CAMPUS EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN

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Nov 9, 2013 (3 years and 7 months ago)

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CAMPUS

EMERGENCY

MANAGEMENT PLAN


Last updated June 3, 2013


2





3


CAMPUS

EMERG
EN
CY

M
ANAGEMENT

PLAN

................................
................................
................................
................................
.........

5

Introduction

5

Purpose

o
f

the

P
l
an

5


Emerge
n
cy”

Defined

5

Administrative

Policy

o
n

C
a
mpus

Emergencies

5

Campus

Emer
g
e
ncy

Ma
nagement

Plan Overview

6

Department

Emergency

Operations

Plans

6

Essential Non

Academic Department Emergency Operation Plans

7

PREPARATION

FOR

AN

EMERGENCY

................................
................................
................................
................................
.....................

8

Em
e
rgency

Resource

Team

8

ERT Composition

8

ERT Planning Activities

8

National

Inc
i
dent

M
a
nagement

System

8

COLLABORATION

AND

COOPERATION

WITH

EMERGENCY

MANAGEMENT

PARTNERS

................................
................................
......

10

First Responders

10

The Mahoning County Emergency Management Agency

10

Other Emergency Management Partners

10

MITIGATION

OF

POTENTIAL

EMERGENCIES

................................
................................
................................
................................
........

11

Interpersonal

Violence

Threats

11

YSU Police

11

The Office of Student Affairs

11

The Student Threat Assessment Team (STAT)

11

RESPONSE

TO

AN

EMERGENCY

................................
................................
................................
................................
............................

13

Reporting an Emergency

13

The Youngstown Campus Emergency Response Procedure

13

Activating the Emergency Response Procedure

13

Executive Officer Response

14

Assembling the Emergency Resource Team

14

Implementation of Department Level Plans

14

Emergency Notification

14

Campus Security Act (“Clery Act”) Notification

15

INCIDENT

COMMAND

SYSTEM

................................
................................
................................
................................
............................

16

Incident Action Plan

16

Incident Command Post

16

Emergency Operations Center

16

CAMPUS

EVACUATION

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
........

18

Cooperation and Mutual Assistance

18

Youngstown Campus Evacuation Plan

18

Building Evacuation

19

Ending Emergency Operations

20

RECOVERING

FROM

AN

EMERGENCY

................................
................................
................................
................................
..................

21

Emergency Recovery Team

21

Conclusion of the Recovery Phase

21

Training and Public A
wareness

21

Exercises

22

Public Awareness and Education

22

4


GLOSSARY

................................
................................
................................
................................
................................
............................

23



5


CAMPUS EMERG
EN
CY

M
ANAGEMENT PLAN

Introduction

The

Cam
p
us

Emergency

Mana
g
ement

Plan (CEMP) reflects

the uniqueness

of

each

cam
p
us

location
while conforming

t
o the essential

common

elements

set forth in

the
Guidebook

Policy number

4018.01
on

Campus

Emergencies.

These

p
lans

form

the
collecti
v
e instituti
o
n
a
l strategy
t
o prepare the University’s

two

campus

sys
t
em

to
respond effectively

and

efficiently during and

after a major

emergency.


The

CEMP provides

the individu
a
l

strategy, through sp
e
cific information

and

suggestions,

for

students,

faculty, staff

and

others

to assist

them in preparing
f
or

and

surviving

emergencies.

Together, they provide

an important means to protect
t
h
e
University’s

single most

important asset

during ti
m
es

of

serious

crisis,

its people.


Purpose

o
f

the

P
l
an

The

Purpose of

the CEMP is

to maximize

human

safety

and

survival,

minimize

danger,
preserve

and

protect property and

critical infrastructure, provide

for

responsible

communications

with the

University Community

and

the public

during and

after an
emergency, and

r
e
store

normal activities.

The CEMP provi
d
es

a template for

the University,
o
n

the

department

level,

to adapt

quickly and

redirect

its immedi
a
te

efforts

under

emergency conditi
o
ns.


Emerge
n
cy


Defined

A
n

Emergency

is

any

event or

conditi
o
n

th
a
t presents

an imminent

risk of

death,
serious

injury or

illn
e
ss

to the University Community,

suspension

or

significant
disruption

of

university operations,

significant physical

or

environmental

damage,

or
significant

threat to
th
e University’s

financial

well

being.


Rather th
a
n establish
i
ng rigid

parameters

f
o
r

qualifying an event

as

an eme
r
gency,

this
definition

i
s

intended

to emphasize

the actual and

pot
e
ntial catastrophic

effect, the
imminent

threat, and

seriousness

inherent
t
o

emergencies.

Other events

may

produce
crises

or

harmful

e
ffe
c
ts

but an emergency is

distingui
s
hed

by the

severity of

the threat
and

its effects

as

well as

the on

goi
n
g

threat

posed

to the University Commu
n
ity.

Administrative

Policy

o
n

C
a
mpus

Emergencies

It is

the p
ol
icy

of

the University to

prepare for

and

effec
t
ively respond

to emergencies
and

other
c
ondit
i
ons

t
h
at present

a serious

threat to the

university community.

This

is
accomplished

by the following elements

included

in each

Campus

Emergency
Management Plan:



The

emer
g
ency

management authority of

th
e University President as defined in
guidebook policy 4018.01.



A

common

Goal and

Purpose



The

Depa
rt
ment

Emer
g
ency

Operations
Plan



The

Emer
g
ency

Resource

Te
a
m



The

coordinating

r
ole

of

the YSU Police Department

6




Use

of

ava
i
lable

university

wide

processes

t
o mitigate

potential threats posed

by individuals



Collaboration with local, state and federal

emergency partners



Adoption

o
f

the

Nati
o
nal Inc
i
dent

Management System



Effective

e
m
ergency

communica
t
ions

and

notification


Campus

Emer
g
e
ncy

Ma
nagement

Plan Overview

The

primary focus

of

the CEMP is

on

t
h
e responsibilities,

processes,

and

activities
necessary

for

the University, as

an institution, to
m
anage

an
eme
rgency

and

its effects.

The

CEMP

at the

Youngstown

campus

and the Southwoods campus are specific for
each location in the scope

of their emergency management responsibiliti
e
s,

the size

of

their staff,

and

the a
v
ailability of

other university support resources

read
i
ly

at hand

i
n
times

of

crisis.



The

Four Phases

of

Emergency

Management illustrate

that the functions

and
responsibilities

associated

with
eme
rgency

managem
e
nt

are on

goi
n
g

and

extend
beyond the

actual response

to
an

emergency. Successful

and

effective emergency
managem
e
nt

begins

before an emergency occurs,

prevents it if possible,

and

continues
after an emer
g
ency.

The

Four Phases

are:



Preparation



Mitigat
i
on



Response



Recovery


The

Preparedness

Phase

involves

the
activit
i
es

undertaken

to pro
v
ide

the University
with the operational c
a
pability

to

effectively

respond

to

an emergency before

it
occurs.


The

Mitig
a
tion Phase

involves

activities that

may

either prevent an

emergency from
occurring

or

reduce

the campus’

vulnerability in ways

that minimize

the ad
v
erse

effects of

an eme
r
gency


The

Resp
o
nse

Phase

involves

recognition that an emergency is

either imminent

or occurring

and

the i
m
mediate

action

taken

t
o save

lives

and

prote
c
t property.


The

Recov
e
ry

Phase

involves

activities taken

to restore

the campus

to normal
c
y

after
actual emergency conditions

ha
v
e

ended.

This

Phase

may

be short

term

with the
prompt restoration

of

critical

services,

support systems,

research,

and

classroom
activity.
O
ther conditions

may

require long

term activities designed

to recover

costs
and

fully restore

infrastructure syste
m
s

to pre

emerge
n
cy

conditi
o
ns.


Department

Emergency

Operations

Plans

The

Department Emergency

Op
e
rations

Pla
n

is

the internal, depa
r
tment

level

plan

th
a
t
prescribes

th
e changes

in the functional responsibilities

and

operations

of

a
department during an
em
ergency.

Each

non

academic

d
epartment

is

expected to
develop, maintain,
a
nd

periodi
c
ally

update

a Department Emergency

Operations

7


Plan.

Each academic

d
ean

shall

determine

those

academic

departments

which

must

have

such

a plan. The

purpose

of

this plan is

to give cla
r
ification

and

guidance,

with
some

degree of predictability, to depa
r
tment

employees

and

t
o coordinate

activities in
times

of

crisis. This

plan

should

minimally

include:



The

succession

of

authority which

identifies

positions

i
n charge in
absence

of

the chair

or

director



The

transition from

normal

to emergency operation for

those
departments

reasonably expected to remain

operational

during an
emergency



A
n

emergency contact

list of

ess
e
ntial

employees



The

process

for

protecting informational,

educational

o
r

physical assets



The

protection and

continuity

of

critical

research



The

identification of

individual

r
oles

and

responsibilities

relating

to
an
emergency


While some

academic

and

supp
o
rt

departments

may

curtail, or

suspend

operations
during an
em
ergency,

others

may

be required

to continue their operations

and

adapt
according
l
y.

Therefore,

some

Department Plans

may

be quite abbreviated while
othe
r
s are extensive and

quite detailed.

Essential Non

A捡摥浩挠c数e牴m敮e Em敲来湣n 佰敲Oti潮oPl慮a

Certain Youngstown State University

departments

have

be
e
n specifically

identifi
e
d

as having

direct roles

and

responsibilities

that are essential

during an
em
ergency.

A
t an operational level,

they

provide

for

safety, health, and

h
o
using

needs,

protect
the critical infrastructure of

the ca
m
pus,

facilitate communication,

and

deli
v
er

other
essential services.

These

departments

are:



YSU Police



Facilities
Maintenance



Student Health Services



Housing and Residence Life



Marketing and Communications



University Dining Services



Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety



Information Technology Services


Due

to the sensitive

nature of

D
e
partme
n
t

Emergency
Operation

Plans

and

the
im
pa
c
t

they

have

on

safety and

security, they may

be considered

confidential

and

will be
distributed to parties

deemed

a
p
propriate by the depa
r
tment

head.


The

YSU Police Department provides

assistance

to departments

to ensure

that
their
emergency plans

meet

the objectives of

the Youngstown

State University

CEMP.





8


PREPARATION FOR AN EMERGENCY

Em
e
rgency

Resource

Team

The

Emer
g
ency

Resource

Te
a
m

(ER
T
)

is

a
g
roup

of

university officials

with
responsibilities

invol
v
ing

the Pr
e
paration
an
d

Response

Phases

of

emergency
managem
e
nt.

The

ERT

is

a key factor

in formulating, and

leading the campus

response

to an emergency.

ERT Composition

The

following university officials

comprise

the Youngstown Campus

ERT:



Chief, YSU Police



Executive Director,

Facilities



Director, Facilities



Provost



Director,

Marketing and Communica
t
ions



VP, Student Affairs



Director,

Housing and Residence



Director,

Student Health Services



V.P. for

Finance

and

Administration



Director, Environmental and Occupat
ional Health and Safety



Information Technology Services representative

ERT Planning Activities

The

ERT,

i
n conjunction

with
t
h
e

YSU Police Department, coordinates

the emergency
plann
i
ng
a
ctivities

for

the Youngstown and Southwoods
C
a
m
p
us.
Planning

a
ctivities

in
c
lude:



Meet

at least once

per semester

to

discuss

issues

and

facilitate plann
i
ng.



Make

recommendations

to the
Chief of YSU Police

for changes

to

the
CEMP or
University Guidebook Policy
.



Develop

and

maintain

effective relationships

with safety, health
and

emergency
management partners external to
t
h
e Campus.



Promote

public awareness

am
o
ng

students,

faculty
an
d

staff.

National

Inc
i
dent

M
a
nagement

System

The CEMP adopts the National Incident Based Management System (NIMS) for
emergency

management. NIMS

is

a comprehensive, nationw
i
de

approach

t
o
incident

managem
e
nt

that

is

applicable to all major emergencies.

It provi
d
es

a
consistent

nati
on
wide

template to enable all government, private

sector,

and

no
n

governmental

organizations

to

work

together during

an emergency as

well as

other large incidents

and

events.

Because

o
f

the necessity

to operate seamlessly

with external

emergency response

and

management partners, the Youngstown State

Plan adopts

the NIMS

system

for

emergency management.
University police

officers

and

dispatchers

are trained, exercised

and

certified

by the Federal Emergency

Management Agency (FEMA),

i
n use

of

NIMS.

The

Emergency

Response Team

9


members

receive

awareness

level

NIMS

training

and

can

fu
nction

comfortably in the

NIMS

e
nviron
men
t.


The

National Incident

Management System

in its entirety

is

rather

complicated

and
provides

considerable

detail, necessarily

so,

in prescribing the structures,

p
r
ocesses,

a
n
d responsibilities

necessary

for

eff
e
ctive

eme
r
gency

management.




10


COLLABORATION AND COOPERATION WITH
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PARTNERS

First Responders

A
t the onset

of

an emergency, first responders

(police,

firefighters, and

emergency
medical

technicians)

ar
e likely to

be the first “emergency managers”

on

the scene.

Their immediate

objectives

ar
e to protect life and

assess

the nature and

scope

of

the
threat posed

by the emergency. Their

initial response

represents

the beginn
i
ng of a
continuing flow

of

people, equipment and

supplies

necessary

to protect persons

and

p
r
operty from the harmful

effects

of

th
e emergency. This

flow,

or

mobilizati
o
n,
continues

until the challenges

presented

by the emergency are met

and

remain

until

the emergency has ended.


Youngstown State University

has

access

to local, state, and federal
e
m
ergency

resources. This

access

co
m
es

with the respon
s
ibility

to

plan, coordinate

and

collaborate in the spirit of cooperation

with
t
h
e larger eme
r
gency

management
community.

Doing so facilitates the response,

reduces

c
onfusion

and

conflict

and

ultimately saves

lives.

The Mahoning County Emergency Management Agency

This

agency serves

as

the single point of

contact

through

which

most

emergency
and support resources

are

summoned

and

coordinated.

Effective

planning requires
building and

maintaining
relati
on
ships

with

the Mahoning

County Emergency

Man
a
gement

Agency.

Other Emergency Management Partners

In

addition

to the Emergency

M
a
nagement

Agency, a host

of

other emerge
n
cy
managem
e
nt

and

support organizations

are

available to render

assistance

in t
i
mes

of
emergency. These

include:



Various

p
o
lice

agencies

at the lo
c
al,

state and

federal

level



Local

area fire departments



The

Red

C
r
oss



The

Mahoning County Health Department



Saint Elizabeth
Health Center



Other support and

service

agencies



11


MITIGATION

OF

POTENTIAL

EMERGENCIES

The

Mitig
a
tion Phase

of

emerge
n
cy

management is

on

going

a
nd may

occur

before,
during or

af
ter an emergency occurs.

The

p
urpose

of

mitigation

is

to prevent potential
emergencies

from

occurring,

reduce

the probability of

their occurr
e
nce,

and

to

lessen
the harmful

effects

of

emergencies

if they do

occur.

All

persons

share

in the
responsibility for

mit
i
gation by reporting

hazardous

conditi
o
ns,

potentially dangerous
persons

and

other conditions

which,

if left unchecked,

may

develop

into
e
m
ergencies.

Interpersonal

Violence

Threats

Violence

ca
n

have

a d
e
vastating

a
nd

lasting

effect on

the University. Often, violent
acts are preceded

by threats and

other

indicators

which,

if acted

upon, can

prevent

them
from

occu
r
ring.

Wh
e
n such

indicators

are observed,

p
o
t
e
nt
ial

violence

can

be
prevented by referring the matter to the appropriate university office

so

that potential
violence

may

be prevented. Below

are some

campus

r
e
sources

available for

such
referrals:

YSU Police

A
n

incident

or

situation
in whi
c
h

a person

displays

actual or

potentially viol
en
t
behavior should

be immediate
l
y

reported

to the po
l
ice.

Doing so

ensures

the prompt
interventi
o
n by office
r
s

trained
a
nd

equipped to deal

w
ith pot
e
nti
a
lly violent

persons.
When

the
r
e is

doubt regarding
t
h
e actual potential for

violence,

it

is

both prudent
and necessary

to call

the police.

The Office of Student Affairs

The

Office

of

Student Affairs

has

the authority and

r
esponsibility for

regulating
t
h
e
behavior of

students

and

visitors

as

provided

in the University Policy

Register and
serves

a dual

role

in
th
e mitigati
o
n of

potent
i
al emergencies.

The

p
rimary role

is

to
provide

due

process

for

students

alleged to

have

violated

the Regulations for

Student
Behavior.

Among

these are stu
d
ents

who

have

comm
i
tted

violent

acts

and

students
who

have

engaged in

behavior that presents

a risk to the University Commu
n
ity.

The
secondary

role

is

to p
r
ovide

due

process

to non

students

who

are denied

access

to
university property
a
nd

facilities

and

are,
thus, persona

non

grata.

Non

students

who
have

engaged in behavior considered

disruptive

or

p
o
tentially

threatening
ar
e
referred for

this purpose.


Faculty, staff and

students

may

refer stude
n
ts

to this o
f
fice.

The Student Threat Assessment Team (STAT)

The

STAT

is

a group of

university officials

who

gat
h
er every two weeks to share
information,

discuss

incidents

and

events,

and

provide

expertise and

the unique
perspectives

of

their respective

professions

and

disciplines

to solve

behavioral
problems.

Team

members

share

common

responsibilities

for

dealing directly

with
crises

and

behavioral problems

of

students.


12


University faculty and

administrators

experiencing similar

behaviors

by stud
e
nts

are
encouraged

to discuss

the matter with the

Team.

Though

not a
decision

making
body, the Team

can

present

valuable options

for

ac
tion.



13


RESPONSE

TO

AN

EMERGENCY

Reporting an Emergency

When

an
eme
rgency

occurs,

or

i
s

imminent,

the
YSU Police Department

m
u
st

be
contacted

as

soon
as

possible.

This

single point of

c
ontact

faci
l
itates

all types of

emergency response

for all types of

emergencies.




Dialing 911 is the preferred method of reporting an emergency.


A

person

reporting
a
n

emergency can

antici
p
ate being asked

for

details

about the
incident

the
y may

or

may

not
h
a
ve

as

well as

personal

i
dentificati
o
n

information

such
as

full name,

address,

etc. Also,

the caller

may

be asked

to ho
l
d

for

a brief period

while the dispat
c
her

advises

officers

of

the situation, dispatches

them to the scene,

and updates

them with
information

a
s

the caller

provides

it.


YSU Police

initiat
e
s

an appropriate emergency response.

For incidents

of

sufficient
magnitude or

severity, YSU Police

may activate the CEMP

at the dire
c
tion

of

the

Chief of YSU Police or his designee.

The Youngstown
Campus Emergency Response Procedure

The

University notifi
e
s

students,

faculty, staff and

the public concerning

all major
emergencies,

as

well
a
s

other conditions,

t
h
a
t present a potential

threat to the public.
This notificati
o
n

is

communicated

th
r
ough

various

media

an
d

is

made

as

soon

as

sufficient reliable information

becomes

available.


The

purpose

of

notification is

t
w
o
-
fold.

The

first is

to quickly noti
f
y persons

of
threatening

conditi
o
ns

so

that th
e
y may

make

informed

decisions

concerning

t
h
eir
safety and

the safety of

others.

The

second

is

to communicate

specific

instructions,

or suggestions,

to assist

them in responding

to

the threat.

It is

recognized

that

i
n
order

to avoid

any

unnecessa
r
y

delay, initial infor
m
ation

conc
e
rning

t
h
e threat may

be incomplete

or,

at times,

erroneous.

The

University strives

to ensure

that
emergency notificati
o
n

is

made

r
e
sponsibly
a
nd

accurately, however,

notifica
t
ion

will

not

be delayed

on

this account.

Activating the Emergency Response Procedure

Merely

qualifying an
e
v
e
nt

as

an

“emergency” does

not

provide

sufficient

cause

to activate the

emergency response

plan.

Other factors

are considered

bef
o
re a
decision

of

whether or

not to act
i
vate the response

plan

is

made.

A

ser
i
ous
automobile accident

or

a
person

i
n cardiac

arrest would

certainly

qualify as
emergencies

but not require activation. Similarly,

a technological

eme
rgency

may
require employing only

a particular element of

the plan,

such

as

emergency
n
o
tification.


The

Chief of Police decides

whether or

not to

activate the

emergency response plan.

Once initi
a
ted, the Chief of Police or his designee

briefs

the University President

and

14


t
h
e Vice President

for

Finance

and

Administration

o
n

the activation and

the

circumst
a
nces giving rise

to it.

Executive Officer Response

Executive

officers

may

be asked

to report to

the Tod Hall Conference

Room

up
o
n
learning of

the response

procedure

activation. The

University President

may

convene

a cabinet meeting after the onset

of

an emergency at

which

time
attendees are
thoroughly briefed on

the status of

the emergency. Divisional

responsibilities

as

they
relate to
t
h
e emergency as

well as

urgent matters requiring immediate

attention

are
discussed.

Assembling the Emergency Resource Team

The

ERT

members

fo
r
m

the core

group of

campus

employees

immediately

assembled and

collectively

charged

with assisting

in

pr
o
viding

necessary

res
o
urces

to
the Incident Command

System.

Unless

othe
r
wise

engaged in emergency operations,

members

may be requested

to assist

at the
Emergency

Op
e
rations

Center.

Implementation of Department Level Plans

Department Plans

are implemented

at the direction

of

t
h
e Deans

or

Directors.

Information from

direct

observation, campus

advisories,

mass

email

and

other

sources

are

used

in this
decision.

The

na
t
ure and

scope

of

an emergency and

its effects

on

the
c
a
m
p
us
population, or

portion

thereof, will help
i
n
d
etermining the departments

needed

for support functions

du
r
ing

an emergency.

Emergency Notification

Emergency

notificati
o
ns

are most

likely to
b
e disseminated

thro
u
gh the alert

monitors in campus

buildings and

on

campus

grounds.

It is

imperative to

broadcast

emergency notificati
on
s

early in
t
h
e crisis

phase

of

an emergency in order

to

alert
the public to the dangers

associated

with that

event.


Public notification of

eme
rgencies

and

other

conditi
o
ns

which

present an ongoing
threat to the university community

is

made

through one

or

more

of

the following

media:



Outdoor

sirens
,
speakers, and marquees (digital signage)



Indoor

alert systems



Text mess
a
ging



Mass

email



University website



Print and

b
roadcast

Media


In

order

to

expedite the decision

making

p
r
ocess

and

ensure

timely notificat
i
on,

YSU
Police Department

initiates eme
r
gency

noti
f
ication.

A
s

the central

repository

for

emergency
information

from

fe
d
eral,

state, local

and

university sources,

YSU Police
Department

can

receive, assess

and

initiate

not
i
fication

from

its 24

hour

profess
i
onally

staffed

communication center. YSU Police Department facilitates notificati
o
n

through
th
e
activation

of

tornado

sirens, alert monitors

and

te
x
t messaging.

Office of
Marketing and Communications, in collaboration with YSU Police Department,

15


facilitates emergency notificati
o
n

through
m
ass email,

the university website, text
messaging

and

t
h
e

dissemination

of

info
rm
ation

to the print
a
nd

broadcast

media.


In

the early

stages

of

an emergency, available information

is

often

incomplete

and
conflicting

but delaying the dissemination

o
f

information

may

be harmful.

Balancing
promptness

with accuracy

requires

sound

judgment

and

decisiveness

as

well

as

access
to information

as

it becomes

ava
i
lable.

Toward

this end,

YSU Police
Department

and

Office of Marketing

and Communications
will promptly no
t
ify

and

update

the public with information

deemed

accurate

as

it becomes

available.
Decisions

regarding
t
h
e content and

timeliness

of

notifications

are made

solely

in the
interest of

protecting life

and
safety and

will not be

unreasonably delayed

nor

infl
u
enced

by other considerations.


Campus Security Act
(“Clery Act”) Notification

Title 20, Chapter 28, Section

1092(F)

of

the United

Stat
e
s

Code

re
q
uires

univ
e
rsities

and colleges

to make

timely notificat
i
on

to students

and

employees

concerning

violent
crime which

presents

an ongoing threat

to the university
community.

In

addition

t
o the
emergency notificati
o
n

media

identified

above, additional

media

may

be u
se
d

for
Campus

Security Act

Notificati
o
n. These

may

include

the posting

of

informational
fliers,

posting of

composite

sketches

(wanted posters),

a news

m
e
dia

press

conference, as

well as

other means

deemed

appropriate.




16


INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM

The

Incident

Command

System

(ICS)

is

a s
t
andard,

o
n

scene,

and

all

hazard

emergency managem
e
nt

system

adopted

by

Youngstown State

University. It
represents organi
z
ational “best practices”

and

has

become

the nati
o
n
a
l standard

f
or

incident response.

Under ICS,

there
i
s

only one

Incident

Commander

who

is

the

person

in
c
harge

of

the incident. This

person

must

possess

s
uffic
i
ent

experience and

knowledge to

manage the
incident. The

nature of

the eme
r
gency

determines

the
position

responsible for

incident command.


A
n

emergency affecting a large

geographi
c
al area or

one

requiring a
multi

disciplinary response

may

require the alternative method

of

Unified

Command.

In

this
case,

each discipline

(
i.e. Fire, Police,

Medical,

etc.) has

one

person

in

charge

of

executing the Incident

A
ction

Plan

as

it relates to that pe
r
son’s

respective

discipline.


The

ICS

consists

of

five

functional components.

The

management of

every
emergency, incident

or

event includes

these co
m
ponent
s
.

They

are:



Command



Operations



Planning



Logistics



Finance/Administrat
i
on

Incident Action Plan

Every

eme
r
gency

must

have

an o
r
al

or

writt
e
n Incid
e
nt

Action

Plan (IAP).

Th
e

purpose of

the IAP

is

to provi
d
e

a coherent means

to identify

and

commun
i
cate

the
overall incident

o
b
jectives

and

priorities

to key supervisors.

Essential

elements

of

the
IAP

are:



A

stateme
n
t of

objectives

appropriate to the

overall

incident



A

description

of

the
IC
S

structu
r
e and

persons

responsible

for

each component



A

stateme
n
t of

strategies and

tact
i
cs

to be employed



The

identification of

s
upporting resources

n
eeded

Incident Command Post

The

Incident

Command

Post

(ICP)

is

the location

from

which

the Incident

Commander manages

all incident

operations.

The

ICP

may

or

may

not be located

on

the
c
a
m
p
us
depending

upon the scope

of

the emergency. Only
t
h
os
e

individu
a
ls

with dir
e
ct authority
a
nd

respon
s
ibility

for

managing
t
h
e response

to the emergency
operate from the ICP.

Emergency
Operations Center

The

Emer
g
ency

Operations Center (EOC)

is

the location

from

which

the coor
d
ination

of information

and

resources

to support inci
d
ent

activit
i
es

take place.

When

an
emergency is

confined

to campus

property
a
nd

facilitie
s
,

the Clingan
-
Waddell

Hall

17


(YSU Police Department)
serves as

the location

of

the
E
O
C
.

Functions conducted

at
the
E
OC

include:



Coordination



Communi
c
ations



Resour
c
e

dispatching

and

tracking



Information

collection,

analysis

a
nd

dissemination

When

an
eme
rgency

extends

beyond the
campus

and

involves

other comm
u
nities,

the EOC

may be located

off

c
a
mpus

and

staffed

by

university as

well as

non


university persons.


18


CAMPUS EVACUATION


In

rare and

extreme c
i
rcumstanc
e
s,

an emergency may

require the evacuation

of

the
Youngstown Campus.

The

purpose

of

e
v
acuation

is

to remove

all persons

not
engag
e
d

in life

safety duties

as

quick
l
y as

possible

from

an impending

threat at
th
e
campus

t
o protect lives.

This

is

accomplished

by directing vehicular

and

pedestrian

traffic to pre

designated

egress

rou
t
es

according

to their p
h
ysical

lo
c
ation

o
n

campus

and

proximity to the rout
e
s.

Evacuation

is

distinguished

from

closure

o
f

the campus

in
that it

requires prompt implementation with lit
t
le or

no

advance

noti
c
e.

Cooperation and Mutual Assistance

Evacuation

places

an extraordinary demand

on

limited

police

resources

und
e
r
emergency conditi
o
ns

and

requires

extraordinary sacrifice,

patience and

cooperation

on the part of the students,

faculty, staff and

visitors

being

evacuated.

Individuals

may
need

to assist

others

not able to care

for

themselves,

p
ersonal

pr
o
perty

may

need

to
be left behind, personal

vehicles

m
a
y

be inaccessible,

individuals

and

groups may

become separated,

and

persons

may

be required

to egress

by routes

not of

their
choo
s
ing.
Persons

e
v
acuating

by vehicle

are encouraged

to prov
i
de

transpo
r
tation
t
o
as

many others

as

possible.

A
b
ove

all, persons

will be called

upon to remain

calm

under tumultuous

conditions

and

to cooperate

with and

foll
o
w

directions

given by
police

and others

assisting

with

traffic control.


Any emergency requiring the evacuation

of either Campus

wou
l
d

invariably

involve
the Mahoning

County Emergency

Manag
e
ment Agency. This agency serves

as

the
point of

contact,

through the EOC,

for

all supplemental

mass
transportation needs

o
f

the campus.


Youngstown Campus Evacuation Plan

Youngstown State

University Police

Department

has

developed

a comprehensive

plan

for

the evacuation

of

the Youngstown campus.

The

d
eve
lop
m
ent

of

this pl
a
n
was

accomplished

in
collaboration with Parking Services,

Facilities,

Marketing and
Communications, Housing and Residence Life,

the Mahoning County Emergency
Management Agency,

the Western Reserve

County Regional Transit

Authority, the
O
h
i
o

State Highway
P
atrol

and

police

agencies

surrou
n
ding

t
h
e University.

This

plan

identifies critical

traffic control

i
ntersections

with preferred

direction

of

egress

toward

primary evacuation

routes

and

utilizes po
l
ice

and

no
n

police

traffic controllers

as

well

as illuminated

traffic c
o
ntrol

devi
c
es

accordingly.

This

plan accommodates

alternative evacuation

routes

in the event th
a
t the emergency or

other conditi
o
ns

preclude

the use of

primary routes.


A
n

emergency of

the

magnitude and

seriousness

requiring the evacuation

of

the
Youngstown campus

w
i
ll likely
an
d

similarly

affect surrounding

communities.

When

the

emergency is

confined

to the local

community,

evacuation

to nei
g
hboring
co
m
m
unities

and

routes leaving the

immediate

area are u
s
ed.

When an emergency is

regional or

larg
e
r

scale, evacuation

routes

direct

traffic to interstate highways for

mass

19


evacuation

and relocation.


A

person

evacuated

f
r
om

the Youngstown

campus

may

have

few

options

regarding the direction

of

travel.


Madison Avenue expressway

located

North of Stambaugh

Stadium has

been
identified

as

the major

traffic artery toward

which

evacuating traffic will be directed.

From

there, evacuees

can

be integrated
i
nto

the la
rg
er regional

evacuation

plan

if
necessary.

Listed

below are the primary egress

routes

to be
utilized:




Belmont Avenue North or South Bound



Fifth Avenue North or South Bound



Elm Street North Bound



Wick Avenue North or South Bound



M
-
1 deck Walnut Street exit East on Adams St. to Andrews Ave. North or South
Bound

Building Evacuation

The

purpose

of

e
vacu
a
ting

a buil
d
ing is

to r
e
move

persons

from

dangerous

and

life


threatening

conditi
o
ns

presented

by a fire,
a
n explosi
o
n,

a suspect
e
d

explosive

device,

a hazardous

material release,

air c
o
ntamination

or

other
s
imilar

emergency.
Usually, such

conditions

and

th
e need

to evacuate

are

readily apparent and

occupants

are expected to leave

the building i
m
mediately.

Activating

the building fire
alarm

is

the most

expedient and

safest

method

to facilit
a
te the evacuation

(whether or

n
o
t

the emergency involves

fire).


In

some

situations,

such

as

bomb

threats, the presence

of

life

threatening
c
o
nditi
o
ns may

be u
n
known

or

non

existent.

In

these cases,

the responsibility for

assessing available information

and

the de
c
ision

of

whether or

n
o
t

to evacuate

rests

with
the police.

When time and

circums
t
ances

permit, this decision

will be
made

after consultati
o
n

with oth
e
r university officials

present.


A
t the sound

of

a fire alarm,

or

other notifi
c
ation

to e
v
acuate,

all persons

are
required

to leave

the building i
m
mediately.

Unless

conditions

pr
e
vent

it, the

best
evacuation

route is

the nearest stairway leading to

t
h
e nearest exit. Elev
a
tors

should

not be us
e
d

as

they become

inoperable during a loss

of

electrical

power

and

can

increase

the risk of

smoke inhala
t
ion

during a fire. Firefighters routinely
check

stairways for

persons

needing assistance.


Actions

will be taken
t
o ensure

persons

remain

at least
tw
o hundred

feet from

the
building to

be clear

of

any danger

and

to avoid

impeding

the movement

of

emergency
responders

and

equipment. This

distance

may

be increased

by police

or

firef
i
ghters according

t
o the circumstances

o
f

the emer
g
ency.

Persons

should

not
return
t
o the building unless

specific

approval

to do

so

h
a
s

been given by police

or

firefighters.


Persons

with disabilities

are res
p
onsible

for

requesting assistance.

In

a classroom,

the instructor should

coordinate, and/or assist, disabled

persons

in

the classroom

to
20


evacuate.

If

this is

not possible,

the instructor should

he
l
p the persons

move

to the

nearest enclosed

stairway and

remain

there with

them while another person advises

eme
r
gency

responders

of

their location.


Ending Emergency Operations

When

the threat presented

by the

emergency has

ended,

emergency operations

cease.

The

ERT

meets

for

a
debriefing to assess

the

response

to the emergency and

decide
which

support operations,

if any,

should

continue. Upon

the recommendation

of

the
ERT

to end

the Response

Phase,

the Chief of Police informs

the University President

of

the recommendation

and

the cessation

of

Emergency

Operation
s
. The focus

of

the

campus

turns at this

point
t
o the

recovery

phase.



21


RECOVERING

FROM

AN EMERGENCY

The

Recov
e
ry

Phase

is

the period

of

time following an
eme
rgency

required

to restore

the Campus

to

normal

op
e
rations.

This

Phase

commences

i
mmediate
l
y
following
t
h
e
cessation

of

emergency operations

and

e
xtends

until all academic and

suppo
r
t

operations

are restored

to a functional lev
e
l (normal operations).


Restoring
t
h
e operations

to a functional level

means

that
departments

can

once

again deliver

the

services

according

to

their respective

mandates.

Emergency Recovery Team

Upon

the cessation

of

emergency response

operations,

t
h
e Vice President

for

F
inance
and

Administration

appoints an

Emergency

Recovery

Team.

The

composition

of

the
team

is

determined

by the Vice President

in order

to facilitate the restoration

of

campus
operations.

The

Emergency

Recovery

Team

is

charged

with cond
u
cting

a d
a
mage
assessment,

developing

a recovery

plan

and

implementing that

pl
a
n.



Conclusion of the Recovery Phase

Upon

completion

of

t
h
e recovery

phase,

the Emergency

Recove
r
y

Team

a
d
vises

the

University President

that emergency management functions have

ended

and

that

the
normal

op
e
rations

of

t
h
e campus

have

been restored.

Training
and Public Awareness

Coordinated, systematic, and comprehensive training and education programs are
essential for the development and maintenance of this plan. Training programs are
provided to departments, organizations and individuals responsible for imp
lementation
of this plan using the following actions:




YSU Police Department coordinates the emergency management preparedness
training and education for personnel within the University.




The training program consists of three dimensions: (1) programs and
courses
available through the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the
State and other governmental/volunteer agencies; (2) local departmental emergency
response training; and (3) community based awareness, self
-
help, population
protection proced
ures, and public awareness training for the general population.




Training available through FEMA is announced through FEMA circulars and the
course information is disseminated through the YSU Police Department to the
departments and agencies. Departments a
nd agencies determine their own needs
assessment of training requirements so as to ensure the appropriate courses are
taken by emergency response personnel. FEMA has a wide range of courses
available to the emergency management community and all effort sho
uld be made to
send personnel to those courses that will maximize the total effort.


22




University sponsored training is provided by individual departments as well as YSU
Police. YSU Police normally helps each department in the logistics and coordination
of
these. Most courses are based on a needs assessment conducted by YSU Police
or the individual department. Emphasis will be placed on those areas that are
considered to be most critical. University programs may include all areas of
emergency management; how
ever, a thorough review of needs is necessary to
ensure proper utilization of training time.




Community based training is conducted and arranged through YSU Police. Public
awareness of all threats within the University is a major concern; however, the most

critical threats are normally repeated in presentations and media awareness
throughout the year. Fire, tornado and flood preparedness are a major focus due to
the large population that may be impacted.

Exercises

All University departments tasked with emer
gency management response and recovery
responsibilities under this plan will participate in exercises conducted under direction of
the YSU Police Department. Exercises are given at least annually, and more frequent
exercises may be held at the discretion o
f YSU Police. Non
-
governmental, not
-
for
-
profit
and other outside agencies with responsibilities under this plan will be encouraged to
attend and participate in such exercises. The majority of the exercises involve multiple
agencies and organizations.


The

YSU Police Department has developed an aggressive training and exercise
schedule that focuses on strengthening specific opportunity areas identified under
previous events and exercises. It is the intent of YSU Police Department to continuously
review and
test portions of this plan, through evaluation and critique of these exercises,
to determine the potential strengths and weaknesses of each planning area.

Public Awareness and Education

The Board of Trustees has determined the awareness and education of
the University
population of emergency preparedness as a priority as identified in the Guidebook
Policy 4018.01.



23


GLOSSARY


Campus Emergency Management Plan (CEMP)

The CEMP is the campus

level plan for responding effectively and efficiently before,
during and after a major emergency.


Campus Security Act

This federal law, codified at 20 USC 1092 (f), requires colleges and universities to
disclose certain timely and annual information abou
t campus crime and security policies
including crimes which pose an ongoing threat to students and employees.


Department Emergency Operations Plans (Department Plan)

The Department Plan is the internal department

level plan that prescribes the functional
responsibilities and operations of a university department during an emergency.


Emergency

An emergency is any event or condition that presents an imminent risk of death, serious
injury or illness to persons, suspension or interruption of university operat
ions,
significant physical or environmental damage or significantly threatens the University’s
financial well

being.


Emergency Operations Center (EOC)

The EOC is the location from which the coordination of information and resources to
support incident act
ivities and to provide for the continuity of critical university
operations takes place.


Emergency Procedures Guide

The Emergency Guide is a quick reference guide that provides basic guidelines and
survival strategies for major emergencies. It is a compan
ion document to the Campus
Emergency Management Plan.


24


Emergency Recovery Team

The Emergency Recovery Team is a group of university officials responsible for
restoring normal campus operations after an emergency. The team is assembled
during an emergency
and charged with conducting a damage assessment, developing a
recovery plan and implementing that plan.


Emergency Resource Team (ERT)

The ERT is a group of campus officials with responsibilities involving the preparation
and response phases of emergency m
anagement. The ERT is a key factor in
supporting and leading the campus response to an emergency


Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

FEMA is a federal agency under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security with the
mission to reduce the loss of lif
e and property and protect the Nation from all hazards,
including natural disasters, acts of terrorism, and other man

made disasters.


First Responders

First responders are police, firefighters, hazardous material teams, paramedics, and
emergency medical t
echnicians responsible for the initial response to an emergency.


Four Phases of Emergency Management

These are the on

going emergency management functions that extend beyond the
actual response to an emergency, including preparedness, mitigation, response

and
recovery.


Hazardous Materials Incident (HAZMAT)

HAZMAT is an incident involving the release of or public exposure to explosives,
flammable and combustible substances, poisons, and radioactive materials.


Incident Action Plan (IAP)

The IAP is a writte
n or oral plan that provides overall objectives and priorities to key
supervisory personnel during an emergency.

25



Incident Command Post (ICP)

The ICP is the location from which the person in charge during an emergency oversees
all emergency response operat
ions.


Incident Command System (ICS
)

ICS is a component of NIMS that incorporates standardized, on

scene, and all

hazard
emergency management functions including command, operations, planning, logistics,
and finance/administration. ICS represents organizat
ional “best practices” and is the
standard for incident response.



Mitigation Phase

The Mitigation Phase is the second phase of emergency management that involves
activities undertaken to prevent, or reduce the adverse effects of, an emergency.


National
Incident Management System (NIMS)

NIMS is a comprehensive, nationwide system of incident management applicable to all
jurisdictional levels of government and across functional disciplines.


Persona Non Grata (PNG)

A student or non

student who has been foun
d to exhibit behavior deemed detrimental to
the university and is no longer permitted to frequent or be present in any, or specified,
university locations.


Preparation Phase

The Preparation Phase is the first phase of emergency management that involves
activities undertaken to provide the operational capability to effectively respond to an
emergency.


Mahoning County Emergency Management Agency

This local emergency management agency is tasked with planning, training, and
assisting local jurisdictions bef
ore, during, and after an emergency. This agency serves
as the single point of contact for additional resources during an emergency.

26



Recovery Phase

The Recovery Phase is the fourth and final phase of emergency management that
involves activities undertak
en to restore normalcy after actual emergency conditions
have ended.


Response Phase

The Response Phase is the third phase of emergency management that involves
immediate action taken to save lives and protect property during an emergency.

27



Functional Annexes

and Hazard Specific Attachments



Letter of Promulgation


Campus Maps


Torna
do Response Plan


Shelter Li
st


Housing & Residence Life Severe Weather/Tornado Plan


Crisis Communication Plan


Emergency Teleph
one Numbers

of Outside Agencies


Disaster Preparedness Supply List


Roster of Departmental Emergency Contacts


Evacuation Planning for Persons With Disabilities


Evacuation Training


Departmental Evacuation Routes


Emergency Preparedn
ess Information Syllabus Insert


Spill Equipment


Radiation Safety Procedures


Hazardous Waste Contingency Plan


Department Disaster Plans


Animal Facility Plan


Ohio Administrative Code 3345.26



28


To All Our Employees,


Youngstown State University (YSU) has adopted a plan to

manage emergencies and

continue business operations in the event of a disaster. This plan has important
benefits for all

of us. The plan

provides for the protection, survival and restoration of our
most important asset


our students, faculty and staff.


The attached informat
ion we are distributing to you today will help you understand the
plan. The plan clarifies your responsibilities to the University and will also give you an
idea of how YSU will help you and your
families

better handle a disaster situation. We
encourage
you and your family to read the details of the plan.


We are fortunate to be in a location where so many resources are available and nearby
to assist with any emergency that may occur in or around campus. These resources
include a University Police Depart
ment staffed with sworn officers and a mutual aid
agreement with Youngstown Police.


Youngstown Fire Departments have two stations
bordering the University. The County Sheriff’s office is across the street. There is a
hospital within a few minutes.


O
ur Emergency Response Team has been in touch with City, County, State and
Federal Government emergency officials for aid in planning and training for emergency
response procedures.

Please be familiar with our guidelines “just in case”.






Sincerely,




Dr. Cynthia Anderson

President


29









Fire Stations on W. Federal St. and Elm St.

Sheriff’s office on W. Wood St.

Hospital on Belmont


30





Campus Emergency Procedures



General Information




Weekend/Evening Building Problems




Water Leaks




Medical Emergencies




Chemical Release




Power Outage




Inclement Weather




Reporting a Crime




Motor Vehicle Accident




Evacuation




Explosion




Elevator Malfunction




Earthquakes




Tornado/Severe Weather




Fire




Crime Prevention




Bomb Threat
*



Suspicious Packages




Emergency Lockdown




Active Shooter




Emergency Communications


G
eneral Information on Reporting Emergencies

Emergency situations can be triggered by a variety of factors, which in most
instances cannot be anticipa
ted.


Knowing what to do and perhaps more
importantly what not to do is paramount in dealing with the crisis at hand. In
many instances
it

i
s

just a question of notifying the proper individuals or
campus department.


Sometimes, however, certain immediate a
ction on your
part may be necessary.


Whichever the case, it is important to remain calm
and


not panic.


Take a few seconds to compose yourself to avoid acting
irrational.


Those first few seconds are important, since most injuries and
deaths occur becau
se of irrational or illogical first response.


This easy to
use guide has been developed to help you deal with most emergency
situations that might occur on campus.


Rest assured that there are many
trained individuals to give you direction and to assist,
but they need to be
notified and supplied with the proper information.


Keep this

CAMPUS
EMERGENCY PROCEDURES GUIDE

nearby to assist you in dealing with
emergency situations. Also, remember that people with disabilities may need
special assistance.


Preplan the assistance needed

if a disabled individual is
31


part of your department or in your class.



The following genera
l information is important when reporting emergencies
on campus.


Remember
---
STAY CALM, DON’T PANIC, HELP IS ON THE
WAY.


NEVER PUT YOURSELF AT RISK!



Call YSU Police at (330)941
-
3527 or from a campus phone, dial 911.



If fire or ambulance response is neede
d, dial 911 on a campus phone,
this will connect you to the University Police Emergency number.



If you dial 911 on a non
-
university phone you will be connected to
Youngstown City’s 911 Emergency Response Center.



WHEN POSSIBLE USE A UNIVERSITY PHONE AND G
O THROUGH
THE YSU POLICE DEPARTMENT.


When reporting an emergency, be sure to speak in a clear voice and be sure
to give the following information.



Your name and your location



A brief description of the emergency situation



If there are people injured



An
y additional information which might be beneficial

DO NOT HANG UP UNTIL INSTRUCTED TO DO SO BY THE DISPATCHER

Evening/Weekend Facilities Problems

For heating/air conditioning, water, electricity or other utility problems
encountered in buildings after 5:00 pm on weekdays and on weekends
contact YSU Police at ext. 3527.


Inform YSU Police of the problem, they will dispatch Maintenance personnel
to t
he area.

Water Leaks

From 7:30am to 5pm weekdays contact Facilities Maintenance at ext. 3232.

After hours or on weekends contact YSU Police at ext. 3527.



Give the location of the leak, the severity and any damage that can be
seen.



Remove from the area any equipment that can be moved safely or
cover equipment with plastic.

32




Do not attempt to move items that are plugged into an electrical outlet
and are already wet.


These items will be removed once the power is
shut down to the area.




Evacuate the area if there is a threat that the water could cause harm
such as wet ceiling tiles
falling
or if an electrocution hazard is present.



Medical Emergencies

If someone is ill or injured and requires assistance:



Call YSU Police at (330)941
-
35
27 or by dialing 911 from a campus
phone.


If an ambulance is needed, tell the dispatcher at the beginning
of your conversation.



Give the dispatcher the following information:



The location of the person.


Include the building and the room
number.



The il
lness or injury of the person.



Whether the person is conscious.



Any other information that is known, such as existing health
conditions.



Do not hang up until you are told to do so by the dispatcher.



Administer first aid if you have the proper training.



Do not move the person.



Assure the person that help is on the way.



Remain on the scene until the Police arrive to give any further
information they may require.

Chemical Release



Sound the fire alar
m to evacuate the building if deadly fumes are
present.



Contact YSU Police at

(330)941
-
3527 or by dialing 911 from a campus
phone.



Give YSU Police a complete description of the incident. Describe the
type of accident: fire, explosion, chemical spill, lea
king drum.


If the
incident is a chemical spill, and you know the name of the chemical,
inform YSU Police.



Identify the building where the incident occurred and the room number
or location of the incident.



If the incident involves a chemical spill give t
he approximate amount of
the spill.



Give your name and the telephone number from which you are calling.



Note any injuries: Are you or anyone else in the building injured? Tell
YSU Police of the injuries.

33




Don’t hang up until told to do so by the dispatch
er.



At a safe distance, await the arrival of YSU Police.