/
Individuals

Bottle bank
outside
Smeaton

Recycling Plant
-

Recycled glass products,
kitchenware, tiling and
aggregates

Viridor

As requested

Head of
Security/Campus
Services

Waste
Administrative
Assistant

SU arrange collection
of glass.

Books/
Journals

Good
condition

Library/
Academia/
Individual

Within the
library

Re
-
used

BetterWorld
Books

Ad
-
Hoc (2/3
times a year)

Learning
Environment &
Information
Services
Manager

Learning
Environment &
Information
Services
Manager



Poor
Condition

Paper
container
(WTC)

Recycling Plant
-

Recycled paper and card

CSO's or DS
Smith
Recycling

As and when
needed CSO
collect books
from library

Central Support
Librarian untill
collected by C
SO's
and then Head of
Security/Campus
Services

Waste
Administrative
Assistant



Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

11


Wood

Brunel/ RLB/
User

(WTC)

Recycling Plant
-

Wood
chip for biofuel, panel
board industry, farm and
equestrian animal
bedding and garden
mulch

Wood Yew
Waste

Ad Hoc


Campus
Services
Supervisor

Waste
Administrative
Assistant

CSO's deliver to Wood
Yew Waste
(Smithaleigh,
Plymouth)

Metal

Estates/
Individuals/
Academia

(WTC)

Sorted and used to make
other products

Sims Metal
Management

Ad
-
Hoc


Campus
Services
Supervisor

Waste
Administrative
Assistant



Plastic bags

Individual

Library have
6 containers

Re
-
used by students

None

Re
-
used

Learning
Environment &
Information
Services
Manager

No data to be
recorded

Re
-
used in library for
students to carry items
home

Furniture

Room/dept.
changes
individual
upgrades etc.

Issac foot
basement

Preferably re
-
used if not
parts recycled and parts
sent to landfill

H&W
Knights and
Sons

Ad
-
Hoc


Campus
Services
Supervisor

No data to be
recorded

Before any new furniture
is purchased an e
-
mail to
Campus Services
Supervisor must happen
to ask if any furniture can
be re
-
used.

Nappies

Nursery

Yellow 770lit
Eurobin
adjacent to
nursery

Incinerated

Viridor

Once a week

Child Care
Manager

Waste
Administrative
Assistant



Non
-
Hazardous streams with no procedure as yet

Textiles

Individuals,
small amount
of uniforms,
arts

Textile
container
TBA

Re
-
used
-

Generally sent
to 3rd world countries

TBA

TBA

E&FM

TBA

It is suggested a
textiles recycling
container is arranged
through Wilcox

Garden (green)

Skardon Place

Composter
at allotment
site TBA

Compost to be used on
PU allotment

None

When CSO's
collect from
squadron place
they take to
allotment
instead of
compactor.

Head of
Security/Campus
Services

No data to be
recorded

This will occur 3/4
times a year

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

12


Planscape

On campus
greenery

Container
near WTC

Composted by
Planscape

Planscape

Ad
-
Hoc

Planscape

No data to be
recorded

Planscape deal with
any waste they
produce

Food Waste

Catering/ User

TBA

TBA

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Feasibility into what
can be done

Hazardous Streams

WEEE
(General)

Paid for
collection

Estates/
Individual/
Academia

Container
(WTC)

Stripped down to
components and
salvaged. What is not
salvaged is recycled

Absolute
Recycling
Centre
(ARC)

Ad Hoc


Campus
Services
Supervisor

Waste
Administrative
Assistant

Make sure Electrical
equipment is not
leased before disposal

Free
collection

Pluss

Mobile phones (WEEE)

Individual,
Staff phones

301
Babbage.
Next to
kitchen. N.B.
These can
be sent
internally

Repair or reuse all handsets
or harvest and retain parts
from faulty
equipment for
use in repairing other
phones. All items which
cannot be re
-
used, are
separated and recycled
EMC recycling rate 93%

EMC

Ad Hoc. Once
10 phones have
been collected

Telephone
Systems
Supervisor

Telephone
Systems
Supervisor

ILS Telephony will a
lways
try to re
-
use, sell or re
-
distribute before re
-
cycling. PU receive
generate a small amount
of income from this
service

Batteries (WEEE)

Individuals

Estates
Yard
-

Endsleigh
Place

Batteries are made from
resources and chemicals
such as Lead, Cadmium,
Zinc, Lithium and
Mercury. Recycled
batteries are taken apart
and materials salvaged

Electrical
waste
recycling
group

Ad Hoc.
Generally once
a year

Maintenance
Charge

hand

Maintenance
Charge

hand

Will take car batteries
and lead acid batteries

Davy 204

ERP Battery
Recycling

Ad Hoc

Aquatic Ecology
Technician

Aquatic Ecology
Technician

All but car battery
recycling, FOC service
available for all
campus users

Toner (WEEE)

Library/ DPC/
Offices and
communal
printing areas

Container
(WTC)

Re
-
used, repaired and re
-
used or final option of
recovering materials to be
used in the manufacture of
washing machine parts,
traffic cones, building
materials, fire alarm casing
or games consoles.

Canon &
eReco

Ad
-
Hoc

DPC Manager

DPC Manager

All makes o
f toner,
toner bottle and other
parts including imaging
units, drums etc.
NO
ink cartridges
however.

Florescent Tubes & Gas
discharge lamps

Estates and
Facility
Management

Estates
Yard
-

Endsleigh
Place

Segregated and recycled
back into products. The
mercury gets recycled
back into new lamps

Electrical
waste
recycling
group

Once a year

Maintenance
Charge

hand

Maintenance
Charge

hand

N.B.
The mercury from 1
single fluorescent tube is
enough to pollute 30,000
litres of water beyond the
UK safe drinking l
evel.

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

13


Ink Cartridges

Individuals
and some
area of
campus

Media
Workshop in
Library

Re
-
used or stripped and
recycled

Green
Agenda

2 or 3 times a
year

Media Workshop
Manager

Media Workshop
Manager

Cartridges Only

Saw Dust

Dust
extraction
system from
Brunel W3

Skip behind
Scott
building

Recycling Plant
-

Wood
chip for biofuels, animal
bedding

Viridor

Ad hoc
-

Approx.
3 times a year

Arts Technical
Manager
-

Workshop &
Materials

Waste
Administrative
Assistant



Plaster

Scott 03

Skip behind
Scott
building

Turned back into
Gypsum Powder to be
re
-
used

Viridor

Ad Hoc
-

Approx. 3 times
a year

Arts Technical
Manager
-

Workshop &
Materials

Waste
Administrative
Assistant



Vegetable oil

Catering

Francis
Drake café,
SU café,
RLB café
and Issac's
Refectory

Recycled by the
company that provide
cooking oil. This is then
sent to Cornwall where is
used to make biofuels
and other products.

OilMasters

Collect waste oil
when deliver
new stock

Catering
Manager

Catering
Manager

Only for catering waste

Science
Waste

Chemicals

Academia

None

Taken to locked
container by technical
manager with correct
paperwork where
Safety Officer will take
responsibility

Tendering
process

Estimated 3
monthly

Safety Officer

Safety Officer



Solids,
liquids and
sharps

Depending on items used and being used for have specific waste
management procedures. Technical managers or Science Faculty Technical
and Physical Resources Manager can advise

Safety Officer &
Science Faculty
Technical
and
Physical Resources
Manager

Safety Officer



Arts
Waste

Photographic
Chemicals

AV Media
and
Performance

Holding
tank in
Scott

Processed, treated
and disposed of

WasteCare

2 times a year

Arts Technical
Manager

Arts Technical
Manager



Spirit based
Inks

Scott

Holding
Vessel

Processed, treated
and disposed of

PartWash
UK

1or2 times a
year

Arts Technical
Manager
-

Workshop &
Materials

Arts Technical
Manager
-

Workshop &
Materials



Other
Workshops

Woodwork,
metal work,
ceramic work
shops

Depending
on waste

Recycled in standard
streams

Viridor

Ad
-
Hoc

Arts Technical
Manager
-

Workshop &
Materials

Waste
Administrative
Assistant



Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

14


3.0 Strategy


It is recommended that PU adopt the following
KPI’s.
P
ercentage of t
otal waste recycled and waste (
kg) per
student per year.
It is also recommended that
2010/2011 become the baseline to which future data
is compared.

Targets will be set to reach 70% of total waste recycled (based on baseline of
2010/11


53.6%) by the end of the 2013
-
14 academic year and bring
kg/student/ye
ar down from 25.7
kg to below 20kg

over the same time period, both
however

are

dependent

on investment.

The
strategy had

outline
d

all wa
ste streams from the university’
s many different
sources highlighting what happens to the waste, how it is managed as well as who is
responsible for that particular stream/ area of waste.
Making this

available to all
campus user
s
will heighten awareness and knowledge leading to recycling more at
source.
Within the strategy the knowledge
of the waste hierarchy should also be
implemented to reduce PU total waste.

Any waste streams currently not recorded
will have procedures set in place as detailed
in the recommendation section so that PU records all of its waste and the strategy
will outline who is responsible fo
r co
llating such data. C
ommuni
cations and
procedures

to be set up so that all
associated staff are aware of when and how they
should record data and to whom they should send information.
I
n addition it will be
emphasised that the producer of specific waste i.e
. faculty waste are responsible for
collection and disposal. This includes checking relevant legislation (
see legislation
section
) and recording waste transfer notes.


Data will be collated by one individual

(E&FM waste administrative assistant)

and it
wi
ll be the duty of the waste producer to notify this person
dates,

quantities and
weights of waste. This will aid the management of data and reduce the risk of non
-
conformities regarding auditing. To summarise using an example, catering dispose
of old veget
able oil and it will be the responsibility of the catering manager to check
KPI’s

1.

% Total Waste Recycled

2.

kg/student/year



T
argets

(By 2013/14)

1.

70% Total Waste Recycled

2.

<20kg/student/year


It is the responsibility of the waste producer to ensure waste is
disposed of
responsibly. This includes checking a company who is contracted to dispose of waste
have correct legislation i.e. waste carrier and disposal licences. The producer is also
required to record waste transfer notices and notify E&FM Waste Administ
rative
Assistant weights of waste disposed of.


Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

15


legislation regarding the company used for collection and disposal, as will the
recording of data and waste transfer notes. The details of waste will then be e
-
mailed
to the data r
ecorder periodically where an electronic copy of all of PU wastes will be
kept.

As departments deal with waste and their
associated costs in different ways
,

there is
no formal procedure in place to record how
much money is spent in this sector. The new
waste strategy will
make use of the waste
collection account code which is
1443
. On
receipt of

an
invoice from

the

waste
contactor the account code
1443
should be
used on the
invoice approval form

which is
then sent to finance. The
related attribut
e

(Cat 6)

should also be not
ed on the f
o
r
m
which will identify the specif
ic waste stream

(see table
)
.
E
xpenditure

reports
of

each

stream

will

then

be made more

efficient

when
reporting

directly from Ag
resso.

The strategy will also encompass an
improvement to the signage of bins
around
campu
s
. A major problem at the moment is

cross
-
contamination
,
for
e.g. a banana skin
in the paper stream may cause the whole
bag of paper waste to be sent to landfill. The

reason for this is due to the confused
m
essage PU portrays on its bins
and wi
th
improved signage, the knowledge to the user
will also increase
,

improving recycling rates.
This should be invested in immediately
and full details are found with
in

the proposal section.

Alongside better signage, precedents should be set by staff to rec
ycle more. The
removal of office bins
to be
replaced with Desk Top Recyclers (DTR’s) and
communal recycle stations

will aid recycling percentages. This will

make staff
members move to the rec
ycle station and not just throw

all waste in a

convenient
desk bi
n.
It will also make staff more responsible for their waste as it will be the
individual’s responsibility to empty the DTR’s. An added benefit to this will give
cleaning staff mor
e time to clean and not empty

bins.
It is suggested that this is done
in Davy

and Portland Square and then rolled out through campus building by
building.

T
he

publication of this report,

waste strea
ms matrix and other informative information

will motivate staff to do more, it is also important that is known what benefits there
Attribute Code

Description



CONPAP

Confidential Paper

CONTAIN

Container Hire

GENWAS

General Waste

GLASS

Glass

GREEN

Green/Garden

HAZWAS

Hazardous Waste

INK

Spirit
Based Inks

METAL

Metal

NAP

Nappies

ORANGE

Orange Bag

PAPER

Paper & Card

PHOCHEM

Photographic
Chemicals

PLASPA

Plaster of Paris

PLATIN

Plastics & Tin

SANIT

Sanitary

SAW

Saw Dust

SCIGLA

Scientific Glass

SHARP

Sharps

TONER

Toner

TUBE

Tubes and
Lamps

WEEE

WEEE

WOOD

Wood

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

16


are
too

added recycling and this will be marketed with the help o
f Marketing and
Communications
.

A
c
ommunal

and central point on campus should be utilised as a

Recycle Hub’

which will be
one point for all campus users to recycle all waste streams
. It is
suggested that the S
outh
W
est

corner of Smeaton be utilised for this and a row of
recycle bins situated along the West elevation (adjacent to the glass container). This
will provide a vibrant, clean and sustainable image for campus users as well as
being a
n

excellent way to manage waste
. This will also show users that PU is
committed to continual improvement.

Having a holistic, efficient and well managed waste strategy will be financially
beneficial, reduce any negative impact on the environment, add to PU
corporate
image as well as aiding peer assessment groups such as LIFE or People and Planet.





Waste Disposal Procedure

Collection and Disposal by E&FM

Collection and Disposal by 3rd
Party

Apply the waste hierarchy. Can it be
re
-
used or reduced

Apply the
waste hierarchy. Can it
be re
-
used or reduced

Sort
,
Bag
-
up, Contain or Secure the
waste

Bag
-
up, Contain or Secure the
waste

Contact
Campus Services
Supervisor

(E&FM)

Contact contractor if not on
regular collection

Provide information on waste
-

type,
quantity, location, general
comments (heavy, dirty etc.)

Collection by contractor. Producer
must receive a waste transfer
notice on colle
c
tion

Collection by CSO's

Disposal by Contractor

Disposal via E&FM or
contractor

Contractor to send records of
weights of waste disposed of

Record

data

via
waste
administrative assistant

(
E&FM
)

Weights to be e
-
mailed to
waste
administrative assistant (E&FM)
f
or data collection

Report to Carbon Advisory Board

Report to
Carbon Advisory Board

It will be the responsibility of the Director of Estates and Facility Management and
Head of Security/Campus Services to ensure this strategy and related policy are
implemented and will be reported to the carbon advisory group.


Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

17


4
.0

Waste Figures

(Tonnes)

PU has
18,841full time equivalent (FTE) students on campus

producing over 480
tonnes of waste. T
his equates to producing
25.7 kg per student per year.

Tonnage data for specific waste streams are detaile
d below 2007/08


2010/11
.


TOTAL WASTE











2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

573.77

476.49

332.14

484.32

(Aug
-

July)



-
16.95%

-
30.29%

45.82%

Fiscal Year



618.88

393.56

415.68

(Apr
-

Mar)





-
36.41%

5.62%

Calendar Year



623.02

451.10

318.40







-
27.59%

-
29.42%






PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL WASTE RECYCLED








2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

67.24%

54.35%

47.59%

53.39%

(Aug
-

July)



-
19.17%

-
12.44%

12.19%

Fiscal Year



65.86%

55.00%

47.69%

(Apr
-

Mar)





-
16.49%

-
13.30%

Calendar Year



66.92%

52.32%

44.73%







-
21.83%

-
14.50%






RECYCLED











2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

385.81

258.99

158.08

258.60

(Aug
-

July)



-
32.87%

-
38.96%

63.59%

Fiscal Year



407.61

216.46

198.22

(Apr
-

Mar)





-
46.90%

-
8.43%

Calendar Year



416.95

236.00

142.42







-
43.40%

-
39.65%






LANDFILL











2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

187.96

217.50

174.06

225.72

(Aug
-

July)



15.72%

-
19.97%

29.68%

Fiscal Year



211.27

177.10

217.46

(Apr
-

Mar)





-
16.17%

22.79%

Calendar Year



206.07

215.10

175.98







4.38%

-
18.19%

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

18







Tins & Plastics











2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

182.92

4.28

3.56

4.06

(Aug
-

July)



-
97.66%

-
16.82%

14.04%

Fiscal Year



183.68

3.58

3.88

(Apr
-

Mar)





-
98.05%

8.38%

Calendar Year



183.34

3.54

4.24







-
98.07%

19.77%






Paper & Card











2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

114.99

168.93

136.98

243.38

(Aug
-

July)



46.90%

-
18.91%

77.68%

Fiscal Year



154.41

168.28

186.96

(Apr
-

Mar)





8.98%

11.10%

Calendar Year



152.01

175.64

128.90







15.55%

-
26.61%






WEEE (Electrical)










2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

2.85

0.00

0.00

0.00

(Aug
-

July)



0
.00%

0.00%

0.00%

Fiscal Year



0.00

0.00

0.00

(Apr
-

Mar)





0.00%

0.00%

Calendar Year



1.14

0.00

0.00







0.00%

0.00%






Metal











2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

9.97

10.78

9.90

7.62

(Aug
-

July)



8.15%

-
8.16%

-
23.03%

Fiscal Year



6.82

17.14

3.24

(Apr
-

Mar)





151.32%

-
81.10%

Calendar Year



9.02

16.84

3.24







86.70%

-
80.76%






Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

19


Wood











2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

5.08

6.00

7.64

3.54

(Aug
-

July)



18.11%

27.33%

-
53.66%

Fiscal Year



5.70

7.46

4.14

(Apr
-

Mar)





30.88%

-
44.50%

Calendar Year



5.94

6.48

6.04







9.09%

-
6.79%






Glass











2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

Academic Year

70.00

69.00

0.00

0.00

(Aug
-

July)



-
1.43%

-
100.00%

#DIV/0!

Fiscal Year



57.00

20.00

0.00

(Apr
-

Mar)





-
64.91%

-
100.00%

Calendar Year



65.50

33.50

0.00







-
48.85%

-
100.00%


5
.0
Targets (Tonnes)


Below are details of
how
the proposed 70% total waste recycled target

will effect PU
waste figures
. It should be noted that this is
based on the 2010
-
2011 baseline. Total
waste collected will rise however for t
his academic year, t
his is due to inefficiencies
being rectified in data collection. Many streams have not been recorded and once
they have

been it is safe to presume

total

waste

will rise. The areas where

improvement is needed are
detailed in the recommendation section

while c
osts

can
be seen in the proposal section of this report.

Sliding scale of achieving 70% of total waste to be recycled by the end of the
2013/14 academic y
ear



2011/12


58.39% (+5.54%)



2012/13


64.47% (+5.54%)



2013/14


70.01% (+5.54%)



Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

20




6
.0 Waste Plan
-

Financing


Plymouth University spend nearly £100,000 per annum on the collectio
n and
disposal of
waste and this

figure is set rise over the next 3 years.
The Government
has already stated that

cost to landfill will rise with a year on year increase of

£8/tonne/annum

scheduled

up to £80
/tonne
/annum in 2014/2015

equating to an
increase of 43
%
.

This
will impact

the

waste budget

by an increase of an estimated
£30,000

in
2014/15
. With the proposed investment however waste costs will fall to just over
£80,000

(£10,000 reduction)
, a saving of over £40,000 compared to business as
usual. The graph

and table

adjacent

show the cost of waste as two s
c
enarios;

a
"business as usual" scenario
and a possible scenario were the university makes real
reductions in reducing waste and improving recycling

by means of investment
.








TOTAL
WASTE









2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

Academic Year

573.77

476.49

332.14

484.32

484.32

484.32

484.32

(Aug
-

July)



-
16.95%

-
30.29%

45.82%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

PERCENTAGE OF TOTAL WASTE
RECYCLED






2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

Academic Year

67.24%

54.35%

47.59%

53.39%

58.39%

64.47%

70.01%

(Aug
-

July)



-
19.17%

-
12.44%

12.19%

9.37%

10.41%

8.59%

RECYCLED









2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

Academic Year

385.81

258.99

158.08

258.60

285.41

312.24

339.07

(Aug
-

July)



-
32.87%

-
38.96%

63.59%

10.37%

9.40%

8.59%

LANDFILL









2007/08

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

Academic Year

187.96

217.50

174.06

225.72

198.91

172.08

145.25

(Aug
-

July)



15.72%

-
19.97%

29.68%

-
11.88%

-
13.49%

-
15.59%

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

21










Business
as Usual



New Strategy

Including Investment

Year

Paper
Revenue

Savings in General
Waste

Baseline
Comparison

2010
-
2011

£90,705

£
0

£
0

£90,705

2011
-
2012

£94,080

£
702

-
£
304

£90,307

2012
-
2013

£100,605

£
1
,
602

£
369

£88,336

2013
-
2014

£110,505

£
2
,
334

£
1
,
647

£84,355

2014
-
2015

£120,405

£
2
,
334

£
1
,
647

£80,374

£75,000
£80,000
£85,000
£90,000
£95,000
£100,000
£105,000
£110,000
£115,000
£120,000
£125,000
2010-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
2013-2014
2014-2015
Business
as Usual
New
Strategy
including
Investment
Comparison between ‘Business as Usual’ and Saving through Investment

£30,000

£10,000

Year

Waste Budget

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

22



To help realise this goal the university

should

inve
st

through four

defined pathways:

1.

Invest in
additional resources to improve the ability to recycle. A proposal for
additional waste bins has been submitted and is reiterated in this document.
The cost to achieve this is £30k

with a payback period of less than 4 years
.

2.

Through raising awareness and
making it easier for s
taff and students to
recycle

3.

Having a common

approach to recycling with our partners at UPP. This will
require additional funds as set out in the attached proposal.

4.

Through the identification of waste streams and quantities there will

be the
ability to monitor and target waste much more thoroughly than before. This
will also aid in the proposed tendering process.


The table below identifies how and where money will be saved through the new
strategy and proposed investment.


Description

2010
-
2011

2011
-
2012

2012
-
2013

2013
-

2014

2014
-
2015

Total

Total Waste (tonnes)

484.3

484.3

484.3

484.3

484.3

0

Quantity to Landfill (tonnes)

225.7

198.9

172.1

145.3

145.3

-
80.5

Total recycled (tonnes)

258.6

285.4

312.2

339.1

339.1

80.5

Recycled paper
(tonnes)

243.4

255.1

270.1

282.3

282.3

38.9

Increase in recycled paper
revenue


£702

£
1,602

£
2,334

£
2,334

£6,972

Savings in general waste
costs (collection, disposal
and landfill tax)


-
£304

£369

£1,647

£1,647

£3,359

Annual Saving



£398

£1,971

£3,981

£3,981

£
10,331


6
.1 Assumptions

In calculating the estimated costs and savings related to this plan, the follow
ing
assumptions have been made:




Costs b
ased upon 2010/
11 expenditure of landfill, paper, cardboard, glass
etc.



There are no additional costs
for programme management. It is not
anticipated that additional staffing requirements would be needed in the
Estates & Facilities Management Directorate.



The university is committed to funding additional resources of £30k.

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

23


6
.2
Unquantifiable

Benefits
/Savin
gs

Some of the
benefits of reducing waste and improving recycling
that

cannot be
measured
include:



Enhanced financial forecasting and reduced risk to the University from
unavoidable and unfor
eseen utility budget increases



Access to further grant funding
for carbon saving measures, eg from the
Carbon Trust



Alignment with Government and HEFCE objectives



Maintain our position as the UK’s top university in environmental performance
in the annual People and Planet Green league table



An improved reputation wit
h both Staff and Students, both physiologically and
encouraging behavioural changes



Improved availability of data for Estates Management Statistical Return


6
.3 Additional Resources

Outside of the additional funding reques
t the system will run within the

current
resource level. The responsibility for financial management will sit with the Director
of Estates and Facilities Management.

6
.4 Financial Costs and Sources of Funding

This pr
oject will be funded through the

Capital Programme and subject to Board

of
Governors approval
on an annual basis as necessary.

7
.0
Recommendations

During the process of information gathering certain areas for improvement ha
ve
been noticed and discussed with

relevant staff and external persons within the waste
industry.

7
.1
Immediate Action Required




Set

‘smart’ target
. From 53.6% recycl
ed waste up to 70% and from
25.7
kg/s
tudent/annum to 20kg/
student/year.
It is recommended to be set over
a three year period on a sliding scale to achieve the target by the end of
2013/14.



Inve
stment
required
to

improve

signage
. A clear, simple
,

consistent message
should be portrayed across campus adherin
g to WRAP guidance.

(D
etails can be found in the waste proposal document).



Due to the change in
laboratory

procedure

general waste and recycli
ng bins
have

been

removed from many areas of

the

Davy Building
.
48 fire retardant
bins should be purchased

and placed in circulation sp
a
c
e

to solve this
problem

at a cost of
£
3,037


(D
etails can be found in the waste proposal document).

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

24




Certain gaps are evident regarding
waste figures
. Currently
E&FM waste
administrative assistant

records figures sent from Viridor. It is recommended
that this occurs for
collating and recording all waste streams

from all
departments
.

This requires communic
ation with relevant PU stakeholders.



An
account code

(1443)

has

already
be
en set up

for
all waste payments
but
this is not always used
.
Currently

you need to search for each stream via the
supplier code but

if this

account code was
used correctly
,

analysis

of financial
figures would be made
easier and more efficient
.

Within this account code,
attributes will also be used to identify separate streams and their related
costs.


7
.2 Short Term



To
have

more
communal
recycle station
s
, introducing desk top
recyclers
to office areas and removing general office waste bins
.
Introduced
throughout Davy building and Portland Square, it will

be used as a precedent
to intr
oduce the system across campus with detailed data analysis proving its
success.



I
t is recommend
ed investigation takes place into the feasibility of a
joint
waste tender

with our partners at UPP, Tama
r Science Park and
UCP
Marjon.



Consideration should be given to a central

point

of

campus

being designated
as

a
large recycle hub
, currently there is
not a central point on campus for
recycling all st
reams. It is suggested that
the hub be

strategically placed
to
service the facility to

recycle plastic/tin, paper/card, glass, batteries, toner,
mobile phones, wood, metal, textiles, food waste and WEEE as
well as a
general waste bin.


7.3

Medium
-
Long Term



The
WTC

should be extended

for additional recycling
.
The

confidential waste
container can then be moved int
o the compound as well as enabling space for
further recycling. Car parking spaces will be reduced how
ever but only during
the construction of the marine building.

-

With additional

space
,

larger containers and compactors could be
used allowing PU to reduce the amount of collections for disposal,
reducing costs and embodied carbon from transport.



Improvemen
ts to the
security of

the
WTC

can be made easily and

at
low
cost.
Within the WTC

there are many

hazardous materials and objects
including the

hazardous chemicals container and i
njury

is risked

with open
gates. The WTC should be
kept locked

at all times.



The recording of

c
atering waste

started in Oct 2011 and will continue through
to Apr 2012. Giving PU accurate information on the amount of waste being
Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

25


produced
. This will give a better understanding of what measures can be
taken to reduce
food
waste.



Food

waste
can contrib
ute up to 30% of all waste, c
urr
ently

all food waste
goes
to landfill
or is macerated
but PU have the possibility to utilise this waste.
It does take good management however but this stream can be utilised to
generate energy through anaer
obic digestion which can done locally at
Language Farm, Smithaleigh, Plymouth.



PU external bins

could be retro
-
fitted to maximise the potential of having 4
waste streams. This fourth stream could be utilised

for

food waste once
investigations into food was
te have been carried out.

The cost of this
modification is in the signage and included with the proposal section of this
report.



On

the west side of Roland Levinski Building E
&
FM’s
electric van

is parked
and being utilised permanently for bin bag storage.
I
t is recommended that
this repaired
and

put back into action, s
aving

CO
²

as

diesel vans will not be
used as much
. Additionally if the food waste stream was feasible the electric
van could be used to collect this as efficient collection
s

will stop to risk
of
problems with odours and vermin.



T
he feasibility of re
-
using

Plaster
-
of
-
P
aris

should be researched by arts
technicians
. Certain processes

can be implemented to get the material back
to a powder to be used again.

Funds could then be saved on collection a
nd
disposal as well as purchasing the raw product.

Discussions required Faculty
of Arts.



With better communication between
staff and students
items could be re
-
used
as
salvage
. As long as they are in a safe condition many items can be re
-
used saving PU to
dispose of such. It is recommended and marketed that at

certain times

campus users are invited
to take items from the WTC

away as
salvage. This could incorporate a salvage page on the intranet where items
wanted/ discarded

are

listed.
It is thought st
ud
ent
s could use materials for
aca
demic

projects.



B
efore any
furniture

is purchased an e
-
mail to

estateshelp@plymouth.ac.uk


should be sent asking if items are available in storage. This ranges from
chairs and
table
s

to filing cabinets. If items are not required and unwanted
after being in storage they should be made available to students to take away
free of charge, thus saving the product from landfill.



A small container for
glass

should be procured

for the W
TC.



Regular audits of departments/schools/office waste to be carried out by a
team of auditors

which will also aid compliance
for ISO 14
001
.



Recommended a
composter

is purchased and stored on PU’s allotment.
Garden waste from Skardon Place (estimated 200 b
ags per annum) can be
utilised by the allotment society
.

o

In the meantime the 5kg composter from the SU should be moved to
the allotment.

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

26




A full
survey

of campus should be undertaken to survey the location, quality,
quantity and state of repair of all bins
.

8
.0
Legislation and Regulations


The producer of waste is responsible for the
collection and disposal


PU must comply with laws, legal requirement
s and follow strict legislation as well as
adhering

to a number of

other directives, laws and acts
regarding the responsible
management, collection and disposal of waste.

A full

list

of

legislation and re
gulations

are detailed on p
.
27



Whether waste is disposed of by PU or the collection a
nd disposal is sub
-
contracted the following

must
be
check
ed, he
ld and record
ed;

1.

Current Waste Carrier Licence.

2.

Current
Waste Disposal Permit.

Waste Transfer Notes.

3.

These should be kept for a minimum of two years and three years if
the waste stream is hazardous.


Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

27



Animal by
-
products regulations 2005

Batteries Directive
2010

Clean Neighbourhoods and environmental act 2005

Control of Pollution

Act 1974

Controlled Waste (Registration of Carriers and Seizure of Vehicles)
Regulations 1991

Controlled Waste Regulations 1992
(as amended 1993)

Environment Act 1995

Environme
ntal Permitting of Waste 2010

Environmental Protection Act 1990

Environmental Protection (Duty of Care
) Regulations 1991

EU Waste Framework Directive 2008

European WEEE directive

Hazardous Waste (Eng
land and Wales) Regulations 2005 & 2009

Information

on the Waste and Emissions Trading Act 2003

Landfill Directive 1999

Landfill Tax Regulations 1996

Packaging, Packaging waste, and the Packaging Waste Regulations 2010

Producer Responsibility Obligations (Packaging Waste) Regulations 1997

Site waste
management plans regulations 2008 (England only)

The List of Wastes (England) Regulations 2005, SI 895

The waste (England and Wales) Regulations 2011

Waste Batteries and Accumulators act 1991

Waste Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) 2007

Waste Incineration (England and Wales) Regulations 2002, SI 2980

Waste Managem
ent Licensing Regulations 1994

Waste Management Licences
(Consultation and Compensation)
Regulations
1999

Waste Man
agement Regulations

(England and Wales)

1996

Waste
Minimisation Act 1998




Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

28


Appendix

9
.0
Current
Waste Streams


9
.1 Non
-
Hazardous Waste

Non
-
hazardous waste can be categorised into recyclable and non
-
recyclable waste
,
PU has

three main streams of waste collection those being
general waste
,
plastics/tin

mixed and
paper/card

mixed. Other streams of waste are also collected
but they require further waste management and more specialised collection and
disposal.

9
.1.1 General Was
te

General waste is collected by cleaners and CSO’s

from main campus
on a set daily
routine,
collections
also incl
ude
Cookworthy Building, the
Diving and Marine Centre
and Royal William Yard which are collected 2/3 times a week. This

is then taken to
the
WTC
,

c
ompacted in a 35 yard compactor and collected by

Viridor
once a week.

9
.1.2 Recyclable Waste

Paper/card

mixed recycling is collected by cleaners and CSO’s and held in a
container within the
WTC
. This is stored and piled by hand by CSO’s and collecte
d
by Viridor on a weekly basis. At the time of this report PU generates income by
collecting this waste stream at £60 per tonne. This figure fl
uctuates however and is
market led, f
orecasts suggest that

this amount will drop and plateau

to ar
ound £50
per to
nne in the short to
medium term.


PU has a duty of care to dispose of its
confidential waste

appropriately,
responsibly, efficiently and conf
identially. The collection and disposal is contracted to
Viridor who collect confidential waste from a locked c
ontainer in the WTC

and take to
a confidential shred
ding unit in Martock, Somerset.
This waste stream is recycled but
unfortunately due to the pr
ocess’ in place PU does not receive income from recycled
confidential waste.


What is Confidential Waste?

Confidential waste is at the discretion of the user but a general rule of
thumb is


any information containing any of the following;

Personal data, social security and PAYE records,
accounts and Vat
records, customer information, banking information, credit card details or
personal health information are classed as confidential.

Only general waste

should
go to
landfill

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

29


For campus users to dispose of their confidential waste it should be placed in blue
bag
s

and stored in a secure location. Collection is arranged by e
-
mailing
the campus
services

supervisor.

Plastic/tin

mixed are

collected by cleaners and CSO’s and stored in a separate
container to await a weekly collection from Viridor. This stream should be contained
in clear plastic bags which help CSO’s check for and filter contamination.

(Ge
neral waste, Plastic/Tin, Confidential waste and Paper/Card can be collected on
request from anywhere on campus and surrounding estates by contacting
the
campus services supervisor and

advising of location and quantity).

Glass

is collected on campus by Vi
ridor but currently through only one place on
campus which is a 15m
³

bottle bank outside Smeaton

Building

(East side). As
Plymouth University Student Union (SU) is the primary user of this facility they call
Viridor when the bank
needs to be emptied. Manag
ement

however
,

of this stream

is
that of
the Head of Security/Campus Services who

is also responsible for all other
matters including contracts, payment, data collection and other legal requisites such
as storing transfer notices. The bottle bank is open t
o
all campus users.

PU Library use a company called ‘BetterWorld Books’ who
re
-
distribute

books

in
good condition to others who require them and books in poorer condition are
recycled. At the time of this report BetterWorld Books had saved over 65 million
books from worldwide landfills by re
-
using or recycling. BetterWorld Books collect
from the library on an Ad
-
Hoc basis depending on size of collection organised by
the
Learning Environment & Information Services Manager
. This service is not available
to st
udents but staff/academics can facilitate this recycling stream. PU generate a
small amount of income once the books have been sold.

Wood

is recycled by a company named ‘WoodYew Waste’ who have a compound in
Smithaleigh, Plymouth. PU general wood waste com
es from pallets, faculty of arts
waste and old furniture. This is

temporarily stored

at the
WTC
, o
nce ther
e is enough
material to fill
E
&FM’s

caged van this is delivered to WoodYew Waste.

Metals

are collected by CSO’s by request and occasionally items are brought to the
WTC
. Metals are stripped and stored in the
WTC

until there is enough waste to fill
and

a

van and this is taken to ‘Sims Metal Management’.

Recently (within a month of report bein
g written) PU Library has started a collection
of used
plastic carrier bags
. 6 collection points
are located

around the Library for
campus users to return carrier bags which will be re
-
used by students when taking
books out
.

Furniture

that
i
s no longer req
uired

but

is

still in good condition is stored in the

basement of Issac Foot
. This comes from office moves and upgrades in furniture.
This storage facility allows for items to be re
-
used
, if items are not required by other
area
s of the institution

they are

sold to H&W knights and sons
. Any furniture that is
Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

30


not re
-
used or sold is then offered to staff and what is left is then discarded into its
specific stream. It should also be noted that if any staff or students require a piece of
furniture they can e
-
mai
l

the

campus services supervisor

and request specific items.
Monthly updates are then e
-
mailed to

O
ffice of Procurement and Sustainability
(O
PS
)

advising of
re
-
used or discarded furniture for data collection.
This

stream
is
the responsibility of
the campus

services supervisor.

9
.2 Hazardous Waste




‘Some types of waste are harmful to human health, or to the environment, either
immediately or over an extended period of time. These are called hazardous wastes
(Environmental Agency).

They can be classified as any waste which ‘can kill, injure,
or cause
health problems to a person, living organism or organisation’.

PU has many different types of hazardous waste due to the functions of the
institution. There are many different types of laboratories, workshops and services
that use chemicals and other types

of hazardous materials.
PU’s Safety

Officer

is
responsible for the collection and disposal of hazardous waste, only once he has
received and
signed for it from the producer however.

9
.2.1 Recyclable Hazardous Waste

Plymouth University

produce
s

saw dust

waste from workshops in Brunel
Laboratories where an ex
traction system produces

3
-
5 bags a week. As this waste
stream is from mixed wood it has to be classified as hazardous. Due to the
manufacturing procedure, MDF contains resin which should not inhaled.

Therefore
CSO’s collect sealed backs of sawdust from Brunel W03 and store it in a locked skip
behind Scott Building where it is collected by Viridor.

Plaster
-
of
-
Paris

waste is stored in a locked skip behind Scott Building and comes
from faculty of Arts
w
orkshops within

Scott
(003)
. CSO’s remove waste plaster from
the workshop where it is stored in a convenient location for both users and
collectors.
Viridor collect this waste stream roughly 4 times a year where it is
processed and henc
e can be used to man
ufacture oth
er gypsum based products.


Vegetable Oil

is used by four

catering facilities on campus namely SU cafeteria,
Drake Café
, Roland Levinksy Building

and Issac’s Refectory. Catering only use
vegetable oil in their methods and this is recycled by a c
ompany called ‘OilMasters’.
When deliveries occur they collect the waste product, this is
managed by

the
Catering Manager
.

WEEE

waste has historically been collected by ‘Absolute Recycling Centre’ (ARC)
with intermediate storage at Estates Yard

or

WTC
.

Hazardous waste is the responsibility of the producer and they must arrange the
collection and disposal of this waste through the health and safety officer.

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

31


PU

has

recently used

‘PLUSS’ who will collect all of our WEEE waste free of charge
(FOC). A
FOC
WEEE amnesty
was

arranged for Friday 25
th

November 2011

collecting
a total of 17.3 tonnes.


Mobile phones

can be recycled in one of two ways, either within Wast
e Electrical
and
Electrical Equipment (WEEE) waste streams or via a specific mobile phone
recycling

stream ran by Information and Communication Technology (ICT) as they
are responsible for staff mobiles. The latter is recommended a
s PU generates
income fro
m the

contactor who is ‘EMC Mobile Phone Recycling’ and the collection
point on campus is
301 (next to kitchen)
Babbage Building.

ICT

try and re
-
use any
mobile phone
s

before sending it away to be

recycled.

This is the
managed by

the
Telephone Systems
Supervisor
.

Battery

recycling is classed as hazardous waste, there are currently two ways in
which campus users can dispose of batteries to be recycled. One is in the Estates
Yard on Endsleigh Place
with collection and disposal from
‘Electrical Waste
Recy
cling Group’

managed by E&FM

and the other is in Davy Building room 204
which is organised by
the
Aquatic Ecology Technician

who arranges for ‘European
Recycling Platform Battery Recyclin
g’ (ERP) to collect and dispose

FOC
.

Ink
bottles

and
toner

are colle
cted by Canon who

work in partnership with eReco,
Canon/eReco re
-
use and recycle this waste. There are a number of recycle points
around campus, mainly in office environments, communal printer points and in the
Library. These are then collected by CSO’s on

request or via routine and stored in
the
WTC

where they are collected by Canon/eReco on an Ad
-
Hoc basis at the
request of
the DPC Manager or

Campus Service Supervisor

Non canon ink cartridges
can be recycle
d via the media centre i
n the basement

of
the Lib
rary. These are collected
and re
-
used or stripped down with

individual
components

being recycled
by Green Agenda

2 or 3 times a year. This service is
available to all campus users.

9
.2.2
Non
-
Recyclable Hazardous Waste

Chemicals are stored in a secure and
locked container within the
WTC
. Users of
chemicals are required to bring the waste to the container where they will meet

the
health and safety officer
with the required documents and
responsibility
will be
signed over.

Details of the items are kept b
y

the administrative assistant for
Gover
nance, Secretariat and Registry

and once the container is full, collection and
disposal are tendered for.

Strict l
egislation
controls
these types of wastes and the Health and Safety Officer
must have a licence from the environmental agency and adhere to regulations from
Control of Substances Hazardous

to Health (COSHH), the environment act 1990 and
relevant transportation regulations.

Heavy prosecution can be inflicted if PU does not conform to regulations
and legislation

regarding the collection and disposal of hazardous waste.


Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

32


9
.3 Department/Faculty Streams

Due to the functions of the institution there are other more specialised areas of waste
management, they mainly come in the form of specif
ic faculty waste such as Science
and Arts. Therefore a more systematic procedure has been put in place to deal with
these waste streams as can be seen below.

9
.3.1 Science waste

(Information from

Faculty Technical and Physical Resources Manager
)

9
.3.2 No
n
-
Hazardous

All waste paper bins, white bin liners, cardboard/paper, plastics/tin waste bins and
recycling “stations” will be removed from laboratories. This will eliminate the need for
any recyclable waste to be taken into laboratories. (Even the presence

of drinks or
food containers in a laboratory waste stream implies eating or drinking in the
laboratory which is not permitted).

Due to this recent change in waste procedure within the Faculty of Science and
Technology (FoST) the number of recycle bins an
d stations has been reduced
drastically, thus diminishing the possibility to recycle waste. It is detailed in the
recommendation section that new ‘fire safe’ bins are purchased for the D
avy
Building
.

9
.3.2.1
In laboratories:

Grey or white swing bin with b
lack bin liner. This bin should be located near the hand
wash basin (if installed) or in a prominent location. It should be labelled “NON
-
HAZARDOUS WASTE ONLY, e.g. hand towel, packaging, paper”. To minimise the
creation of packaging waste within laborator
ies, staff should aim to unpack as many
boxes as is safe and possible to do, prior to entry into the lab. This means it would
be sensible to set up a delivery point in an office or “preparation” area.

All botanical or garden waste (unless genetically modif
ied or non
-
native species) can
be composted at Skardon Place. However, imported plants and seeds should be
incinerated via the yellow bag/orange tag and yellow Eurocart waste stream (see
below).

9
.3.3 Hazardous Waste

The following list identifies the vario
us types of hazardous waste generated by the
Faculty and how to handle them. The guidance seeks to provide consistent
procedures throughout the Faculty and thereby facilitate segregation of the different
waste streams. The majority of hazardous waste is pr
oduced within the laboratory
but there are some items e.g. batteries which equally derive from the office
environment.

9
.3.3.1
Biological Waste

Stream:

The Faculty (mainly within the Davy Building) routinely produces the following
categories of hazardous b
iological waste:

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

33




GM 1/2 and HG 1/2 (GM=genetically modified, HG=Hazard Group)



Animal (including marine organisms)



Human (some of which may fall under control of the Human Tissue Act, 2008)

It may occasionally produce HG3 waste.

The waste may take the form
of solid, liquid or sharps. Legislation dictates what
procedures must be used for waste disposal and these relate to the degree of risk
associated with the waste. In the past, most biological waste (even when autoclaved
on
-
site) has been sent for incinerat
ion. For environmental reasons, to minimise the
volume of waste for incineration, an “Alternative Treatment” (usually industrial
autoclaving) process followed by rendering has been introduced. This waste stream
then goes to landfill. However, in the south
west alternative treatment facilities are
not locally available. This means that all categories of hazardous biological waste at
the University of Plymouth after on
-
site sterilisation/disinfection will need to be
incinerated.

Solid waste

(non
-
sharp) will initially be placed in autoclave waste bags and following
autoclaving will be placed in yellow bags. These will be taken (by technical staff) to a
dedicated yellow Eurocart. All bags will be sealed with a yellow tag, except for any
waste
that falls under the Human Tissue Act. These yellow bags will be sealed with a
red tag. Contaminated animal waste (carcases, bedding etc.) will be placed in a
yellow bin (Griff or Wiva sealed
-
lid type), the lid sealed on and the whole placed in
the yellow
Eurocart. Carcases and tissue from non
-
hazardous aquaria/shellfish
waste should be incinerated. To avoid foul odours, all such waste should be frozen
and then placed in a yellow bag/orange tag and removed to the yellow Eurocart
within 24hours of its remova
l. The shells, once rinsed, can be placed in black bags.

Liquid waste

(e.g. from liquid cultures, not hot media) should preferably be
disinfected (but might be autoclaved) and then either flushed to drain (subject to risk
assessment and validation) or plac
ed in a yellow waste bin with a sealed orange lid
for disposal via the yellow Eurocart.

All sharps

(
i.e scalpels & needles) will be placed in yellow sharps bins with orange
lids. Plastic disposable pipettes (e.g. 10ml+, not pastettes) should be considered
as
sharps (since they can puncture a plastic bag). These should be double bagged or
there are rectangular sharps bins available specifically designed to take these.

All uncontaminated sharps
, small items of
laboratory
glassware

(e.g. vials,
cuvettes, test
tubes etc.), broken glass and all pyrex glass should be disposed of via
an orange 22l Dannibin (with orange lid) which will be collected by the CSOs for
crushing prior to landfill.

Glass waste

will usually either fall into the category of uncontaminated sh
arps
above or “domestic” glass. The latter will comprise mainly laboratory reagent bottles.
These should be rinsed (via wash
-
up room), dried and disposed of (unbroken) via
Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

34


the cardboard glass waste boxes. Standard 2.5l Winchesters should be returned to
the

supplier, ultimately via the Post
-
Room collection point. NB should anyone
generate contaminated glass waste, consultation with the Technical Manager is
required.

9
.3.3.2
Chemical Waste Stream:

All
surplus chemicals

should be catalogued, segregated by haza
rd, and disposed
of using the University hazardous waste procedure, via the Technical Manager.

All
reagents/solutions

should be disposed of according to a COSHH assessment
which will identify the hazard category (e.g. harmful, toxic etc) and the concentrat
ion.
The assessment may result in disposal via the drain or via the University hazardous
waste procedure.

All
chemical contaminated sharps/small items of lab glassware

e.g. vials, test
tubes etc. should be disposed of according to a COSHH assessment which
will
identify the hazard category (e.g. harmful, toxic etc) and the concentration. The
assessment may result in disposal via the non
-
hazardous laboratory sharps/glass
system, an orange Dannibin or via the University hazardous waste procedure.
Particular at
tention should be paid to chemical waste which is flammable (see
below), explosive, toxic or mutagenic/carcinogenic. These will certainly require
disposal via the University hazardous waste procedure. CHIP 4, 2009 provides a list
of risk and safety phrases

which will help determine the method of disposal.

Flammable solvent waste

should be disposed of via two waste streams,
chlorinated and non
-
chlorinated. Laboratories generating this type of waste should
supply two bottles (e.g. 1L or 2.5L according to volu
me produced) appropriately
identified with orange 3WE labels. Usually there is no need to either segregate (other
than the two named above) or record volumes of different flammable solvents. The
waste bottles should be stored (as the stock solvents) in a f
lammables cabinet.

9
.3.3.3
Disposable Gloves:


The waste stream for disposable gloves is governed by the nature of the
contaminant. If the gloves are contaminated with a biohazard they will need to be
autoclaved and disposed of by incineration. If the che
mical is very toxic e.g. a
carcinogen then gloves should be incinerated.

However, no gloves should enter the
non
-
hazardous (black bag) waste stream.



Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

35


9
.4 Arts Waste




Students using metal, ceramics, clay and wood have to purchase materials
themselves. Because of this, there

is generally very little waste and

as a recycling
scheme takes p
lace which allows students to re
-
use
materials

before purchasing
new
.


AV Media and Performance
waste

comes in the form of surplus photographic
chemistry
, which is poured down a sink in
to a holdin
g tank. This is pumped out 2 or 3
times
per year
. S
ilver is

removed from

the
chemicals

and its value
is taken off the
cost of collection and disposal
. It is collected by WasteCare

Ltd
.

There is also other waste from AV Media and Performance, which includes wide
format paper and photographic paper which is not
recyclable

and thus does go to
landfill
.

It should be noted that this is very minimal and the waste hierarchy is
implemented at every opportunity.

Plaster
-
of
-
Paris

is used by arts and is produced by using gypsum
, therefore classed
as hazardous
. A secure s
kip is situated behind Scott building and collected by Viridor
3 or 4 times a year. This is then processed to turn the product back into its original
form of gypsum powder.

Clay

is non
-
hazardous, but plaster is. When students work with these products,
pla
ster gets in to the clay. A large amount of clay is recycled by pulping it, and
reforming dry clay in a pug mill. If it has impurities in it, it will cause a kiln exp
losion

and so some c
lay is

collected by

Viridor

within the plaster skip
.

Metal print

on t
o paper uses spirit based inks. This means oil rags are disposed of,
as they are combustible with heat.
Spent acids cannot be re
-
used and r
oughly
10
litres

are disposed of

through PartsWash UK
. The rags are collected by
the Safety
O
fficer
.

Letter press involves a
chemical spirit

based washing of oil based inks. There is

a
contract with Parts Wash UK with
a

50 litre

container

being

collected
twice a year
.

Screen print

is water based only. Therefore water based ink is used on fabrics and
pape
r. The primary waste product is sodden paper, and this is disposed of in
the
standard way
.

As the screen print is water based any excess which cannot be re
-
used is disposed of though the drains and water course.

Royal William Yard

is an area used for fine

art. There are some spirit based
materials used by students. The majority of waste is wood, which is recycled. There
is no facility there for the safe disposal of spirit based chemicals. However, they
have
moved away from
spirit based chemicals towards wa
ter based chemicals. This
Responsibility for arts waste is by two Technical Man
agers. The
Technical
Mana
ger for
Workshops and Materials

and
the
Technical Manag
er for AV Media
and Performance
.


Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

36


includes using ‘Zest
-
it’


a mor
e environmentally friendly, non
-
flammable
biodegradable alternative

which is now common practise
.


9
.5 Catering Waste

Catering waste has not historically been recorded or monitored but improvements
have been made regarding waste in this sector

with data being recorded at time of
report being created.
Vegetable oil is recycled but some food waste comes from
events and meetings, this is not the fault of catering however as it is difficult to
predict
quantities of numbers and how hungry the client is. Recent procedures have
been put in place to reduce the amount of catering PU provides at meeting and
events wh
ich will reduce food waste. Food

waste
either
goes to landfill
or is
macerated
but improvement
s can still be made as detailed in the recommendation
section.

9
.6 University of Plymouth Students Union

(SU)

The SU building is leased by PU and therefore PU dispose of SU waste in the same
manner as any other building. The SU do however have a composter

positioned
behind their

‘urban garden’.
It is a standard 5kg vessel and can produce a bucket of
compost every 1
-
2weeks but this has not been utilised or marketed and very rarely
used

so it is advised this is moved to the PU allotment as detailed in
recomm
endation section
.

9
.7

Halls of Residence
-

University Partnerships Programme (UPP)

UPP are a separate entity to PU and therefore have different waste policies and
procedures. Their current waste contract is with Plymouth City Council and have
arranged for

mixed recycling (other than glass) to be collected from student
accommodation. Therefore, a different message is being portrayed to the largest
University stakeholder, the students, which may cause confusion on what can and
cannot be recycled on campus an
d in halls.

Changes to the signage of PU bins will
help irradiate this problem and details can be found in the recommendation section.


UPP

do have a clothing bank

situated near to Radnor halls which is collected by
Wilcox who ship them abroad, this servi
ce is available

FOC

for all campus users.

9
.8

Other Waste Streams

9
.8
.1 Nursery

The Nursery on Campus dispose of an estimated 15 bags of nappies per week
which is collected from a secure external bin by Viridor who collect and dispose of
this non
-
hazardo
us clinical waste.

Additionally the nursery will take scrap and shredded paper to use as resource for
the children.

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

37


9
.
8
.2 Planscape

Planscape are sub
-
contracted

to deal with the University grounds and hence they
dispose of green, garden waste. This is no
t recorded however as their waste is
mixed with waste from other clients and not recordable.

9
.8
.3 Contractors

External contractors working on campus are generally required to dispose of their
own waste including that arising from construction, refurbish
ment and maintenance.
All external contractors are required to either hold a Waste Carriers Licence or
demonstrate that waste is removed by a provider who holds a Waste Carriers
Licence. The disposal of waste is set out in the contract between the employer

and
contractor; no generic rules exist for this reason.

9
.8
.4 Estates

Oil and Paint are used by estates and are both classed as hazardous waste, this is
managed very effectively by E
&
FM and wastes from these sources are

negligible.

Fluorescent tubes

which are classed as hazardous waste

and light bulbs

(
non
-
hazardous
)

are disposed of in containers in

the Es
tates yard, Endsleigh Place. They
are taken by Electrical
Waste Recycling Group Ltd and are managed by

the Yard
store
-
man
of E&FM
.

9
.9

Improvements to Waste Streams
without
a Procedure in Place


Certain waste streams have been identified but as of yet no procedure is in place to
dispose of food, textiles and garden waste. At the moment they go to landfill so
certain procedures will be req
uired for them to be re
-
used, reduced or re
-
cycled
saving associated costs of collection and disposal, landfill space and associated
greenhouse gases.

Textiles currently
go to landfill

via the compactor in the WTC. Textiles come from old
uniforms generall
y from E&FM, arts waste and individual staff and students wishing
to recycle textiles. If a textile recycling bank was
procured

then unwanted textiles
could be re
-
used.

PU

generate
s

green waste

from Skardon Place
, how
ever most comes from
Planscape. It
is e
stimated t
hat E&FM

collect 50 bags

from Skardon Place

four times
a year which go to landfill. If procedures
were in place this waste

can be saved from
lanfill

and put to better use.
Recommendations have been made to save this waste
from landfill

and aid th
e sustainable food group in their production of fresh fruit and
vegetables

through the use of a composter
.



Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

38


10
.0

Glossary of Terms

CO
²

-

Carbon Dioxide

COSHH



Control of Substances Hazardous to Health. Part of the Health and Safety
executive it gives practical advice and states legislation due to hazardous materials.

CSO



Campus Service Operatives. Members of staff who collect and sort waste.

DMC



Diving

an
d Marine Centre

DPC



Document Production Centre

DTR



Desk Top Recycler.
This is a small box to be placed on a desk to be used for
paper or other recyclable items

E&FM


Estates and Facility Management

FOC



Free of Charge

FTE



Full time equivalent

LIFE



Performance improvement system to manage, measure, improve and
promote social responsibility and sustainability performance

OPS



Office of Procurement and Sustainability

PCC



Plymouth City Council

PCMD



Peninsula College of Medicine and Dentistry

Pe
ople and Planet (P&P
)


Annual ‘green’ league tables publishing the
environmental and sustainable performance of universities.

PU



Plymouth University

SU



Student Union

UPP



University Partnerships Programme

WEEE



Waste Electrical and Electrical Equipment

Virido
r


Pu’s current main waste contractor

WRAP



Waste

and
Resources

Action Programme

WTC



Waste Transfer Centre
. The area behind Babbage Building where waste is
sorted and stored.

WTN



Waste Transfer Noti
ce

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

39



11.0 Current Bin Signage


A selection of the same bin style but different messages being portrayed across
campus buildings.









Rolle

Babbage

Rolle

Smeaton

Library

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

40


Other examples of confused signage



Incorrect logo’s



Different colours for the same streams



The same colour for different streams



PU

do not have a food waste stream


Four containers for two waste streams

o

Plastic & Cans mixed

o

Paper & Card mixed






Examples of the poor state of exterior recycle stations


Rolle

Outside IVT

Rolle Square

Outside Brunel

Outside the Library

Plymouth University


Waste Management Plan

41


Examples of poor planning which has led to multiple bins on certain areas and a lack
of bins in other areas



To rectify some of the problems in Appendix A, a full bin survey will have to take
place before any of the budget is spent. It will b
e used to highlight what bins are on
c
ampus, how many bins and exactly where they are. Then plans can be put into
place to intelligently manage PU’s waste streams.

11.1 Suggested Bin Signage

Details of the proposed new signage in accordance with Waste and Resources
Action Programme (WRAP)






In between Babbage and Portland Villa’s

First Floor of Rolle

3 Bins

3 recycle stations (6 Bins)
(One out of shot)