John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of Geosciences

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Nov 9, 2013 (3 years and 9 months ago)

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John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of
Geosciences

Sharon Mosher, PhD,
Dean

Phil Bennett, PhD,

Associate Dean, Academic Affairs

http://www.jsg.utexas.edu/

General Information

Mission

As civilization enters an era of increasing challenge, it is imperative that leaders, professionals,
and citizens be well educated, competently and realistically able to address issues of local to
global scope. With regard to the origin, history, structure
, and processes of the planet Earth, and
the use and management of its resources, the John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of
Geosciences aims to provide such an education. The objective of every natural science, including
geological sciences, is to und
erstand the realm of physical nature. Geological sciences, or
geosciences, is a synthetic subject that examines the Earth through such traditional subdisciplines
as geophysics, hydrogeology, paleontology, petrology, stratigraphy, and structural geology.
Ge
oscientists also draw upon discoveries from mathematics, geography, archaeology,
engineering, and the other sciences to meld an approach that is interdisciplinary, yet uniquely
geological.

The need for well
-
educated geoscientists in industry, government, a
nd education promises a
bright future for geoscience professionals in the coming decades. As the human population
expands, it is essential to develop sufficient resources and to maintain a livable environment.
Geoscientists understand the dynamics of the E
arth and its systems

the occurrence of natural
resources and the diverse time scales of natural and human
-
induced change.

Every university seeks to enrich the education of its student body generally. Study of
geosciences enhances a liberal arts or arts and

sciences education. Geosciences uses experiments
and observations to explore origins and processes, whether of the Earth itself, of geologic
phenomena, or of the history of life. It operates in the conventional three dimensions of space
and in the fourth
dimension of deep geologic time. Both in the laboratory and in the field, it
examines the Earth on all scales, from atomic nuclei, to a hand sample of rock, to an entire
landscape, to continents and oceans, to the planet as a whole.

Financial Assistance Av
ailable through the School

Through the Geology Foundation, the Jackson School makes available to its students a number
of scholarship funds established by individuals, foundations, and industrial or research
organizations. Scholarships are awarded entirely

on the basis of academic performance and
standing. Grants, when available, may be awarded on the basis of demonstrated financial need,
without regard to grade point average. Information is available from the Undergraduate Student
Services Office. The Geol
ogy Foundation also offers a student emergency loan program, and
students may seek additional assistance through the University’s Office of Student Financial
Services.

Student Services

Academic Advising

The Undergraduate Student Services Office and faculty

members advise students in the Jackson
School, including those not seeking a degree in geological sciences and those who have not yet
selected a major.

Academic advising begins after the twelfth class day in the fall and spring semesters and after the
fou
rth class day in the summer session. Students are encouraged to meet with an adviser as early
as possible, because procrastination may prevent their timely registration.

Career Services

The Jackson School offers career planning and job placement assistance

for students. The Career
Services staff offers interview tips and can help with career planning, résumé writing, job search
techniques, and business and professional etiquette.

Career Services also helps Jackson School

graduates and students about to grad
uate seek full
-
time or part
-
time jobs and internships. The staff posts job opportunities throughout the year and
hosts recruiters who offer information sessions as well as on
-
campus interviews each fall and
spring. The Career Services office also offers ré
sumé referral for students and employers. The
Jackson School of Geosciences Career Fair, which brings students and employers together every
fall, provides another forum for geosciences students to learn about different career
opportunities.

Career services

for students who plan to teach are provided by Education Career Services in the
College of Education and by UTeach
-
Natural Sciences.

Career Services and the Undergraduate Student Services Office can help students choose
majors

and careers, find internship
s, and plan for employment or graduate study. However, the
University makes no guarantee to secure employment for each graduate.

Admission and Registration

Admission

Admission and readmission of undergraduate students to the University is the responsibility of
the director of admissions. Information about admission to the University is given in
General
I
nformation
.

Students admitted to the University with deficiencies in high school units must remove the
deficiencies as prescribed in
General Information.

Admission to the Environmental Science Program

All new freshmen and transfer students are admitted to
the University as entry
-
level
environmental science majors and later seek admission to one of the three majors offered in the
degree program by the Jackson School of Geosciences, College of Liberal Arts, and the College
of Natural Sciences.

To apply for th
e Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science Geological Sciences major in the
Jackson School of Geosciences, the student must be an entry
-
level environmental science major
who has met the following requirements:

1.

Completion of Biology 311C, Chemistry 301,

and Mathematics 408C or 408N with a
grade of at least
C
-

in each course

2.

Completion of Geological Sciences 401 or 303


with a grade of at least B
-

To be competitive for admission, the student must have a grade point average of at least 2.75 in
these four c
ourses.

Applications are evaluated after the end of each fall. Students whose applications are denied may
reapply through the supplemental admission process. Admission decisions are based on the
student’s grade point average in the basic sequence courses,
his or her University grade point
average, and other factors; these factors include, but are not limited to, the difficulty of the
student’s course load, course repetitions, and proven mathematical ability. Students should
consult advisers in the Jackson S
chool of Geosciences Undergraduate Student Services Office
for information about the application process and application deadlines.

More information about the degree program is given in
Bachelor of Science in Environmental
Science
.

Registration

General Information

gives information about registration, adding and
dropping courses,
transferring from one division of the University to another, and auditing a course. The
Course
Schedule,

registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/
, published before registration for

each semester and
summer session, contains registration instructions, advising locations, and the times, places, and
instructors of classes. The
Course Schedule

and
General Information

are published on the
registrar’s Web site,
http://registrar.utexas.edu/
.

Academic Policies and Procedures

Minimum Scholastic Requirements

The student must earn a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 in all courses taken at the
Univer
sity of Texas at Austin (including credit by examination, correspondence, and extension)
for which a grade or symbol other than
Q, W, X,

or
CR

is recorded. In addition, the student must
earn a grade point average of at least 2.00 in geological sciences cou
rses taken at the University
and counted toward the major requirement.

The student must earn a grade of at least
C
-

in each semester of each course used to fulfill any of
the requirements for the degree.

For more information about grades and the grade poin
t average, see
General Information
.

Repetition of a Course

A student may not enroll in any course in the Jackson School more than twice, even if the course
is needed to meet degree requirements, without first obtaining written consent in the
Undergraduate Student Services Office. The symbol
Q

or
W

counts as an enr
ollment unless it has
been approved by the Undergraduate Student Services Office for nonacademic reasons.

Honors

University
-
wide honors are described in
Honors

and in
General Information
.

Students who meet
the following requirements may also graduate with departmental honors.

School Honors Program

The Jackson School offers a dep
artmental honors program to its majors. Minimum requirements
for the completion of this program are

1.

A cumulative University grade point average of at least 3.00, and a grade point average in
geological sciences of at least 3.50

2.

Geological Sciences 171H, 17
2H, and 173H with a grade of at least
B
-

in each

3.

Geological Sciences 379H,
Honors Tutorial,

with a grade of at least
B
-

4.

Completion at the University of at least sixty semester hours of coursework counted
toward the degree

The statement “Special Honors in
Geological Sciences” appears on the transcript of each student
certified as having completed the honors program.

Students who wish to participate in the program should apply to the departmental honors adviser
when they have completed sixty semester hours o
f coursework, including at least twelve
semester hours of upper
-
division coursework in geological sciences.

Graduation

Special Requirements of the School

All students must fulfill the
general requirements

for graduation. Students in the Jackson School
must also fulfill the following requirements.

1.

The University requires that the student complete in residence at least sixty semester
hours
of the coursework counted toward the degree. For the Bachelor of Arts in
Geological Sciences, these sixty hours must include at least eighteen hours in geological
sciences.

2.

The University requires that at least six semester hours of advanced coursework in
the
major be completed in residence. Options I, II, and III of the BSGeoSci require at least
eighteen hours of upper
-
division coursework in geological sciences to be completed in
residence; option V requires at least twelve hours. (Option IV: Environmental

Science
and Sustainability is no longer offered.)

3.

An Air Force, Army, or Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) student who
elects the basic and/or advanced program in air force science, military science, or naval
science will not be approved for gra
duation until the student’s government contract is
completed or the student is released from the ROTC.

Applying for Graduation

An electronic degree audit is created for each student each semester; the student should view the
audit through IDA, the Universi
ty’s Interactive Degree Audit system. The degree audit tells the
student the courses he or she must take and the requirements he or she must fulfill to receive the
degree. Although the degree audit normally provides an accurate statement of requirements, t
he
student is responsible for knowing and meeting the requirements of the degree as stated in a
catalog under which he or she is eligible to graduate (see rules on
graduation under a particular
catalog
). If in doubt about any requirement, the student should seek an official ruling in the
Undergraduate Student Services Office before registering.

In the semester or summer s
ession in which the degree is to be conferred, the candidate must be
registered at the University and must file a graduation application form in the Undergraduate
Student Services Office. This should be done during the first week of classes, if possible, a
nd
certainly no later than the deadline published in the academic calendar. No degree will be
conferred unless the graduation application form has been filed on time.

Degrees and Programs

Degrees

The Jackson School offers the Bachelor of Arts in Geological Sciences, the Bachelor of Science
in Environmental Science, the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences, and, in partnership
with the Cockrell School of Engineering, the Bachelor of Science in

Geosystems Engineering
and Hydrogeology. Whichever degree they pursue, geological sciences students must take
courses in the Jackson School, the College of Natural Sciences, and the College of Liberal Arts.
These units work together to meet students’ indi
vidual needs and to ensure that they receive a
superior education.

Programs

The University and the Jackson School offer the following programs to supplement the degree
plans mentioned above.

Undergraduate Research

The University offers an opportunity for undergraduates to participate in state
-
of
-
the
-
art
research, for University credit, with eminent scientists. If qualified, the student may also earn
special departmental honors for exceptional research and may receiv
e recognition through
participation in the
Bridging Disciplines Programs
, or the annual Undergraduate Rese
arch Forum
sponsored by the College of Natural Sciences. Additional information about undergraduate
research is available from the Jackson School Undergraduate Student Services Office.

Certificate in Computational Science and Engineering

For information ab
out this transcript
-
recognized certificate, see

Certificate in Computat
ional
Science and Engineering
. The Jackson School sponsors this program along with the Cockrell
School of Engineering, the College of Liberal Arts, and the College of Natural Sciences.

U
-
Teach Natural Sciences

The Jackson School participates in UTeach
-
Natu
ral Sciences, an innovative teacher preparation
program offered by the Colleges of Natural Sciences and Education that allows students to
pursue middle grades and secondary school teacher certification within a four
-
year mathematics,
science, or computer s
cience degree program. While learning the subject matter of their majors,
students also learn how to teach. Upon completing the program, students graduate with a
bachelor’s degree and are recommended for a middle grades or secondary school teaching
certifi
cate. The UTeach
-
Natural Sciences program invites students to explore their interest in
teaching as early as the freshman year. Through courses taught by some of Texas’s most
respected secondary school math and science teachers, students learn quickly whet
her they are
suited to the profession.

A description of the UTeach
-
Natural Sciences curriculum is given in
UTeac
h
-
Natural Sciences
;
more information is available at the UTeach
-
Natural Sciences Office. In the Jackson School, the
BSGeoSci, Option V: Teaching, prepares students to seek teacher certification.

Program Assessment Activities

Students in the Jackson School
are required to participate in assessment activities related to
maintaining accreditation with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools, in addition to
their required coursework. Students are exempted from participation only in extenuating
circumst
ances and with the prior approval of the undergraduate faculty adviser and the
Undergraduate Student Services Office.

Applicability of Certain Courses

Physical Activity Courses

Physical activity (PED) courses and Kinesiology 119 may not be counted toward a

degree in the
Jackson School. However, they are counted as courses for which the student is enrolled, and the
grades are included in the grade point average.

ROTC Courses

The Departments of Air Force Science, Military Science, and Naval Science maintain R
OTC
units on campus. Information about each program is available from the chair of the department
concerned.

Nine semester hours of coursework in air force science, military science, or naval science may be
counted toward any degree in the Jackson School.
Such credit may be used only as electives or to
fulfill the writing requirement, and only by students who are commissioned by the University
ROTC program.

Correspondence and Extension Courses

Concurrent enrollment is enrollment simultaneously at the Univer
sity and at another educational
institution or in University Extension.


During a long
-
session semester students in the Jackson
School enrolled at the University are not allowed to take courses at another school or institution
or by correspondence or exten
sion at the University unless specifically approved in advance by
the Dean.


Exceptions are considered on a case by case basis after the student meets with their
academic advisor and submits a Concurrent Enrollment Petition to the Undergraduate Student
Ser
vices Office in advance.


Exceptions to this policy for math and science courses are
considered only in extremely rare circumstances.


No more than 30 percent of the semester hours
required for any degree in the Jackson School may be completed online with

by correspondence
or University Extension
.

Bible Courses

No more than twelve semester hours of Bible courses may be counted toward a degree.

Bachelor of Arts in Geological Sciences

The Bachelor of Arts in Geological Sciences (BAGeoSci) is a classical arts

and sciences degree
that gives students a great deal of flexibility in their choice of upper
-
division geological sciences
courses. Students must complete courses in the natural sciences, the social and behavioral
sciences, and the humanities. This diversi
ty of subjects provides an opportunity to learn about
basic differences in outlook among different disciplines, the ways questions are raised and
answered, and the ways the answers are validated and made relevant in practical use.

The
Bachelor of Arts in G
eological Sciences also

provides for a minor made up of four courses in
another field, including two upper
-
division courses. These choices let students combine their
interests in liberal arts and geosciences to prepare for professions such as business, jou
rnalism,
resource management, public policy, law, and medicine.

Another option for outstanding students interested in geology is the Bachelor of Arts, Plan II,
offered by the College of Liberal Arts. This broad liberal arts honors program emphasizes the
hu
manities but also permits a concentration in science that is equivalent to a major. The BA, Plan
II, is described in

Bachel
or of Arts, Plan II
.

Students who plan to become professional
geoscientists should pursue one of the BSGeoSci degree options.


A total of 120 semester hours is required. Thirty
-
six hours must be in upper
-
division courses. At
least sixty hours, including ei
ghteen hours of upper
-
division coursework, must be completed in
residence at the University; at least twenty
-
four of the last thirty hours must be completed in
residence at the University. As long as these residence rules are met, credit may be earned by
e
xamination, by extension, by correspondence (up to 30 percent of the semester hours required
for the degree), or, with the approval of the dean, by work transferred from another institution.

The coursework counted toward the degree may include no more than

thirty
-
six hours in any one
field of study in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Natural Sciences; and no more than
thirty
-
six hours in any other single college or school of the University, including the Jackson
School.

No coursework to be coun
ted toward the degree may be taken on the pass/fail basis.

All students must complete the University’s
core

curriculum
.

The specific requirements for the
Bachelor of Arts in Geological Sciences consist of prescribed work, major and minor
requirements, and electives. In addition, the student must fulfill the University
general
requirements
,

and the requirements of the Jackson School given in
special requirements of the
college
.

Prescribed Work

1.

Writing:

Two courses that carry a writing flag. Courses with a writing flag are identified
in the
Course Schedule
,
registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/
. They may be used
simultaneously to fulfill other requirements, unless otherwise specified.

2.

Foreign language:

Four semesters, or the equivalent, in a single fo
reign language. The
foreign language requirement is the attainment of a certain proficiency, rather than the
completion of a specified number of hours. Any part of the requirement may be fulfilled
by credit by examination. To achieve proficiency in a forei
gn language as rapidly as
possible, qualified students are urged to take intensive foreign language courses.
Information about these courses is available from the departments that offer them.
Courses used to fulfill the foreign language requirement must be

language courses;
literature
-
in
-
translation courses, for example, may not be counted.

3.

Social science:

Three semester hours in social science, in addition to the course counted
toward the social and behavioral sciences requirement of the core curriculum. T
he course
must be chosen from the following fields; it must be in a different field from the course
used to fulfill the core curriculum social and behavioral sciences requirement.

a.

Anthropology

b.

Economics

c.

Geography

d.

Linguistics

e.

Psychology

f.

Sociology

4.

Natural
science:

Six semester hours in natural sciences, in addition to the courses
counted toward the science and technology requirements of the core curriculum. Courses
must be chosen from the following fields; no more than three hours may be in either the
histo
ry of science or the philosophy of science.

a.

Astronomy

b.

Biology

c.

Chemistry

d.

Marine science

e.

Nutrition

f.

Physical science

g.

Physics

h.

Mathematics

i.

Computer science

j.

Experimental psychology

k.

Physical anthropology

l.

Physical geography

m.

Philosophy (courses in logic)

n.

History of

science and philosophy of science

o.

Other fields approved by the dean

5.

General culture:

Three semester hours in addition to the course counted toward the visual
and performing arts requirement of the core curriculum. Courses in the following fields
may be us
ed:

a.

Architecture

b.

Classical civilization, Greek, Latin

c.

Art history, design, ensemble, fine arts, instruments, music, studio art, theatre and
dance, visual art studies

d.

Philosophy (excluding courses in logic)

e.

Approved interdisciplinary courses including, but
not limited to, those in
programs of special concentration cutting across specific departments, schools, or
colleges. Lists of approved courses are available in the Undergraduate Student
Services Office.

The BA Major and Minor

With the exception of courses

that carry a writing flag, a course taken to fulfill the requirements
under “Prescribed Work” above may not also be counted toward fulfillment of the major and
minor requirements.

Residence Requirements for the Major

At least eighteen semester hours of co
ursework in geological sciences, including six hours of
upper
-
division coursework, must be completed in residence at the University.

Course Requirements for the Major

Geological Sciences 401 or 303, 404C or 405, 416K, 416M, 420K, and enough additional uppe
r
-
division coursework in geological sciences to make a total of thirty
-
two semester hours; six
semester hours in biology; Chemistry 301 and 302; and three semester hours in physics.

Minor

Twelve semester hours, of which at least six must be in upper
-
divisi
on coursework, in any one of
the following disciplines: anthropology, astronomy, biology, business, computer science,
chemistry, education, engineering, geography, mathematics, and physics. Other disciplines may
be chosen with submission and approval of a
petition through the Undergraduate Student
Services Office.

Electives

In addition to the core curriculum, the prescribed work, and the major and minor, the student
must complete enough elective coursework to provide the 120 semester hours required for the
degree. These 120 hours may include no more than twelve semester hours of Bible and no more
than nine hours of air force science, military science, or naval science.

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science

The Bachelor of Science in Environmental Science degree program,

offered by the College of
Liberal Arts, the College of Natural Sciences, and the Jackson School,

is designed for students
interested in an interdisciplinary scientific perspective on environm
ental and sustainability
issues, analysis, and management. The degree program provides the broad foundation in
physical, life, and social sciences needed for a career or graduate study in environmental science
and related fields such as climate change, eco
logy, and conservation. Students who complete the
program successfully will be able to assess environmental issues critically from multiple
perspectives; to perform field, laboratory, and computer analyses; and to conduct original
research. The program is
designed to prepare graduates for careers in local, state, and federal
government laboratories and nonprofit agencies, environmental consulting firms, environmental
education and outreach agencies, and universities and other research settings. The degree i
s
offered by the Jackson School with a major in geological sciences, by the College of Liberal Arts
with a major in geographical sciences, and by the College of Natural Sciences with a major in
biological sciences. The degree programs share common prescrib
ed work, but each major has its
own specific requirements. Students may earn only one Bachelor of Science in Environmental
Science degree from the University.

Students must apply for admission to the degree program after completing prerequisite
coursework.

To be competitive for admission, students should have a grade point average of at
least 2.75. More information about admission requirements is given in
Admission to the
Environmental Science Program
.

The BSEnviroSci curriculum consists of 126 semester hours of coursework. All students must
complete the University’s
core curriculum
. The specific degree requirements consist of
prescribed work and major requirements. In some cases, a course that is required

for the degree
may also be counted toward the core curriculum.

A course in one prescribed work area may not also be used to fulfill the requirements of another
prescribed work area; the only exception to this rule is that a course that fulfills another
re
quirement may also be used to fulfill the writing requirement if the course carries a writing
flag.

Prescribed Work

1.

Mathematics
: Mathematics 408C, or 408N and 408S

2.

Chemistry
: Chemistry 301 or 301H; 302 or 302H; and 204

3.

Physics
: Physics 317K and 117M, or an
other four
-
hour calculus
-
based physics sequence

4.

Biological sciences
: Biology 311C and 311D, or 315H

5.

Ecology
: Biology 373 and 373L, or Marine Science 320 and either 120L or 152T (Topic:
Marine Ecology)

6.

Geological sciences
: Geological Sciences 401 or 303,
346C, and an approved geological
sciences course in sustainability

7.

Geography
: Geography 335N

8.

Field experience
: One course in each of the following areas:

a.

Introductory field seminar: Environmental Science 311

b.

Senior field/research experience: Environmental
Science 371, Biology 377 (with
prior approval of the faculty adviser), 478T

9.

Research methods
: Environmental Science 331

10.

Environmental and sustainability themes
: One course in each of the following thematic
areas:

a.

Environmental and sustainability policy, et
hics, and history
: Geography 334,
336C, 340D, 342C, 356C, 356T (approved topics), Philosophy 325C

b.

Geographic information systems
: Geography 360G, 462K, Geological Sciences
327G

c.

Climates and oceans
: Biology 456L, Geography 333K, 356T (approved topics),
Geological Sciences 371C (approved topics), 377P, Marine Science 320, 440,
354Q, 354T, 367K

d.

Environmental economics, sustainability, and business
: Economics 304K, 330T

11.

Environmental Science 141 and 151

Marine Science 320 may not be used to satisfy both req
uirement 5 and requirement 10c.

Major Requirements

The following thirty
-
six semester hours of coursework are required; these hours must include at
least twelve hours of approved upper
-
division work in geological sciences.

1.

Geological Sciences 404C or 405, 4
16K, 416M and 420K

2.

Mathematics 408D or 408M

3.

Four semester hours of physics in one of the following second
-
semester sequences:
Physics 316 and 116L, 317L and 117N, 303L and 103N

4.

One of the following courses on climate and water: Geological Sciences 371C
(approved
topics), 376E, 476K, 476M, 376S, 377P


(The same course may not be used to satisfy
both requirement 4 of the major requirements and requirement 10 of the prescribed
work.)

5.

Nine semester hours of upper
-
division elective coursework in geological sc
iences

6.

Two courses that carry a writing flag (One of these courses must be upper
-
division.
Courses with a writing flag are identified in the
Course Schedule
,
http://registrar.utexas.edu/sch
edules/
. They may be used simultaneously to fulfill other
requirements, unless otherwise specified.)

7.

Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Special Requirements

Students must fulfill the University
-
wide
General Requirements

and the
Special Requirements

of
the Jackson School given earlier in this section. They must also earn a grade of at least
C
-

in each
mathematics and science course required for the degree, and a grade point average in these
courses of at least 2.00. More inform
ation about grades and the grade point average is given in
General Information
.

Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences

The Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences

(BSGeoSci)

serves as

a professional degree for
students planning careers as geologists, geophysicists, or teachers, as well as for those planning
to pursue graduate work in the geosciences or a profession such as law or business. Careers are
available in the petroleum and rel
ated energy industries, resource evaluation, mineral
exploration, geologic hazard monitoring, environmental control and reclamation, building
foundation evaluation, groundwater contamination studies, soil testing, regional planning,
watershed management, c
limate modeling, and college or secondary school teaching. Graduates
may also work in state or federal agencies, in universities or museums, with consulting firms, or
with service companies to the energy and mineral industries.

A plan of study for the Bach
elor of Science in Geological Sciences includes courses required by
the University and required and elective courses in geological sciences (preceded by their
prerequisite courses). Taken together, these courses make up an option, a degree plan with a
part
icular concentration or emphasis. Thus, individuals may develop intellectually challenging
yet quite different plans of study according to their personal interests and goals.

Students seeking
the Bachelor of Science in Geological Sciences degree must choos
e one of four options
--
I:
General Geology, II: Geophysics, III: Hydrogeology, V: Teaching. (Option IV: Environmental
Science and Sustainability is no longer offered.)

In addition to the prescribed work outlined below, all students must complete the Univers
ity’s
core curriculum
. In some cases, a course that is required for the BSGeoSci may also be counted
toward

the core curriculum; these courses are identified below.

Prescribed Work Common to All Options

1.

Two courses that carry a writing flag. Courses with a writing flag are identified in the
Course Schedule
,
registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/
. They may be used simultaneously to
fulfill other requirements, unless otherwise specified.



2.

Courses 506 and 507 (or the equivalent) in a single foreign language, or as much of this
coursework as required by th
e student’s score on the appropriate language placement test.
Students in the teaching option must fulfill a different foreign language requirement,
given with the other option requirements below.

For students who enter the University with fewer than two
high school units in a single
foreign language, the first two semesters in a language may not be counted toward the
total number of semester hours required for the degree.

3.

Thirty
-
six semester hours of upper
-
division coursework must be completed in residenc
e
at the University. For students in options I, II, and III, at least eighteen of these hours
must be in geological sciences; for students in option V, at least twelve hours must be in
geological sciences. (Option IV: Environmental Science and Sustainabili
ty is no longer
offered.) For all students, at least twelve of the thirty
-
six hours must be outside geological
sciences.

Option I: General Geology

1.

Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M. Mathematics 408C or 408K
also meets the mathematics
requirement of the core curriculum. Algebra courses at the
level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total number
of semester hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with fewer
than three units of hig
h school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher must take
Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.



2.

Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or Physics 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N.



3.

Chemistry 301, 302, and 204. Together, the cou
rses that meet requirements 2 and 3 also
meet parts I and II of the science and technology requirement of the core curriculum.



4.

Geological Sciences 401 or 303, 404C or 405, 416K, 416M, 420K, 426P, 428, 660
(completed in residence), and enough additional a
pproved upper
-
division coursework in
geological sciences to make a total of fifty
-
two semester hours.



5.

Twelve semester hours chosen from a list of approved courses in aerospace engineering,
architectural engineering, astronomy, biology, chemical engineeri
ng, chemistry, civil
engineering, computer science, engineering mechanics, geography, marine science,
mathematics, mechanical engineering, petroleum and geosystems engineering, and
physics. Geological Sciences 325K may also be counted toward requirement 5.

6.

This requirement is intended to function as an unspecified minor.
Courses used to fulfill the

7.

requirement do not have to be taken in the same field of study, but
they should form a self
-
reinforcing

8.

sequence related to geological sciences. Courses not on

the list of
approved courses will be

9.

considered upon petition to the undergraduate faculty adviser.

10.


11.

Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.



Option II: Geophysics

1.

Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M; 427K; and

427L. Mathematics
408C or 408K also meets the mathematics requirement of the core curriculum. Algebra
courses at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the
total number of semester hours required for the degree. Students
who enter the University
with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of Algebra I or higher
must take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.



2.

Physics 301, 101L, 315, 115L, 316, and 116L.



3.

Chemistry 301
and 302. Together, the courses that meet requirements 2 and 3 also meet
parts I and II of the science and technology requirement of the core curriculum.



4.

Geological Sciences 325J,
Programming in FORTRAN and MATLAB.

5.

Geological Sciences 401 or 303, 416K, 41
6M, 420K, 325K, 428, 354, 465K, 366M, six
hours in approved field/research courses, and three additional hours of approved upper
-
division coursework in geological sciences. The field/research requirement may be met
by several courses, including Geological
Sciences 348K, 660, 376L, 679G, and approved
off
-
campus geophysics field courses.



6.

Six semester hours of technical electives chosen from a list of
approved coursework in mathematics,

7.

physics, computer science, engineering, and related fields. A list of

approved courses is available in

8.

the undergraduate advising office. Technical elective credit for
courses not on the approved list may

9.

be requested by petition. These courses will be added to the list after
geophysics faculty review and

10.

approval.


11.



12.


13.

Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.



Option III: Hydrogeology

1.

Mathematics 408C and 408D, or 408K, 408L, and 408M; and 427K. Mathematics 408C
or 408K also meets the mathematics requirement of the core curriculum.
Algebra courses
at the level of Mathematics 301 or the equivalent may not be counted toward the total
number of semester hours required for the degree. Students who enter the University with
fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of

Algebra I or higher must
take Mathematics 301 without degree credit to remove their deficiency.



2.

Physics 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or Physics 303K, 103M, 303L, and 103N.



3.

Chemistry 301, 302, and 204.



4.

Biology 311C. Together, the courses that meet requi
rements 2 and 3 also meet parts I and
II of the science and technology requirement of the core curriculum; Biology 311C may
also be used to meet part II of that requirement.



5.

The following coursework in geological sciences:

a.

Geological Sciences 401 or 303,

416K, 416M, 420K, 428, 476K, 476M, and 376S

b.

Six semester hours of field experience which must include Geological Sciences
376L and three additional hours selected from one of the following:


Geological
Sciences 660A, 660B, or 679J, or other appropriate co
urse approved in advance
by the Undergraduate Adviser

c.

Three upper
-
division semester hours in hydrogeology or a related area, chosen
from Geological Sciences 325K, 376E, 377P, 327G, or other approved course

d.

Nine additional semester hours of upper
-
division c
ourse
-
work in geological
sciences


6.

Six semester hours chosen from a list of approved courses in biology, chemistry, civil
engineering, geography, marine science, mathematics, mechanical engineering, and
petroleum and geosystems engineering.

7.

This requireme
nt is intended to function as an unspecified minor.
Courses used to fulfill the

8.

requirement do not have to be taken in the same field of study, but
they should form a self
-
reinforcing

9.

sequence related to geological sciences. Courses not on the list of
ap
proved courses will be

10.

considered upon petition to the undergraduate faculty adviser.

11.


12.

Enough additional coursework to make a total of 126 semester hours.

Option V: Teaching

This option is designed to fulfill the course requirements for composite science
certification as a
middle grades or secondary school teacher in Texas with geological sciences as the primary
teaching field; composite certification requires twenty
-
four semester hours of coursework in the
primary field, twelve hours in a second field, an
d six hours each in two additional fields.

Completion of the required courses does not guarantee teacher certification. To graduate and be
recommended for certification, the student must have a cumulative University grade point
average of at least 2.50 and

must pass the final teaching portfolio review. Information about the
portfolio review and additional certification requirements is available from the UTeach
-
Natural
Sciences academic adviser.

1.

In place of the foreign language requirement above, either two
years of high school
coursework in a single foreign language or course 506 (or the equivalent) in a foreign
language.



2.

Mathematics 408C. This course also meets the mathematics requirement of the core
curriculum. Algebra courses at the level of Mathematics

301 or the equivalent may not be
counted toward the total number of semester hours required for the degree. Students who
enter the University with fewer than three units of high school mathematics at the level of
Algebra I or higher must take Mathematics
301 without degree credit to remove their
deficiency.



3.

History 329U or Philosophy 329U.



4.

Geological Sciences 401 or 303, 404C or 405, 416K, 416M, 420K or 320L, 335, and
enough additional upper
-
division coursework in geological sciences to make a total of

at
least twenty
-
eight semester hours.



5.

To meet the requirements of composite certification, the student must complete the
following courses. In meeting this requirement, the student also fulfills parts I and II of
the science and technology requirement o
f the core curriculum.

a.

Biology 311C and 311D

b.

Chemistry 301 and 302

c.

Physics 302K, 102M, 302L, and 102N; or 301, 101L, 316, and 116L; or an
equivalent sequence

d.

Enough additional approved coursework in biology, chemistry, or physics to
provide the required tw
elve semester hours in a second field

6.

Biology 337 (Topic 2:
Research Methods
:
UTeach
), Chemistry 368 (Topic 1:
Research
Methods: UTeach
), or Physics 341 (Topic 7:
Research Methods: UTeach
).



7.

Astronomy 303, 307, or 367M; and Marine Science 307.



8.

Eighteen
semester hours of professional development coursework, with a grade of at least
C

in each course: Curriculum and Instruction 650S, UTeach
-
Natural Sciences 101, 110,
350, 355, 360,

170.



9.

For students seeking middle grades certification, the following cours
ework with a grade
of at least
C

in each course: Educational Psychology 363M (Topic 3:
Adolescent
Development
), or Psychology 301 and 304; and Curriculum and Instruction 339E.



10.

Enough additional coursework to make a total of 128 semester hours.

Bachelor o
f Science in Geosystems
Engineering and Hydrogeology

Geosystems engineers and hydrogeologists are concerned with the development and use of
engineering approaches in the management of natural resources from the Earth’s surface and
subsurface, environmental

restoration of subsurface sites, and other processes related to the earth
sciences. This degree program, offered in partnership by the Cockrell School of Engineering and
the Jackson School, is designed to teach students the geological and engineering prin
ciples
needed to solve subsurface resource development and environmental problems. The curriculum
includes a fundamental sequence of engineering and geological sciences courses in such areas as
multiphase fluid flow, physical and chemical hydrology, heat a
nd mass transfer, field methods,
and engineering design. This interdisciplinary systems approach, combining engineering and
geological sciences, is increasingly required to address complex real
-
world problems such as
characterization and remediation of aqu
ifers. The degree program is designed to prepare
graduates for employment with environmental, water resource management, and energy
companies in addition to many government agencies. Better
-
qualified graduates of the program
may pursue graduate study in su
bsurface environmental engineering, petroleum engineering,
geology, and related fields.

The objective of the degree program is to prepare graduates for successful careers in subsurface
environmental engineering (including carbon dioxide sequestration), oil and gas production and
services, and similar fields. Graduates are expected to understa
nd the fundamental principles of
science and engineering behind the technology of geosystems engineering and hydrogeology, so
that their education will not become outdated and so that they will be capable of self
-
instruction
after graduation. They should a
lso be prepared to serve society by applying the ideals of ethical
behavior, professionalism, and environmentally responsible stewardship of natural resources.

Containing the following elements, the technical curriculum provides both breadth and depth in a

range of topics:



A combination of college
-
level mathematics and basic sciences (some with experimental
work) that includes mathematics through differential equations, physics, chemistry, and
geology



Basic engineering and geologic topics that develop a wor
king knowledge of fluid
mechanics, strength of materials, transport phenomena, material properties, phase
behavior, and thermodynamics



Engineering and geosciences topics that develop competence in characterization and
evaluation of subsurface geological fo
rmations and their resources using geoscientific
and engineering methods, including field methods; design and analysis of systems for
producing, injecting, and handling fluids; application of hydrogeologic and reservoir
engineering principles and practices

for water and energy resource development and
management; contamination evaluation and remediation methods for hydrologic
resources; and use of project economics and resource valuation methods for design and
decision making under conditions of risk and un
certainty



A major capstone design experience that prepares students for engineering and
hydrogeologic practice, based on the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier coursework
and incorporating engineering and geological standards and realistic constraint
s



A general education component that complements the technical content of the curriculum

Curriculum

Course requirements are divided into three categories: basic sequence courses, major sequence
courses, and other required courses. In addition, each student

must complete the University’s
core curriculum
. In some cases, a course required as part of the basic sequence may also be
counted toward the core curriculum; these courses are identified below. To ensure that courses
used to fulfill the social and behavioral sciences and visual and performing arts re
quirements of
the core curriculum also meet ABET criteria, students should follow the guidance given in
ABET Criteria
.

In the proce
ss of fulfilling the following degree requirements, students must also complete a
course that carries an independent inquiry flag, a course that carries a quantitative reasoning flag,
and two courses that carry a writing flag. The independent inquiry flag,

the quantitative
reasoning flag, and one writing flag are provided by courses specifically required for the degree;
these courses are identified below. Students are advised to fulfill the second writing flag
requirement with a course that meets another re
quirement of the core curriculum, such as the
first
-
year signature course. Courses that may be used to fulfill flag requirements are identified in
the
Course Schedule
,
registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/
.
More information about flags is given
at

Skills and Experiences Flags
.

Enrollment in major sequen
ce courses is restricted to students who have received credit for all of
the basic sequence courses and have been admitted to the major sequence. Requirements for
admission to a major sequence are given in
Admission to a Major Sequence
. Enrollment in other
required courses is not restricted by completion of the basic sequence.

Courses used to fulfill nontechnical el
ective requirements must be approved by the petroleum
and geosystems engineering faculty and the geological sciences faculty before the student
registers for them.

Students must fulfill the
Foreign Language Requirement
. They must also remove any admission
deficiencies in mathematics as described in
General Information
.
A suggested arrangement of
courses by semester is given in
Suggested Arrangement of Courses
.

Courses

Sem
Hrs

Basic Sequence Courses





Chemistry 301, 302 (Chemistry 301 may be used to fulfill part II of the science
and technology requirement of the core curriculum.)

6



Engineering
Mechanics 306, 319

6



Geological Sciences 303, 416K, 416M

11



Mathematics 408C, 408D, 427K (Mathematics 408C may be used to fulfill the
mathematics requirement of the core curriculum; Mathematics 408C and 427K
each carry a quantitative reasoning flag.)

12



Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering 310, 312, 322K, 333T (Petroleum and
Geosystems Engineering 333T carries a writing flag.)

12



Physics 303K, 303L, 103M, 103N (Physics 303K and 303L may be used to fulfill
part I of the science and technology requirement

of the core curriculum; both
courses carry a quantitative reasoning flag.)

8



Rhetoric and Writing 306 (May be counted toward the English composition
requirement of the core curriculum.)

3



Undergraduate Studies 302 or 303 (May be used to fulfill the
first
-
year signature
course requirement of the core curriculum; some sections carry a writing flag.)

3



Total
61

Major Sequence Courses





Geological Sciences 420K, 428, 468K, 476K, 376L, 376S

22



Petroleum and Geosystems

Engineering 323K, 323L, 323M, 424, 326, 365, 368,
373L

25



Civil Engineering 357

3



Total
50

Remaining Core Curriculum Courses





English 316K (humanities)

3



American and Texas government

6



American history

6



Visual and performing arts

3



Social and

behavioral sciences

3



Total
21

Minimum required 132

Courses

The faculty has approval to offer the following courses in the academic years 2012

2013 and
2013

2014; however, not all courses are taught each semester or summer session. Students
should consult the
Course Schedule,


registrar.utexas.edu/schedules/
, to determine which courses
and topics will be offered during a particular semester or summer session. The
Course Schedule

may also reflect changes made to the course inventory after the publication of this catalog.

A full explanation of course numbers is given in
General Information
.

In brief, the first digit
of a
course number indicates the semester hour value of the course. The second and third digits
indicate the rank of the course: if they are 01 through 19, the course is of lower
-
division rank; if
20 through 79, of upper
-
division rank; if 80 through 99, of

graduate rank.

The information in parentheses after a course number is the Texas Common Course Numbering
(TCCN) designation. Only TCCN designations that are exact semester
-
hour equivalents of
University courses are listed here. Additional TCCN information

is given in
Appendix A
.

John A. and Katherine G. Jackson School of
Geosciences Faculty